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Full text of "The New York Clipper (October 1916)"

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THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 
in hi in ii| in tti iti mm ill i t i m iriin Hi~m 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



Oetober 7, 1916 




Copyright, 1916. by The Clipper Corporation. 



-Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN. 1833 



NEW YORK, OCTOBER 7, 1916. 



VOLUME LXTV-No. 35 
Price, Tea Cents 



WHITE RATS PLAN STRIKE, 
TO START ON OCTOBER 5th 

With Artists and Managers Dead-locked in Final Struggle, V. M. 

P. Ass'n Retaliates by Threatening Lock-out of All Union 

Acts— Backdown on Either Side Spells Defeat 



The absolute . refusal of the Vaudeville 
■Managers' Protective Association to accept 
'the tentative "pipe of peace" extended to. 
them last week by James William Fitz- 
patrick, big chief of the White Rats Actors' 
'Union of America, in behalf of his organ- 
' ization, has, apparently, precipitated the 
long threatened crisis in the conflict be- 
tween those two organizations. 

According to. statements made at White 
• Rat headquarters, a general strike of all 

I members of the organization will be called 
this week. Indications point to October 5 
i as the date. 

This declaration of war on the part of 
the artists' union finds the vaudeville man- 
agers with defenses prepared and guns 
mounted, aa. evidenced by the fact that they 
have issued a lock-out order against union 
' performers. 

Harry Mountford, general organizer of 
the Bats, returned from Oklahoma City 
this week to marshall his forces and make 
ready for the bitter struggle which seems 
inevitable unless the strike order is re- 
scinded. It is estimated that of the 40,000 
acts now furnishing vaudeville entertain- 
ment, at least one-third of them are mem- 
bers of the White Bats. The result of their 
withdrawal from the various stages where 
they are booked to appear can be realized 
from the figures mentioned above. 

The favorable finding of the State Arbi- 
tration Board in the recent Oklahoma con- 
troversy has, apparently, inspired Mount- 
ford and his followers with fresh courage 
to press their demands for the "closed 
shop" policy which requires that all vaude- 
ville managers play union acts exclusively. 
The Vaudeville Managers' Protective As- 
sociation is immovable in its stand not to 
treat with the Rats association in its pres- 
ent organized form of a trade nnion, stat- 
ing in their opposition to the labor idea 
that if vaudeville is to be unionized along 
the fundamentals of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor the same procedure must be 
followed as is now used in treating with 
the ordinary day laborer. 

This, they contend, would destroy the 
creative element of the two-a-day as an art, 
reduce the performer to the status of the 
average mechanic, and incidentally bring 
about a leveling of present salaries to a 
common scale of wages effective in all labor 
unions. Carrying out the precepts of 
unionism as the Vaudeville Managers' Pro- 
tective Association visualize them, this 



would mean the elimination of headliners 
and. feature turns. 

In. behalf of the "closed shop" policy, 
which Mr. Mountford and the Bats are 
steadfastly committed to, the artists' or- 
ganization declares it is simply a means to 
secure justice and fair play for both sides 
through a Board of Arbitration to govern 
the; relations of the two factors in the con- 
stantly arising difficulties over position on 
tbe bill, cancellation of contracts, and also 
the rebate practice which many agents in- 
dulge in. • 

Investigation among the various elements 
in the White Rats ranks disclose an un- 
easiness regarding the coming clash between 
the two bodies, as the prospect of long lay- 
off periods with the resultant loss of salary 
in -the event of a strike- or lock-out, is not 
relished by the average player. 

In view of the emphatic refusal of the 
Managers' Association to be represented at 
a conference between themselves and e dele- 
gation of the Bats as a step toward adjust- 
ing the existing conditions in a friendly 
manner, it would appear that the gauntlet 
bad been thrown down and that either side 
must retire from the position it has as- 
sumed, in order to avert a condition in 
vaudeville which now prevails between the 
traction magnates and street car workers. 
The long and rancorous strife between 
actor and manager which is rapidly near- 
ing a serious culmination, had its inception 
in June, 1900, when a few prominent 
vaudevillians formed themselves into a pro- 
tective body, which they called the White 
Rata. The -organization sprang into being 
through the statements of tbe Vaudeville 
Managers' Association as to their future 
dealings with the variety performer. Hie 
first artists' strike, called in 1901, ended in 
the successful fulfilment of their demands. 
Since the first small group of players 
banded themselves together almost sixteen 
years ago, the White Bats have passed 
through successive stages of internal disten- 
tion, weakness of membership and at times 
what threatened to be complete disruption. 
The various gales have been weathered, 
however. The representatives of the col- 
ored race In vaudeville are allied with the 
White Bats and the feminine contingent, 
taken, in under tbe name of Associated 
Actresses of America, augment strongly the 
forces which will oppose the Vaudeville 
Managers' Protective Association in the 
event of the threatened break. 



ACTOR SUES HOTEL 

,Frederick P. Noss, owner and manager 
of the Six Musical Kosses, has. brought 
suit against the management of the 
Hotel Shelburne at Coney Island, through 
his attorney James A. Timothy, for al- 
leged breach of contract. 

Noss claims that on the first of May, 
1916, he received a contract for his act 
calling for ten week's engagement at 
$350 per week, in the Revue at the sea- 
shore hostelry. It appears that after re- 
ceiving the sum of $308.32, it was decided 
to dispense with the services of his 
troupe, and now Mr. Xoss wants $1,- 
390.68, pleading breach of contract on the 
part of the Shelburne management. It 
would appear from this that "the good 
old summer time" is not always so good. 
John Dunsinere, another sea shore enter- 
tainer, has started action against the 
Shelburne for the same purpose. 



SYRACUSE HAS TWO 

NOTABLE PREMIERS 

Up-State City Becomes Dogtown for 

Cyril Maude in "Jeff' and Elsie 

Ferguson in "Shirley Kaye" 

Sybaccse, Oct. 2. — This week and next 
local playgoers will witness the premiere of 
two new comedies at the Empire Theatre 
in this city. Cyril Maude has selected Syra- 
cuse in which to make his initial appear- 
ance in the new comedy, "Jeff," which is 
the work of Michael Morton. The produc- 
tion of the play will be made to-night. 

At tbe same house on October 13 Elsie 
Ferguson will make her premiere in "Shir- 
ley Kaye." It will be Miss Ferguson's first 
appearance in a straight comedy role. 

"Shirley Kaye" is a comedy of to-day, 
dealing with American types. The scenes 
are laid in a fashionable Long Island home 
at the present time, and the characters are 
mainly of tbe socially elect. 



HORACE SINCLAIR MARRIED 

Horace Sinclair, presently playing in 
"Nobody Home," was married Thursday 
last to Miss Sterling, a non-professional. 
The bridegroom has appeared in "The 
Broken Mirror" act of Schwartz Brothers 
for five vears. 



RICHARD BENNETT'S HOME SOLD 

The former residence of Richard Ben- 
nett, at Palisade, X. J., has been sold by 
George Howe to Robert Scott Newcomb. 
It is one of the most valuable houses on 
the Palisades. 



OFFER $250 FOR SKETCH 

After the opening of "Turn to the Right" 
the management offered $250 for the beat 
sketch to be used on all its advertising mat- 
ter. None of the responses bare been ac- 
cepted. Not the finished drawing, but a 
mere suggestion is desired. 



AUSTRALIAN 

TOUR FOR 

TANGUAY 

WILL MAKE JUMP FROM COAST 



' Eva Tanguay will invade Australia on 
the completion of her present tour at the 
head of her own road company. 

It is Miss Tanguay's intention to rake 
with her the entire aggregation of artists 
now forming her traveling organization. 

There will be one feature attraction miss- 
ing, however, which would greatly 
strengthen the road show in its Australian 
trip. M. Rudinoff, the clever manipulator 
of smoke outlines through the sole medium 
, of his finger-tips, left the organization im- 
mediately after the opening in Union Hill, 
N. J., a few weeks ago. J 

Under the direction of William Morris 
Miss Tanguay started her season at the 
head of her road show on Sept. 16th at 
the Lincoln, in Union Hill, N. J., The star 
has surrounded herself with a rather ordi- 
nary troupe, unless some changes have 
been made since the premiere. 

Since that time tbe attraction has been 
moving rapidly westward on its one-night 
itinerary, nnd unless present calculations 
fail should be on the Coast .Thanksgiving 
Day. 

It is significant that the W. M. Tours. 
Inc., was formed recently, J. Wilzin. tbe 
leading spirit, being attorney for William 
Morris, the theatrical manager. - 

It is presumably the intention of the new 
company to increase the present activities 
of Morris, and in addition to the contem- 
plated Australian tour by Miss Tanguay.. 
Nora Bayes has been dickering for some 
time with Miss Tanguay's manager rela- 
tive to heading a road show. 

Conditions in Australia at present are 
reported good, and with the addition of one 
or two attractions to the show, a tour of 
the principal cities throughout the British 
possession should prove profitable to all 
concerned. 

Sydney is thirty-one days' sailing from 
Seattle, and allowing for unavoidable de- 
lays and the time necessary to complete 
her present route. Miss Tanguay should 
open her Australian engagement about the 
middle of January, 1917. 



"SEVEN CHANCES" TO MOVE 

Despite the fact that business is. good 
David Belasco must vacate the George M. 
Cohan Theatre with his "Seven Chances" 
in a few weekB to make room for tbe 
Klaw & Erlangcr Henry Miller production 
"Come Out of the Kitchen," in which Both 
Chatterton is starred. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



BRONX THEATRE 

BOYCOTT IS 

GROWING 

MOSS HOUSE NOW INVOLVED 



NO MOURNERS FOR HAWKINS 

Chicago, Sept 25. — Chas. B. Hawkins, 
a famous comedian of. the Civil War days, 
was buried here to-day without a mourner 
present The veteran actor was found dy- 
ing a week ago in a cheap rooming house. 



- The strike of the stage hands, mu- 
sicians and operators at the Picker Thea- 
tres in the Bronx, which was reported in 
last week's Clippeb, has been settled, fa- 
vorably to the unions. 

The trouble started more than two 
week* ago, when the demand of the 
unions to discharge the non-union men 
employed by David W. Picker was refused. 
He gave as hia reason that the men had 
been faithful and efficient, although, he 
claimed, he bad no objection to their join- 
ing the union. 

The Bronx is strong for unionism, and 
the pickets and street meetings did not 
Bnd it hard to keep the people from pat- 
ronizing the Burland and Spooner theatres, 
owned by Mr. Picker. Patronage at both 
these houses fell on", it is reported, to such 
an extant that Mr. Picker, on Thursday, 
roet the union representatives in confer- 
ence and gave in to their demands. 

Corse Payton, who is a member of the 
White Rats, and who is conducting a stock 
company at the Spooner, absolutely re- 
fused to aid the unions by withdrawing 
his company. 

If. I* Abbott, of the Theatrical Pro- 
tective Union, and Harry Mackler, of the 
Moving Picture Machine Operators Union, 
have started work unionizing the two 
houses, those of Mr. Picker's men wishing 
hi join the organization being retained. 

On Monday the strike extended to the 
Prospect in the Bronx, a Moss house, and 
all the other houses on the Moss circuit 
wilt join, it is reported. 



$100 A WEEK FOR 

MANAGER'S WIDOW 



HENDERSON PLAYERS READY 

Beginning on next Thursday the Hender- 
son Players, directed by Alfred E. Hen- 
derson, will give monthly performances of 
one act plays at the McAIpin Hotel. Music 
will be provided by the Henderson Trio. 
Miss Agda Granberg, pantomimist, • will 
present Victor Hugo's "The Trumpeter'B 
Betrothed" at one performance. 



STRIKE BOARD 

FAVORS OKLA. 

ACTORS 

SAYS THEY SHOULD HAVE UNION 



KINDEST STAGE 

MANAGER DEAD 



Asks for Mor* bat Surrogate Cohalan 

Decides She Will Have to Worry 

Along on That Amount. 

Mrs. Martin C. Wright, who was for- 
merly the wife of the late George H. 
Huber, the wealthy museum manager and 
sporting man, has asked for a. weekly al- 
lowance from the Huber estate of which 
she is an heir. 

In her petition she stated that her 
present husband is unable to support her 
in the style to which she is accustomed 
and asked for $150 per week. 

The petition further stated that as the 
income from the estate was about $3,000 
per month the amount she asked for was 
little enough for her to receive, pending 
the final decision of the court as to. 
whether she is to receive the entire estate 
or only half of it— the decision resting 
upon which one of two wills the court 
shall decide is valid. 

Surrogate J. P. Cohalan, to whom Mrs. 
Wright made her application, decided that 
she had asked for too much and that she 
would have to worry along on $100 every 
seven days. He therefore signed papers 
for this amount. 



Arthur R. Evans, Who Befriended Many- 
Chorus Girls, Expired Last Week, 
Following Nervous Breakdown 

Word of the death of Arthur R. Evans, 
for years known as the "kindest" stage 
manager on Broadway, which occurred 
Sept. 20, was received by his many 
friends and admirers. Evans, who was 
forty-three years old and lived with his 
mother in the Bronx, died in a sanitarium 
at Watkins Glen, N. Y., following a 
nervous breakdown. 

For the past seven years he had been 
stage manager for "Ziegfeld Follies," and 
prior to that time was with the Winter 
Garden and the Broadway Theatre. 

He earned the name of 'kindest stage 
manager" because of his consideration for 
chorus girls 



Harry Mountford, international organ- 
izer of the White Rats of America, in 
speaking of the present conditions of 
vaudeville and the relative attitude of the 
White Bats, in a recent interview laid par- 
ticular stress upon the fact that all talk 
of strikes and walk outs were emanating 
from sources other than official. He has 
been quoted repeatedly as threatening the 
vaudeville interests with such a catas- 
trophe, without any reason whatever, he 
insists. 

"The union shop, of course, is our ulti- 
mate object," he said, "and we have no 
fear whatever that my object and the ob- 
ject of the White Rats of America will 
not be attained. 

"Conditions in vaudeville as they exist 
at present are largely due to the fact that 
the bookings at the vaudeville houses are 
handicapped by personal reasons and fra- 
ternal affiliations interfering with the cor- 
■ rect and effective construction of the vari- 
ous bills. No matter how valuable or 
desirable an act may be for a certain pro- 
gramme, for a reason of belonging to a 
certain order or being in disfavor in cer- 
tain directions it cannot be placed. On 
the other hand an. act which may be en- 
tirely unsuitable to a bill or an audience 
has to be placed by 'orders' to meet cer- 
tain obligations or considerations. . 




POPULAR VERA DORIA 
HERE 

Vera Doria, the English actress, who 
arrived last week from abroad, is ap- 
pearing this week in Pittsburgh in "So 
Long Letty" and will soon be seen in the 
show on Broadway. ■.• 

Miss Doria previously appeared on 
both stage and the screen for Mr. Moros- 
CO in "Tik Tok Man of Oz," and "Ma- 
jesty of the Law," a recent photo-play 
release. Her work on the TCngllsh stage' 
with Hawtrey, Wyndham and other 
widely known artists made her popular, 
on the other side, and it is expected that 
she will duplicate this popularity in this 
country. 



Toe photo was snapped by Al Foatell, 

GUESTS AT ACTORS* FUND HOME AT WEST NEW BRIGHTON 

Left to right — Charles Morris, Wm. T. Stephens, Minnie Oscar Gray, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Morton, Nanie Cotter, Fred Runnells, May Silvia, Mrs. Alice Adams, Mrs. 
Preston, Mrs. Brennan, Marie Jackson. 



HERZ IN NEW MUSICAL COMEDY 

Ralph Herz will be seen in the new 
musical comedy, "A Regular Girl," to be 
produced by the Greeley Producing Cor- 
poration. 

The piece will open in Boston in about 
two weeks. Martha Mayo has been en- 
gaged for a leading role. 



Betty Hamilton is in Chicago. 



MANAGER MARRIES MILLINER 

Klgin, 111., Sept. 26. — W. B. Newman, 
manager of the Grand Theatre, married 
Myrtle Wade, former Elgin milliner, Sept. 
21, in this city. 



"The announcements made to frighten 
the actors are in some measure lived up 
to with the above mentioned unfortunate 
results." 

When a possibility of a sympathetic 
strike was mentioned, Mr. Mountford em- 
phatically stated that there does positively 
exist no agreement at present providing 
for any such contingency between the 
White Rats and the musicians or the 
stage hands. 

The recent happenings at Oklahoma City 

which were forced upon the White Rats, 

Mr." Mountford declares, were strictly a 

local agreement, and have resulted in the 

(Continued on page 88) 



HERBERT BRENON 

SEEKS TO ENJOIN FOX 



Claim. "The War Bride's Secret Is an 
Infringement of His New Pro- 
duction "War Brides." 

Claiming that the Fox Film Corpora- 
tion's picture production, "The War Bride's 
Secret," is an infringement' of the Nazi- 
mova picture play, "War Brides," Herbert 
Brenon has served a notice of injunction 
on the Fox Company. 

- The picture "War Brides" is founded 
upon Marion Craig Wentwortb's play, in 
which Madame Hazimova appeared in 
vaudeville with marked success last sea- 
son. The copyright title to "War Brides" 
was secured from the author by Madame 
Nazimova, who in turn transferred it to 
the Brenon Company. Mr. Brenon claims 
that the use of the name "War Bride's.' 
Secret," or any similar title, is an in- 
fringement of his copyright. 

The Brenon picture will, it is claimed, 
be one of the moat expensive productions 
seen this year, Madame Nazimova alone' 
receiving $30,000 for her services. 



COWLES, YANKEE COMEDIAN, DIES 

Cleveland, O., Oct 2. — Charles Or- 
rin Cowles, for many years a favorite 
comedian, noted for his artistic imper- 
sonations of Yankee character roles, died 1 
here on Sept. 20, at the age of fifty-five 
years. He had been on the stage practi- 
cally all of his life, up to nine years ago, 
when ill health compelled him to retire. 
His death was due to an automobile ac- 
cident, sustained when taking an outing 
last week with friends. Twenty-six 
years ago he made his New York suc- 
cess as a co-star with McKee Rankin in 
"The Canuck," at the Bijou Theatre, He 
remained with Mr. Rankin for three 
years, going to the Hoyt & Thomas' 
forces, playing several seasons, as "The 
Stranger" in "A Hole in the Ground." 
Afterwards he starred for several years 
in his own production of "A Country 
Merchant," written for him by Mr. Ran- 
kin. Later he played for several sea- 
sons in vaudeville. The funeral took 
place in Cleveland today. He is survived 
by a sister. 



UNIVERSAL, LYNCHBURG, RE-OPENS 

Lynchburg, Va., Oct 3. — The Uni- 
versal Theatre, which was closed down 
several months ago by the Piedmont 
Amusement Co., opened its doors this 
week as the Broadway Theatre under the' 
same control with L. M. Abbott as man- 
ager. ' .>i " ' 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



MANAGERS TO 
EXPAND ALL 
OVER U. S. 



WILL HAVE CHAPTERS EVERY* 
WHERE 



If the plans of the United Managers' 
Protective Association, of which Marc 
Klaw is president, and Lee Shnbert, E. F. 
Albee, Henry W. Savage and Adolpb 
Zukor vice-presidents, are carried out, that 
important body will shortly have a chapter 
in each important city of the United 
States and Canada, where matters 'of all 
sorts affecting theatrical interests can be 
taken up. 

This is a step which has been deemed 
advisable for some time, but has never 
been attempted heretofore. The chapters, 
though, are now being established and the 
powerful organization is soon expected to 
become even more so. Speaking of the sit- 
uation recently, Ligon Johnson, attorney of 
the association, said : 

"We have issued bulletins to our mem- 
bers in the leading cities and communi- 
ties asking them to organize locally. Our 
action, we believe, is the only means of ob- 
taining unity and thorough co-operation of 
all managers on matters affecting amuse- 
ment enterprises and we are receiving re- 
plies which indicate that our plan is re- 
garded enthusiastically. 

"Everybody finding employment in the 
theatre is organized today, nationally as 
well as locally. All employes, whether 
they are stage handB, musicians, cleaners, 
or what not, belong to a national organiza- 
tion with a local chapter or unit.' locally 
and nationally they act together for their 
beneSt. Even actors have a union which, 
aids them in settling certain problems. 
The managers, being, in' the employer class, 
could not, of course, joib federated labor 
any more than railroad presidents, man- 
ufacturers, or ' other capitalized groups. 
But tbey can organize along similar' lines 
to the labor unions for the expeditious set- 
tlement of all questions arising in their 
affairs. 

We simply believe that by placing our- 
selves upon a labor union basis that we can 
work with greater efficiency and speed. 
"According to present methods, when 
trouble springs up in Boston or Chicago,, 
we are forced to go to great expense of 
time and money in traveling, telegraphing, 
etc. By the new arrangement the local 
Boston or Chicago branch can adjnst its 
affairs in its own way, only seeking aid 
of the main chapter as a last resort- Most 
of their work will probably be confined to 
arbitrating differences between themselves, 
the musicians, stage hands and other or- 
ganized bodies connected with the theater. 
We want our locals to elect their officers 
and governing boards from their members.'' 

Asked as to the number of local chapters 
or branches to be established, Mr. Johnson 
said: . 

"We intend to install chapters in every 
amusement center in this country and Can- 
ada. When we find a section that does not 
contain a large center we shall group all 
its cities and towns into a community 
which shall be designated a unit. The ad- 
vantage of such an organization is appar- 
ent. It win centralize our affairs and 
enable ns to carry on our work with the 



same degree of efficiency as other lines of 
business. The' association was compelled to 
postpone its annual meeting this year on 
account of the fight it was conducting in 
Washington against the theatre tax -bill. 
At our next- meeting, however, we expect 
to have delegates present from every unit 
of the organization." 



BRADY TO LAUNCH 

BIG AD CAMPAIGN 

"The Man Who Came Back," Jule. 
Eckert Goodman'* New Play, to 
Receive Country-Wide News- 
paper Publicity. 

William A. Brady will, early this month, 
inaugurate a nation-wide newspaper pub- 
licity campaign in connection with the 
new Jules Eckert Goodman play, "The 
Man Who Came Back," now being pre- 
sented at the Playhouse. This production, 
now in its second month, was brought into 
New York with practically no heralding, 
and, as a result, opened rather quietly, 
but on its first night it was enthusi- 
astically received, and within a few days 
was known as one of the dramatic suc- 
cesses of the season. 

Mr. Brady, believing that the piece haa 
great possibilities, haa determined upon a 
big newspaper campaign, commencing with 
the week of Oct. 9. Some of the most 
widely circulated daily newspapers of the 
country will be used as mediums to make 
known to their readers the excellence of 
the play. 



O'HEARN COMMENCES SUIT 

Wm. J. CHearn, the theatrical cleaner, 
who last week served notice upon the 
Clara Kimball Young Film Corporation to 
remove the large electric sign from the 
James drug-store corner at Broadway and 
Forty-sixth Street, has filed a complaint 
against this company, following its re- 
fusal to accede to his demands. O'Hearn 
claims that tho sign infringes his rights as 
tenant of the . third floor of the James 
Building and is a public nuisance. In his 
complaint he states that after he had 
signed a lease of the premises his front 
windows were boarded up to make room 
for the sign. 



"DORA DEANE" FOR WEE dr. REILLY 

0. E. Wee and Edwin F. Reilly have 
secured the exclusive rights to Mary J. 
Holmes novel "Dora Deane," which is 
now being dramatized by Lem B. Par- 
ker. Messrs. Wee and Reilly will pro- 
duce the play the latter part of the 
month for a tour of the leading cities. 



ZOE ZIEUE MASKELL ENGAGED 

MEADVXtiE, Pa., Oct. 2. — Manager 
Schutz of the Lyceum Theatre has se- 
cured Miss Maskell as pianist for his vau- 
deville theatre. 



PERFORMERS LOSE CHILD • 
Chicago, Oct 1. — Arthur Collins and 
wife (Adah Miller), well known stock 
and repertoire people mourn the loss of 
their only child, Axdell Louise, aged four 
and a half years. The little one died 
suddenly from pneumonia, while with her 
parenta in Tennessee. Interment at Ar- 
lington Cemetery, Chicago. 



LATEST "FROLIC 

HAS GREAT 

START 



ALL BROADWAY ATTENDS 



One of the institutions of Broadway's 
night life is the "Midnight Frolic," in- 
vented by Florenz Ziegfeld two seasons 
ago. Each production has surpassed its 
predecessor in all around excellence, the 
beauty of its ensemble, the loveliness of 
tho costumes, the catchy music, the won- 
derful scenic effects of Josef Urban have 
each contributed its part to make the 
midnight show a really remarkable en- 
tertainment. The latest prodution seen 
at the New Amsterdam roof on Monday 
night is by far the best of the series. 

All of the old favorites appeared and 
in addition a half dozen of new enter- 
tainers were seen, each of whom were fa- 
vorably received. 

Perhaps the best of the newcomers, was 
Lawrence Hayncs, a tenor who made his 
debut in America after a successful career 
abroad. Mr. Haynes has a pleasing, if 
rather light voice and was heard to ex- 
cellent advantage in several excellent 
numbers. 

Among the popular members of tho 
company whose new specialties were en- 
thusiastically applauded were the dan- 
cers, Frances White and William Rock, 
Bird Millman, the Arnut Brothers, Lucy 
Gillette, Adelaide Bell and Peggy Brooks. 



LOWE'S NEW CORP. 

Maxim P. Lowe, for the pest five years 
connected with the H. B. Marinelle office, 
recently opened up offices in the Fitzgerald 
Building where be will conduct a general 
booking and production department. 

Mr. Lowe has formed two separate com- 
panies, the Lowe Producing Company and 
the Maxim P. Lowe, Inc. One to stage 
the production and the other to handle the 
managerial end. Lowe will also direct the 
tour for Wurln's English Orchestra, of 
twcnty-Gve pieces. 



BIDE DUDLEY IS A 

MARRIED MAN NOW 

Wedding of Newspaper Mas to Miss 

Taney Keplinger Took Place Ten 

Days Ago. Will Honeymoon 

in South 

Theatrical folk in general were sur- 
prised this week to hear of the*wedding of 
Bide Dudley to Miss Taney Keplinger, 
daughter of a well known cotton broker. 

The groom managed to keep the joyful 
news a secret for more than a week, but 
"weddings will out !" 

Dudley, who was christened Walter 
Bronson Dudley, is a well known newspaper 
man, and Is at present conducting a column 
of theatrical gossip for the Evening World. 

The Newlyweda are at present "honey- 
mooning" in the South. On their return 
they will be at home in The Royalton, West 
Seventy-second Street, to their many 
friends. 



DRAMATIC CRITICS VISITING 

Following the arrival of critics from 
various remote centers to attend the 
premiere of "The Flame," Percy Ham- 
mond of the Chicago Tribune dropped 
into town early last week. This week F. 
W. White of the Denver Pott and Edward 
H. Crosby of Boston are expected. 



CHANGE OF PLANS 

FOR BALLET SCHOOL 



Dillingham Fixes Age Limit Because el 

Avalanche of Applications. Letters 

Come from All Over the 

United States. 

Since Charles Dillingham's announce- 
ment that he planned to aid, free of 
charge, young girls who are ambitious to 
become proficient as ballet dancers, he 
has been compelled to change his original 
ideas on the subject because he has been 
swamped with applications. 

It was originally intended to organize a 

class and accept all applicants, but up to 

the present over 1,400 have applied, some 

of whom being as far distant as Seattle, 

- in the west, and New Orleans, in the south. 

This avalanche of applications surprised 
Mr. Dillingham and Mme. Pavlowa, who 
will conduct the class, and they have de- 
cided to form classes of fifty each, the 
first to include residents of Greater New 
York, and to reject, for the present, those 
coming from out-of-town. As soon as the 
experimental stages of organization have 
'been passed with the first class the second 
will be formed, and so on. 

Only those who can devote one hour 
daily in the forenoon can avail themselves 

of the offer, as instruction will be given in 
the morning only. No girl under twelve 
years nor over twenty will be accepted, 
and tbey will be divided into two grades, 
the younger from twelve to fifteen in- 
elusive and the elder from sixteen ts 
twenty inclusive. In teaching her pupils 
Pavlowa will follow the routine of the 
Petrograd institute, at which establish- 
ment she received her instruction. 



CHANGES IN LYNCHBURG THEATRE 

Ltnchbubu, Va., Oct 3. — The Acad- 
emy of Music, which was leased about 
two years ago by Samuel H. Jolliffe, i- 
now being operated by the stockholders. 
The lessee surrendered the keys of the 
theatre, despite the fact that he still 
holds the lease and has bookings for 
Lynchburg until early Spring. Roland T. 
Hamner, who haa been connected with 
the theatre for about ten years, was ap- 
pointed manager to succeed Mr. Jolliffe. 
Mr. Jolliffe claims that he controls the 
local situation by reason of his contract 
with the Klaw A Erlanger offices, and he 
is making an effort to transfer his book- 
ings to another theatre. 



EXCITEMENT KILLS STAGEHAND 

Clifford M. Ball, a stagehand employed 
at the Hippodrome, died suddenly yester- 
day morning at Reaney's Hall. Death, 
according to the police report, was due 
to excitement brought on by an argument 
with several fellow members of a thea- 
trical union. 



The Smithwick Empire has been sold to 
a Mr. Black, and ceases to belong to the 
Kennedy Tour. 



LYNCHBURG NO VAUDEVILLE TOWN 
Ltrchbubo, Va., Oct. 8. — Manager 
Trent of the Trent Theatre, has discon- 
tinued vaudeville at bis house and tabloid 
musical shows are now substituting. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 




VAUDEVILLIANS PREPARING 

■« ONE HUNDRE D NEW ACTS 

Turns of All Descriptions Being Whipped Into Shape for Early 

Presentation, by Stars, Movie Actors and Stock Players 

— Authors Kept Busy Devising Original Material 



All indications forecast remarkable ac- 
tivity in the vaudeville field, for the sea- 
son -which has already began. 

An abundance of spectacular and nov- 
elty offerings for the two-a-day have been 
conceived and are in process of production 
by Edgar Allan Woolf, Joseph Hart, Gene 
Hughes, Jean Havez, and several other 
managers and producers of note, -while 
many of the head-line attractions on the 
big circuits have secured entirely new ma-. 
terial and, in some cases, pretentious ve- 
hicles for their 1910-17 vaudeville season. 

There has also been an influx of West- 
ern variety turns into New York this fall., 
most of which have never shown locally 
and the impetus given by this flood of 
new acts has made things hum in the of- 
fice of the agent and producer. 

Then, the invasion of vaudeville by the 
many picture stars and stock favorites 
because of the long lay-off periods in their 
respective branches of the profession has 
materially helped to make a busy season, 
giving- many writers of vaudeville material 
a chance to increase their bank-accounts 
by supplying the newcomers with the 
proper vehicle for their variety debut. 

Among the screen performers who will 
be seen shortly on the big circuits are 
Guy Coombs and Anna Nilsaon in a dra- 
matic sketch, Dan Mason and company in 
"Via the Coal-hole," a farce comedy em- 
ploying three people, Billie Beeves and 
Eunice Elliot in a slap-stick comedy skit, 
and Virginia Korden in a novelty picture 
act. 

Lynne Overman, formerly of Providence 
■took, has a comedy vehicle in course of 
preparation. 

Many musical "tabs," carrying from ten 
to fifteen people and with special sets, 
will go over the big circuits, a few be- 
ing "The Midnight Kiss," by Fred de 
Gresac, featuring Mabel Berra and ten 
people; "The Smart Shop," a Chicago pro- 
duction; "The Package Deliverers," with 
nine people, including Joe Phillips and 
Herman Meyers; "The Fire Brigade," with 
Nat Ellis and a company of twelve per- 
sons; "The TJneeda Girls," a production 
with special book, number and scenery, 
carrying nine people, and a "Bit of Pipe," 
including Dick Morgan, Margaret Slavin 
and Charles Seal. 

The vaudeville favorites, McWatters & 
Tyson, have something new in their "Re- 
view of 1916"; Lew Brice has taken a new 
partner in the person of Helene Coyne, 
and will offer an original dancing spe- 
cialty; Marty McHale and Mike Donlin, 
of diamond fame, have a new version of 
"Rijsht Off the Bat"; Claude Gillingwater 
and company will appear in "The Frame- 
Up," an intensely dramatic playlet; and 
Ed. Gallagher, formerly of Gallagher and 
Barrett, has joined hands with the de- 



lineator of the Hebrew type, Andy Lewis, 
in a new talking act. 

The small-time circuits will carry their 
full quota of new turns, many of them 
hailing from Chicago and points further 
West, showing their wares for the first 
time on Eastern vaudeville stages. 

Tommie Gray states that he is swamped 
with orders for new acts and novelties 
from performers, big and small, and, all 
things considered, the season 1916-17 looks 
like a busy, if not a prosperous one, for 
the two- three- and four-a-day style of 
entertainment. 

In addition to the aforementioned, a 
host of new turns will be found in the 
offerings of Harriet Marlotte and company 
in "Looks," by Edgar Allan Woolf; "Sun- 
shine Mary," with Hugh Herbert and com- 
pany ; El wood Bostwick and Vivian Black- 
burn in another one by E. A. Woolf; Ma- 
son and Sullivan, with a sketch from the 
pen of Brandon Walsh; Norton and Allen 
in a skit by Tommy Gray; Powers and 
Pendleton in "Borneo and Juliet, Jr," by 
Jean Havez ; Billy Gaston, assisted by a 
girl partner, in "The Beautiful Bandit"; 
Bob Fitzsimmons, the ex-pugilist, working 
with his son, and many others of lesser 
vaudeville repute. 



CARLETONS RETURN 

The Carleton Sisters, Hazel and Daisy, 
are -again in vaudeville after an absence 
of several seasons, spent with stock or- 
ganizations of the country and most of 
the time at the head of their own at- 
traction. 

During the week of Sept. 18 they were 
at the Garrick Theatre, Wilmington, Del. 
Their tour is being arranged by Jo Paige 
Smith. 



VIRGINIA EARL HAS NEW ACT 

Virginia Earl, of musical comedy fame, 
is going into vaudeville and will be seen 
in a sketch from the pen of Edgar Allan 
Woolf atsthe Boyal Theatre, the Bronx, 
shortly. George Nathanson has been en- 
gaged to portray the leading role opposite 
Miss Earl in the playlet. 



MORRIS SIGNS RUD1NOFF 
Richard Pit rot has closed a contract 
between the Russian entertainer, William 
Rudinoff, and William Morris to cover two 
seasons. Rudinoff is now with the Eva 
Tanguay road show, and next Season win 
be a special feature with the Harry 
Lauder show. Mr. Pi trot also expects to 
place him on one of the New York Roof 
Gardens, as a special attraction, next 
Summer. 



LADDIE CUFF SELLS FARM 

Poet Jebvis, N. Y„ Sept 29. — An- 
nouncement wag made today of the 
sale of the farm of Laddie Cliff, vau- 
deville Star, who is shortly to sail for 
England to join the British army aviation 
corps. It was purchased by Dr. William 
E. Barth, of Newburgh. 

Laddie Cliff is really Clifford Albyn 
Cliff, bnt he has always been called Laddie 
and assumed this name on the stage. 
About three years ago he purchased a 
place on the North Plank road, about three 
miles, from the city, and has spent consid- 
erable time there. 



NEW THEATRE FOR S. & C. 

Augusta, Ga., Oct. 2. — Manager Frank 
J. Miller, of the Modjeska Theatre, an- 
nounces that about Nov. 1 he will present 
high class vaudeville, from the Sullivan- 
Conaidine Circuit, in the new theatre being 
erected by the Modjeska Theatre Co. The 
new playhouse, now nearly completed, will 
be absolutely fire-proof and modern in every 
respect, and equipped to handle motion pic- 
tures, vaudeville, and the big road shows. 
It is to cost in the neighborhood of one 
hundred thousand dollars and will be one 
of the handsomest amusement houses in the 
South. 




TOM GILLEN 

Tom Gillen, known the world over as 
"Finnigan's Friend," opened his season at 
Keith's, Toledo, Ohio, with Keith's Indian- 
apolis, Ind. ; Keith's, Dayton, Ohio ; Johns- 
town, Pa. ; (Majestic) Sheridan Square, 
Pittsburg, Pa.; Jefferson, Auburn, N. Y. ; 
Proctor's, Albany, N. Y.; City, Perth Am- 
boy, N. J., all in a row, playing U. B. O. 
time. 



GETS DAMAGES 

Ethelyn Clark, who is appearing in 
vaudeville with Jos. E. Howard, received 
$7,000 for an auto accident that occurred 
at Atlantic City a few weeks ago. Miss 
Clark has a scar on her cheek that robs her 
of beauty, bnt is hardly noticeable while 
working. Five thousand dollars was paid 
for the accident $1,000 for counsel fees 
and $1,000 for repairs to the auto. 



ST. LOUIS HAS 

VAUDEVILLE 

BOYCOTT 

WELL KNOWN PERFORMERS BANNED 



St. Lores, Mo, Sept 29. — The actors' 
strike at Oklahoma City, in which the 
White Rats are involved, extended its in- 
fluence to this city during the past week, 
for a campaign was launched here against 
performers who had acted as so-called 
strike breakers in the Oklahoma City 
trouble 

The Royal Gascoignes, Nan Nannery and 
company, and Sallie Fields, playing at the 
Grand, were the acts against which the 
attack was made, and it is intimated that 
similar measures against them will be 
taken in all cities where they appear. 

Early in the week, handbills, stating 
that the three acts were strikebreakers and 
unfair to organized labor, were distributed 
throughout the city, and particularly in 
front of the theatre, while patrons were 
on their way to the box office. All perform- 
ances, both afternoon and evening, were 
covered in this manner, bnt no information 
could be obtained as to whether or not it 
affected the receipts. It. is presumed the 
bills were distributed by the local unions 
that are affiliated with the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. 



A NEW DANCE CRAZE 

Just as the dance craze seems nearinp 
its end a new one comes- from London 
which promises to eclipse all of the dan- 
ces which have met- with popularity dur- 
ing the past year. 

It is called "London Taps" and, thor- 
oughly Americanized, is being danced in 
the leading cabarets and restaurants. 

The original music for the dance is 
called "A Broken Doll" and is published 
by T. B. Harms and Francis, Day & 
Hunter. 



ALBEE VISITS CINCINNATI 

CiscnraAH, Sept 30. — E. F. Albee, 
head of the B. F. Keith interests, was here 
this week and conferred with local repre- 
sentatives regarding the proposed new Keith 
Theatre building which is to be rebuilt on 
a larger scale on the present site. Work 
will begin next Spring, it was said. 



TEAM CHANGES NAME 

The vaudevile team, formerly known as 
Kolb and Harland, are now known as 
Florenz Ames and Adelaide Winthrop, hav- 
ing recently appeared in a" new act at the 
Alhambra Theatre under that name. 



Bob Anderson and his polo pony, Bonita, 
are in their fourth week at the Palace. 



AHEARNS LEAVE HIPPODROME 

The Charles Abeam Troupe closed at 
the New York Hippodrome Sept 23. 



QUIRK RETURNS TO STAGE 

Billy Quirk, popular screen comic, is 
making ready for an appearance in vaude- 
ville with his wife, Jane Quirk. The lat- 
ter will work from the orchestra pit, 
leading her husband's numbers and acting 
as a "feeder" for his material. Miss 
Quirk has appeared in this capacity with 
"The Red Heads," being one of the fea- 
tures of the former big time act 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




NEW ACTS 



DONLIN AND McHALE 

Theatre — Proctor 1 a Fifth Avenue. 

Style— Talk and tonga. 

Time — Twelve minute* in one. 

Persons — Two men. 

Wardrobe — Evening clothes. 

Construction— Well arranged. 

Action — Smooth. 

Comedy — Just enough. 

Estimated Value — Big time act. 

Remarks — Mike Donlin and Marty McHale 
have revamped their former vaude- 
ville offering, using a bright line of con- 
versation which is properly arranged, 
and a well chosen selection of numbers. 
While the orchestra plays insinuatingly 
"Take Me Out to the Ball Game" a short 
reel shows the ex-blg leaguers on the 
diamond, paving the way for an easy 
entrance. A double version of Tacki 
Hula Hicka Dula is exceedingly well 
rendered by the two and the baseball 
talk following this number brought a 
quick response in laughs. Donlin and 
McHale must be commended for the in- 
telligent and clever manner in which they 
handle their dialog, both displaying much 
ease of manner. McHale's sweet tenor 
voice is immensely pleasing in a ballad 
number and he would do well to replace 
his present song with a melody like "Ire- 
land Mnst Be Heaven." The "punch" 
finish with McHale singing the straight 
version and Mike palling the comedy 
verse brought them a well earned hit. 
Both of the boys look perfect in their 
evening clothes and to their credit it 
must be said they need not depend upon 
big league reputations to get them by in 
vaudeville. 



JOSEPHINE VICTOR 

Theatre— Paface. 
Style— Dramatic sketch. 
Time — Twenty minutes. 
Setting — Special. 
Value — Miss Victor's name. 

Miss Victor is the best thing about 
this act and if the author had done as 
much for her as she does for him, it 
would probably have been much bet- 
ter. 

The action opens in the room of a 
dope fiend who is part of a crooked 
gang of which a girl is also a member 
and for whose affections the drug 
habitue and a safe cracker are con- 
testing. She is absent when the cur- 
tain rises, but enters shortly after- 
ward and tells of having been saved 
from arrest by a man who had told 
her he, too, was a crook. She praises 
his gallantry and shortly afterward he 
enters. 

Carrying considerable money with 
him, the dope fiend and safe cracker 
try to trim, but are defeated by the 
girl. It finally turns out that the 
stranger is a detective, and instead of 
arresting the girl, takes her away to 
his sister's home with the intention of 
marrying her. 

Miss Victor, as the girl, was splendid, 
portraying the part with feeling and 
intensity. But the plot of the piece is 
obvious, mechanical and slow and but 
little suspence is maintained. What- 
ever there was good about it pertained 
to the ability of Miss Victor and her 
company. But it is doubtful if this, 
even is able to overcome the draw- 
backs of the sketch itself. 



HENRY LEWIS 

Thea tr e Palace. 
Style— Songs, dances, talk. 
Time — About thirty minutes. 
Setting— Special. 
Value— A good feature. 

This act ran away with the Palace 
bill and deserved all it got, of applause. 
The curtain, rising, shows the gates 
of Heaven with St. Peter standing 
guard and watching for actors. He 
tells of how vain they are and finally 
announces that Henry Lewis, a Thes- 
pian is approaching and that he must 
show what he can do before being ad- 
mitted. 

The curtain then descends and Lewis 
enters. before the stage drop and pro- 
ceeds to show what he can do, which 
he succeeds in convincing one, is con- 
siderable. To a personality that is 
naturally funny, he adds patter, songs 
and dances that are more so, inter- 
spersed with quips and jokes that are 
original and new. He also introduces 
an Italian singer of operatic airs whose 
voice is of remarkably good quality 
and adds much to the act. 

The audience at the Palace received 
the offering with marked cordiality 
and assured Lewis that he is an en- 
tertainer of high rank. 



HAT .I.F.N AND HUNTER 

Theatre — Proctor's Fifth Avenue. 
Style — Violin playing and talk. 
Time — Fifteen minute*. 
Setting — House drop in (too. 
Value— Possibility for big time. 

The combination of a lady violinist 
and a "nut" comic is not happy, ac- 
cording to all the precepts of vaude- 
ville, but Hallen and Hunter doing this 
same identical thing succeed in regis- 
tering .effectively at the Fifth Avenue 
this week, so why cavil t The man's 
style of work and delivery parallels 
that of the usual comic of this type. 
His gags, while in some instances a tri- 
fle time worn, are handled effectively 
and drew many laughs Monday after- 
noon. The woman has little to do 
playing the violin pleasingly. Her 
partner's song entitled "Cut It Out" 
should have that very thing done to it, 
as he jb capable of better material. 
The "kind applause" thing at the finish 
with the usual "Yankee Doodle Lyrics," 
while it brings them back to several 
bows, could be eliminated to advant- 
age. The turn shows excellent possibili- 
ties for the better time. 



F ARREL-J AMES CO. 

Theatre— American Roof. 
Style — Going Home. A dramatic sketch. 
Time — Tv>enty-ttoo minutes. 
Setting— Reception room. House set. 
Value— Good attraction for small time. 

The actor playing the old father in 
"Going Home," presumably Stanley 
James, is a -finished performer. His 
splendid work retrieves to a great ex- 
tent a rather weakly constructed dra- 
matic episode. His daughter, played by 
Vessie Farrell, leaves her small town, 
and once in the city, her feet stray into 
paths not so straight. The guileless old 
father decides to hunt her up and after 
managing to deceive him for a time as 
to the life she is leading, the truth comes. 
The old man is heart-broken, bnt prevails 
upon his daughter to go home with him 
and sin no more. Several little bits of 
comedy relief are delightfully interpolated 
by James. The sketch is mildly pleas- 
ing, bnt as it stands, is far too weak for 
the bigger houses. The woman playing 
a minor rOle performs acceptably and no 
fault can be found with the cast or its 
work. The fault lies with the vehicle. The 
players should endeavor to strengthen 
the present sketch, or replace it with 
one suitable for their really excellent 
acting abilities. 

NORA WHITES has joined the east of 
"The Girl from BrariL" 



ness. His partner's fast work, confined 
to a straight routine, is out of the 
ordinary. An excellent double dance 
with a unique finish scored heavily for 
them. This turn is capable of starting 
roost any Bhow on the big time. They 
are comers. 



CLEO GASCOIGNE 

Theatre — Proctor's Fifth Avenue. 
Style — Singing exclusively. 
Time — Eleven minute*. 
Setting — Houie drop in one. 
Value — Acceptable for present time. 

Cleo Gascoigne appearing in No. 2 
position at the Fifth Avenue on Mon- 
day afternoon showa nothing startling 
in her single singing offering. The 
act is nicely put gogether and the 
changes which she makes are' dexter- 
ously accomplished through the me- 
dium of a dark stage between the 
numbers. Opening in Italian male 
character, she makes two changes. 
The second gown is not becoming and 
should be changed. Her voice is pleas- 
ing but a trifle weak. The selection of 
almost entirely all operatic melodies ia 
open to question. A popular ballad 
would help to vary the routine. With 
plenty of playing and a little more 
comfidence Miss Gascoinge should do 
acceptably for the present time. The 
use of a velvet drop would add class to 
the offering and create better atmos- 
phere for her style of work. 



TOM EDWARDS 

Theatre — Colonial. 
Style— VenfrilooMMt and singing. 
Time— Fourteen minutes. 
Setting — Special, full stage. 
Value — Good for three or four spot. 

Tom Edwards, assisted by Alice Mel- 
ville, a wrist watch and several new 
ventriloquist figures, msde his reappear- 
ance to American vaudeville and showed 
a splendidly arranged act- 
Tom is well known on this aide as a 
first-rate ventriloquist and he hasn't gone 
back any. He appears in riding habit 
at the opening of the act, using a news- 
boy figure, and puts over a clever line of 
patter. He then introduces Mim Mel- 
ville, who has a singing voice that could 
almost be called bass. It is a remark- 
ble one for a woman. She does a single 
singing turn and tried to do some so- 
prano work, bnt it spoils the novelty. 
Edwards then goes Into a "Put the Baby 
to Sleep" hit that scored heavily. 



ROWLEY AND YOUNG 

Theatre — American Roof. 

Style— Songs and dances. Dancing featured. 

Time — About fourteen minute*. 

Setting — House drop in one. 

Value— Could open -show in big houses. 

Rowley and Young are two young 
men with a nimble pair of feet and a 
proper taste in clothes, something rare- 
ly displayed by dancing turns of this 
order. In well made sack suits they 
'open with a song, but show good judg- 
ment in sticking to what they do best, 
dancing. The individual stepping of 
the pair ranks with the best. An ec- 
centric dance contributed by the 
shorter of the two displayed a variety 
of steps commendable for their new- 



VAN UEW TRIO 

Theatre— Proctor' a Fifth Avenue. 
Style— Singing. 
Time — Sixteen minutes. 
Setting— Artistic fuU stage set with beau- 
tiful special drop. 
Value — Very good for emtatt time. 

Fine taste in dressing and a general 
air of refinement and class do much 
toward helping the Van Liew Trio to 
register. The act employs two -ladles 
and one gentlemen (the terms used in 
the proper sense) who render a variety 
of numbers both in trio and individual- 
ly. The songs are handled in fairly 
pleasing fashion. The treatment ac- 
corded this type of entertainment de- 
serves commendation for its attempt 

"to be different.'* With briefly ren- 
dered interludes on the piano, one of 
the female members of the act de- 
scribes the numbers which tbey suc- 
cessively sing. The pianist assists ma- 
terially with lota of personal magnet- 
ism and a pleasing rendition of an Irish 
song. The trio should look to their 
harmonizing. It could be improved. 
A baritone solo by the man is nicely 
handled. 



SUES AGENT FOR $50,000 

Albert D. Gould, a Chicago hooking 
agent, with headquarters in the Kimball 
Building, has been made defendant in a 
suit iiled by the Boston Xationn] Grand 
Opera Co. 

According to the attorney for the com- 
pany, Samuel R. Rabinoff, Mr. Could baa 
visited the committees in cities where the 
above-named opera company has been 
booked to appear, and told them the or- 
ganization would not be able to fill Ha 
bookings because it was in "bad shape.** 

The reason for Mr. Gould's action, Mr. 
Rabinoff s statement declares, la plain. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 




PALACE 

Henry Lewis ran away with the bill at 
the Palace this week in his new offering 
entitled "Squidgulum," a vaudeville 
Poussccofe that will keep everyone who 
' sees it happy for a long time after they 
leave the theatre. And this was despite 
the fact that the bill was a good one 
throughout. 

The program started with Page, Hack 
and Mack, a trio of acrobats and tumblers 
who not only did stunts, but thrilled their 
audience with the most amazing twists and 
turns. It is one of the best acts of its 
kind seen in a long time. 

Jack King and Morton Harvey, a team 
of men, were well received in a piano- 
dialogue offering which revealed Harvey as 
an accomplished female impersonator even 
to his ability to sing notes far above the 
vocal range of men. Their turn does not 
hut long, hut is filled with ginger from 
first to last. 

Charles E. Evans used to win laughs 
with the "Parlor Match," but never more 
than with "A Forgotten Combination" 
which he is now presenting supported by 
Helena. Phillips. The combination is that 
of a safe in which are kept the diamonds 
of Mrs. Hewed, who is very eager to wear 
the jewels at a dinner. The combination 
being lost, she and her husband alter- 
nately search for it and a lost collar hut- 
ton in such a manner as to keep the audi- 
ence laughing continuously. The situa- 
tions were unusual and worthy of the ap- 
plause the act received. 

Miss Belle Storey has a voice that is 
capable of covering a wide range with a 
sweetness of tone which has won her a 
host of admirers. Many of them were 
present during Monday's performance and 
greeted her enthusiastically. Miss Storey 
makes a mistake in not leaving the stage 
between her numbers as, by remaining on, 
she creates a moment of confusion in the 
minds of her hearers as to what she is 
going to do that slackens the speed of her 
part of the program. 

"Lindy Lou," "I Wonder Who's Kissing 
Her How" and a number of other songs 
written by Joe Howard were sung by the 
composer and Miss Ethelyn Clark, his new 
partner. Howard is always popular with 
vaudeville audiences and was received 
cordially. Miss Clark is very pretty and 
with a wardrobe of charming gowns adds 
much to the drawing power of this act. 

Charlie Ahearn always presents a good 
act, always bicycles and always has a race 
with somebody. He did not fail to do all 
his old tricks during his turn, which came 
next, and added some new ones for good 
measure. 

In order to liven things a bit more he 
put an imitation Charlie Chaplin on a. 
bicycle also and lost nothing by it, for 
"Charley" rode a bicycle just as he doe* 
everything else, much to the merriment 
of the audience. 

Miss Josephine Victor whose perform- 
ances in many Broadway successes is well 
remembered, presented a new sketch en- 
titled "The Pink Ruby" for the first time 
and a description of it with one of 
•'Squidgulum*' will be found under New 
Acts. 

The usual Current News Pictorial opened 
the bill. 



JEFFERSON 

Manager Wm. H. Raynor offered a well 
arranged bill the first three days of this 
week, and the usual good Monday attend- 
ance was there for the first show. 

In number one position Archie Onri, 
assisted by Dolly, presented his novelty 
act and scored heavily. He opened doing 
an oil painting of a very pretty mill 
scene. He followed this with a number 
on the banjo, then he did a little magic 
and followed this with some very clever 
juggling. 

Daisy Leon, a great favorite here, was 
welcomed with a storm of applause. She 
sang four songs and they called her out 
to do another, not being satisfied with 
bows. She gets her song over the foot- 
lights nicely. 

The Seven Corkers filled position num- 
ber 3 to its fullest. They do a regular 
minstrel first part, and give an interest- 
ing performance. One of them, a tenor, 
sings a couple of old time songs, and 
another is an excellent bone soloist. The 
others sing, dance and pass merry quips. 
All in all it is a capital turn and was 
well received. 

The White Sisters, in a singing and 
dancing act, were next on the- bill. They 
are a little short on voices, but put their 
songs over in great shape. They are also 
clever dancers, and were so well liked 
that they were forced to take an encore. 

Andrew Kelly did an Irish monologue 
in which he spoke of McSwiggin, Downey 
and O'Brien. He failed to arouse any 
enthusiasm, and went off without a hand. 

Maurice Samuels and company pre- 
sented a sketch which told of the arrest 
of an Italian for the supposed murder 
of a countryman who first swindled him 
and then tried to steal his sweetheart. 
There are four men and a woman in the 
act and the man doing the supposed mur- 
der proved himself to be a clever de- 
lineator, and the woman also did good 
work. The skit has much human appeal 
and scored a decided success. The act 
carries a special drop. 

Cole, Russell and Davis, two men and 
a woman, do a sketch dealing with two 
ex-convicts in search of a job from the 
woman proprietor of a restaurant. They 
do some clever patter and some which is 
not so clever. They are all good per- 
formers and the woman is very pretty. 
As a finish the three do a song during 
which one of the men "lifts" a breast 
pin from the woman, and "props" in a 
comedy policeman make-up marches them 
off stage under arrest. This act also 
carries a special drop. 

Barlow's Circus in closing position held 
them in. Opening with a pony-riding 
dog Mr. Barlow follows with four dogs 
on the pony. Then comes a short menage 
act by a pony, a pony-riding cat, and as 
closing stunts the unrideable donkey and 
the revolving table. The act scored. 



FIFTH AVE. 

The entertainment at the Fifth Avenue 
for the first half is not up to the usual 
standard of excellence maintained by the 
Proctor management. 

Harry Cooper, assisted by Ross Robert- 
son, gives the bill an atmosphere of class 
which is otherwise lacking. Not that the 
rest of the show is poor in the true sense 
of the word. Fair would be an honest 
criticism for the balance of the perform- 
ance. 

The Kemps open. A new partner has 
replaced Bob Kemp. The comparison is 
not fair to either performer. The act of 
songs and dances suffice to start proceed- 
ings on the present time. 

The sketch portion of the bill is accept- 
ably cared for by Edward Farrel and com- 
pany. The familiar idea of jealous wife, 
mistaken identity and resultant confusion 
is played with a fair sense of comedy 
values. The man handling the role of the 
hotel detective has a tendency to over- 
play. The dialogue is rapid-fire and the 
action fast. The line at the finish seems 
rather unnecessary. The act pleased. 

The well-known act of Kelso and Leigh- 
ton, now programmed as Mr. and Mrs. 
Kelso, pulled down the laughing hit of the 
show. Jimmy Kelso has the happy faculty 
of making old material listen great. This 
is a tribute to any light comedian. His 
work shows the fruits of long experience 
and a fine sense of comedy values. Miss 
Leigbton feeds acceptably and gowns be- 
comingly. The turn should aspire for a 
place on the big time. 

Dan Burke and Girls supply the dancing 
feature of the show. It seems inane for 
Mr. Burke to assume the dramatic char- 
acter of an old ballet master, considering 
the interpolation of a medley of songs 
played on the bells by one of the girls 
using her feet. In passing it may be re- 
marked she possesses a beautiful and 
shapely pair of limbs, attractively en- 
cased in black silk fleshings. The setting 
of the turn is artistic and the lighting ef- 
fective. The three girls are excellent danc- 
ers and Mr, Burke lends a fine soft shoe 
specialty. But why the dramatic atmo- 
shere created, only to be'spoiled at various 
timeB by the introduction of things incon- 
gruous to the idea. As a dancing feature 
it classes with the good ones. 

Harry Cooper scored effectively with his 
familiar mail man act. The turn needs 
no description here. 

The Three Escardos close with wonder- 
ful somersaulting by one of the men. The 
turn is neat and the three men work clean 
and fast. 

Chas. Chaplin in "The Pawnbroker" fur- 
nishes the picture for the week. 



DIAGHILEFF DANCERS ARRIVE 

Mr. and Mrs. Kamischoff and Messrs. 
Herman and Tariat, four members of the 
Diaghileff Ballet Russe, arrived this week 
from Havana whither they had gone last 
month from Spain. Dr. Anselm Goetxl 
has commenced with the orchestral re- 
hearsals of the ballet. 



MARIE BURIES HATCHET 

Marie Dressler's long drawn out liti- 
gation with the Keystone Film Company 
anent her share of the profits of the 
motion picture of "Tfllie'B Punctured Ro- 
mance" came to an end last Monday 
when her attorney, M. G. Goldberg, sub- 
mitted to Supreme Court Justice Goff the 
agreement which has been reached with 
the company and Miss Dressier. The 
court then approved an order dismissing 
the case, and both sides refused to dis- 
close the terms of the agreement. 



AMERICAN 

A toning down on the part of the Amer- 
ican Roof orchestra would help materially 
the acts who depend upon it for their 
song accompaniments. Monday night they 
played with more vigor than Intelligence, 
to the detriment of the numerous vocal 
turns on the bill. 

Nina Esphey opened with a pleasing 
routine of banjo numbers. The instru- 
mental work is good and the act nicely ar- 
ranged. In an early spot, the banjoist did 
exceedingly well. 

_ The amusing, if almost unintelligible, 
conversation of Torcot throughout the per- 
formance of his Trained Game Roosters 
entertained the Roof crowd highly. The 
work of the birds is really marvelous, and 
the wire-walking, hurdling and balancing 
tricks accomplished little short of wonder- 
ful. A "rooster" comedian helped to en- 
liven the proceedings, his unconscious 
clowning causing much laughter. The bur- 
lesque boxing match between the game 
roosters designated as Willard and John- 
son was startling in its fidelity to the 
recent Garden fiasco. 

A breath of "old Ireland" Is realistically 
conveyed in the little skit offend by 
Broughton and Turner. The girl is of the 
typical colleen class and her rendition of 
"The Top of the Morning Mary" is ev- 
eellent. Her partner showed a sweet Irish 
tenor to good advantage, using "Believe 
Me if All Those Endearing Young 
Charms" and one other. The medley of old 
Irish tunes touched the audience In the 
right spot and they responded liberally. 
It is needless to outline here the act of 
Owen McGivney, featured this week at 
the forty-second street house. Suffice to 
say that his protean work is wonderful and 
the condensed version of Chas. Dickens' 
story "Bill Sykes," offers him full scope 
for the exercise of his truly remarkable 
talents. 

Following the intermission, Ethel Thayer 
Costello created a distinct impression by 
her beauty of appearance and well-trained 
singing voice. She uses four numbers, all 
well chosen. This is a turn especially de- 
serving of commendation for its class and 
method of presentation. Miss Costello 
should be heard from. 

The obese nomologist, Patsey Doyle, kept 
them laughing with a routine of jokes 
which are rather poorly strung together. 
His delivery is good, and he would be wise 
in brushing up the present offering with a 
few new gags intelligently constructed. In 
its present form, this single will find favor 
on the small time but it needs attention be- 
fore playing the larger houses. Doyle is a 
good performer. A little thought will make 
him a whole lot better. 

It is indeed a pleasure, to Bee a pair of 
gymnasts without the customary tights, 
tossing of handkerchief and pompadour 
hair-cuts. Standard Brothers are as good 
as they look. Their balancing is danger- 
ous and difficult, and the ease with which 
they accomplish their work in no way de- 
tracts from their skill. The finish of the 
somersault to a hand-stand while blind- 
folded is great. These two young men can 
close any show and hold their own. 

The Pawnbroker, featuring the inimita- 
ble Chaplin, is the picture attraction for 
the week. 



October 7, 1916- 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




Founded in MB by Frank Quern 

Published by the 

CUPPER CORPORATION 

oiland W. Vaughan. .President and Secretary 

.robn F. Edwards Vice President 

Frederic* C. Muller .........Treasurer 

1604 Broadway, New York. 
ORLAND W. VATJGHAN, EDITOR. 
John F. Edwards. 
Frederick C. Mailer, 

Associate Editors. 



JOHN DALY MURPHY has left "The 
Amber Empress" and joined Mrs. Fiske's 
company for "Erstwhile Susan." 

-THE GIRL FROM BRAZIL" is in its 
sixth week at the Forty-fourth Street 
Theatre, 



in "Heart'a Desire," axe: Arthur Vinton, 
J. F. Sullivan, J. E. Miller, Helen Valley, 
Bess Sankey, Lisle Leigh and Lou Ripley. 

HARRY HUTCHINS, scenic artist, is in 
the Union Hospital, Fall River, Mass., suf- 
fering from fractures as the result of a 
bad fall. 



CHARLES CHERRY has signed for the 
role of Hotchkiss in "Getting Married." 



MLLE. CARRIE is playing the Cleve- 
land time again, having recovered fully 
from her recent illness. 



NEW YORK, OCTOBER 7, 1916 



Entered June 24, 1879. at the Post Office 
a.t New York. N. Y., as second clasB matter, 
under the act of March 3, "'9.- 
THE CUPPER is issued every WEDNESDAY. 
Forms Close Promptly on Tuesday at 10 A. M. 
SUBSCRIPTION 

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age extra. Single copies will be sent, post- 
paid, on receipt of 10 cents. 

ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON 
APPLICATION. 



Chicago Office— Room 210, 35 S. Dearborn St. 
Caspar Nathan, Mamageb. 

Southwestern Office— 1125 Grand Ave.. 

Kansas City. Mo. 

Al. Makinson., Manages. 



Address All Communications to 

THE NEW YORK CUPPER, 

ISM Broadway, Now York 

Registered Cable Address, "Atjthobiit.' 



HENRY E. DIXEY in '"Mr. Lazarus" is 
in his fifth week at the Shubert Theatre. 

MABEL BROWNELL forsakes stock for 
a Broadway production this season. 

WALTER DAMROSCH has returned 
from his summer home at Bar Harbor. 

TWENTY-EIGHT pupils of the New 
York Institute for the Deaf and Dumb 
were guests at the Booth Theatre last 
week and saw ''Pierrot the Prodigal." 

H. H. FRAZEE will bring "The Silent 
Witness" back to New York after its en- 
gagement in Boston. 

MAUD ODELL announces that she has 
quit the serious drama for good and will 
stick to musical comedy. 



BEN J. KRAMPE'S mother is danger- 
ously ill at a St. Joseph, Mo., hospital. 



"YOU'RE IN LOVE" is the title of Ar- 
thur Hammerstein's new musical comedy 
by Otto Hauerbnch, Edward Clark anil 
Rudolph Friml. 



SID WINTERS, Irish comedian with 
T. W. Dinkins' Thoroughbreds Co., has 
been signed up for same show for 1917. 



PERCY HEATH goes in advance of 
•Hip. Hip. Hooray 1" 



NED NELSON has joined Stetson's 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin" company, playing 
Simon Legree and directing stnge. 

NORMAN has returned from a four- 
months' tour of the Maritime Provinces. 



Thb Cmppeb car bb obtained wholbsalb 
and bbtaii., at onr agents, Daw's 8teamauip 
Agency, 17 Green Street, Charing Cross Boad, 
London, W. C, England; Brentano's News 
Depot, 37 Avenue de rOpera, Paris, France; 
Manila Book and Stationery Co.. 128 Escolta. 
Manila. P. I.; Gordon & Gotch. 123 Pitt 
Street, Sydney, N. S. W., Australia. 



JERRY HART 
bluckface part in 



is re-engaged for the 
'The House of Glass." 



THE PARK, Indianapolis, on the In- 
ternational circuit, is -under the manage- 
ment of Sbafer Ziegler. Phil Brown is 
the business manager and press representa- 
tive. 



With this issue of THE NEW YOKE 
CLIPPER we present the oldest theatrical 
journal in America in new and modern 
dress. 

How do you like the new "Old Reliable"? 



T. J. OROURKE, manager of the Royal 
Opera House, Yarmouth, Can., and Kath- 
leen Ashe, were married Sept 6, at Yar- 
mouth. 



EMMETT CORRIGAN will be at the 
Palace next week in Oliver White's sketch 
entitled "The Van Lowe Diamond." 



HELEN JEWELL is recovering slowly 
from a serious operation performed at the 
Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, B. C, and would 
like to hear from friends. 



VERA FULLER MELLISH has signed 
with Silvio Hein to play Anne Page in 
"The Merry Wives of Windsor." 



MR. and MRS. BARNEY SHEA 
("Wanda"), of the Ka Dell-Kritchfleld 
Show, announce the birth of a baby boy 
on Sept. 7, at Lebanon, Ky. 



RICHARD ORDYNSKY left last Sun- 
day for Los Angeles, where he is to re- 
main for ten weeks at the Little Theatre 
as producer. 

MILE. MARGOT, principal danaeuse 
at the Opera Comique, Paris, has arrived 
in New York. She will appear under the 
direction of Elisabeth Marbury. 



MR. and MRS. EDW. C. HORNE have 
returned from Arnold's Park, la., where 
they had a bungalow on Lake Okeboji. 



LARRY LARRTVEE and Ellen Nugent, 
members of the stock company at the 
Crystal, Quebec, Can., were married Sept. 21. 



"THE GIRL FROM BRAZIL" moves on 
Oct 9 from the Forty-fourth Street to the 
Shubert, and "The Flame" moves from the 
Lyric to the Forty-fourth Street. 



THE LEXINGTON 
Sunday, Oct. 1, with 
tures. 



THEATRE opened 
vaudeville and pic- 



THE Nine O'clock Theatre opens Oct. 
16, with a bill of one act foreign plays. 



GENEVIEVE ROLLO, formerly a well- 
known actress, is dead in Chicago. She 
was the wife of Walter Clarke Bellowes. 



F. C. CLUMP is resident manager of the 
new Gaiety, Kankakee, IB., under direc- 
tion of E. P. Churchill, Inc. 

ESTIMATES are to be invited this fall 
for the $2,000,000 convention hall to be 
built in Philadelphia. 



THE premier of "Rich Man, Poor Man," 
at the Forty-eighth Street Theatre,- has 
been postponed till Oct. 6. 



THE HIPPODROME attendance for 
Sept. 27 and 28 totaled 22,526 persons. A 
record for a two-day business. 



RONALD BRYAM will play a leading 
role in "Shirley Kaye." 



LOU-TELLEGEN returns to the spoken 
drama this season. 

MAXIMILIAN FOSTER, author of "Rich 
Man, Poor Man," is in town to see the 
production of the play taken from his 
story. 

ED WYNN has contracted to produce 
a three reel comedy picture called "The 
Purple Devilfish." 



NEW (UPPER orriCES 

The new uptown office* of 

THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 

both business and editorial, are in 
the heart of the theatrical district. 
The Business Office address is No. 
1604 Broadway. The Editorial 
Rooms ate at No. 732 Seventh Ave. 



ELSIE FERGUSON, in "Shirley Kaye," 
opens Oct. 9 at the Apollo, Atlantic City. 



"THE AMBER EMPRESS" closed 
Sept. 80 its two weeks* stay at the Globe 
Theatre. 



DE WOLF HOPPER reached the end 
of his Coast-to-Coast auto trip last week 
when he landed on Broadway. 



IDA STANHOPE has signed 
H. Frazee for a leading role in 
of Queens." 



with H. 
"A Pair 



SYDNEY SHIELDS has returned to 
Broadway . from New Orleans, entirely re- 
covered from her recent attack of appen- 
dicitis. 



GEORGE M. DE VERE is grandpa to a 
new baby girl, born last month. He has 
just returned from a western tour. 



LEWIS STONE 
Queen, Jack" Co- 
leading man. 



has left the "King, 
with which he was 



THE Corning Opera House, at Corning, 
N. Y., has been leased for a term of five 
years to Messrs. Lee & Harris, of Albion, 
N. Y., who will re- open it about Oct. 1. 



HARRY 

of Arthur 
Boy" Co. 



P. DEWEY is 
Alston's "Girl 



THE new theatre being erected in 
Augusta, Ga., by the owners of the Mod- 
jeska, will be ready to open about Oct. 15. 



RICHARD M. HENRY has been ap- 
pointed by Surrogate Cohalan as executor 
of the estate of the late Augustin Daly. 



"VERY GOOD EDDIE" moved back to 
the Princess Monday night. 



"THE WITCHING HOUR" is to have 
an international premiere shortly. In 
London it is to be played as a spoken 
drama, and: in New York, it is to be 
filmed with Mnrie Shotwell in the lend. 



"COPY," will have a revival at the 
Little Theatre, Los Angeles, next week. 
Kirah Markham plays the lady of the 
street as she did on each previous occa- 
sion. 



"JUSTICE" will play a long engage- 
ment at the Powers Theatre, Chicago, Iw- 
ginning in a fortnight. 



HARRY GRIBBLE. who has been ap- 
pearing in musical comologues, has joined 
a new vaudeville sketrh which is beiu^ 
rehearsed by Ben Teal. 



AMY RICARD is seeking a play for her 
'return to the footlights after a long ab- 
sence. 



GARETH HUGHES closed 
Man" this week. He goes 
geles next month. 



'The Guilty 
to Los An- 



leading man 
He Couldn't 



CHARLES FOSTER has signed to play 
the role of Pistol in "The Merry Wives of 
Windsor." 



THE tour of the Portmanteau Theatre 
will begin Oct. 23, at the Court Square 
Theatre, Springfield, Mass. 



CHARLES COMPTON lias returned 
from the Western stock company to New 
York to appear in a new Pathe picture. 

ANNIE HUGHES, who has been a 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. James K. TIackttt 
at their home at Clayton, N. Y.. lias re- 
turned to New York. 

RICHARD BENNETT returns to New 
York this week to begin rehearsals under 
the direction of B. Iden Payne. The play 
is "Zack," by Harold Brighouse. 

PAUL GORDON has joined the Rolfe 
Film Co. for a special engagement, fol- 
lowing the close of the season of "Mar- 
gery Daw." 



IN THE CAST supporting Fiske CHara, 



BRANDON TYNAN has signed with 
John D. Williams for the role of Arthur 
In "Msjor Pendennis." 



MARGARET FARELEIGH, late of 
"The Happy Ending," has gone into vau- 
deville wi»h .»rlin<< TVcVricTce. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 




GOOD SHOWS PREDOMINATE 

BUT AT TENDA NCE IS POOR 

Lack of Business Shelves Good Productions, but New York 

Managers Are Optimistic and Look for Big Attendance 

with Normal Condition* Later in the Season 



Ne«v York's producing managers have 
every reason to be proud of their output so 
far this season, artistically speaking. 
From a financial standpoint they have 
every reason to be dissatisfied. 

From a manager's viewpoint last season 
wis considered a banner one, but a com- 
parison between the attractions of a year* 
ago and those already produced this season 
is difficult because of connections. 

There have been more plays produced so 
far this season on the Xew York stage 
than were last year in the same length of 
time, and still the comparative merit of 
this season's work is higher than that of 
iaRt season's. 

Again, while this season's productions 
are of better average calibre, the attend- 
nnce this season has been the worst on 
record, while last season's was among the 
best. 

This season's slump in theatrical busi- 
ness, so far as New York is concerned, is 
entirely due to existing conditions! well 
calculated to make a stay-at-home of the 
most confirmed theatregoer, and it is like- 
ly to be some time before he returns to bis 
normal theatregoing state. 

There was no infantile paralysis last 
senson. August of 1915 gave New York 
some good indoor amusement weather and 
there was no strike. Any one of these 
three would, in itself, work a hardship, 
but the three combined have been a calam- 
ity. 

Of the forty odd productions of this sea- 
son up to now, twenty-five are still with 
us, showing that more than fifteen shows 
of the current season have been forced by 
the first week in October to either take to 
the road or go to the storage house. In 
other words, about thirty-Sve per cent, 
have failed to attract New Yorkers. 

The New York manager has been placed 
in the peculiar position this season, owing 
to the absence of his balcony and gallery 
attendance, of not being able to tell, with 
any degree of certainty, whether or not he 
has a play with earmarks of success. An 
emphatic success is, in the majority of 
cases, as easy to detect as an emphatic 
failure, but the medium success, which is 
by far the more prevalent of all the plays 
that are not failures, is under present con- 
ditions, difficult of determination. 

The manager's thermometer of the suc- 
cess or failure of a play is the attendance 
of the balcony and gallery. Filled seats in 
those parts of the bonse spells success; 
empty ones, under normal conditions, in- 
variably mean failure. Hence the poor bal- 
cony and gallery attendance that has ob- 
tained so far this season confuses the man- 
ager. If that role held good at the pres- 
ent time New York could scarcely boast of 
a single success. 

There have been but four real failures, 
and of these "Yvette" lasted for one per- 
formance. "A Little Bit of Fluff" was with 



US for a week, and "The Happy Ending" 
lasted for the same length of time. 

Bnt a number of those which have either 
been sent on the road or taken off entirely, 
gave every evidence of having the elements 
of a New York success if they were given 
half a chance. In this class can be men- 
tioned "Coat Tales," written by Edward 
Clark, and produced by Arthur Ham- 
merstein ; "Broadway and Buttermilk," 
Blanche Ring's present vehicle; "Some- 
body's Luggage," in which James T. 
Powers is starring; "A Pair of Queens," 
a Frazee production ; "The Silent Witness" 
and "The Guilty Man." 

Of the August productions those still 
with us are, "Seven Chances," at the 
Cohan; "Cheating Cheaters," at the El- 
tinge; "Turn to the Right," at the Gai- 
ety ; "His Bridal Night," at the Republic : 
"The Girl from Brazil," it the Forty-fourth 
Street, and "The Big Show," at the Hip- 
podrome. 

Of those produced during September 
there remain "The Man Who Came Back," 
Playhouse; "Mr. Lazarus," with Henry E. 
Dizey, Shubert; "Pierrot, the Prodigal," 
Booth; "Flora Bella," with Lina Abarba- 
nell, Casino; "Mister Antonio," with Otis 
Skinner, Lyceum; "Pollyanna," Hudson; 
"Pag anirri, " with George Arliss, Criterion; 
"Nothing But the Truth," with Wra. Col- 
lier, Longacre; "Caroline," with Margaret 
Anglin, Empire: "Miss Springtime," New 
Amsterdam; "Upstairs and Down," Cort; 
"The Intruder," Cohan & Harris.: and 
"Arms and the Girl," Fulton. 

This brings the season up to Oct. 1, and 
is as formidable a list of shows, ranging 
from light opera to melodrama, as one 
could hope to see. 

Prominent among those which have 
found favor is "Miss Springtime," which 
scored one of those instantaneous hits 
managers so like to see. 

Of revivals there were two, "The Great 
Lover" and "Sybil," last year's successes, 
while "Fair and Warmer," "Very Good, 
Eddie" and "The Boomerang" were hold- 
overs from last season, the two last men- 
tioned being still with us. 

For the first week in October we have 
"Rich Man, Poor Man," at the Forty- 
eighth Street ; "His Majesty Bunker Bean" 
at the Astor: the Washington Players in 
new one act plays at the Comedy ; "Betty," 
with Raymond Hitchcock, at the Globe, 
"Back Fire," at the Thirty-ninth Street; 
"Fixing Sister," at the Marine Elliott, 
and "Hush," at the little Theatre. 

The managers take an optimistic view 
of the situation and there are many shows 
jnst waiting the opportunity to get on 
Broadway. Just as soon as the city settles 
down to normal conditions there is no 
question that the theatrical attendance will 
pick np. and some of the shows which have 
been slighted by the public will come into 
their own. 



START 24-HR. REHEARSALS 

Charles Dillingham and Florenz Ziegfeld 
Jr. started twenty-four hour rehearsals 
Thursday morning, Sept. 28, for the prin- 
cipals and chorus of their forthcoming 
production of "The Century Girl," at the 
Century Theatre. The rehearsals will be 
conducted in shifts of eight hours each, 
the innovation having been necessitated 
by reason of the very large number of stars, 
twenty-eight in number, employed in the 
cast. 

The first sub-division of eight hours will 
be devoted to the chorus, under the direc- 
tion of Irving Berlin, the second to the 
principals, including: Sam Bernard, Leon 
Erroll, Hazel Dawn, Elsie Janis, Doyle 
and Dixon, Harry Kelly, Gertrude Rut- 
land, the Barr Twins, Marie Dressier, Irv- 
ing Fisher, Harry Langdon, Eddie Foy and 
the Seven Little Foys, Gus Van and Joe 
Scbenk, Frank Tinney, Stan- Stanley, Law- 
rence Haynes, Marjorie Villis, and Helen 
Barnes, conducted by Frederick G. 
Latham, general director of the Century 
Theatre ; the last eight hoars to the lyrics, 
topical songs and orchestral numbers, under 
the direction of Victor Herbert. 



VERNON CASTLE SAFE 

Reports which reached Broadway a few 
weeks ago to the effect that Vernon Castle 
had been killed in action in France, were 
evidently wrong, for Louis Bustanoby, the 
restaurateur, has received a letter and 
some pictures from the dancer himself. 

The letter gave an account of the expe- 
riences Castle has undergone since sailing 
from these shores, and the pictures showed 
various scenes of life in the training camps 
and the aviation schools. 



NEW MANAGER IN BROOKLYN 

Fletcher Billings has been made mana- 
ger of the Majestic Theatre, Brooklyn, this 
season, succeeding John R. Pierce. Mr. 
Billings was treasurer of the Majestic last 
season. The house opened Sept. 30 with 
"Just A Woman." 



NOW IT'S THE COHAN & HARRIS 

Messrs. Cohan & Harris have at last 
decided to name their recently purchased 
Candler Theatre after the firm, and there- 
fore it will hereafter be known as the 
Cohan & Harris Theatre. When the firm 
announced they intended to call the house 
the C. & H. they were swamped with 
letters of protest from their friends, who 
declared it sounded like the abbreviation 
of a railroad or a tea store advertise- 
ment. Hence the Cohan & Harris Theatre. 



NAME OF PLAY CHANGED 

Nancy Buyer has changed the title of 
her play from "The Little Lady from 
Lonesome Town" to "The Woman Who 
Paid." The new title goes into effect Oct 
16 when the company plays Richmond, Va. 



COHAN AND HARRIS'S 
NEWEST PLAY IS 

GOOD MELODRAMA 



"HER SOLDIER BOY" PRESENTED 

Stamford, Conn., Sept. 29. — The Shu- 
berts presented "Her Soldier Boy" here last 
night, for the first time upon any stage. 
Clifton Crawford was seen in the leading 
role. The book is adapted by Rida John- 
son Young from the original of Victor Leon, 
and the score is by Emmerich Kalmen and 
Sigmund Romberg. 



"THB INTRUDES"— A three act play 
bT Cjrll Bareoart. presented Sept. 
26. at the Cohan and Harris Tbcatre. 
THE CAST. x 

Pauline LeTardler Olive Tell 

George Goerand Vernon steel 

Bene Lerardier Frank Kemble Cooper 

Baptiste Lawrence White 

The Stntnser. H. Cooper Cliffe 

Natalie Dorle Sawyer 

Commisaaire of Police.. Frederick Esraelton 

Agent of Police ....J. H. Greene 

Agent of Police a. B. Beno 

Francois George Barr 

First Clerk Kenneth Keith 

Second Clerk. P. O. Barley 



J 



"The Intruder" is one of those Cohan & 
Harris melodramatic plays that thrills 
without giving you the creeps, and inter- 
ests without nerve-trying tenseness. Its 
story, as revealed at the opening, Sept. 26, 
-leals with the eternal triangle, to which 
"ie average playwright turns when at a 
loss for a theme for a new play. 

Bnt all the Intruder has to do with it 
is to bring about the discovery of the de- 
ception of the man and woman by the hus- 
band. 

The Intruder is a thief, in the night who 
times his burglary when the husband is 
away and the wife and her lover are tak- 
ing advantage of his absence. The wife 
discovers the theft, a mere trifle of 
200,000 francs, and calls the police by 
phone, which proves ber undoing. 

From then on it is merely a matter of 
time how soon the husband will denounce 
the sinners. When he does, he gets the 
man in his power only, as his final act, to 
let him go free. 

Olive Tell did good work" as Pauline, the 
wife, albeit at times she was not quite 
equal to the emotional demands of the role. 
Vernon Steel made George Gnerand, the 
lover, a manly chap wha^pbn your sym- 
pathy in spite of his misdoing. 

Frank Kemble Cooper had a difficult 
task to make the role of Rene Levardier, 
the husband, convincing. However, he sur- 
mounted all difficulties and gave a force- 
ful performance. 

H. Cooper Cliffe, as The Stranger, gave 
one of the best performances of his career 
in this country. Always a finished actor, 
he was never more artistic than he is in 
this play. 

The others without exception did good 
work. 

"The Intruder" is a well written, well 
acted, well staged melodrama. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 
Times — Well made play. 
Herald — Excitement in every move. 
Tribune — Fine Ml of work. 
Sun — Concentrated melodrama. 
World — Soggy melodrama. 

MUSIC MASTER REVIVED 

Wilmington, Del., Sept. 29. — The Mu- 
sic Master," with David Warfield, was re- 
vived here tonight, with a cast that in- 
cluded Marie Bates, Jane Cooper, Helen 
Weer, Eleanor Barry, Rose SaltonstaL Ger- 
trude Valentine, Charles Abbott, William 
Boag, Tony Bevan, Louis Hendricks, An- 
guste Arnmini, Francis Gaillard, Edward 
Holler, William H. Barwald, Pickering 
Brown, Griffith Lost, Thomas Gilbert and 
William Battista. 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




ARMS AND THE GIRL 
PLEASING COMEDY 
WELL PRESENTED 



"ARMS AND THB OIKL."— A three- 
act comedy by Grant Stewart and 
Robert Baker, produced Sept. 27 at 
Ibe Fulton Theatre. 

OAST. 

Madame Coolen Marie Hassell 

Tolnette Ethel IntropMl 

Burgomaster Paul Cazeneure 

Olga Karnorltcb Suzanne Jackson 

Ruth Sherwood Fay Balnter 

Wilfred Ferrers Cyril Scott 

Telephone Operator Carl Axxel! 

Lieut. Vou Elbe J. Malcom Dunn 

General Klaus Henry Vogel 

Captain Scbultx .* — John Downer 

Jack Martin Francis Byrne 



Wm. Harris, Jr., displayed rare good 
judgment when he accepted "Arms and 
the Girl" for production. The fact that 
its story has a bearing upon the European 
war now going on would have deterred 
many a manager from producing it, but 
Mr. Harris realized the comedy value of 
the work. Truly its relation to the war 
begins and stops with the fact that its 
action occurs in a Belgian town after the 
German invasion. 

It treats with the trials of a young 
American girl (Ruth Sherwood), prin- 
cipally occasioned by the loss of her pass- 
port, stolen from her by a Russian spy 
(Olga Karnovitch), and because this pre- 
dicament forces her to marry a young 
American (Wilfred Ferrers) in order to 
save his life. This places her in a pre- 
dicament when she later faces her fiance 
(Jack Martin). He, however, transfers 
his affection to another and Ruth discov- 
ers that she loves her husband. 

"Arms and the Girl" is a delightful 
comedy. It is well conceived and well 
written, and is a pleasing addition to the 
list of this season's good plays. 

Fay Bainter, a new comer to our stage, 
played Ruth with an irresistible naivete. 
She is among the most talented ingenues 
on the stage today, added to which she 
has personality, magnetism and charm. 
Her present success is a guarantee that 
we will see more of her. 

Cyril Scott can always be relied upon 
to give a good performance, and his work 
as Wilfred was no exception. 

Henry Vogel gave a most artistic por- 
trayal of General Klaus. He made him 
authoritative without arrogance or ex- 
aggeration. 

The Lieut, von Elbe of J. Malcolm 
Dunn was a clever bit of work. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 

Herald— Entertains. 
Times — Light and amusing. 
Tribune— Charming play. 
Sun — Amuses first nighters. 
World — Rattling good play. 
American — Effective comedy. 



DAUGHTER OF C. K. HARRIS 
TO WED 

Miss Ethel Harris, daughter of Charles 
K. Harris, the song writer and music 
publisher, will be married on Oct. 12 to 
Bernard Weil, the junior of the big manu- 
facturing company of Well & WeiL Miss 
Harris is one of the most popular of 
New York's younger social set, and is a 
talented musician. 



$1,000,000 BROOKLYN HOUSE 

Through one of the largest realty deals 
closed in. Brooklyn in many months that 
borough has become assured of a million- 
dollar theatre in the near future. The deal 
included the sale of a square block bounded 
by Bedford and Atlantic avenues, Bedford 
place and Brevoort place. 

The Palmer Realty Co., of which Paul 
M. Herzog is president, purchased the prop- 
erty from the Townsend Wendell estate, it 
being valued at more than $500,000. Plans 
will be drawn up, it is announced, for a 
theatre which will be larger than any 
amusement house now in Brooklyn. 



BALLET RUSSE READY 

The program ror the opening night of 
the Russian ballet at the Manhattan Opera 
House, Oct 9, will be "Till Eulenspiegel," 
which has never been given as a ballet 
before ; "Les Sylphides," "Prince Igor" and 
"Schehorazado." 

The last three were in the repertoire last 
season. In "Till Eulenspiegel," by Rich- 
ard Strauss, Nijinsky will dance as Till, 
appearing as buffoon, cleric, knight and 
professor. Pierre Monteux will conduct 
for all the ballets except this. -\ nother nov- 
elty which will have its world premiere 
during the first week at the Manhattan is 
"Sadko." 

INTERNATIONAL 

CIRCUIT CHANGES 

New Shows and New Theatres to Be 
Added. Non-Paying Theatres in 

Various Towns to Be Eliminated. 

The International circuit is going to cut 
out theatres in several cities which have 
not done well and is planning to give its 
attractions 'a season of thirty-two weeks. 
Gus Hill is producing a new musical show 
for the circuit. 

Other shows that are to be added to the 
circuit are: "Major Meg," with Florence 
Bindley, scheduled to open Oct. 9; "Step 
Lively," a musical comedy, and "Sons of 
the Rich," a melodrama to be produced by 
Haltin Powell, and the Gracie Emmett 
show, which is being fixed up. All of these 
shows will be opened during the coming 
month. 



PITROT SEEKING ATTRACTIONS 

Richard Pitrot, the South American 
booking manager, has received instructions 
by cable to book all the shows possible for 
South American countries. He will also 
send "Civilization" to that territory, in ad- 
dition to a complete American circus, 
which will open at the Japanese Park, in 
Buenos Ayre«, under the management of 
Carlos Seguin. 



"LE POILU" OCT. 9 

The Messrs. Shubert, beginning Monday 
night, Oct. 9, will present at the Garrick 
Theatre, in conjunction with Lueien Bon- 
bear, director of the Theatre Francais, a 
sensational Paris success, called "lie 
Poilu," with book by Hennequin and Veber, 
and music by Jacqnet, produced by Mr. 
Bonhenr, in French. "Le Poilu" is the 
nickname for a French soldier — a word 
coined daring the present war In Europe — 
and means the "hairy" one, descriptive of 
the long French beard worn by the soldiers. 



MANAGERS BREAKING RECORDS 
40 NEW SHOWS REHEARSING 

A. H. Woods Has Three, the Charles Frohman Co. Four and 

John D. Williams Three — Theatres and Rehearsal Halls 

at a Premium — Stage Directors Working Overtime 



Upwards of forty productions, musical 
and otherwise, are in rehearsal in New 
York, breaking all records for prolific 
output on the part of Broadway man- 
agers. 

New York theatre managers have seen 
the time when more than one show would 
be kept in the city simply because they 
had nothing to take their places. No 
such condition exists just now, for there 
are more shows than can be accommodated 
with New York theatres. 

The stage of every theatre in New York 
knows no idle moments these days. Every 
hall, lodge room, club room, and, in fact, 
any available place where a company can 
be assembled, has been pressed into serv- 
ice and rehearsals are being carried on 
seven days a week, and, wherever possi- 
ble, every night. 

Every stage director of any repute has 
his time well booked up, in some instances 
till after the first of next year, and many 
an actor who had previously given little 
thought to that end of the business have 
turned their attention to stage directing. 

Several thousand players are either ac- 
tively engaged in rehearsals or are about 
to begin them, and two or three times 
their number of chorus girls and chorus 
men are being trained to take their places 
in the new shows to come. 

At the Century Theatre rehearsals of 
"The Century Girl" are employing the 
services of several directors, among them 
being Irving Berlin, who is attending to 
the musical numbers. Of the dance num- 
bers, R. H. Burnside has charge, and the 
principals are receiving their instruction 
from Mr. Burnside and Fred Latham. 

B. Iden Payne is busy with rehearsals 
of three shows for John D. Williams. 

A. H. Woods, who has been a prolific 
producer so far this season, puts three 
new shows in the director's hands this 
week. While Mr. Woods has different di- 
rectors at different times, Willard Mack 
is his general director and oversees all 
of the Woods' productions. 

Tn the Charles Frohman, Inc., offices, 
George Henry Trader is the leading stage 
director, but is subject to Alf Hayman 
and Gus Thomas. At present there are 
four productions under way, which has 
necessitated the employment of Frank 
McCoy to assist in the work. 

Edward McGregor, besides superintend- 
ing rehearsals for his own productions, 
finds time to put on plays for H. If. 
Frazee and at present is overseeing the 
next Frazee offering. 

While Oliver Morosco has no regular di- 
rector, Robert Milton has been active in 
Morosco's interest recently, the latest out- 
put of this Western manager, "Upstairs 
and Down," was staged by Mr. Milton, 
and he is now at work on Morosco's next 
offering. 

Winthrop Ames, who supervises all of 



his productions, has in preparation several 
new ones. 

Paul Dickey, the general stage director 
for Wm. Harris, Jr., is busy on new Har- 
ris productions. 

At the Shubert headquarters Jack Huff- 
man and J. Harry Benrimo divide first 
honors as general stage directors. They 
are kept busy nearly the whole year 
'round and at present have rehearsals un- 
derway for four new Shubert offerings. 

For Klaw & Erlanger, Herbert Gresham 
is busy staging their next production. 

At Gus Hill's the usual activity seen 
at this time of year is apparent. Sev- 
eral of the Hill shows are in rehearsal, 
including one for the International Circuit. 

Robert Edeson is conducting rehearsals 
for one of- the two new shows Rush A 
Andrews have under way. 

Besides being busy with "The Century 
Girl," R. H. Burnside finds time to over- 
look a couple of other Dillingham pro- 
ductions now in rehearsal. 

Among the productions in rehearsal at 
the various theatres are: "King, Queen, 
Jack" at the Eltinge; "Our Little Wife," 
with Margaret Illington, at the Harris; E. 
H. Sothern in "If I Were King," and 
Anna Held, in "Follow Me," divide the 
Shubert Theatre stage in the mornings, 
and the chorus girlB and boys of the Held 
show rehearse downstairs in the smoking 
room. Two companies of "Alone at Last" 
occupy this stage on the afternoons when 
there is "Mr. Lazarus" matinee. 
. At the Booth, "The Fear Market"; at 
the A at or, three companies for. "Just a 
Woman"; at the Gayety, the Elsie Fer- 
guson company in "Shirley Kaye"; at the 
Playhouse, "Object — Matrimony"; at the 
Casino, two "Blue Paradise", companies; 
at the Princess, "Jane Clegg"; David War- 
field in 'SThe Music Master," and John 
Drew in "Major Pendennis," are dividing 
the Knickerbocker stage; "The Rio 
Grande" and Cyril Maude in "Jeff" are at 
the Empire; "So Long, Letty" at the 
Lyric; a second "Girl from Brazil" com- 
pany on the roof of the Forty-fourth 
Street; at the Century the three-shift re- 
hearsals are going for the twenty-four 
hours of the day and night; at the Cri- 
terion, "The Merry Wives of Windsor": 
at the Hudson, Arnold Daly in "The Mas- 
ters"; Mrs. Fiske and company are re- 
hearsing at the offices of Corey & Riter, 
while on Joseph Riter's yacht, on the Hud- 
son River, rehearsals of an unnamed play 
are in progress; every room in Bryant 
Hall and Lyric Hall is occupied day and 
night with companies, in full or in part. 

"For the Love of Mike," "His Brother's 
Keeper," "Where the Rooster Crows," a 
new company for "Bringing Up Father," 
Rose Stahl in "Emma MeCheaney," and 
Frances Starr, in "Little Lady in Bine," 
are all rehearsing. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 




BROOKLYN WILL 

HAVE STOCK 

CO.JOON 

HORN OPENS AT FIFTH AVE. OCT. 9 



The appeals which Brooklynites have 
been making for a resident stock company 
arc finally answered. Brooklyn has been 
without a stock company since last April, 
and although it was rumored several weeks 
ago that Corse Payton would bring a com- 
pany to one of the theatres, lovers of stock 
in Brooklyn were forced to forego the pleas- 
ure of having their own company for the 
time being. 

Jacque E. Horn has now announced that 
be will present the Fifth Avenue Theatre 
Stock Go. at the Fifth Avenue Theatre, 
opening Oct. 9, in "Under Cover." 

The players already engaged include: 
Irene Summerly and Gns Forbes for the 
leading roles, and Elmer Buffham, Anthony 
Blair, Henry Crosby, Stewart E. Wilson 
and Francis Younge. Harry Home will be 
stage director. 

Brooklyn has always been considered a 
good stock town, Phillips Spooner and 
Corse Payton having made a fortune there 
in days gone by, before the moving picture 
craze cut into the business of stock houses 
all over the country. 

Only last year the Crescent. Gotham and 
Grand Opera House were playing nightly to 
good business, and when Lew Parker closed 
his company at the last named theatre, it 
was understood a company would return for 
the Summer season. 

Brooklyn theatre patrons felt the want of 
their favorite amusement, and a good com- 
pany could have remained and made money 
throughout the warm weather. Letters 
have been appearing in the dailies and 
theatrical papers by persons in Brooklyn 
interested in the theatre to that effect, and 
it is surprising that good stock companies 
have nntll now passed up the plea. 

Mr. Horn should feel confident of a suc- 
cessful s e as on for his company, and as he 
promises current releases, will no doubt be 
welcomed aa a timely acquisition. The 
players themselves are not unknown to 
Brooklyn, and if they have the field to 
themselves, win soon have an enviable fol- 
lowing. 



BRANDON CO. CLOSES TENT SEASON 

Blot Mound, m., Sept. SO, — The Reli- 
able Brandon Show, which has been play- 
ing through Illinois under canvas, closes 
its tenting season here to-day, and Mana- 
ger Brandon will open the opera house 
season with his company Oct. 9. The show 
consists of Dr. William Brandon, manager 
and owner; Mrs. William Brandon, Grace 
Brandon, Bob Bomola, Myrtle Bomola, 
Robert Bomola, Jess Brandon, Morris Mc- 
Gammon and John Hyde. 



TIBBILS CLOSES WITH LEWIS CO. 

W. H. TtbbUa, the well known Western 
time agent, has just closed a season of 
twenty weeks aa agent for the Wo. F. 
Lewis Stock Co.. and will go South for the 
Winter. The show goes into houses. 



WARBURTON BENEFIT 

FUTOLAX, Ohio, Sept. 30. — The Earle 
Stock Company gave a benefit performance 
at the Marvin Theatre Sept. 27, afternoon, 
for Jack Warburton's mother. 

No charge was made for the perform- 
ance, but a collection taken at the door 
was sent as a memorial fond and a testi- 
monial to the personal tie which endeared 
the deceased Jack Warbnrton to Findlay. 
The production was "The Woman That 
Was/' 



NESTELL CO. OPENS 

Fbeepobt, Ii.t.., Oct. 2. — The Nestell 
Players began an indefinite stock engage- 
ment at the Orpheum yesterday with 
"Within The Law" as the opening bill. 

Homer Nestell is supported by Edyth 
La Nora. The cast is made up of — AUwyn 
King, heavies ; Howard Race, second man ; 
A. C. Sinclair, characters ; Fern Renworth, 
ingenue; Blanche Tarvez, characters and 
Grace Gamble, juveniles. "The Wolf" is 
offering for last half. 



HOWARD SCHOPPE ENGAGED 
Howard Schoppe has been engaged to 
appear with a stock company in Northamp- 
ton, Mass., where Selmar Jackson and 
Gilda Leary are to play leads. 



NEWS NOTES 



"THE SPENDTHRIFT," is the offering 
tMs week at the Princess, Des Moines, la., 
under the management of Elbert & Get- 
chell. "The Ghost Breaker" underlined. 

"TESS OF THE STORM COUNTRY," 
with Bessie Dainty playing the lead, is the 
attraction this week at the Majestic, 
Evansville, Ind., under the management of 
Ira Earle. 

"THE MISLEADING LADY," "The Man 
from Home" and "Freckles" will be offered 
very shortly by the stock company at the 
Temple, Fort Wayne, Ind, under the man- 
agement of Louis Wolford. 

"A TEMPERANCE TOWN," "Cameo 
Kirby" and "The Trail of the Lonesome 
Pine" are scheduled for very early pro- 
duction at the Academy of Music, Hali- 
fax, N. S. Sydney Toler is playing the 
leads and J. F. CConnell is the manager. 

TESS OF THE STORM COUNTRY" 
will be the offering week ending Oct. 14 at 
the Academy of Music, Haverhill, Mass., 
under the management of E. A. Cuddy. 
"Never Say Die" underlined. 

"THE ROAD TO HAPPINESS" will be 
offered week ending Oct. 14 at the Willis 
Wood Theatre, Kansas City, Mo., under 
the management of Joseph Gil day. The 
stage is under the direction of Percy 
Winter. 

"MARY JANE'S PA" has been selected 
by Henry Menges for this week at the 
Hyperion, New Haven, Conn. "Sherlock 
Holmes" underlined. 

"MARRYING MONEY" is the selection 
of George Poultney for this week at the 
Elsmere, New York City. Margaret Frye 
and Clay Clements are playing the leads. 
"The Melting Pot" underlined. 



MOBILE HOUSE 

LEASED FOR 

STOCK 

COMPANY TO PLAY INDEFINITELY 



Mobile, Ala., Oct. 2. — Details have been 
completed whereby the Strand Amusement 
Company has secured a lease of the theatre 
formerly known as the Dreamland and 
later as the Columbia, and has renamed 
the house the Strand, according to papers 
filed with the Secretary of State here. 
Negotiations had been in progress for sev- 
eral weeks. 

The house will be entirely remodeled and 
the opening date is given for about Nov. 
10. Moving pictures, stock and vaudeville 
between the acts will be tbe policy. A four- 
piece orchestra will be used. 

Rehearsals will begin as soon as the 
players are selected, which is expected to be 
in the very near future, as several engage- 
ments are under consideration. Tbe com- 
pany will be a permanent organisation if 
the experiment is a success. 

The officers and incorporators are R. H. 
McConneH, president ; E. H. Marshall, vice- 
president; Henry C. Steiner, secretary and 
treasurer. John H. McEvoy, George E. 
Drago, Lee O. Cummins and L. H. Scott. 
Capital stock is given at $3,000. 



STOCK RE-OPENS IMPERIAL 
St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 2. — The Imperial 
Theatre here re-opened its doors yesterday 
with a dramatic stock company to be 
known as the Imperial Stock Company. 
Oscar Dane and Oppenbeimer Brothers are 
backers of the enterprise. 

Gene Lewis and Olga Worth are appear- 
ing in the leading roles. "Kick In" was 
the opening attraction. 



VAN DYKE & EATON IN TULSA 

Tulsa, Okla., Sept. 30. — The Van Dyke 
ft Eaton Co. opened its Winter season here 

at the Grand Theatre with the following 
roster: Lorena Tolson and Clifford Hast- 
ings, leads; Bessie Jackson, second busi- 
ness; Helen De Land, characters; Willard 
Foster, comedian ; Jack Kohler, characters 
and heavies; J. E. McCoy, general busi- 
ness and specialties, and Harry Yickery, 
director. 



IRENE OSHIER RETURNING 
Irene Oshier will end her engagement 
with the Princess Stock Co., Sioux City, 
la,, shortly, and will return to Broadway 
for the Winter season. 



NEW BEDFORD ALL-STAR CO. OPENS 

New Bedfobd, Mass., Oct 2. — Tbe All- 
Star Stock Co. opens its season tonight 
at the New Bedford Theatre presenting 
"Kick In." The company includes Alfred 
Sivenson, Enid May Jackson, Bob Me- 
Clung, Carrie Lowe, Roxanne Lansing, 
Harvey Hayes, Dorothy Beardsley, H 
Orris Holland, Lorle Palmer and Lyman 
Abbe; Fred Sutton, stage director; H. A. 
Hanson, scenic artist; Edward Denison, 
director, and Warren OHara, manager. 



ADAIR AND LOWE IN CAIRO 

Cajbo, 111., Oct. 2. — John Adair and 
Jane Lowe opened their season here yes- 
terday at the Kimmel Theatre with "Tess 
of the Storm Country." The company in- 
cludes George Robinson, Claudia White and 
others. "Freckles" will be the attraction 
next week. 



OLIVER TO PLAY AT OAK PARK 

^outh Behd, Ind., Oct 2. — Otia Oliver, 
who has recently closed bis stock engage- 
ment at the Oliver Theatre here, has leased 
the Warrington Theatre in Oak Park, 111., 
for the season and will open in stock there 
Monday Oct 9 with "Under Cover." One 
play a week will be offered, and each will 
be given a scenic production. "Too Many 
Cooks" win be the offering for the second 
week. ■ i 



ROSTER OF CUTTER STOCK 

The roster of tbe Cutter Stock Co. is as 
follows: D. Bernard Hurl, M. A. Brewer, 
William S. Nunn Fred Weston, John S. 
Brock, Jack Raymond, Wallace R. Cut- 
ter, W. H. Cutter, Winifred Lambert Ruth 
Leighton, Grace Raymond and Ella Smith. 



ST0CKLETS 



CECIL SPOONER has completed her 
four weeks' engagement at the Hartford 
Theatre, Hartford, Conn. 

MILDRED FLORENCE scored a per- 
sonal hit as Norma Noggs last week, in 
"Rolling Stones," upon her return to the 
Keith Hudson Theatre Stock Co., Union 
Hill, N. J. 

W. VAUGHAN-MORGAN has left New 
York with the Morgan-Wallace Players, 
and will open an extended engagement with 
that company at Sionx City, la, 

W. C. MASSON is again hard at work 
directing the stock company at Union Hill, 
N. J. This is Mr. Masson's fifth consecu- 
tive year with the Keith firm as director. 

■THE MISLEADING LADY" is the at- 
traction this week at the Orpheum, Oak- 
land, Cal., under the management of George 
Ebey. 

"THE BLINDNESS OF VIRTUE" is 
being played by Corse Payton for the first 
four days this week at the Spooner The- 
atre, New York City. 

"THE MASTER MIND" is the offering 
this week at the Empire Theatre, Salem, 
Mass., under the management of Harry 
Katzes. 

"NEVER SAY DIE," with Mitchell Har- 
ris and Thais Magrane playing tbe leads, 
is the offering this week at the Players 

Theatre, St Louis. 

. "DAVID HARUM" is being played by 
the. Harry Leland Stock Co. this week at 
the American Theatre, Spokane, Wash. 

"THE STRANGER," is the play selected 
by Messrs. Kreuger & Guthrie for this 
week at ihe Nesbit Theatre, Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. 

"THE HAWK" will be the offering week 
ending Oct 14 at the Shubert, St Paul, 
Minn., under the management of F. C. 
Priest 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 21 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




CASPAR NATHAN, 

Manager, 

Telephone, Randolph 5423 



NATIVE PLAYS 

HOLD LOCAL 

STAGE 

AMERICAN AUTHOR ASCENDING 



Monday, Oct. 2. 

That the American stage is finding its 
own drama and musical comedy is incon- 
trovertibly demonstrated by the fact that 
all of the three new plays coming to Chi- 
cago's Loop this week are of simon-pure 
Yankee workmanship. 

Time there was when a drama bad to be 
English, a farce French and an operetta 
Viennese to gain credence, but recently 
American (and even local) writers have 
asserted themselves, so that the Chicago 
stage ia American through-and-through. 

Louis K. Anspacher/a "The Unchastened 
Woman," with Emily Stevens in the title 
role and H. Beeves-Smith in most active 
support, started on what looks like a 
healthy ran, at the Princess, Saturday 
night, its philosophical study of a shallow 
and self-centered woman being of peculiar 
appeal because everybody in the audience 
had personally met with the kind of char- 
acter portrayed. 

Personal triumphs were scored by Leo 
Ditrichstein and his new-to-Chicago lead- 
ing lady, Betty Callish, when "The Great 
Lover" opened before a large and enthusias- 
tic audience at Cohan's Grand. The play, 
of local authorship, bears every earmark 
of duplicating its New Turk success. 

"The Princess Pat," from the pens of 
Herbert and Blossom, responsible for many 
other successes along the musical order, 
came to the Garc-iek, last night, replacing 
Lew Fields in "Step This Way." It seems 
to have fulfilled all the nice things that 
were said about it before the offering came 
to town. Venita Fitshugh, Oscar Pigman, 
AI Shean, Alexander Clark, Louis Casa- 
vant, David Quiiano and Martin Hayden 
unfold the story told by words and music. 

Oct 8— "My Home Town Girl," a musi- 
cal comedy with John Hyama, Leila Mc- 
Intyre, Eda von Luke and Alma Toulin in 
the cast, will begin an engagement of three 
weeks at the Auditorium. 

Oct 9 — The Playhouse, formerly known 
as the Fine Arts Theatre, will resume with 
a comedy, "Where the Booster Crows," by 
(Miss) A. N. Banee as the dedicatory at- 
traction. Geoffrey C. Stein, Mary Mallon, 
Viola Beach, Mildred Barrett and John 
Marble will be in the cast 

Oct. 11 — Burton Holmes will begin his 
season of travelogues at Orchestra Hall, 
where he will be heard on Wednesday and 
Friday nights and Saturday afternoons for 
five weeks. His five subjects will be "Can- 
ada from Coast to Coast" "The Canadian 
Rockies," "Imperial Britain," "The German 
Fatherland" and "La Belle France." 

Oct 15— "Alone at Last" a Viennese 
operetta, with music by Franc Lehar, com- 
poser of "The Merry Widow" and "Gypsy 
Love," will come to the IllinoU, with Harry 
Conor. Stella Norelle. Forrest Huff and 
Fritzi von Busing. 

Oct 16--Jobn Galsworthy's "Justice," 
with John Barrymore, O. P. Heggie, Whit- 
ford Kane and Bertha Mann acting it, 



will begin an engagement at Powers'. 

Oct. 17 — "Mary Broome," an English 
tragi-comedy by Allan Monkhouae, will be 
produced at the Little Theatre, opening the 
season there. 

Nov. 6 — The Theatre de la Renaissance 
Francaise will begin its career at The Play- 
house with Gustave Rolland as director, 
Raymond Faure as artistic director and a 
company recruited from the leading Paris 
theatres. 

Nov. 13 — "The Boomerang," a light com- 
edy by WincbeB Smith and Victor Mapes, 
will come to Powers' with Arthur Byron, 
Wallace Eddinger, Martha Hedman and 
Ruth Shepley. 



Cohan's Grand (Harry Ridings, mgr.) 
"The Great Lover," with Leo Ditrichstein, 
first week. 

Black stone (Edwin Wapler, mgr.) — 
Thomas W. Ross and Maclyn Arbuckle in 
"What's Tour Husband Doing?" second 
week. 



Harmony Notes 



ELAINE DE SELLEM, of the Boston 
English Grand Opera Co., wrote E. Clin- 
ton Keithley, professional manager of the 
McKinley Music Co., a letter, from Des 
Moines, in which she declared "When 
Shadows Fall" (which Miss De Sellem uses 
in the opera "Martha") gets as big a hand 
as does "He Last Rose of Summer," which 
has always been the standard applause win- 
ner of the opera. 

ROCCO VOCCO has his mind centered 
upon out of the ordinary accomplishments. 
When B. F. Bltner, Feist's general mana- 
ger, came to Chicago, he was surprised to 
notice a thirty foot banner in front of the 
Kreage 5 and 10 cent store, on Sate Street 
bearing two hit titles— "Ireland Must Be 
Heaven" and "There's a Little Bit of Bad 
in Every Good Little Girl." The last men- 
tioned song has proved a sensational coun- 
ter number in the West. 

JACK FROST has invested the major 
portion of recent earnings from song writing 
in patents controlled by his father. 

CLARENCE JONES, the colored com- 
poser, declares he is working on some new 
ideas that will prove better sellers than 
"One Wonderful Night" 

ELSIE MEYEBSON is still composing 
popular ditties, though more of them find 
their way into vaudeville acts than are re- 
leased under publishers* imprints. 

JEROME H. REMICK'S Chicago office, 
spurred by last season's exceptional success, 
has started working on a fine batch of new 
numbers which the boys are determined to 
put over for solid hits. 

WILL ROSSITER is still working hard 
on "WaBrin' the Dog." 



Song weeks — that is, a given week dedi- 
cated to a certain song — have become quite 
the vogue with music publishers lately. 
The surprising success of "Pretty Baby" 
has led J. H. Remick & Co. to can the 
week of Oct 9 "Pretty Baby" week. Chi- 
cago Manager Harry Worth an hag gent an 
appeal broadcast asking orchestra leaders 
to use the number as an exit march during 
this week. 



VAUDEVILLEjIN 

CHICAGO NOT 

ACTIVE 



MARKED SCARCITY OF NEW ACTS 



Chicago vaudeville seems somewhat list- 
less. The early season activity has worn 
off, and the established agencies are "rest- 
ing on their oars," the receding tide of the 
strike scare finding them burdened with 
many eleventh-hour acta that cannot be 
placed readily. Big-time booking is chiefly 
repetition, as about seventy-five per cent 
of the acts shown at the leading theatres 
were seen in previous years, though some 
of them have been induced to replace time- 
worn material. 

The best show that played the Avenue 
Theatre in the past year was opened by 
Richard Wally and company, the past week, 
with his juggling act. Wally does impos- 
sible feats with the billard balls, reminding 
one a great deal of "Kara." His is an ideal 
op ning act. 

Ray Snow was a big hit with bis polite 
monologue. He was on too early and ahould 
have exchanged position.) with Clark and 
McCnllough. 

Those Five Girls offered one of vaude- 
ville's daintest offerings with their musical, 
singing and dancing specialties. The girla 
are all good looking and are fine performers, 
one of the girls being an exceptional artist. 

Clark and McCnllough, with their very 
rough comedy and parodies, pleased. Great 
Tilford and company, with his ventriloquial 
offering is a credit to small time. Why the 
big time, looking for novelties,' overlooks 

this act ia hard to understand. He makes 

a splendid appearance, besides possessing a 
fine singing voice. 

McVieker'a vaudeville bill is headlined 
by "All Aboard," a musical comedy of 
short length, featuring Jack Ellsworth & 
Bob Harmon, with six scenic changes. 
Fred Hildenbrand, the elongated comedian, 
is on the bill, and Mosa & Fry present a 
black-faced act of sense and nonsense. The 
Manhattan Trio offer popular songs and 
the McDonald Trio are cyclists of skill. 
Fred Eckhoff & Anna Gordon present a 
comedy act, and the London Bell Ringers 
offer their novelty. The Four Whatt Girls 
are melodious and interesting. 

Ray Samuels and James J. Corbett on 
same bill was reason for capacity audi- 
ence Monday afternoon. Bill did not be- 
gin until two-thirty, probably because 
Donov; a and Lee slated for spot two, dis- 
appointed. 

Three Bobs, three men and exceptional- 
ly clever dog not mentioned in pro- 
gramme perform juggling stunts with 
clubs. 

Conlin and Parks Trio, two boys and 
girl, got laughs with comedy piano stunts 
and singing eleven minutes in one. 

Orville Harrold made splendid impres- 
sion singing standard and popular num- 
bers in high class style with rich tenor 
voice. Splendid reception. 

James J. Corbett told same good gaga he 
used when last seen here, but they all 



went over splendidly. His footlight per- 
sonality ia superb. 

Royal Bal-Alaka Band of weird Hus- 
sion string instruments, played by nine 
musicians under director's eye, made novel 
and interesting closing number. 

Smith and Austin did so well with 
their comedy conglomeration that every- 
body wondered why they were put so 
close to opening as all their antics scored 
laughs. Their finish showing fake art 
and singing stunt followed by xylophone 
playing also faked, waa terrific. Young 
lady with youthful voice and new ap- 
pearance, assisted. Fifteen minutes filled 
with fun. 

Harry Bereaford, supported by boy and 
girl, haa somewhat long drawn out sketch 
showing youthful romance's effect on old 
man. Nice scenery and good acting. 

Raymond Samuels, Chicago's own prod- 
uct, sang herself into the hearts of the 
audience with inimitable character work. 



News Briefs 



COLLIN VARREY, an old-time actor, 
waa taken to the Elgin State Asylum for 
the insane, last week. Worry, brought oa 
by a succession of misfortunes, unbalanced 
his mind. His wife U in Chicago, penni- 
less. 

FRANK Q. DOYLE moved into a more 
pretentious suite, laat week, as the rash of 
business of the many allied circuits mad* it 
impossible to trantact everything in the 
space originally Intended for J. C. Mat- 
thews, alone. Additional space adjoining 
was secured and Frank now has a suite 
almost as elaborate as the one he deserted 
on the lower floor in order to get near 
Matthews. 

MICHIGAN AVENUE ia now a regular 
movie centre. For a long time the public 
waa indifferent to the many beautiful thea- 
tres, formerly legitimate nouses, which bad 
been converted to moving picture policies. 
But the managements secured so many ex- 
ceptional features that their efforts have 
been rewarded, finally, by splendid patron- 
age. 

FRANCES MCHENRY and her husband 
(who heads the Imperial Trio) have so 
arranged their bookings that they play the 
same dates simultaneously, although each 
haa a separate and distinct act on a five 
act bin. It isn't often that married people 
in vaudeville can solve the problem of keep- 
ing together so easily, when they're engaged 
with different acts. 

Frank A. P. Gaszolo is planning several 
editions of "The Katzenjaromer Kids," now 
in the process of production— one for the 
International Circuit the others for one- 
night stands. It will be a bright and breezy 
musical comedy. 

Jones. Linick 4 Schaefer will move Into 
their new Rialto theatre office early in De- 
cember. 

CamiBe D'Arcy, formerly a melodramic 
star, frequently seen at Chicago's West-aide 
theatres, but more recently identified with 
Essanay photoplays (as she withdrew from 
the regular stage since marrying Dr. Lorin 
Wilder) died last week from an infection 
caused by lake-water contamination — the 
theory being that she swallowed polluted 
water while swimming. ... 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 




TANGO QUEENS GIVE 
INTERESTING SHOW 
AT THE OLYMPIC 

Tom Coyne is featured with this pro- 
duction, and at the Olympic, New York, 
last week, lived up to his reputation for 
furnishing comedy. As Clancy, be proved 
an all round good fellow, always ready for 
a fark in "A Night at the Bath," and as 
Dougherty in "The Girl with the Golden 
Calf," with enough ginger thrown in to 
make it interesting to the large audiences. 

Bob Spencer's character was a cross be- 
tween Hebrew and Dutch, and he was a 
suitable "butt" for Clancys pleasantries. 

Frank Martin played the straight, in 
noisy manner, in keeping with the rest of 
the male cast. He also did an Italian and 
other' characters, getting a number of en- 
cores for his "Garden in Italy" number. 

Milton Frankford and Jack Cunningham 
filled in. 

Grace Lewis was a buxom leading lady, 
long on voice and looks; Beatrice Lovera 
was an adventuress of the French type, 
and Dollie Wilson disported herself in 
manner becoming a soubrette, with swish- 
ing skirt, and anxious to display her form. 
Mabel Deckhard was roled as a cabaretist. 

The chorus included Elinor Taylor, Flos- 
sie Davis, Beatrice York, Hazel Calvert, 
Lily Bobson, Violet Bobson, Minnie Coul- 
burn, La Vina Harrison, Jill Edison, Vir- 
ginia Thompson, Hattie Dean, Etta Rogers, 
Dot Ryan. Flo King, Mabel Frankford, 
Anna Jackson. 

The comedy bits of note were the wire- 
less telephone booth, wherein Tom Coyne 
was rocked energetically by Ms partner 
and irate customer; the names on the 
stockings of ladies, and a thin party on 
stilts. 

The numbers included: "Nashville," by 
Miss Lovera; "To Get to New Orleans," 
by Dottie Wilson; "Galloping Horse," by 
Miss Lewis; "Sweetest Girl in Monterey," 
by Frank Martin; "Ragtime Trombone," 
by Miss Wilson; "The Army Blues," by 
Ethel Green; "You Can't Get Away from 
Me," "Land of Old Black Joe," "On the 
Sonth Sea Isle," Honest Injunj" "Mili- 
tary Maids," "Piccolo," "Welcome to You 
Old Plantation Home," "Honolulu Blues," 
. and "Love and Temptation," by Miss Lo- 
vera and Jack Cunningham. 

The olio presented Frank Martin and 
Mflt Frankford in a singing and piano act. 
Mr. Frankford's playing and dancing was 
especially well liked. 

Jack Dempsey and Beatrice Lovera en- 
tertained, Miss Lovera appearing first in a 
richly spangled onion suit, then in a ballet 
dress for a series of excellent toe dances, 
•ind finally in Scotch kilts for a jolly High- 
land fling. Mr. Dempsey acted eccentric 
bits, and did some acrobatic and novelty 
dancing. 

The Spencer Trio, a lady and two men, 
talked, sang and comedied for an enjoyable 
spell. 

Mile. Devere, assisted by Frank Martin, 
did a dramatic pantomime, with the climax 
of having her pose in the nearly altogether, 
and the killing of the artist by her hus- 
band. 



PRAISE FOR AL REEVES 

Al Reeves was accorded great praise by 
the Hoboken papers during the engage- 
men there last week of his Beauty Show. 
The Observer, speaking of him, and it 
said: 

"Al Beeves' Beauty Show has long 
since attained a fame that is widespread, 
and in Hoboken be has a host of admirers 
who always foregather to give him a hearty 
welcome. It is sufficient to say that the 
show this year is bigger and better than 
last year's. There is a great deal of new 
business introduced, and some of the spe- 
cialties are as fine as any at present show- 
ing at the high class vaudeville houses. It 
speaks volumes for this famous manager 
that he is able to get so many talented 
artists together each year, and the public 
have long since come to recognize this 
fact" 



WRESTLING A HIT 

"Spiegel's Revue" was an especially 
well liked attraction at the Miner's, Bronx, 
last week, according to local reports. 
Bill Mossey and Harry Crawford led the 
tun. 

The wrestling matches on Friday nights 
are drawing big, as local talent in that 
line has been arranged for by Manager 
George Miner. 



SUNDAY SHOWS AT WASHINGTON 

Washington, Sept. 30. — Sunday open- 
ings now being in order, "Puss Puss" had 
two sell outs, Sept 24. Business was good 
the entire week. Sunday performances 
were formerly given without shift of scenery 
or short skirts, but the show is presented 
under the new order. 



CHICAGO OBJECTS SOME 

Certain papers in Chicago have recently 
taken up the matter of a crusade, insti- 
tuted by members of a religious society, 
against one of the American Wheel bur- 
lesque houses in that city, which has been 
catering to lady audiences. No action baa 
been taken by the authorities, and steps 
are being taken by the circuit officers, in- 
vestigating whether there was any just 
cause for complaint. 



DALY'S NOT LEASED 

Daly's Theatre is still being reported 
leaded to this or that producer for bur- 
lesque, but nothing definite has been done 
by any of the men who are said to have 
closed Tor it. 

Among the latter are Walter Rosen- 
berg, but when asked about the matter, 
he said nothing had been done. In fact, 
despite the reports, it is doubtful if a 
license to give burlesque at Daljrs could 
be obtained, for the reputation it has es- 
tablished in the past when giving that 
form of entertainment has made the city 
officials rather hesitant about letting any- 
one have it for that purpose again. 



Bennie and Roxburgh are this week at 
the Coliseum, Portsmouth. 



BURLESQUE GIRL MARRIES 

Helen Bourie, a spry "pony" with Uncle 
Sam's Belles, married Jack Dribbs, the 
wrestler. They are spending their honey- 
moon with the show. 



THE BIG SHOW 

ONLY FAIR; COMEDY 
BELOW STANDARD 

Fred Irwin's aggregation reached The 
Columbia, New York, on Monday in 
rather bad shape, one of the comedians 
having joined but recently. 

Frank Stanley as the Hebrew comedian 
and Boy Gordon as the eccentric com- 
edian, who are depended upon for the 
comedy element, seemed to feel awed by 
their New York appearance. 

The first act was fairly well presented 
and the numbers went over, but towards 
the end of the burlesque the comedy weak- 
ened perceptibly, as put on by the two 
comedians, who appeared as girls in the 
Seminary. 

George Gould, George Wang, Nat Na- 
zarro and Jean Nazarro filled in the other 
roles. 

Jean Leonard looked well in fights and 
led several numbers. 

Virginia Irwin played the Seminary 
principal. The Sherlock girls worked 
well, especially in the "South Sea Isle" 
number which got several encores. 

Queenie Happy, who also assists the 
Nazarro Trio served in several capacities 
and Patsy O'Brien was honored with a 
line in the cast. 

"Love a Piano": "Eyes": "Not That 
Kind of a Girl"; "Sunshine of Your 
Smile"; "Lout of Kelly"; a cello, violin 
and piano trio and the "Dixieland" finale 
led by Little Nazarro were successful 
numbers. 

"The Cadet March" and "Mississippi 
Days" and "Good Little Girl" were on. 
in the burlesque. 

The olio on Monday evening had the 
Sherlock Sisters in several catchy selec- 
tions well sung and also contributed a 
nifty little dance. 

The Beynolds Trio, two clever little girls 
and the man sang "Black Sheep," "Danger- 
ous Girl" and did a comedy disappearing 

act. 

Nat Nazarro and Co. are well known 
for their acrobatic act and presented their 
rapid work in the usual style, assisted by 
the lady. The little fellow in his hand 
balancing feat gained big applause, also 
the medium sized tumbler. 

The costumes for the entire show were 
very striking, being original in design and 
in color scheme. 

A novel opening was the appearance of 
the girl's heads through haystacks with 
the curtain raised slightly. 

Several changes are scheduled for the 
bill at an early day. 



CAMDEN FOR AMERICANS 

' The American Burlesque Circuit has ar- 
ranged to open at Camden, N. J., on Oct. 
9 with "The September Morning Glories." 
The shows will go from the Gaiety, Phila- 
delphia, to Camden, three days; Trenton, 
N. J., three days; South Bethlehem, Pa.; 
East on. Pa-; Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and the 
Star, Brooklyn. 



BURLESQUERS ENTERTAINED 

Rochesteb, N. Y., Sept. 30. — The week 
spent here was one of pleasure for Dan 
Coleman and Harry Hastings' Big Show, 
for tbe Bartenders Union, Local No. 171, 
entertained them at a banquet. Mr. Cole- 
man was made an honorary member of the 
union. Later the members of Harry Hast- 
ings' Big Show celebrated Mr. and Mrs. 
Coleman's twelfth wedding anniversary 
and presented them with a silver loving 
cup. 



BURLESQUERS WED 

Philadelphia, Sept 30.— Charles Smith 
and Reba Dickinson, members of the Sight- 
seers' burlesque show, appearing at the 
People's Theatre here, recently were mar- 
ried in the City Hall. 

The ceremony was performed by Magis- 
trate Pennock. The happy couple were 
given a big reception by their colleagues 
after the wedding. 



NO MIDNIGHT SHOW 

Billy Watson will not give a midnight 
show. If he sells out twice at the Star 
and Garter he is satisfied, and will rest 
instead of giving the third show. 



GERARD IS HUNTING 

Barney Gerard is on a hunting trip with 
Andy Gardner' in the Adirondacks. He is 
in good health and will auto to Syracuse 
to see the "Follies"; then to Toronto to 
see "Some Show";' thence to Philadelphia 
to see the "Americans." 



HAS BIG WEEK 

Jack Singer's Show put in a very profita- 
ble week at Hurtig and Seamons. Kelly, 
Hascall and TenBrooke are going fine. 



Irene Metta has joined the "Hello 
Paris" Company in place of Beatrice Darl- 
ing. 



THEATRICAL WORKERS 
PLAN CELEBRATION 

Twenty-Fifth Anniversary of Brooklyn 

Lodge No. 30 Will Occur Next Sunday 

Evening at tbe Imperial Hall. 

Theatrical workers of Brooklyn and vicin- 
ity, with their families and friends, will 
gather in greater numbers than the borough 
has ever seen before on Sunday evening 
next,' Oct 8, to celebrate the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of Brooklyn Lodge, No. 30, 
Theatrical Mechanical Association. The 
lodge is one of the largest and most pros- 
perous of tbe more than 100 lodges of the 
T. M . A., and it is sparing no pains nor 
trouble to make its silver jubilee a notable 
affair. The celebration will be held at the 
Imperial, Fulton Street and Red. Hook 
Lane. 

Most of the managers of the Brooklyn 
theatres are members of tbe lodge and will 
be in attendance. The others have been 
specially invited, as have some Manhattan 
managers and agents. Invitations have 
sent to tbe actors and actresses who have 
helped the lodge at its benefit performances, 
and delegations will attend from the New 
York, Newark, Jersey City, Pateraon, As- 
bury Park and Philadelphia lodges. It is 
also hoped to. have some of the grand offi- 
cers, present Dinners and souvenirs . have 
been provided for an attendance of 1,000. 



October 7. 1916 THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 15 



PRODUCERS *» SINGERS! 

10 Leading Song Successes of the Day 



™, "AND THEY CALLED IT DIXIELAND 



55 

RADFORD and WHITING The "surest fire" song hit in the country 



"UNDERNEATH THE STARS" 



Hit No. 
2 

BROWN-SPENCER The most popular song and Fox-trot of the year 



"V "Down Honolulu Way' 

DEMPSEY-BURKE-BURTNETT 
That haunting melody you're hearing everywhere you go 



■V "In Old Brazil" 

A new song hy Spencer and Brown and 
a positive hit 



■V* "MEMORIES" 

KAHN-VAN ALSTYNE-LITTLE 
. The ballad beautiful 



Hit No. 



"Come Back to Arizona'' 

BRYAN and PALEY 
As popular as "The Sweetest Girl in Monterey" 



■v "ON THE OLD DOMINION LINE" 

BOTSFORD-HAVEZ A great fast song by the writers of "Sailing Down the Chesapeake Bay" 



■v MAMMY'S LITTLE COAL BLACK ROSE" 

WHITING -and EGAN A wonderful new song by the writers of "They Called It Dixieland" 



-v-MUST A WORD of SYMPATHY" 

KAHN-VAN ALSTYNE A brand new ballad, but one that we say will be another "Memories" and "When I Was a Dreamer" 

■v "ON LAKE CHAMPLAIN" 

BRYAN-GUMBLE One of the most beautiful ballads' we have ever published 



The Big Song Hit in Two of the Biggest Musical Productions in America — from the House of "Remick" 

"PRETTY BABY" 

By KAHN-VAN ALSTYNE-J ACKSON 

"PASSING SHOW OF 1916" "A WORLD OF PLEASURE" 

RESTRICTED! 



JEROME H. REMICK & CO. 

137 West Fort St. 219 West 46th St. Majestic Theatre BIdg. 228 Trement St. 906 Market St. 

Detroit New York Chicago Boston San Francisco 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



VMUBEWIi 




U. B.O. 

CIRCUIT 

HEW YOB K CITY. 

Colonial. 

Bradley * Ardlne 
Kltamara Japs 
Tempest A Sunshine 
Geo- Kelly ft Co. 

Kurtia' Boosters 

KoyaL 

GIlMoa ft Guinan 
Coco* ft Albert! 
Moon * Hssrer 
Frank A Toby 
Monobola Sextette 
Yanderbllt A Moon 

itao 

AJhamba. 

frank Le Seat 
Dugan * Raymond 
PanseBo Sletera 
Marian's Doge 
World Dancers 
Jewell Power* ft Co. 
Osmllls's Birds 

Bushwicfc (BUn.) 

Maria La' 
"Prosperity" 
Alexander Bra*. 
Claremont Bros. 
"Age of Reason" 
Phlna ft Plx 
Gus Edwards * Co. 
DeTtne ft WllUsms 
Vinton A Boater 

Orpheum (3kh.) 

UnDbtn Slsten 
Wstson Stater* 
Arthur Deagoa 
Dong Foog Que ft B»w 
Gasman] Trie 
Morton ft Moore 
Jea. J. Morton 

ATLANTA, A. 
Fonjth. 

Mrs. Tboe. Whlffse 
"Welti Dream" 
Walters ft Welter. 




Adams 'ft Murray 
EUnore A Carlton 
Rosbanar 
"Vacuum Cleanen" 

COLUMBUS, 0. 

Keith's. 

Minnie Allen 
Kerr A Weaton 
Valerie Bergen ft Co. 

Uereditn ft Scooter 
Stuart Barnes 
EmxieOMQ Poo 

DAYTON, 0. 
Keith's. 

Bob Albright 
Dooley ft Bogel 
Men Bros. 
Jordan Trio 
Edwin George 
Keens A Mortimer 

DETROIT. 

Temple. 

La Argentins 
Herbert's Dogs 
Schooler ft Dickinson 
WUlla Solar 
Smith ft Austin 
Gene Adair ft Co. 

EETE , PA. 

Colonial 

Pepplno ft Perry 

■tut Collin* 

Keno. Keys ft Melross 

••Wbst Happened to E" 

frank Shields 

Howard ft Clark 

GRAND RAPIDS. 

Empress, 

Harris * Manioc 
Wlnasnm S t ale r ft 00. 
Harry Bcresf ord Co. 
BIsob City roar 

HAMILTON, OUT. 
Temple. 

Dorothy Begs] ft Co. 
Ketches ft C h to tsm 
Donald Roberts 
Kane Bros. 
The Craspa 
Schrode * Mnlrey 

INDIANAPOLIS. 

QsjasjA, 
"Forty Winki" 



Dotty ft Daisy 
Althoff Children 
Lockrtt ft Waldron 
Arellng ft Lloyd 

PHILADELPHIA. 

Keith's. 

laabelle D'Artnosd 
Maud Mailer 
Great Howard 
Joe Futon ft Co. 
Harry Cooper 
Cflccollnl • 

PITTSBURGH. 

Davis. 

Mildred Mseomber 
Tie C inert 
Geo. -Lyons 

RICHMOND, VA. 

ColoniftL 

First Half 
Jonea ft Sylrester 

Last Half 
Clara Howard 

Flore tte 

ROCHESTER, H. Y. 

Temple. 

Frank Crnmlt 
Three Btanos 
Harry Fern ft Co. 
Lew Dockstader 
Olympic Trio 
Tonry ft Norman 

SAVANNAH, G A. 
First Half 
Musical Johnstons 
Lorraine * Cameron 
Geo. N. BoscBer 
Last Half 
Cum eon ft Baldwin 
Email 's Monkeys 
Bare boo ft Groha 
VloUnaky 

TOLEDO, 0. 

Keith's. 

Palfrey. Hall ft Brown 

Yalmoot ft Beynan 
Meal Trarera ft Co. 
'Those FITS Girls" 
Tower A DarreU 
Chock Hill 

Hoey ft Lea 



DENVER. 
Orpheum. 

Areo Bras. 
Dan. P. Casey 
Fred ft Bra Mosart 
Cooper ft Smith 
Brier ft King 
Caxtmell ft Harrla 
OUtct ft Olp 

DULUTH. 

Orpheum. 

Sarah Paddea ft Go. 

Raymond ft Carerly 

Werner Amoros Troope 

Lelptl* 

"Girl In the Moon" 

The Brighton* 

Claire Rochester 

DES MOINES. 
Orpheum, 

Carroll ft Wheaton 
Leo Zsrrell Trio 
Harry Holman ft Co. 
G. Aldo K. Andegger 
Bockwrn ft Wood 
Stone & Kalles 

Six Water Llllea 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Orpheum. 

BankoS * Girlie 
"Might Hare Beans" 
Fay. Two Coleys ft Fay 
MeLaTJen ft Carson 
Albright ft Bodoiri 
Bobble Gordone 
Spencer * Williams 

LOS ANGELES. 

Orpheum. 

J. C. Lewis ft Co. 

WUlard . . 

"Old Time Darkles" 
Alan Brooks ft Co. 
Gordon 'ft Biea 
Al ft Fannie Bteadman 
Hans Uane ft Glrla 

LINCOLN. 

• - Orphoiiju. 

Roensy ft Bent 



Girls 
. Lewis 

NeBta T. Nichols 
BIRMINGHAM, 
Lyrfe. 

rtrtt Hatf 

Ckss. Xenon 
■tea* ft Hayes 

ft Douglas 
Bait 

Meatrasa 
ualB ft Tala 

BUTTALO, M. T. 



t CtFlar ft C*. 

Lusomt's Coerbays 
av ft 



BALTTMOM 
MajtU**. 



Parian A Pert 
•Ttre or Cl a s s " 
T isaa; rr««Wrl 

ttftstbi Aaarta O a. 
CHARLESTON, 8. C 

First Half 

La Paterles ft 0*. 




Casts. Mack ft Co. 

CHATTANOOGA. 

Keith's. 

Last Hair 



CTNCINNATL 

Keith's, 

Harry B. Latter 
Tstsa ft Wbaelsr 

Tall man 



Two Bloody! 
Adelaide ft Hackee 

CLEVELAND. 

Keith's. 
Bert HssIob 



Jan, Carson ft Co. 
Togtn ft Genera 
Clark ft Verdi 
purer ft Douglas 

JACKSONVILLE. 

Pint Half 

._ ft Baldwin 

Btsrett's ktoakaya 
Seeaben ft Groha 
VSettasky 

Last Hair 
Lorraine ft Cameron 
Musical JobnstOBS 
Geo. N. Baeeaar 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 
Bijou. 
First Half 
'"Th* Oetopoa" 
Marie Stoddard 

LOUISVILLE. 

Keith's. 

Das Clayton ft Co. 
Baker ft Janlo 
CUEord Walker 
Two Tom Boys 
Mssts Ktns ft Co. 
■ddle ft Bsmsdes 
AkI Troope 
MONTREAL, CAN. 

OTpheum. 

Barley ft Barley 
Dancing LeVtn 
Hsnttng ft Francis 
Act Baaattfal 
Arthur SalUraa ft Oa. 

NORFOLK, VA. 

ColftBJsl. 
First Half 
Olara Howard 

wtor * tu „ .- 
Last Half 
Jooce ft 8yrreeter 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Princes*. 

First Half 
Jasper 

Violet McMillan 
Antrim ft Vs> 

Last Half 
Jasper 

Stone ft Hayes 
Sampson A Dooc.Ua 

PROVIDENCE. 

Keith's. 

J. a N afoot ft Co. 
Nat 



Haacar ft Goodwin 

TORONTO, CAN. 
She*V 

Nan Halperm. . ■ 

Creasy ft Dayne 
Hopkins Aitell ft Co. 
Mirano Bros. 
DePsee Opera Co. 
Weber ft D lehl 
Valentine ft Bell 

WASHINGTON. 
Keith's. 
Haas Hanks 
Apdale'e aalmals 
Belle Storey 
G erard A Clark 
"Pour Hnsbsnds" 
Bdwta Ardea ft Co. 

YOTJNGSTOWN, O. 

Keith's. 
Harry oilfoll 

The DeMacos 
Hallea ft Poller 

Ben Deelcy A Co. 
yietar aferley ft Co. 

HoD ft Dnrkin 
Baa Eyas ft Co. 

ORPHEUM 

CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO. 
Majestic. 
SteDa Maybew 
Bobt. T. Haines ft Co. 
BtsB Btanley Trio 

Trorato 

OutSJllI The Great 
Lloyd ft Brlrt 
Llgntae* ft A JeaBB s st 
Elxxa ft Byan 
Carl Baeint ft Co. 

PftlftCB. 

Both St. Dents 



Duffy ft Lorense 
MeCooneU * Simpson 
Mme. Samlko ft Girts 
Three DnFbr Boys 

MINNEAPOLIS. 

Of pherfln. . 

"Dancing dm" 
Hallea A Coogan 

Jlaa * Betty Morgan 

Wilfred Clarke ft Co. 

Poor Head toga 
Maryland Singers 

MEMPHIS. 

OiySiCom. 

Eddie Leonard ft Co. 
Benlta ft Lew Hearn 
EnaaeLI ft Ward Co. 
Asaea ft Wlntnrop 
Bert Melrose 
Gladiators 

Vlnle Daby 

MILWAUKEE. 

OTpheum. 

Bessie Clayton ft Ob.' 
rranklya ArdeB ft Co. 
Loo Anger. 
Moore. Gardner ft Base 

Conlin ft Parks Trio 



Saerman ft Dttry 
Plllert ft Senebeld 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

OTpheum. 

Lenetta Slaters 
Fred ▼. Bowers ft Co. 
Walter Brower 
Helens Daria 
"Honor Thy Cbtldren-* 

ST. PAUL. 

Oipheuin. 

Ellia ft Bordool 
Geo. Howell ft Co. 
Mooo ft Morris 
Oantier't Toy Shop 
Imperial Chinese Trio 
Bert Lery 
Savoy ft Brennan 

SEATTLE. 

Orpheum. 

Morton ft Glass 
Scotch Lsds A Lassies 
Williams ft Wolfos 
Marshall Montgomery 
Brltt Wood 
Lanra Nelson Hall 

Francis ft Kennedy 

ST. LOUIS. 

Columbia. 

Lonlse Dresser 
Lew Doers fader 
Linian Kingsbury A Co. 
Primrose Foot 
Milton A DeLoor Srt. 
Harry Clarke 
The Meyakos 
Howard's Ponies 

SALT LAKE CITY. 

Orpheum. 

Mrs. Langlly 
The Sbarroeks 
Lydell ft Hbjgms - 
Dancing Kennedys 
Joseph Newman 
Partes ft Conwsy 
"Toe Bride Shoe" 
DeWltt, Bnma ft Tor 
Maod Lambert 
Ernest BlO 
Raymond Bond ft Co. 
Bernard ft Seartb 
Musical Geralds 

WINNIPEG, CAN. 

Orpheum. 

Sophie Tucker ft Co. 
Bleb ft Burt 
Cantwell A Walker 
Beeman * Anderson 
"Cran usiiiss" 
Bert Fltxclbbon 
Bath Badd 

LOEW~ 

CIRCUIT 

HEW YORK CITY. 

Americaju. 
Add Tsodenne BUIs .. 

Pint Half 
Math Bros. A Girlie 
Walton ft Delberg 
Qastos Palmer 
Kaufman A T ' w «— 
"Boys ft GtrU" 



The Volunteers 
Leo Bears 
Mary Gray 
May» ft Tally 
Martin ft rabrtai 
Bobble Gordons 

CALGARY, CAN. 

Orpheum. 

"Forest Fire" 

Ward Bros. 

Miller ft Vincent 

Kltaro Bros. 

Jeate Heather ft Co. 

McDesTlt, KeUy ft Locy 



Loo Holts 
The Seonsrrs 

HEW ORLEANS. 

Orpuemn. 

Taeo. Koslott ft Co. 

Lydia Barry 

Elsie Williams ft Co. 

Al Snsyoe 

Ptnl Gordoo 

MeSbayse ft Hathaway 

>**•**"» Bras, ft Bobby 

OMAHA. 

OTpheum. 

Lew Madden ft Oa. . . 
"Pwtrleoeta" . ^ 

■ytria Loyal ft Co. 
O. ft A. Parsdofaka 
Gomes Trto 

Mrs. Ltaft Hers ft Co. 
Glsrk ft Hamilton 
OAKLAND. 
OrpheuiiL. 

Bahttr Bisters 
Allen ft Howard 
Jseqnes Plntrel 
Webb ft Boms 
Demarest ft Oslastte 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

Chip ft Marble ,. 
Ortb ft Doolay 
Claire Vincent ft Co. 

Aleitnder MtcFayden 



Mr. and airs. N. PhlDlps 

Adams ft Guhl 
The Ki t te n 

Last Half 
Slnfar-Bsh ft Co. 
Snyder A May 
Frank Gahy ft Co. . 
TTiiHis ft Wmiams 
"Day at Ocean Beach" 
"What Molly Knew" 
Tbos. Potter Danne 
DsTsssio 

BoureTSxA 

First Half 
DeBr A Calanse 
Murphy ft Eeln 
Abbott ft White 
••School Dsrs" 

Last Half 
Math Brae..* Girlie 
Forrester ft Lloyd 
Nora Allen 

Mr. sad Mn. H. Philips 
Billy McDermott 

Delsmcew Street. 

First Half 
Snyder ft May 
Frank Gaby ft Co. 
Beed St. John Trio 
Billy McDermott 
Bobt. O'Connor ft Os. 
T.iuisn Watson. 
Standard Bros. 

Last Half 
The Halklnt 
Beatrice Diamond 
The Beynolds 
LsBay ft See moo 
Al Woblman ft Co. 
■•School Days" 
Theodore Trio 

Marie Russell 

Greeley SquAie. 

First Half 

Stereos ft BmneDe 
Archer ft Belford ■ 
Nora Allen 



"Her Honor, the Mayor" 
AX Woblman ft Co. 
Theodore Trio 

.Last Half 
Dale ft Boyle 
Daniels & Walters 
Frostnl 

Vessle Farrell ft Co. 
wnaoo Bros. 

Lincoln Square. 
Pint Half 
Gardner'a Msolacs 
Three Dolce Slaters 
Gray ft Graham 
Cblaholm ft Breen 
American Comedy Poor 
Jack Barnett 

Last Half 
Hesra A Butter 
Wlnchester A Clsre 
SteTSSt ft Brnselle 
Owen McGlroey 
Stelncr Trio 

National. 

Pint Half 
Edgar Berger ft Co. 
Dsnlels A Walters 
••Vice Verss* # 
Dare Thortby 
Bennett's Entertainers 

Last Half 
Gaston Palmer 
Walton A Derberg 
Arthur DeVoy ft Co. 
Geo. Yeomana 
Bennett's Entertainers 

Orpheum. 

Pint Half 

Hearn ft Better 
LeBoy ft Seamon 
Eeene ft WlUlama 
John O'Malley 
Jaa. ft Bonnie Thornton 
Francis Renault 
8infer-Bah ft Co. 
Last Half 
Bonble 81ms 
Lam ft Lota 
Archer ft Belford 
Burke A Harris 
Murphy ft Klein 
ju. A; Bonnie Thornton 
Jsek Bsrnett 
Dsnbar. Banrard ft D. 

Seventh Avenue. 

Tint Half 

Norton ft Noble 
Hawaiian Berlew 
Bertie FOwler 
E. B. CUre ft Co. 
Prosinl 
Stelncr Trio 

Last Half 
••Fireside Beesrle" 
as ssBtsBl ft Lillian 
Tracey ft Vlneent 
IBdawSfaj ft Breen 
John O'Malley 

f.1— Entertainers 

Bijou (Bkdn.). 

Pint Bait 
Martyn ft Florence 
Dale ft Boyle 
Porresler ft Lloyd 
"Tradition" 
"Bar at Ocean Beach" 

Last Half 
Dolly ft Catenae 
Carry ft Graham 
Three Dolce Sisters 
"Bors ft Girls" 
Adams ft Guhl 
Phillip! Four 

De Kalb (Bkla.). 
. First Half 
Hewitt ft Calame 
Herbert ft Dennis 
nisoss ft Brown 
Tessas FtrreU ft Co. 



Last Half 



Meehan ft Pood 
Three Lyres 
Fennell ft Tijou 
Tom Maboney 
Erelyn ft Dolly 

BOSTON. 

Orpheum. 

Pint Half . . 
Fred C. Thomas ft Co. 
Annie Kent ■ 

Sicilian Serenaden 
Patsy Doyle 
Wolgae A Girlie 

Last Half 
WHbor Sweatman 
CaL Oranm Packers 
Edah Deldridge Trio 
Snllj Family 
Burnt ft Kisses 

St. James. 

First Halt 
Wilbur Sweatman 
Ethel Mae Ball ft Co. 
Bums A TTIasm 
Conroy's Models 

- Lest Half 
Fred C. Thomas ft Co. 
Patsy Doyle 
Conroy's Models 

PALL RIVER. 
Bijou. 
Pint Half 
Harold Selman ft Co. 
Edah Deldridge Trio 
Csl. Orange Psekers 

Last Half 
Ethel Mae Hall ft Co. 
jtck Symonda • - 

Sicilian Sereoadere 

HOBOKEN, N. J. 
Lyrle. . , 

pint Half 
Holmes A BUey 
"What Molly Knew" 
George Yeomana 

Laat Half 
NEWARK, N. J. 

Majestic. 

First Hslf 
The Heltons 
Beed ft Wrlsht 
Bw a tshta a ft Tomer ■ -. 

Owen MeOlnwy 
Qoreoraa ft stack 
Pnnilel Pear 

Lsst Hslf 
Edgar Berter ft Os. 
Herbert A Deonla 
Lose ft Ward 
Phanpb leads : : 

Henry Prey 

HEW ROCHELLE. 
Loew's. 

Fixer Half 
Holdes ft Grthsm 
Onrry ft Graham 
Chinese Bntertslners 

Lsst Half J 

Ncrton ft Nosts 



Johnson ft Waus 
Dorothy Herman ft On. 
"Vies Versa" 
ABterlcaa Comedy Poor 
Pord ft Leslie 

Fnlten (Bkla.). 

First Ball . - 
Beatrice Diamond 
Winchester ft Clare 
Arthur DeYoy ft Co. 

Wilson Bros. * • A" 

i Last Half 
Hewitt A Calams 
Gny ft Grthsm 
B. B. area ft Co. 

Folsom ft Brown 

Palace (Skin,). 

First Half 
Rogers * Wood 
Long ft Ward 
Lottie Williams ft Co. 
Henry Frey 
Dnnoar, Banrard ft D. 

Last Half 
Dr. -Cook 

Beed St. John Trio 
••Her Honor, the Mayor" 
LUllsn Wstsoa 
Martyn A Florence 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
Hippodrome. 

Johnson ft Crane 

(CowJSMtwT 



Juliet Wood ft Co. 

PROVLDBHCE. 

BBaCrw. 
Pint ■Mf„ . 
Harry ft A. Torpla 
Sully Paaslly 
Jack Sjaonda 

Last Hslf ' ' 
Harold Selaua ft Cow " 
Annie Kent 
Wobrss ft Girlie 

TORONTO, CAN. 
YwBSa Street, - 

ToJetU ft Bexosett 
"OSsos Otrla" 
Gny ft KlbaUs 
Fred C Hagan ft Co. 

Armitroex ft Potd 
Banloe, Dean A n a nVa a ■ 

PANTAGES' 
CIRCUIT 

CALGARY. CAN. 

PftartftgeaX*. 

Batista 

Primrose Minstrels 
GUrey. Hayaea ft Moat. 
Lee ft Mae Jackson 
Weser ft Elliott 

DENVER, COLO. 
PanUges'. 

"Mldsdght Foillea" 
Poor Haley Slsttxa 
Warn. DeHonis ft Co. 
Geo. N. Brown ft Co. 
Sllber A North 
EDMONTON, CAN. 
Pantages'. 

"Mr. Uanumre" 
Three Keatons 
Isetta 

Sucker ft Winifred 
Burke ft Broderick-.. 

* parr 19.) 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



BIGGEST NOVELTY* 
SONG HIT 

THERE'S A 

LITTLE BIT 

OF BAD IN 

EVERY GOOD 

LITTLE 




.A SENSATIONAL KNOCKOUT 

BY 
GRANT CLARKE 

AND . 

FRED FISCHER. 



F^ANCK^i^ THE 

Z^%TSUPREME 
iTAGEsauar BALLAD HIT 

OF THE SEASON 

IRELAND 

MUST BE 

HEAVEN 

FOR MY 

MOTHER CAM! 

FROM THERI 

LYRIC BY . 
JOE M£CARTHV and 
HOWARD JOHNSON 

MUSIC BY 
FRED FISCHER 



||fcSK* 



THE MOST SUNG 

11 1FS0NG IN AMERICA' 



A X 



HITS 



ANEW 

NOVEL SONG 

WITH THE PUNCH 



YOU RE A 

DOGGONE 

DANGEROUS 

GIRL 




i 



THE 

SWEETEST 

MELODY 

OF 

ALL 




BY 
GRANT CLARKE 

AND 
JIMMIE MONACO, 



BY 



^^^^^5 



GRANT CLARKE 

AND 
JIMMIE MONACO 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 




LONDON AT A GLANCE 



London, Eng., Sept 28. 
Latest reports from Marie Lloyd are to 
the effect that she is slowly recovering 
from the nervous breakdown she suffered 
three weeks ago while playing the Pal- 
ladium. She only appeared one day, Mon- 
day, not two as some reports had it. On 
Tuesday she was too ill to play and was 
taken to her home at (Solder's Green the 
following Thursday, where she has since 
remained. Her condition is such that only 
her relatives and intimate friends are 
allowed to see her. 

Arthur Roberts has joined the cast of 
"Look Who's Here" at the London Opera 
House. 

In spite of the war it does seem aa 
though the usual number of theatres were 
open. The following is the list of current 
■bows at the virions bouses: Adelphi, 
"High Jinks"; Ambassador's, "Pell Mell"; 
Apollo, "Hobson'a Choice"; Belham Hip- 
podrome, "The Whip"; Brixton, "Within 
the Law"; Criterion, "A Little Bit of 
Fluff";. Croydon Hippodrome, "My Lady 
Frayle"; Dalaton, "Eliza Comes to Stay"; 
Daly's, "The Happy Day" ; Duke of York's, 
"Daddy Long Legs"; Elephant and Gastle, 
"A Factory Girl's Honour"; Garrick, "The 
Girl from CuoV; Globe, "Peg o' My 
Heart"; Hammersmith Kings, "Annie 
Laurie"; His Majesty a, "Chu-Chin-Chaw"; 
Kennington, "The Fatal Wedding"; Lon- 
don Opera House, "Look Who's Here"; 
Lyceum, "Woman and Wine"; Lyric, 
"Romance"; New, ^Her Husband's Wife"; 
Flay house, "The Misleading Lady"; Prince 
Of Wales, "Mr.' Manhattan"; Prince's,' 
"Broadway Jones"; Queen's, "Potash, and 
Perlmutter in'Society"; Savoy, "The Pro- 
fessor's Love Story"; Shaftesbury, "The 
Light Blues"; Strand, "The Rotters*';' 
Stratford Borough, "The Only Girl*?; 
StrntfonJ Royal, "The Girl Who" Went 
StrsiglitV; Vaudeville, "Some"; Wimble - 
doiji^borothy"; Woolwich Artillery, "To- 
NigS«Hbe Night"; Woolwich RojaL-'The 
Staj.v Alarm"; Wyndham'a, "The Old 



' 'the above, eleven are of American 
making and one, "Hobson's Choice," al- 
though written here, was first presented 
in the United States because no English 
manager thought it worthy of a produc- 
tion. Now, any one of them would be 
glad to have it. 

R. G. Enowles is successfully introduc- 
ing the American song "There's a Little 
Bit of Bad in Every Good Little Girl." 

Those two American, ecce nt ric dancers, 
Daly and Healey, were on the bill at a 
recent performance at Geo. Betser's Enfield 
Pavilion for the entertainment of wounded 
soldiers. 

The Gothams opened at the Granville, 
Walh&m Green, on Sept. 25. 

i 

A variety performance was given Sept 

21 at St- Dunatan's Hospital. Regent's 

Park, for the benefit of the Blinded Heroes 

Pond. 



The Mayfeir Agency has opened special 
concert and variety departments at its 
offices, 43 Dover street, Piccadilly, W. 

The cast of "The Best of Luck" at 
Drury Lane numbers thirty-three prin- 
cipals and a great number of extras. 
Among the well-known players are: 
Madge Titherage, Miss Fortescue, Edith 
Broad, Olga Lindo, Renee Mayer, Maud 
Hobson, Violet Blyth-Pratt, Langhome 
Burton, E. M. Hallard, John Campbell, 
John Ekins, James Leverett, Fred Knight 
and Robert Hale. 

It is announced that New York is to 
see "The Love Thief," under the manage- 
ment of the Shuberta. 

"We Are King," familiar to theatre- 
goers in the States as a Walker Whiteside 
production, is to be given a London 
presentation in November. 

Next Monday night Alfred Butt wiH 
present "The Clock Goes "Round" at the 
Globe. This week it is being given in the 
provinces. In the cast are Joseph Coyne, 
Lennox Pawle, Ruth Mackay, Mary 
Glynne and other well known players. "" • 

Charles Hawtrey is back in .townT- 

P. Champlin-Smith, Charles Hawtrey's 
manager, -who was granted a "two months' 
exemption by the Wandsworth Tribunal, 
is due to "go with the colors on*October 2. 

,. Wm. Armstrong, after a tworyears' en- 1 
gagement at the Liverpool Repertory The- 
atre, has been engaged by the Birmingham 
Repertory Co. 

The -.recent saving by Claude Edwards 
qf the life of a lady member of Maggie 
Morton's Co.. should bring him praise, as 
Mr. Edwards suffers from an injury to 
his right foot which the examining board 
." considered serious enough to exempt him 
from service. __ 

The Bath Players report good business 
since their opening three weeks since at 
the Palace, Redditch. 

. "Hobson's Choice" has passed its century 
mark at the Apollo, while "Mr. Manhat- 
tan" registered its two hundredth per- 
formance at the Prince of Wales two 
weeks ago. ___ 

We extend our hearty congratulations 
to Henry Arthur Jones who, on Septem- 
ber 20 celebrated the sixty-fifth anni- 
versary of his birth. 

Will Penman's Four Nibs are at the 
Picturedrome, Newark-on-Trent, this week 
and play the Empire, Mansfield, next week. 

Beatie and Bobs are in their second and 
last week at the Palladium. 

Silbon's Cats are on this week's bill at 
the Electric Theatre, Boston. 

Bert Enrol is at the Regent, Salford, 
this week. 



The Gaakells are this week in Oldham. 

Chester and Dottridge are playing the 
Empire, Barnsley. 

The Kavanaghs are this week in 
Plymouth. 

Norman Field is pleasing the audiences 
at the Tower, Morecombe, this week, with 
his "Frocks, Frills and Music." 

The Bradshawa are thia week at the 
Hippodrome, Airdrie. 

Connie Browning is on the bill at the 
Grand, Bolton, this -week. 

The four Chandons are this week at the 
Palace, Harwich. 

Savonne, the boy magician, is mystify- 
ing the audiences this week at the Cinema, 

Cinderf ord. 

"Frills and Fancies," this- week at the 
Hippodrome, Balham, next week-plays the 
' Hippodrome, Willesden. . _ 

- * * ... '• .* ___. . 

Tie Ifafcziang Manchn Troupe .is .play- 
ing the Empire, Holborn, this week.'- - — « ' 

Vona Clifford, at the Grand, ' Evesham; 
this week, will playthe Surrey next week. 

There- was a special meeting of the 
-Variety | Artistes' Benevolent Fund . and 
Institution, at the Trocadero on September 
28 .at noon. Frank Allen presided. 

The New Theatre at Oxford has re- 
opened. 

The .Punch Trio wiH. introduce their new 
comedy cycling act October 23 at the 
Empire, Finsbury Park. , 

Carl Hertz will bring his Indian Rope 
Trick to London for an .early presentation. 

The Roeeville Empire, Dartmouth, which 
has been closed for interior decorations, 
will reopen October 2 with high class 
vaudeville and pictures, under the man- 
agement of Will Hitt, who owns the house. 

The Four Black Diamonds are playing 
a month's engagement in Paris. Two. 
weeks at the Alhambra and two at the 
Olympia. 

Stage manager Jim Beswick, of the 
Blackpool Palace, has joined the colors. 

Flora and Alberta are booked for the 
Macnaughten Circuit and open shortly at 
the Palace, Halifax. 

Chirgwin, "the White Eyed Kaffir," is 
back in London after a. few weeks, on 
Burgh Island, Bigbury-on-Sea, Sooth 
Devon. 

Harry Baleon, the harmonious black- 
smith, is this week at the Palace, Llanelly. 



LONDON WANTS "FOLLIES" 

London, Oct 2. — Report has it that 
Albert De Courville is negotiating with 
Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr., to bring the entire 
production of "The Follies" to London. 

Mr. De Courville refused to affirm or 
deny the report when questioned, but looked 
very wise. It is the opinion here that "The 
Follies" would be a big hit with Londoners. 



AMERICAN SHOWS GAINING FAVOR 

London, Oct 1. — There is no question 
of the growing tendency of our public in 
favor of American shows. We have twelve 
with us now, and they are all accounted 
hits. 



CANCELS AMERICAN TOUR 

London, Oct L — Arthur Roberts has 
been secured by Oswald Stoll for "Look 
Who's Here." In order to accept the en- 
gagement he was obliged to cancel an 
American tour on the TJ. B. O. Time. 



MURIEL WINDOW RETURNING 
London, Sept 28.— Muriel Window has 
sailed for New York. She and her hus- 
band, Robert Emmet Keane, have been here 
since early Summer. Mr. Keane wiH re- 
main here. Miss Window is obliged to re- 
turn to fill engagements. 



PARISIAN PLAYS COMING 

Paris, France, Oct 2.— Carrie :V. King, 
who;, under the -name of Carrie Seivie, was 
for a number of years Paris correspondent 
for a New 'York daily,. sails this week from 
Bordeaux with the plays formerly done at 
the Grand GuignoL ' '" 

The American rights of these plays have 
been obtained for a new playhouse to be 
established in. New York. 



UNA C A VALIERI RETURNING 
Bordeaux, Sept. 30. — Mme. Lina Cava- 
lieri sailed from here today to join her hus- 
band, Lucien Muratore, in America. 



BERNHARDT SAILS 

Paris, Oct. 1. — Sarah Bernhardt sailed 
yesterday from Bordeaux for New York, 
for her American tour under Wm. F. Con- 
nor's direction. 



FRENCH COMPOSER SAILS 

Parts, « Oct 1. — Eugene d'Harcourt, a 
French composer and musician, sailed for 
New York yesterday. He will produce 
"Mors et Vita" at the Metropolitan Opera 
House on Nov. 14. This will be its first 
production in New York, although it was 
given in Brooklyn thirty years ago. 



John Cecil having closed his tour in 
"The Parish Pump" has returned to the 
Gaiety, Manchester, for the Fall season. 

R- D*Oyly Carte, proprietor of the 
D"Oyly Carte Opera Co., has been granted 
a four months' exemption by the West- 
minster Tribunal. 

Kenneth Douglas and C. E. Cobb have 
each been granted a four months' exemp- 
tion, conditional upon joining a V. T. C. 

Happy Atwood promises to bring his 
'The Pearl of the Orient" to London 
shortly. 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 




Wfe<&lk 



GREAT FALLS. 

Pantages'. 

(Oct. 10-11) . 
O'Neal * Wslmaley 
Perlera Sextette 
Barry Hlnes 
Adonis ft Dog 
Valerie Sister* 
KANSAS CITY, HO. 

Empress. 

W1TJ Morris 
Florence Ray-Held 
Dickenson * Deagon 
"Tn« Elopers" 
Lasar ft Dale 
Daren * Dtrrall 

LOS ANGELES. 

Pantage3*. 

"Night In The Park" 
Klmberly ft Arnold 
Harry Coleman 

Melody six 

Karl Emmy's Pets 

Stanley ft Panel! 

MOLLNE, ILL. 
• Family. 

First Halt 
Bell * Era 
Prank A Rose slack 

Stoddard ft Haines 

Reed ft Hudson 

Military Elephant* 
Last Hair 

Helen Rice ft Co. 
Dreano ft Goodwin 
Mabel Harper ft Co. 
Two to nn 

- OGDEN, D. 

Pontages'. 

"Brides of the Desert" 
Cameron ft O'Connor 
Ed BtondeU ft Co. 
Models DeLnxe 
Greene ft Parker 
Alex, ft Mand Ryan 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

Pontages'. 

Pirnlkoff Rose Ballet 
Lacier Trio 
Besnmoote ft Arnold 
Garclnetti Bros. 
Holmes ft Wells 
Clark's Hawaiian* 

PORTLAND, OSS. 

Pontages'. 

Henrietta DeSerris 
Benny ft Hazel Mann 
Slatko's RoUIckers 
Latoska 
Edna Ana: 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

Pontages'. 

Von Cello 
Maley ft Woods 
George Morton 
Norton ft Earl 
Alice Hamilton 
"That's My Horse" 
L. Anderson Players 

SALT LAKE, CITY. 

Pontages'. 

Six Kirksmlth sisters 
"DlTorce Question" 
Freeman ft Dunham 
Brooks ft Bowen 
Black ft White 

SEATTLE. 

Pantages'. 

"A Nut Sundae" 
Three Mori Bros. 
Clifford ft Mack 
Valentin* Vox 
Sherman, Van ft layman 

SPOKANE, WASH. 

Pantages". 

"Oh. The Women" 
James Grady ft Co. 
Ollie ft Johnnie Vanla 
■ Joe Quong Tal 
Warren, ft Templeton 

- . SAN FRANCISCO. 

Pontages'. 

"Sodety Buils" 
Welch, Nealey ft Mont. 
Creole Ragtime Band 
Claudia Coleman 
KartelU 

TACOMA, WASH. 
Pantages'. 

Wins Gilbert ft Co. 
Gsylord ft Lancton 
Era Shirley 
Keno A Green 
Long; Tack Sam 

VANCOUVER, CAN. 

Pantages'. 

Cblnko 

Ward at Faye 



Poor Benees 
Herbert Lloyd ft Co. 
Neal Abel 

VICTORIA, CAN. 

Pantages'. 

RIgoletto Bros. 
Great Lester 
Crawford ft Broderlck 
Three Bartos 
Nestor ft- Sweethearts 
Dooley ft Nelson 

WINNIPEG, CAN. 

Pontages'. 

The Bell Ringers 
oliTe Briscoe 
Betting Bettys 
Smith ft Kaufman 
Stance's Dogs 

INT. CIRCUIT 

AUSTIN, TEX. 

(Oct. 9-10) 
The Lerneds 
Bert ft Betty Wheeler 
No rcr nsa ft Co. 
Kenny ft Nobody 
New Producer 
Adler ft Arlina 
La Gradoaa 

DALLAS, TEX. 

Majestic 

Heras ft Preston 
Fred ft Adele Astalre 
Eddie Can- ft Co. 
Lilian Herleln 
Victor Morley * Co. 
Willing. Bentley ft W. 
S Stewart Slaters 

FT. WORTH, TEX. 
Byers. 
First Half 
Milch ft Martin 
Chauncey Monroe ft Co. 
Pearl Bros, ft Burns 
"Statues" 

Last Half 
Cnabot ft Dixon 

Swiss Song Birds 

Kane ft Herman 
Mosher, Hayes ft Moaner 

Majestic 

(Oct. 11-14) 
Flying Rnasells 
Joyce, West & Senna 
James Thompson 
Helen Lackaye ft Co. 
Adair ft Adelphl 
Ruby Cseelle ft Co. 

GALVESTON, TEX. 

G. 0. H. 

(Oct. 8-9) 
Tnscauo Brothers 
Elklns. Fay ft Elklns 
Fire Antwerp Girls 
Benses ft Bsird 
Homer Miles ft Co. 
Whiting ft Burt 
Bice, Solly ft Scott 

HOUSTON, TEX. 

Majestic. 

Honey Boy Minstrels 
Rita Mario 
Derklns Pantomime 
Helen Beresford 
Diane D'Aubrey 
Jan Bubsni 
Swann - ft Swann 

MUSKOGEE, OKLA. 
Broadway. 

Flying RnsseDa 
Joyce. West ft Senno 
James Thompson 

Helen Lackaye 

Adair ft Adelphl 
Ruby Carelle ft Co. 

OKLA. CITY, OKLA. 
Lyric 

First Half 
Teddy ft May 
Cbabot ft Dixon 
Swiss Song Birds 
Kane ft Herman 
Moaner. Hayes ft Moaber 

Last Half 
Zeda ft Hoot 
Howard Slaters 
Bay L. Boyoe 
Adroit Brothers 

ST. JOSEPH, MO. 

CrystaL 9 
First Half 
Virgil ft LeBlanche 
Bad ft Nellie Helm 
Gordon Bros, ft Kangaroo 
Majestic Four 

Last Half 
"The Tamer" 
Jaa, McDonald ft Co. 
Georgalls Trio 
Willie Brothers 



SAN ANTONIO, TEX 
Majestic 

Last Half 
Toscano Brothers 
Elklns, Fay ft Elklns 
Five Antwerp Girls 
Bensee ft Baird 
Homer Miles ft Co. 
Whiting ft Bart 
Bice, Sully & Scott 

TOPEKA, KAN. 
Novelty. 

First Half 
Bmllle Willie ft Co. 

Flo ft Allle Walters 
Hal Stephens 
Three Melrins 

Last Half 
Virgil ft LeBlanche 
Bud ft Nellie Helm 
Gordon Bros, ft Kangarod 
Majestic Four 

TULSA, OKLA. 

Empress. 

First Half 
Zeda ft Hoot 
Howard Sisters 
Ray L. Royce 
Adroit Brothers 

Lsst Half 
Belle Monte Sisters 
Harris ft Nagle 
Erans Llovd ft Co. 
Victoria Trio 
Bee Ho Gray 
Rio ft Normen 

WICHITA, KAN. 
Princess. 

First Half 
Bio ft Normen 
Harris ft Nagle 
Erans Lloyd ft Co. 
Victoria Four 
Belle Monte Sisters 

Last Half 
Dancing Mars 
Permatne 
Roth ft Roberts 
Prenes Circus 

POU CIRCUIT 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 
Pott's. 

First Half 
Claire ft Atwood 
Wm. Ebbs 
WU1 Morrisey ft Co. 

Last Half 
Barnon's Horses 
Holden ft Harnm 
Sam Llebert ft Co. 
Ray ft Gordon Dooley 
Bruce ft Coyne 

Plata. 

First Half 
Byron ft Dural 
Carson ft WlUard 
Ed ft Lottie Ford 
Last Half 
Savannah ft Georgia 
Kennedy ft Burt 

(Two To Fill) 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

Palace: 

First Half 
Asakl ft Co. 
Ward ft Wilson 
Julia Ring ft Co. 
Gold. Lawrence, Howard 
"Whirl of Song ft D." 

Last Half 
Vlrlan ft Arsentan 
Flaber ft Boekaway 
Dorothy Regal ft Co. 
slumlord ft Thomson 
Hall's Minstrels 

PoU's. 

First Half 
Delmore ft Moore 
Hilton ft Sheldon 
Vat/da * Brazilian Nuts 
Pinkie 

Last Half 
Hooper ft Barkholder 
Lewis Harrington ft Oo. 
Sid Lewis 
Welsh Minstrels 
(To Fill) 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 
Poll's. 

First Half 
Holden ft Harron 
Clem Reran ft Co. 
Bruce ft Coyne 
Bid Lewis 
Welsh Minstrels 

Last Half 
Claire ft Atwood 
.Byron ft Dural 
Ward ft Wilson 
Pinkie 

(To FIB) 

Bijou. 
First Half 
Barnon's Horses 
Hooper ft Barkholder 
Lewis Harrington ft Co. 
Arthur Lipsoa . 



Dana's "Fisher Folk" 

Last Half 
Armstrong ft Stroose 
Julia Ring ft Co. 
Ed ft Lottie Ford 
(Two to Fill) 

SPRINGFIELD, 
MASS. 
Palace. 

First Half 

Qneenle Dunedln 
Shorty Dewltt 
Robinson ft McShayne 
Spencer Charter ft Co. 
Kennedy ft Bart 
"Heart of s Thief- 
Last Half 
Msrdo ft Hunter 
Wm. Ebbs 
Del more ft Moore 
Fire HarmonleGlrls 
Carson ft Wiuard 
"Going Op" 

SCRANTON, PA. 
PoU's. 

First Half 
Daly ft Berlow 
Dorothy Mnether 
"Vice Versa", 
Handera ft Mlllss 
"Hello Honolulu" 

Last Half 
Wilson ft Larson 
Zeno ft Mindel 
Barry McCormlck ft Co. 
Ed Dowilng 
Lew Winder ft Co. 

WATERBURV, CT. 
PoU's. 

First Half 
Vlrlan ft Arsenlan 
Armstrong ft 8tronse 
Three Kelos 
Sam Llebert ft Co. 
Momford ft Thomson 
Fire Harmonic Girls 

Last Halt 
Qoeeole Donedln 
Shorty Dawttt 
Clem Bevan ft Co. 
Goldlng ft Keating 
Will Morrlseey ft Co. 
"Heart of a -Thief" 

WILKES-BARRE. 

PoU's. 

First Half 
Wilson ft Larson 
Zeno ft Mandel 
Barry McCormlck ft Co. 
Ed Dowilng 
Lew Linder ft Co. 

Last Half 
Daly ft Berlow 
Dorothy Mnether 
"Vice Versa" 
Handera ft Mlllas 

WORCESTER, MASS. 
PoU's. 

First Half 
Merle's Cockatoos 
Arthur Barrett 
Dorothy Regal ft Co. 
Goldlng ft Keating 
"Going Dp" 
Last to orer 

Last Half 
The Paynes 

Gold. Lawrence. Howard 
Spencer Charter ft Co. 
Arthur Llpson 
Dana's "Fisher Folk" 

Plan. 

First Half 
MardO ft Hunter 
Savanrah ft Georgis 
Fisher ft Boekaway 
Hall's Minstrels 

Last Half 
Asakl ft Co. 
Valyda ft Braxlllan Nuta 
"Boarding School Girls" 
(To Fill) 

S. & C CIRCT 

ATLANTA, GA. 
Piedmont. 

First Half 
Russell Sisters 

Ellna Gardner 
Le* ft Bennett 
Lssier Worth ft Co. 
Balph-Bayle ft Co. 
Last Half 
St. Julians 
Insplrstio Vlollnse 
Morton ft Baser 
Beatrice McKenxIe 
Van Atta ft Greesboa 

ABERDEEN, S. D. 
Bijou. 
First Half 
Elliott ft McGreevy 
Lyric Comedy Four 
"anion ft Lenxe 



BISMARCK, N. D. 
Grand. 

First Half 
20th Century Minstrels 
Woods. MelelUe ft PhlL 
Wilson ft Snyder 

CINCINNATI. 0. 
Empress. 

LaDell Slaters 
Wilbur ft Doll 
Clipper Trio 
Qulgg ft Nlckersoo 
Nat Fields ft Co. 

COLUMBUS, GA. 

Grand. 

Last Half 
Ererett ft White 
Lee ft Bennett 
LaMont ft Wright 
Bay A Ray 
Ralph-Bayle ft Co. 

DEVILS LAKE, N. D. 
Grand. 

Last Half 
Ogden ft Benson 

Elliott ft McGreevy 
MeAnllffe ft Pearson 

DICKINSON, N. D. 
Opera Honse. 

Last Half 
Kraft ft Myrtle 
Harma Trio 
Goldle ft Mack 

DETROIT. 

Miles. 

Apollo Trio 
Vincent ft DeXoble 
Penn City Trio 
Gypsy Meredith ft Co. 
Frank Gregory Troupe 
Frtgol 

FARGO, N. D. 
Grand. 

First Half 
Kraft ft Myrtle 
Harms Trio 
Goldle ft Msck 
"Is It Bight to Do 

Wrong T" 
Lyric Comedy Four 

Last Half 

20th Century Minstrels 
Woods, MelTllle ft PhlL 
Challls ft Lambert 
Cameron. Derltt ft Co. 
Wilson ft Snyder 

JANESVILLE, WIS. 

Apollo. 

Last Half 
Ogden ft Benson 
Draper ft Clayton 
Musical Three 
Pitroff 

White. Mulla!y ft White 
Coratla 
KNOXVLLLE, TENN. 

' .Grand. 

First Half 
Ererett ft White 
Lee ft Bennett 
LsMont ft Wright 
Bay ft Ray 
Prerett Merrill ft Co. 

Lsst Half 
The Newmana 
Ellna Gardner 
Clifford ft Wilts 
Nichols Sisters 
Jack Gardner A Co. 

MINNEAPOLIS. 

Unique. 

First Half 
Landry Bros. 
Challls ft Lambert 
Cameron. Derltt ft Co. 
20th Century Minstrels 
Olson ft Jobnaon > 
Last Half 
3 Anderson Sisters 
The Norrlses 
King ft Friend 

(Two to Fill) 

MASON CITY, IA. 

CedL 

Hut Half 

.Toe Tt'enwen 

The Norrlses 

(Two to nn) 

Last Half 

Variety Trio 

(Three to Fill) 

MARSHALLTOWN, 

LA. 

Casino. 

First Halt 
Olson ft Johnson 
Marconi Bros. 
(Two to Fin) 

MACON, GA. 

Macon. 

First Half 
The Newman* 
Clifford * wills 
Nichols Sisters 
Happy Jack Gardner 
(One to FBI) 



Last Half 
De Armo ft Marguerite 
Marie Dreams 
Potts Bros, ft Co. 
Milton ft Herbert 
Chief Utile Elk ft Co. 

ST. CLOUD, MINN. 
Nemo. 

(One day) 
Kraft ft Myrtle 
Coratla 

Goldle ft Mark 
"Right to Do Wrong)" 
Harma Trio 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Hippodrome. 

First Halt 

S Anderson Slaters 
DeVoy * Dayton 
King ft Friend 
Wolf ft Brady 
Joe Whitehead 

Last Half 
Landry Bros. 
Lyric Comedy Four 
"Right to Do Wrong!" 
Ferguson ft Sunderland 
La Petite Mercedes 
W. V. M. A. 

ALTON, ILL. 

Hippodrome. 

Chas. ft Anna Glocker 
Delmar ft Klgsrd 
Last Half 
Wallace Galrln 
Barry Girls 

BEL0IT, WIS. 

New Wilson. 

Stone ft Hngbes 
Green ft Pugb 
Dare Wood's Animals 
(Two to nil) 

CAMP HUGHES. 

Great Westln 
Chsae ft La Toar 
Dam Good ft Funny 
Stuart. Roberts ft 8. 

CHICAGO. 
Kedzie. 

First Half 
Plplfax ft Paulo 
La Verne ft Dagmar 
Muslcsl Matinee 
Anderson ft Golnes 
(One to nil) 

Last Hslf 
Countess Nordloe 
Joo. R. Gordon ft Oo. 
Lew ft Molly Hnntlsg 
Fung Choy Co. 
(One to Bill 

Windsor. 

First Half 
Wsnda 

Morton ft Weat 
"AH Wrong" 
Parlllo ft Frablto 
Three Melrins 

Last Half 
Baby Sylria 
"Female Clerks" 
(Three to BO) 

Avenue. 

First Half 
Neloaeo ft Hurley 
Johnnie Small ft Srs. 
Brown Fletcher Trio 
(Two to nil) 

Last Half 
Four Slickers 
Grace Gibson ft Co. 
Wing ft Ah Hoy 
(Two to Sll) 

WiUoo. 

First Half 
Connteas Nordloe 
Robt. Henry Hodge 
Grant Gardner 
Hersen Berne 
(One to fill) 

Last Half 
Anderson ft Golnes 
Hersen Berne 
(Three to fill) 
CEDAR RAPIDS. 

Majestic 

First Hslf 
Ross Bros. 

Le Boy ft Mabel Hart 
Porter J. Whits ft Co. 
May Melrille 
Finks Mules 

Last Half 
Sterling ft Marguerite 
Falnnan ft Fnrman 
"Vanity Fair" 

DULUTH, MLNN,. 
First Bait 
La Vlra 

Fields. Keene ft Walsh 
McGee ft Kerry 
Frank Stafford ft Oo. 
Last Halt 

Gedinsn * Co. 

Connolly Sisters 
Bob Hall 

Chas. Maann ft Co. 
DUBUQUE, LA. 

Majestic 

First Hslf 
The Kelloge 
Morton 



PIsano ft Bingham 
Powdei ft Capman 
Chas, Howard ft On. 

Last Halt 
Wanda 

La Verne ft Dagmar 
Robt. Henry Hodge 
Fiddler A SheltOB 
Rosa Bras. 
EAST ST. LOUIS, 
ILL. 
Erter's. 

First Half 
Wallace Galrln 

Willing ft Jordan 

Knapp ft Cornelia 
General PIsano ft Co. 

Last Halt 
Uahoner ft Rogers 
Wm. O'Clalro ft Girls 
(Two to fill) 

FT. DODGE, LA. 
Princess. 

First Hslf 
Bennington ft Scott 
Van Sickles ft Leonard 
Lorraine ft Dunn 

Last Hslf 
Norton ft Earle 
Weston ft Young 
Mimic Four 
(One to fill) 

FT. WILLIAM, CAN. 

Last Halt 
La Vlra 

Fields. Keene ft Walsh 
McUee ft Kerry 
Frank Stafford ft Co. 

HAMMOND, LND. 

Last Half 
Mcllgsr ft Hamilton 
E. J. Moore 
Burke ft Bark* 
Fire Armsntos 

INTERNATIONAL 

FALLS, MLNN. 

(Oct. 16.) 

La Vlra 

Fields, Kerne ft Walsh 
McGee ft Kerry 
Frank Stafford ft Co. 

JANESVLLLE, WIS. 

New Meyers. 

Last Half 
La Vine ft lnman 
Roattloo ft Shelly 
(Three to fill) 

LA CROSSE. 
La Crosse. 

First Hair 
6 Musical SpUlers 
Harry Gilbert 
(Thraa to nil) 

Last Half 
Maris ft Kitty 
Frank Colby ft Oo. 
Kenny ft Hollls 
5 Flormonda 

(One to fiin 

LINCOLN, NEB. 

Oxpheum. 

First Half 
Geo. Galls Trio 
Parker ft Roller 
(Three to 0)1) 

Lyric 

first Ha 1 f 
Norelty Trio 
Weston * Zonae 

Last Halt 
Geo. ft Lilly Gardes 
N ct ma ft ErwoBt 

MINNEAPOLIS 

New Palace. 

3 Peroneea 

O'Nell ft OsDagher 
Petticoat Mlnatreis 
Bert ft Hsrry Oordon 
Paul Klelst 

Grand. 

Coghlan. Arery ft Otto 
Van ft Carrie Avary 
Bert Howard 
Ortoo Troop* 

OMAHA, NEB. 

Empress. 

Pint. Hslf 
Geo. ft Ully Garden 
Flo Adler 
Mlmle Poor 
Norton ft Earl* 

Lsst Half 
Van Sickles ft Lsoaard 
Ask ft Bbaw 
Anita Diss' Moaka 
(One to SID 

0SHK0SH, WIS. 
Majvtle. 

First Half 
La Vine ft Inmaa 
Dolly ft Calsrae 
(One to fiO) 

. Last Halt 
Le Bent ft Mitchell 
iTwo to Oil) 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



CIRCUS 



CARNI 




PARRS 



ANOTHER CIRCUS PLANS TO 

TOUR CUBA THIS SEASON 

Interest Centered in Rumor of Amusement Venture of Justo 

O'HaUorans. Outfit Purchased in Chicago Backs Up 

Report Show to Open About Nov. 15 



Chicago, Sept 30. — Much interest is 
being evidenced here by circus and carni- 
val people in the reported organization of 
a circus to make a tour of Cuba. 

Justo O'HaUorans is the reported or- 
ganizer. Mr. O'HaUorans, who is a Cuban 
by birth, knows the island well enough to 
assure himself of a profitable season. He 
is said to be alone in the enterprise, and 
when launched, the circus win be billed as 
the O'Hallorans Circo. 

The circus will carry ten acts. Among 
those which have been decided upon are 
the Five Florimonds, a wire act; Mirano 



PLAN WINTER CARNIVAL 

St. Paul, Oct 2.— Jan. 27 to Feb. 3 
have been chosen as the dates of the an- 
nual Northwest Outdoor Sports Carnival, 
to be held in this city. 

During this cold season festival thou- 
sands of men, women and children will 
parade the frozen streets in formal march- 
ing lines, and many outdoor exercises will 
be indulged in. 

TOWN WANTS CARNIVAL 

North Gikakd, Pa., Oct 2. — A com- 
mittee which recently canvassed the mer- 
chants here to determine whether or not 
they were in favor of holding a carnival 
and Old Home Week, reported the results 
of their canvas in the affirmative. 

A meeting of the business men and mer- 
chants is soon to be held at which the mat- 
ter will be discussed. Mr. Todd, a theat- 
rical man, is interested in the movement 



WILL HOLD ANOTHER FAIR 

Clabksvuxe, Tenn., Oct 2. — At a meet- 
ing of the Farmers' Institute here it was 
decided to hold an agricultural fair in this 
city on Oct. 8-10, inclusive. The last fair 
held in this county was during August at 
Dunbar's Cave, near here. 



FAIR DATE CHANGED 

Gratz, Pa., Oct. 2. — The Gratz Fair As- 
sociation, of this city, which was to have 
held its fair Sept 19-22, has changed the 
dates to Oct 10-13. 



$5,000 GIVEN FOR CARNIVAL. 

Sam Francisco, Oct 2. — Five thousand 
dollars has been subscribed by local mer- 
chants for San Francisco's illumination 
carnival, to be held Wednesday and Thurs- 
day, in conjunction with Home Coming 
Week. The general committee in charge 
of the festival announces that 520,000 is 
needed. 



GOLDEN SIGNS CONTRACT 
"Duke" M. B. Golden for die past four 
eyara special agent of the Rutherford 
Greater Shows, has signed again with the 
Polack Bros, to act as general agent of the 
Rutherford Greater Shows for the next two 
years. 



Brothers, perch act; Panuelito, clowning 
and dancing; Sugranes, juggler and eques- 
trian director, and Nelssin, acrobat 

Mr. O'Hallorans has been in Chicago 
for the past week, purchasing tents, chairs 
and all necessary circus paraphernalia. He 
will return to Cuba shortly to whip the 
show into shape. 

If Mr. O'Hallorans plans materialize — 
and be feels very confident of the success 
of his venture — the show will open in Ha- 
vana about Nov. 13 and run for about 
five months. 



ACTS BOOKED FOR TEXAS FAIR 

Dallas, Tex., Oct. 3. — Many amusement 
acts have been booked the State Fair 
of Texas, to be held here Oct 14-29, in- 
clusive. Among them are: Randow Trio, 
Ewain-Ostmon Trio, A. F. Thaviu's Band, 
Jnas Troupe, the Bimbos, Four Casters, 
the Cornelias, Major Bennett Ishikawa 
Jnps, De Carno, the Casting Lamys, the 
Toozoonin Araba Acrobats, Staley, Birbeck 
and Company, French and Eis, Gruber's 
animals, the Boganny Troupe, Blake's 
Comedy . Circus, Holland and Doekrill 
Troupe, Seabert Sisters, two graceful cycl- 
ists ; the Wilhat Troupe, Le Roy and Paul, 
the Naesses, Burns, Brown and Burns, and 
the Fisher Sisters. 



CIRCUS MAN DEAD 

Decatttk, in., Sept 28. — Charjes Wig- 
gins, aged forty years, a laborer traveling 
with the Ringling Circus,, was found dead 
in 1: is berth in the sleeper when a train 
arrived in Decatur. 



A Group of Golhnar Bros. Show Folk 



»S 






- V V u 



-f 



Sitting, left to right — Hook Cross, Gus (Dude) Lind, Earl (Red) Shipley, Tom 
Auman, African Slim, Chas. Fisher, Major Bugs, Frank Ardell, Harry Wertz, Doc 
Stoddard. Wra. Hewitt, Chas. (Buck) Leahy, Al Deam, Toby Tyler, Dewey Camp- 
bell, Toy Wallace. 

Standing, left to right — Doc Slack, Sasaki, Al La Fleur, Georgia McGee, Margette 
Jackson. Edith Fisher, Myra Huyth, Lillian Lind, Art Lind, Elizabeth Rooney, Bill 
Loos, Minnie Hogdin, Chas. Rooney, Emma Loos, Back Gebhard, Billy Reid, Bobby 
Fisher. 



GEORGIA FAIR PROGRESSING 

Macon, Ga., Oct. 3. — The improvements 
on Central City Park property in prepara- 
tion of opening of the Georgia State Fair, 
on Nov. 2, are progressing. The foundation 
for the new building in which the auto- 
mobile exhibit is to be placed has already 
been laid, and work has been started on the 
building proper. 



PAWNEE BILL CLOSES SEASON 

Grand Rapids, Mich., Sept 30. — Paw- 
nee Bill's Pioneer Days closed its season 
last Saturday in this city, where it was a 
big feature at the Michigan State Fair. 
The show was transported by special train 
to Major IiUie's Buffalo Ranch, at Paw- 
nee, Okla., where spacious quarters have 
been provided. 



LITTLE GIANT SHOWS CLOSE 

West Dux.tjth, Minn., Sept 30. — Frank 
D. Corey, manager of the Little Giant 
Shows, closes the season of the show here 
to-day. The show will have one week to 
overhaul and get ready for the Big Moose 
Indoor doings to be held in the Auditorium, 
at Duluth, Oct. S-21. 



RUTHERFORD SHOWS CLOSE 

Montgomeby, W. Va., Sept. 30. — The 
Rutherford Greater Shows (Western) are 
playing here this week, the first stop of 
their Southern tour. The Eastern com- 
pany closed last week and will Winter in 
New Philadelphia, O. 



BUCKEYE LAKE PARK CLOSES 

Buckeye Lake, Oct 2. — The regular 
season at Buckeye Lake Park closed yester- 
day with special amusements. A big 
crowd was there to dance the season out. 



LADY AVIATOR FOR FAIR ^ 

Mobile, Ala., Oct 3. — The Gulf Coast 
Fair, which will be held in this city Oct. 
CO- Nov. 5, will have a big attraction in 
{Catherine Stinson, "The Lady Who Flies." 
She will make flights day and night during 
the fair. 



CARNIVAL GOODS 

MEN TAKE NOTICE ! 



U. S. Vice Consul Says Here Is Chance 

to Make Money. Colombia Offers 

Market for Carnival G o ods. 

Manufacturers of carnival paraphernalia 
would do well to follow the suggestion of 
United States Vice Consul Claude E. 
Guyant, Barranquilla, Colombia, published 
in Commerce Reports, issued by the 
United States Government 

According to the report every year the 
city of Barranquilla has a carnival that 
is the principal event in the city's public 
and social life. The holidays commence 
Jan. 20 (San Sebastian's Day), and each 
Thursday, Saturday and Sunday from 
that date up to the three day's carnival 
in March is declared a feast day. Dur- 
ing the carnival itself masks are worn 
and all kinds of carnival goods — confetti, 
serpentines, paper hats, balloons, etc. — 
are extensively used. 

Local merchants will soon begin stock- 
ing up for next year's celebration, and 
American manufacturers of this class of 

goods would do well to send catalogues, 
samples and prices to the Barranquilla 
firms that handle these wares, says Mr. 
Guyant. 

[Their names may be obtained from 
the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce or its district and co-operative 
offees by referring to file No. 80209.] 



CLYDE IN NEW YORK 

John T. Clyde, owner of the "World at 
Home" shows, was in town hist week. 
His shows are now playing the fairs and 
are enjoying the most prosperous season 
since taking to the road several years 
ago. 

Mr. Clyde stopped at the Elks' club- 
house and was kept very busy with visi- 
tors. He also booked several new fea- 
tures for his company. 



PARK IN HANDS OF RECEIVER 

Buffalo, N. Y., Sept 30. — On account 
Of an alleged dispute about the management 
of the business between Maurice Unger and 
John T. Sherlock, who have been operat- 
ing Carnival Court, Justice Wheeler, in a 
special term of court last week, appointed 
Charles F. Murphy receiver of the partner- 
ship operating the park. 



WORK STARTED ON LAUREL FAIR 

Latjkex, Miss., Oct 3. — Work is well 
under way for the coming fair to be -held 
in this city Oct 10-15. There will be a 
new grand stand with a seating capacity 
of one thousand. Glen Fleming is manager 
of the fair. 



FRED DE KOR, AVIATOR, HURT 

Bethany, Mo., Sept 30. — Fred De 
Kor, exhibition aviator, met with an acci- 
dent recently while making a Sight at the 
Harrison County Fair, when he lost con- 
trol of his biplane and fell about one hun- 
dred feet landing atop the grand stand. 
His injuries consisted of a broken leg and 
arm, severe cuts and bruises about bis bead 
and body, and probably internal injuries. 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 




THE WORLD AT HOME SHOWS 



Now closing a, season of phenomenal 
artistic and financial success, due to 
merit and clean methods, presents 
compliments and good wishes to the 
entire show world and the old reli- 
able organ, The New York Clipper. 



• ■ 


JAMES T. CLYDE 




Owner and Director 


Home Office 


Winter Quarters 


GRAND PACIFIC HOTEL 


STREATOR 


CHICAGO 


ILL. 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

Route. Most Reach This Office Not Later 
Than Saturday. 

Anglln, Margaret (Chan. Frobman, Inc., 

mgrs.) — Empire, New York, lndef, 
Abarbanell, Una (John Cort, mgr.) — Casino, 

New York, indef. 
Ariias, Geo. (Klaw A Erlanger A Geo. C. 
Tyler, tngrs.) — Criterion. New York, lndef. 
Adams, Maude (Chan. Frobman, Inc., mgra.) 
— Lebanon. Pa., 4 : Altoona, 3 ; Johnstown, 
0; Wheeling W. Va., 7; E. Liverpool, O., 
9; Youngstown, 10; New Castle, Va., 11; 
canton. O., 12; Zanesrtlle, 13; Parkers- 
burs, W. Va., 14. 
Aborn Opera Co. — National. Washington, 2-7. 
"Arms and the Girl" (Wm. Harris Jr., mgr.) 

— Fulton, New York, lndef. 
Boston National Opera Co. — Indianapolis. 2-7. 
'Boomerang, The (David Belasco, mgr.) — 

Kelasco. New York, lndef. 
•Bridal Night. His" (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — 

Republic, New York, lndef. 
"Big Show, The" (Cfaaa. B. Dillingham, mgr.) 

—Hipp., New York, indef. 
"Back Fire" {Waiter N. Lawrence, mgr.) — 

Thirty-ninth Street, New York, 2, lndef. 
"Blue fnradlne. The (The Shuherts, mgra.) 

— Chicago. Chicago, lndef. 
"Blue Envelope, The" — Hartford, Conn., 6-7. 
Collier, Wm. (H. H. Frazee, mgr.) — Long- 
acre. New York, lndef. 
"Cheating Cheaters" (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — 

Eltlnge. New York, lndef. 
"Cohan Itevue of 1016" (Cohan & Harris, 

mgra.) — Oakland, CaL, 2-7. 
"Canary Cottage" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) — 

Oakland. Cal, 2-7. 
"Common Clay." with John Mason (A. H. 

Woods, mgr.) — Olympic. Chicago, lndef. 
"Common Clay," with Jane Cowl (A. H. 
Woods, mgr.) — Providence, 2-7; Sbubert, 
Bklyn.. 0-14. 
"Cinderella Man. The" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) 

— Belasco, Washington, 2-7. 
Dlxey. Henry E. (Helen Tyler, mgr.) — Shn- 

bert. New York, lndef. 
Dltrlcbsteln, Leo (Cohan & Harris, mgra.) — 

Grand. Chicago, 1, Indef. 
DlaghilefTs Ballet Russe — Manhattan O. H„ 

New York, 9. lndef. 
Kltinse, Julian (A. H. WoodB, mgr.) — St. 

Paul. 1-7. Milwaukee, 8-14. 
"Everywoman" (Henry W. Savage, mgr.) — 
Toronto, Can., 2-7: St. Catherines, 0; 
Woodstock, 10 ; London, 11 ; St. Thomas, 
12; Stratford, 13: Branford, 14. 
"Experience" (Elliott. Comstock A Geat, 

mgrs.) — Adclpbia. Phlla., lndef. 
Fiske. Mrs. (Corey * Riter, mgra.)— Atlantic 

City, 2-4. 
"Fair and Wanner" (Sclwyn A Co., mgrs.)— 

Montauk, Bklyn., 2-7. 
"Fair and Warmer* (Selwyn A Co., mgra.) — 

Cort. Chicago, 2-7. 
"Flame. The" (Richard Walton Tnlly, mgr.) 

Lytic. New Tork, 2-14. 
"Fear Market, The" — Newark, N. J., 2-7. 
"FamouH Bostonians" (B. Lang, mgr.)- — Kal 
Ispell. Mont.. 4-7 : Ferule, B. C, Can., 0-14. 
"Frame Up. The" (Fred Byers, mgr.) — Bur- 
lington, Colo, 7. 
"Girl From Brazil, The" (The Shuberts, 
mgra.) — Forty- fourth street. New York. 
lndef. 
"Guilty Man. The" (A. H. Woods mgr.) — 

Standard. New York, 2-7. 
"Go To It" (Ray F. Comstock, mgr.) — Al- 
bany. N. Y„ 3-5. 
"Girl Without a Chance," Eastern Co. (Rob- 
ert Sherman, mgr.) — Hicksvllle. 0„ 4; 
Paulding, 5; Bellefontalne, 6; Marlon, 7; 
Bucyrus, 9; Loudonvllle, 10; Ashland. 11; 
Wadsworth. 12: Chicago Jet. 14. 
"Girl Without a Cnance." Western Co. (Rob- 
ert Sherman, mgr.) — Sleepy Eye, Minn., 4; 
Fairmont, 5; Fonda, 7; Breda, 8; Perry, 
: Denlson. 10 ; Blair. Neb., 11 ; Wahoo. 
12: Lincoln, 13-14. 
"Girl from TJ. S. A." (Wm. Wamsher, mgr.) 
— Junction • City, Neb., 4 : Hope, 5 ; Her- 
rington. 6: McFheraon. 7. 
Hodge. Wm. (The Shuberts. mgra.) — Marine 

Elliott. New York, 4, indef. 
Holmes, Taylor — Astor, New York, 2, lndef. 
Hitchcock; Raymond — Globe, New York, 8, 

lndef. 
"Hush" (Wtnthrop Ames, mgr.) — Little, New 

Tork, 2. lndef. 
"Hit-the-Trall Holliday" (Cohan A Harris, 

mgrs.) — Park So... Boston, 2-7. 
"House of Glass" (Cohan A Harris, mgrs.) — 

Carrlck, Phlla.. 2-7. 
"Honson's Choice" — Bronx O. H., New York, 

2-7. 
"Intruders, The" (Cohan & Harris, mgrs.) — 

C. A "H., New York, lndef. 
"lkey and Abey" (Geo. H. Bnbb, mgr.) — Ar- 
lington, la., 4 ; Strawberry Paint. 5 ; Dyers- 
ville. 6: Sumner. 7: Elma, 8: Ricevllle. 0; 
Osage. 10: Spring Valley. Minn., 11: Pres- 
ton, 12; Lanesboro, 13; Grand Meadow. 14. 
"Justice" (Corey A Biter, mgrs.) — Sbubert, 

Bklyn.. 2-7: Montauk, Bklyn. 9-14. 

"Just a Woman" — Majestic. Bklyn., 2-7. 
"Katlnka" (Arthur Hammersteln, mgr.) — 

Hartford. 0«nn.. 2-4. 
"Lady Luxury" (Guy S. Burley. mgr.) — Har- 

risburc. Pa.. 4. 
Maude. Cyril— Buffalo. N. Y.. 5-7. 
Murdoek. Ann (Chas. Frobman, Inc., mgrs.) 

— Powers'. Chicago. 2-14. 
MI til (Henry W. Savage, mgr.) — Illinois, 

Chicago, 1-14. 
Montgomery A Stone (Chas. Dillingham, 

mcr.l — Nixon, Pittsburgh, 2-14. 
"Man Who Came Back" (Wm. A. Brady, 

rogr.l — Playhouse, New York, lndef. 
"Miss Springtime" (Klaw A Erlanger, mgrs.) 

— Sew Amsterdam. New York, indef. 
"Montana" (Bankston A Morris, mgrs.) — 
Palisade. Neb.. 4 : Trenton. 5 : Arapahoe. 
R: Holhrook, 7: Oxford, 9; Edison. 10; 
Bonver CItv. 11: Wtlsonville. 12: Orleans, 
13 : Woodruff. Kan.. 14. 





"Natural Law, The," Western Co., United 
Prod. Co.'s (Merle H. Norton, gen. mgr.) — 
Cassopolis, Mich., 4: Elkhart, Ind., 5; Kal- 
amazoo, Mich., 6; Michigan City, Ind- 7; 
Kenosha, Wis., 8 ; Burlington, 9 ; Hartford, 
10 : Waupun, 11 ; Princeton, 12 ; Rlpon, 13 ; 
Osbkosh, 14. 
"Other Man's Wife, The," Eastern, Lambert 
Prod. Co.'s (Lem Edwards, mgr.) — Tiffin, 
O.. 4 ; Sandusky, 5 ; Canton, 7-10 ; Stenben- 
ville, 11: Salem, 12; Greenville, Pa., 13; 
Sharon. 14. 
Patton, w. B. (Frank B. Smith, mgr.) — 
Sutherland. la., 4 : Marathon, 5 ; Spencer, 
H : Armstrong, 7 : Emmettsburg, 9 ; Alcona, 
10; Belmond. 11: Clarksvllle, 12; Eldora, 
13; Iowa Falls, 14. 
"Passing Show of 1916" — -Winter Garden, 

New York, lndef. 
"Pierrot, the Prodigal" (Wlnthrop Ames and 
Walter Knight, mgrs.) — Booth, New York, 
lndef. 
"Pollyaona" (Klaw A Erlanger A Geo. C 
Tyler, mgrs.) — Hudson, New York, indef. 
"Potash A Perlmutter In Society" (A. H. 

Woods, mgr.) — Tremont, Boston, 9-21. 
"Princess Pat, The"— Garrtck, Chicago, 1, 

lndef. 
Ross, Thos. W. & Maciyn Arbnckle — Black- 
stone, Chicago, lndef. 
Hobson. May — Buffalo, N. Y., 1-4; Danville, 
6 ; Gneonta, 6 : Norwich, 7 ; Elmlra. 9 ; 
Geneva, 10: Auburn, 11; Glovergvllie, 18; 
Schenectady, 14. 
"Rich Man. Poor Man" (George Broadhnrst, 

mgr.) — Forty-eighth Street, 2. indef. 
"Rio Grande" (Chas. Frohman, Inc., mgrs.) — 

Hollls, Boston, 2-14. 
Sanderson-Biian-Cawthorn Co. (Chas. Froh- 
man, Inc.. mgrs.) — Forrest, Phlla., 2-28. 
Skinner, Otis (Chas. Frohman, Inc., mgrs.) — 

Lyceum, New York, lndef. 
San Carlos Opera Co. — Montreal. Can., indef. 
"Seven Chances" (David Belasco, mgr.) — 

Cohan's, New York, indef. 
"Silent Witness, The," (H. H. Frazee, mgr.) 

— Plymouth. Boston. 2-7. 
"So Long, Letty" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) — 

Alvln, Pittsburgh, 2-7. 
"Silas Green from New Orleans" (Prof. E. 
Williams, mgr.) — Isola, Miss., 4-5: Belzona, 
6 : Itta Bena. 7 : Greenville, 9 ; lndlanola, 
10; Morehead, 11; Tntwiler, 12; BulevUle, 
13; Sunflower, 14. 
"Sunny South" (J. C. Rockwell, mgr.) — Bel- 
mont, N. Y.. 4; Galeton, Pa., 5: Addison, 
N. Y., 6; Tioga, Pa., 7; Wellsboro. 9; 
Blossburg, 10 : Canton, 11 ; Jersey Shore, 
12; Milton, 13: Sunbury, 14. 
"Serenade, The" (Walker A Stevens, mgrs.) — 
Wheeling, W. Va., 4 ; Newark. 0., 5 ; Colum- 
bus. 6-7 ; Hamilton, 8 : Dayton, 9 ; Spring- 
field, 10: Lexington, Ky.. 11-12; Hunting- 
ton, W. Va., 13 ; Charleston, 14. 
"Step lively" — Monongahela. Pa., 4: Johns- 
town, 5; Altoona, 6; Bamesboro, 7; Houtz- 
dale, 9 ; Du Bols, 10 ; Clearfield, 11 ; St. 
Marys, 12 ; Emporium, 13 ; Corey, 14. 
Taylor. I -anrette — Atlantic City. 5-7. 
"Tarn to the Right" (Smith A Golden, mgrs.) 

— Gaiety, New York, lndef. 
"Two Janes" — Broad. Phila., 2-7. 
"Twin Beds" — Grand, Cincinnati, 1-7. 
"Up Stairs and Down" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) 

— Cort. New York, lndef. 
"Under Sentence" (Selwyn A Co., mgrs.) — 

Harris. New Tork, 3, lndef. 
"Unchastened Woman, The" (Oliver Morosco, 

mgr.) — Princess, Chicago, 1, lndef. 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin," Kibble's — Wellston, O., 
4; Chllllcotbe, 5; Springfield, 6; Hamil- 
ton, 7. 
"Very Good. Eddie" (Marburv, Comstock Co., 

mgrs.) — Princess. New York, 2, lndef. 
"Very Good, Eddie" (Marbury, Comstock Co., 

mgrs.) — Wilbur. Boston. Indef. 
Washington So.. Players — Comedy, New York, 

lndef. 
Warfield, David (David Belasco, mgr.) — 

Ford's, Baltimore, 2-7. 
Wilson, AL H. (Sidney R. Ellis, mgr.) — Psdu- 
cab. Ky.. 4: Memphis. Tenn., 5; Little 
Rock, Ark.. 6 : Texarkana, Tex., 7 ; Shreve- 
port. La.. 9 ; Longvlew, Tex., 10 ; Marshall, 
11 ; Sulphur Springs, 12 ; Greenville, 13 ; 
Sherman, 14. 
' "Where the Rooster Crows" (Rush A An- 
drews, mgrs.) — Fine Arts, Chicago, 9. lndef. 
"When Dreams Come True" (Coutts A Tennis, 
mgrs.) — St. Johns. Can., 2-4; Calais, Me., 
5 : Woodstock, Can., 6 ; Frederleton. 7 ; 
Chatham. 9 : Bathnrst, 10 ; Campbellton, 
11; Quebec, 12-14. 
"Ziegfeld's Follies" — Colonial, Boston, lndef. 

INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT. 

Bover. Nancy (Will J. Donnelly, mgr.) — 
Bijou. Birmingham, Ala.. 2-7. 

"Bringing Up Father in Politics" (Chas. H. 
Yale, mgr.) — Poll's. Washington, 2-7. 

"Broadway After Dark" (Halton Powell, 
mgr.) — Lyric, Memphis, 2-7. 

"Devil's Harvest, The" (Leffler A Bratton, 
mgrs.) — Castle Sq„ Boston, 2-7. 

"Daughter of Mother Machree" — G. O. H., 
Bklyn.. 2-7. 

Elinorc. Kate (Williams A Hill, mgrs.) — Ly- 
ceum, Detroit. 2-7. 

"Eternal Magdalene. The" (Lee Harrison, 
mgr.)- — Broadway, Camden, N. J., 2-7.' 

Fox A Stewart (J. Goldenberg, mgr.) — Cres- 
cent, New Orleans, 2-7. 

"For the Man She Loved" (Wm. Woods, mgr.) 
— Nixon, Atlantic City, 2-4; Trent, Tren- 
ton, 5-7. 

"Funny Mr. Dooley" (Wm. I sham, mgr.) — 
Park Place. Newark. N. J.. 2-7. 

"Girl Wlthont a Chance, The" (Boht. Sher- 
man, mgr.) — Bijou, Richmond, Va., 2-7. 

"Girl He Couldn't Buy, The" (Arthur C. 
Alston, mgr.) — Majestic, Jersey City, N. J., 
2-7. 

"Heart of Dixie" (Robert Campbell, mgr.) — 



Wletlng O. H., Syracuse, N. Y., 2-4; Colo- 
nial, Utlca, 5-7. 
"Her Naked Self" — Lyceum, Pittsburgh. 2-7. 
"Hour of Temptation" (Schiller A Weis, 

mgrs.) — Modern, Providence, 2-7. 
"Little Girl In a Big City" (Arthur AlBton, 

mgr.) — Palace, Toledo, O, 2-7. 
"Little Peggy O'Moore" (Halton Powell, 

mgr.) — Orpnenm, Phila., 2-7. 
"Little Girl God Forgot, The" (J. Bernero, 

mgr.) — Gaiety, Louisville, Ky., 2-7. 
"My Mother's Rosary" (Ed. Rowland, mgr.) — 

BIJou, Nashville, Term., 2-7. 
"Madame Spy" — Knickerbocker, Phila.; 2-7. 
"Mutt and Jeff's Wedding" (Joe Pettengill, 

mgr.) — Majestic, Buffalo, N. Y„ 2-7. 
"Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl, The"— 

Imperial, Chicago, 2-7. 
"Natural Law," The" (Geo. Goett, mgr.) — 

Auditorium, Baltimore, 2-7. 
"Old Homestead, The" (S. Z. Poll, mgr.) — 

American, St. Louis, 2-7. 
"Other Wife, The" (Vaughan Glaser, mgr.) — 

Garden, Kansas City, 2-7. 
"Other Woman, The" — Lyceum. Paterson. 

N. J., 2-7. 
"Path of Folly" (Vance & Sullivan, mgrs.) — 

G. O. H.. Youngstown, 0., 2-7. 
"Peg o' My Heart" — G. O. H„ Wllkes-Barre, 

Pa., 2-4 ; Academy, Scranton, 5-7. 
"Rolling Stones" (Clark Ross, mgr.) — Lyric, 

Bridgeport, Conn.. 2-7. 
"Somewhere In France" — Park, Indianapolis, 

2-7. 
"Shameen Dhu" — Walnut St., Phila., 2-7. 
Thurston, Howard (Geo. H. NlcolaL mgr.) — 

Prospect, Cleveland, 2-7. 
"Texas 1 ' (Jake Lieberman, mgr.) — Bronx, 

New York, 2-7. 
Joe Welcb (M. Jacobs, mgr.) — Grand, Worces- 
ter, Mans., 2*7. 
"While the City Sleeps" (Edwin Clifford, 

mgr.) — G. O. H., Atlanta, Ga„ 2-7. 
"Woman He Married, The" (Max Spiegel, 

mgr.) — Boyd's O. H., Omaha. 2-7. 
"Which One Shall I Marry?" (J. J. Howard, 

mgr.) — National. Chicago, 2-7. 

STOCK AND REPERTOIRE ROUTES. 

Permanent and Traveling. 

Academy Playera — Haverhill, Mass., lndef. 

Alcazar Playera — San Francisco, lndef. 

Alcine Flayers — Wichita, Kan., lndef. 

American Players — Spokane, Wash., indef. 

Academy Players — Halifax, N. 8., Can., lndef. 

Angell Stock (Joe Angell, mgr.) — Park, Pitts- 
burgh, lndef. 

Angeli's Comedians, Southern Co. (Blllle 0. 
Angelo, mgr.) — Leon. la., 2-7. 

Bainbridge Players — Minneapolis, lndef. 

Burbank Players — Los Angeles, Indef. 

Benjamin. Jack. Stock — Wakefield. Kan., 2-7. 

Brownie Blye Rep. Co. — Coshocton, O., 2-7. 

Byers, Fred, Stock (Fred Byers, mgr.j — Bur- 
lington, Colo., 2-0. 

Belgarde, Sadie. A Co. (Richard St. Vrain, 
mgr.) — Kingston. N. Y.. 2-7. 

Colonial Plavers — Plttsfield. Mass., indef. 

Coburn-Pear8on Players— St. Cloud, Minn.. 
Indef. 

Chicago Stock (C. H. Rosskam, mgr.) — 

Cornell-Price Players — Battle Creek, Mich., 
2-8. 

Denham Stock — Denver, lndef. 

Dobinsky Stock (Ed. Dnblnsky, mgr.) — St. 
Joseph, Mo.. Indef. 

Dougherty, Jim, Stock— Eau Claire, Wis., 
lndef. 

Davis, Walter, Stock (Adam W. Friend, mgr.) 
Herkimer, N. v., 2-7 ; Cooperstown, 9-14. 

Elsmere Stock — Elsmore, Bronx, indef. 

Eckhardt, Oliver, Players — Reglna, Sask., 
Can., lndef. 

Emerson Players — Lowell. Mass.. indef. 

Empire Players — Salem, Mass., lndef. 

Edwards, Mae, Players — Madison, Wis., 2-7. 

Fields, Margaret, Stock — MeadvUle, Pa., 2-7; 
Warren, 9-14. 

Glaser. Vanghan. Stock — Cleveland, lndef. 

Hyperion PlayerB — New Haven, Conn., lndef. 

Hlmmeleln Associate Players — Evansvllle, 
Ind., lndef. 

Harrison A Wblte's Ideal Players (Allen O. 
White, mgr.). — Hartford, Mich., 2-7; South 
Haven, 9-14. j 

Imperial Stock — Imperial, St Louis, 1, lndef. 

Keith's Hudson Theatre Stock — Union Hill, 
N. J., lndef. 

Lawrence. Del, Stock — Wigwam, San Fran- 
cisco, indef. 

Lorch. Theo., Stock — Topeka, Kan., lndef. 

Lewis, Wm. F., Stock — Belvidere, Neb.; 2-7; 
Oak, 9-14 ; closes season. 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, indef. 

Mozart Players (Jay Packard, mgr.) — Elmlra, 
N. Y.. indef. 

Machan's Associate Players — Sndbnry, Out., 
Can., lndef. 

Northampton Players — Northampton, Mass., 
indef. 

National M. C. Co.— -Detroit, Indef. 

National Stock (F. B. Cole, mgr.) — Minneap- 
olis, lndef. 

Nestcll Players — Freeport, 111., Indef. 

Orpheani Players Stock (Ed. Williams, mgr.) 
Omaha. Neb., indef. 

Orphenm Players — Reading. Pa., lndef. 

Oliver, Otis, Players (Harry J. Wallace, 
mgr.) — So. Bend. Ind.. lndef. 

Poll Stock — Worcester, Maes., lndef. 

Payton, Corse, Stock — Spooner, Bronx, N. Y., 
lndef. 

Park Opera Co. — Park. St Louis, indef. 

Players Stock — Players, St Louis, lndef. 

Sherman Stock (Robert Sherman, mgr.) — Dal- 
las, Tex., indef. 

Spooner, Cecil. Stock — Hartford, Conn., lndef. 

Sbubert Stock — Milwaukee, lndef. 

Sbubert Stock — St Paul, indef. . 

Somerville Theatre Players — Somerville, 
Mass., indef. 

Sclby Mus. Stock (Art L. Selby, mgr.) — Terre 
Haute, Ind., lndef. 



Savldge, Walter, Players — Battle Creek, 2-7. 
Trumbull Players (L. H. Trumbull, mgr.) — 

Romford, Me., 2-7: Colebrook. N. H„ 9-14. 
Van Dyke A Eaton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.) — 

Tulsa, Okla., indef. 

Wilkes Players — Seattle. Wash., indef. 
Wilkes Players — Salt Lake City, U., lndef. 
Wallace, Chester, Players — Sharon, Pa., 9. 
Indef. 

RANDS AND ORCHESTRAS. 

Conway, Patrick, & Band — Pittsburgh, 1-8 ; 
Ithaca, N. Y.. 9-14. 

Foreman's Band — Oakland, CaL, lndef. 

Kyrl's Bohemian Orchestra (H. J. Leake, 
mgr.) — West Union, la., 7: Monona, 9; 
Sumner, 10; Alden, 12; Southland, 18; In- 
wood, 14. 

COMPANIES IN TABLOID PLAYS. 

American Girl Co. (H. D. Zarrow, mgr.) — 
Wilmington, N. C, 2-7. 

Bernard's, AL 4 Gertrude, Girls and Boys 
from Dixie (AL Bernard, mgr.) — Birming- 
ham, Ala., lndef 

Broadway Girls M. C. Co. (Hal Wattlera, 
mgr.) — Joplln, Mo., 1-6; Commerce, Okla., 
7-14. 

Enterprise Stock (Norman HUyard, mgr.) — 
Chicago, lndef. 

Enterprise Stock, No. 2 Co. (Norman HU- 
yard, mgr.) — Chicago, lndef. 

Globe Trotters (Fox Rellly. mgr.) 

Hoyt's Musical Revue (M. J. Meaner, mgr.) 



-E. Liverpool, O., 



Portland, Me., 2-7. 
Lee, James P., M. C. Co.- 

indef. 
Lord A Vernon M. C. Co. — Clarksburg. W. Va.;. 

2-14. 
Thomas M. C. Co. — Plymouth, Mass., 2-7; 

Bowdoln Sq„ Boston, 9-14. 
Variety Review, Zarrow's (D. J. Lynch, mgr.) 

— Petersburg, Va., 2-7. _ 

Walker, Musical A Lady Minstrels — Elwood, 

Ind., 2-7; New Castle, 9-14. 

CARNIVALS. 

Big Four Amuse. Co. — Mountain City, Tenn., 

2-7 : Chester, S. C, 9-14. 
Campbell, W. H., United Shows — St Louis, 

2-7 ; Poplar BlnlT, 9-13. „ • 

Dorman A Krause Shows — Goldsboro, N. . C 

2-7. 
Frisco Expo. Shows (Chas. Martin, mgr.) — 

Yorktown, Tex,, 2-7; Flotonla, 9-14. 
Great American Shows (J. F. Murphy, mgr.) 

— Gas ton la. N. C_ 2-7: Monroe, Ga„ 9-14. 
Gray, Roy, Amuse. Co. — Montevallo, Ala., 2-7 ; 
Hunter, Harry C, Shows — Braddock, Pa-, 2-7. 
Jones, Johnny J., Expo. Shows — Sherman, 

Tex., 2-7. _ 

Krause Greater Shows — Scranton, Pa., 2-7. 
Majestic Amuse. Co. — Benwood, W. Va., 2-7. 
Metropolitan Shows — Corinth, Miss.. 2-7. 
Peerless Expo. Shows (C. F. Mitchell, mgr.) 

Saginaw, Mich., 2-7. . mmm m m 

Sogers Greater Shows — Aberdeen, Miss., 2-7. 
Veal's Famous Shows — Scottsboro, Ala., 2-7. 
Wortham, C. A., Shows — HonBton, Tex^ 2-7. 

CIRCUSES. 

Barnes, AL G. — Lafayette, La., 4; Franklin, 
5; New Orleans, 6-8; Thlbodaux, 9: Mor- 
gan City, 10 ; AbbeyvlUe, 11 ; Jennings, 12 ; 
Lake Charles, 13 ; Beaumont. Tex.. 14. _ 

Buffalo BUI A 101 Ranch — Winchester. Va,, 
4 : Staunton, 5 ; Lexington, : Roanoke, 7. 

Carlisle's Frontier WUd West Show — North- 
ampton, Mass., 2-7. „ ., ' 

Hagenbeck- Wallace — Ada,. Okla., 4; McAlea- 
ter, 6; Durant 6; Hugo, 7. . • _ 

Honest Bill Shows — Caramee. Okla., 4; Da- 
coma, 5 ; Avard, 6 ; Waynoka, 7 : Quintan, 
9: Mooreland. 10; Mutual, 11; Cestos, 12; 
Selling, 13; Tacoga, 14. 

Ringling Bros. — Louisville, Ky., 4 : Lexington, 
3 ; Richmond. 6 ; Knoxville, Tenn., 7 ; At- 
lanta, Ga., 9-10; Athens. 11; Anderson, 
S. C. 12; Greenville, 13: Spartanburg, 14. 

Sells-Floto — Modesto, Cat, 4 ; Oakland, 6 ; 
San Francisco. 6-8. 

{Routes continued on page 86) 



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NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

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*S Deposit Required — - 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



"BUNKER BEAN" IS A 
DELIGHTFUL COMEDY, 
WELL PRESENTED 



"BUNKER BHAN."— A comedy In 
three icti by Lee WilKn Dodd, pre- 
sented at the Astor Theatre, Oct, 2. 

THE OAST. 
Pop* Charles Abbe 

Bulger •••••••••..••--....Jack Deyereaux 

Larabeo Bonce Mitchell 

The flapper Florence Shirley 

Mason John Hogan 

Bunker Bean .Taylor Holmes 

The Waster.....,,.. Harry C. Power 

Mope Marlon Kerby 

The Big- Sister Clara Louise Moorea 

Grandma, the demon Lllllsn Lawrence 

The Countess Grace Peters 

Maid Annette Westbay 

Balthaaur ....Walter Sherwln 

The Greatest Lett-handed Pitcher the 
World Has Erer Known... Bobert Kelly 

Janitor George 0. Lyman 

The Llxato Boy Belford Forrest 

Loot* George O'Ronrka 

The Very Young Minister John Hogan 



Taylor Holmes in "His Majesty Banker 
Bean," a dramatization of Harry Leon 
Wilson's clever story which appeared some- 
time ago in the Saturday Evening Pott, 
came to the Astor Theatre on Monday 
night and presented what proved to be one 
of the most delightful comedies seen on 
Broadway in many months. 

"Bunker Bean," as the thousands who 
have read and enjoyed Mr. Wilson's story 
know, is a bashful, diffident young stenog- 
rapher in the employ of an irritable mil- 
lionaire, who allows him more liberties 
than the average stenographer enjoys as 
he happens to be the only one who can 
take hia erratic dictation, "Bunker Bean" 
comes into a legacy and at the same 
time falls into the hands of a psychic 
faker who, learning that he believes in 
reincarnation, easily convinces him that 
he on his first appearance on earth was 
the powerful king "Ram-Tab." 

From that moment the fortunes of 
Bunker begin to improve. He becomes bold 
and fearless in the business world. He 
gains wealth and finally wins the girl of his 
choice who is the young daughter of the 
millionaire. 

The discovery that he has been a dup ■• 
of the clairvoyants does not shake his 
faith in himself and he goes on to suc- 
cess. ■ -. 

The piece was dramatized by Lee Wilson 
Dodd, who fortunately has closely fol'owed 
the author's story and preserved the original 
characters. 

Taylor Holmes, as Banker Bean, gave 
an exceptionally clever performance, his 
work throughout the entire piece stamps 
him as one of the best of our light come- 
dians. Florence Shirley, the Flapper, Was 
a delight to the eye. and gave a charming 
portrayal of the ■ somewhat-spoiled young 
daughter of the millionaire. 

Charles Abbe, who played the " eccentric 
millionaire, gave a fine bit of character act- 
ing and his spasmodic and almost unintelli- 
gible manner of dictating his correspondence 
was responsible for many of the laughs of 
:he evening. ■ 

The parts of the Big Sister, the Greatest 
Left-Hand Pitcher in the World, and 
Grandma, the Demon, were particularly 
well played. 

MAUDE ADAMS OPENS HER SEASON 

Montclaib, N. J., Oct. 3. — Maude 
Adams opened her season here last night 
appearing in "The Little Minister." Miss 
Adams win continue to present "The Lit- 
tle Minister" on tour until she produces 
the new J. M. Barrie play, "A Kiss For* 
Cinderella," at ttie Empire, New York at 
Christmas. 



Washington Sq. Players 

At the Comedy Theatre on Monday 
evening the Washington Square Players 
presented four new one-act plays for the 
first bill of the subscription season. 

The first offering waa The Sugar Route 
by Alice Brown. This is another of the 
triangle plays with two women and one 
man, where the wife not only triumphs 
in the end, but incidentally saves her 
husband's paramour from being tarred 
and feathered by enraged citizens of the 
town in which the parties live. The cast 
was: Sue Berry, Gwladys Wynne; Mary 
Masters, Marjorie Vonnegut; Dan Mas- 
ters, Arthur E. Hohl; Grandmother Ber- 
ry, Miriam Kiper; Bill Blaine, Erakine 
Sanford; Alvin Greene, Robert Strange; 
Christopher Wills, Spalding Hall. 

Marjorie Vonnegut, Arthur H. Hall and 
Gwladys Wynne, in the leading roles, 
did very good work. The others were 
adequate to the demands made upon 
them. 

The playlet is well written and inter- 
esting. 

Lover's Luck, the second offering, has 
little to recommend it. Whether or not 
the fault lies in its translation we do 
not know. Its author is Georges dc 
Porto-Riche, and Ralph Roeder and Bea- 
trice de Rolthoir are responsible for the 
English version. It is talky and the 
players had little to do. The best work 
was done by Gwladys Wynne and Jose 
Ruben. Arthur E. Hohl was totally un- 
auited to the role of Pierre. 

The east waa: Francoiae Desroches, 
Gwladys Wynne; Marcel Desroches, JosG 
Ruben; Jeanne, a maid, Jean Strange; 
Madeleine Guerin, Helen Westley; Pierre 
Guerin, Arthur E. Hohl. 

Third on the bill was A. Merry Death, 
a translation from the Russian by C. E. 
Bcchhofer. It tells the atory of a Harle- 
quin who has lived his life and expects 
death at midnight. He has only four 
hours to live and lives them in a merry 
as well as amorous fashion. The playlet 
opens with a long explanation by Pierrot 
and closes with a abort one. 

The cast was: Pierrot, Phil'ip Tonge; 
Harlequin, Edward Balzerit; The Doctor, 
Erakine Sanford; Columbine, Florence 
En right; Death, Helen Westley. 

The players did capital work. 

The last offering was Sitters of Su- 
sanna, a farce by Philip Moeller. It deals 
with the Biblical story of SuBanna, who, 
because she defended herself became an 
object of scandal, and was dragged in the 
courts of law. 

The cast: Job, Erakine Sanford; Sam- 
son, Arthur E. Hohl; Chew, Spalding 
Hall; Myrah, Helen Westley; Zillali, 
Mary Coates; A Scholar from the East, 
Ralph Roeder; A Traveler from the West, 
Robert Strange. 

A friendly audience saw the opening; 
performance. 



WHAT THE DAILIES SAY 

World — Merit in pieces and actors.- • 

Tribune— "Sugar Bouse" of greatest appeal. 

Times — New programme distinct step for- 
ward. 

Herald— "Lovers Luck." wicked, not to say 
piquant. 

American — Players have achieved Broad- 
way. 



NEW MELODRAMA 
WELL RECEIVED AT 
39th STREET THEATRE 



"BACKFIRE." — A roar-act melo- 
drama by Stuart Fox, presented at 
the 39th Street Theatre, Oct. 2. 
OAST. 

Hiram Pace Frederick TtnesdeU 

Lydla Pace Mary Boland 

Marjory Pace Adrians* BonneU 

Mathew Garth Ogden Crane 

Herbert Garth Henry Gsell 

Sally Girth Atteen Poe 

alias Donaldson Walter Horton 

Bob Padgett Boy BrUnt 

Frederick Harrey William Bonelli 

Doctor ata^rdj ^ w . pe ,.„ 

Joles Martin Cheesman 

Maid Caroline Campe 

The action or the play la laid is a 
cotton manufacturing town. 



"Backfire," described on the programme 
as "a melodramatic play" by Stuart Fox, 
was presented for the first time in New 
York at the Thirty-ninth Street Theatre on 
Monday evening last. The play was re- 
ceived with favor by the large audience, but 
it is a question whether blase New Yorkers 
are prepared yet to warmly welcome this 
type of drama. 

There is the oldtime business man who 
saves himself at the expense of his trusting 
friend, whose daughter later becomes the 
secretary of the former in the hope of re- 
venging her father's wrongs. A younger 
daughter is killed while working in the 
plant, and everything is excused on the 
plea of "contributory negligence." The 
heroine succeeds in all her plans, to find 
in the end that she prefers to show mercy, 
and her employer is made to bring about 
bis own ruin, after her marriage to the son. 

Mary Boland is the heroine, and did full 
justice to her opportunities, making a most 
attractive picture. Frederick Truesdell 
played her father, who was transformed 
from the successful business man to a. 
watchman in the factory of his former 
friend. The latter was portrayed by Ogden 
Crane, while Walter Horton was a typical 
corporation lawyer, with his suave explana- 
tions of the business deal which brought 
about the ruin of the heroine's father and 
the unsafe elevator in which the younger 
daughter was killed. Henry Gsell, the 
heroine's lover, was acceptable in the role, 
and Aileen Poe, as bis Bister, and daughter 
of the rival manufacturer, was captivating 
as the fiancee of a busy insurance broker, 
Roy Briant, who was a sort of "big 
brother" to everyone. 

No melodrama Is complete without a 
villain, and William Bonelli set a new style 
and won his audienc by being a "good 
sport" in the end. Mr. Bonelli, always a 
splendid performer, brought to a somewhat 
unsympathetic rOle a magnetic personality 
which made his every appearance welcome. 

"Backfire" is an interesting play, with its 
tense moments, which, however, were not 
always received with the greatest serious- 
ness by the audience. It furnishes a good 
evening's entertainment. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY 

American— Audience not serious. 
World— Won't set city aflame. 
Times — Melodrama. 
Telegraph— True to its name. 



"HUSH" 

"Hush" is an amusing English satirical 
farce, with witty, charming dialogue, ad- 
mirably acted by a splendid cast, and pro- 
duced in that intimate, artistic manner that 
we are accustomed to expect from Winthrop 
Ames. 

Miss Violet Pearn, the author, accom- 
plishes what she sets out to do, to poke 
gentle fun at the daring sex play. The 
"modern" girl In "Hush" thinks it her duty 
to shake the mid-Victorian parents of her 
fiance out of their lethargy. While she her- 
self does not set about doing so, the play 
that she has anonymously written, and 
which the so-called Victorians attend, is in- 
tended to shock them. Not even this 
. "ultra" play, in which the young, "natural" 
mother, to prove to the scandal-monginf 
"Mother's Union" that her husband la 
really the father of ber baby, undresses the 
child and discloses a mole on its chest and 
commands her husband to remove his shirt 
and place upon view a similar, mole simi- 
larly situated — not even this can shock- the 
Victorians. The parents finally persuade 
the daring young girl that she, is really very 
old-fashioned after all. 

Simply because there is a ploy within a 
play is no reason for assuming that Miss 
Pearn borrowed from Shakespeare or Shaw, 
who used the same device. Suffice it to say 
that it is an admirable comedy, and highly 
entertaining. It fairly sparkles. 

Not a little of the success of "Hush" Is 
due to the vivacious, spirited and alto- 
gether refreshing acting of Miss Estelle 
Winwood as Lucilla, the daring young per- 
son who removes her stockings in public. 
A more charming portrayal has surely not 
been seen on the stage for acme time. 
Miss Cathleen Nesbitt as Julie Lazton, the 
playwright, is splendid. Miss Winifred 
Eraser as the mid-Victorian mother, Erie 
Blind aa the father, Robert Rendel as Jim, 

Cecil Yapp as the Reverend, Miss Katharine 
Brook as Mrs. Allison, Miss Augusta Havi- 
land as Lizzie are but a few that may be 
singled out in a cast that la well-selected, 
and in which every member is true to type. 
There is a delicate, subtle quality of 
satire in "Hush" tbat-Jnst prevents it from 
descending to ordinary farce. This It never 
does. It is refined, amusing, and certainly 
diverting. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY 

World — Freak humor. 
Sun— Quaint and witty. 
Evening Post— A sizzling squib. 
Evening World— A far fetched smUre. 
Times- 'Thin and unsubstantial. 



"Pell Mell" has passed its one hundredth 
performance at the Ambassadors. 



PRIMA DONNA ENGAGED 

The engagement of SberUe Beatrice 
Wheeler, prima donna, recently of the Chi- 
cego-Philadelphla Opera Co., to Charles 
Leroy Harpham, has been announced. Mr. 
Harpham is not in the profession. 



SONGS IN VAUDEVILLE 

But a few years ago the introduction of 
a high class ballad upon the vaudeville 
stage was something of an event. None 
but singers of reputation gained In opera 
or upon the concert stage had the temerity 
to attempt it, and many, of these singers, 
after the rendition of their favorite) con- 
cert or operatic selection, left the stage 
with scarcely a ripple of applause. 

Today there is scarcely a big vaudeville 
bill without its Chappell or Boosey ballad, 
and these numbers are almost invariably 
received with the greatest enthusiasm. 



JULIA ARTHUR ENTERTAINED 
The Gamut CI nb gave a d inner bit i 
to Julia Arthur, who spoke on "Haw It 
Feels to Come Back." 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 





A NEW STYLE 

PROFESSIONAL COPY 



Groat Sftviof in Production Cost as Well 

a* the Elimination of Large Part 

of Free List Will Be Effected. 

The professional copies of eight of the 
new Leo Feist songs will be issued in a 
new form which in addition to effecting a 
srcat saving in plates, paper and printing, 
will also do away with a large part of the 
free distribution of professional copies 
among people who have no right to them. 

Tbe new copies which will consist of a* 
single sheet will be only about one-half 
tbe size of the present sheet of music and 
will have an entire song'on each side. This 
is made possible by printing the melody 
alone with no piano part or accompani- 
ment. The principal parts of the harmony 
will be "cued" in. making it easy for any 
professional pianist to play tbe number 
just as the composer intended and to all 
intents and purposes is the same as the 
present professional copy. The amateur 
pianist, who by the way is the bane of 
tbe publisher's existence will not find the 
copy so valuable, as he will not be able 
to give a satisfactory rendition from the 
new style sheet and will in consequence 
be obliged to purchase a regular copy of 
the song. 

The new copies will be ready in a few 
days and their reception will undoubtedly 
be watched with much interest. 



HELEN TRIX'S FEATURE SONG 

Helen Trix, who is appearing in "Cas- 
tles in the Air," atop the Forty-f ourth 
Street Theatre, is meeting with great 
success with a new Bong by Herman L. 
Gantvoort and Rupert M. Graves entitled 
"1 Want to Be Wooed by a Toreador." 
The Karczag Publishing Company pub- 
lish it. 



EDNA WILLIAMS 

Edna Williams, after many years' as- 
sociation with the Jos. N. Stern Com- 
pany as production writer, has severed 
her connection with the firm. 

Miss Williams has not as yet made 
future plans. 



ANOTHER VON TILZER HIT 
"On the South Sea Isle," one of Harry 
Von Tiller's recent songs, is attracting 
much attention. It is being featured by 
scores of the best known singers, and judg- 
ing from its large sales is bound to rival 
any of Mr. Von Tilzer's famous song hits 
of the past. 



DOROTHY JARDON'S NEW SONG HIT 
Dorothy Jaraon, who is this season 
appearing in vaudeville, is scoring a great 
success with the new Chappell & Co.'s song 
"Oh! Ton Haunting Waltx." 



A CAMPAIGN SONG 

The C R. Foster Company have a new 
song entitled "Wilson Has a Winnin' Way 
and a Gash-darned Way of Winnin'," 
which has Just been accepted by the Demo- 
cratic National Committee. Considering 
the fact that this aong was written, pub- 
lished and accepted inside of two weeks we 
moat hand it to this enterprising western 
publishing firm that they show some speed. 



A NOVEL ADVERTISING STUNT 

Earl Burtnett, manager of the Philadel- 
phia office of tbe A. J. Stasny Music Co., 
will next week introduce a novel adver- 
tising stunt in connection with the suc- 
cessful song "I Found You Among the 
Roses." On Wednesday all of tbe retail 
Philadelphia stores will feature the song 
and every purchaser of a copy will be pre- 
sented with a beautiful American rose. 
Mr. Burtnett has secured tbe co-opera- 
tion of all the 5 and 10-cent stores as well 
as the other music dealers and expects a 
record-breaking business. 



THE "SUREST FIRE" SONG HIT 

Mose Gumble, professional manager of 
Jerome H. Remick & Co., says that "And 
They Called It Dixieland" is the "surest 
fire" song hit of the country. 



"HAVE A HEART" RELEASED 

"Have a Heart," one of the song hits of 
the "Ziegfeld's Follies," has been released 
to the profession at large. The song is a 
cleverly written, singable number, very 
melodious, and its publishers, T. B. Harms 
& FranciB, Day & Hunter, are confident 
that it will become a big popular success. 



TWO NEW QUARTETTE SONGS 

Male, mixed and female quartettes are 
among the busiest searchers after good 
things, and their task isn't an easy one, for 
really effective quartette numbers are. hard 
to find. But their joy is great over the 
discovery of a couple of numbers which, 
though at the apex of popularity as solos, 
have just begun to make themselves firmer 
in popular favor owing to their splendid 
adaptability for the use of quartettes. 
These two numbers are "Can't Yo' Heah 
Me Callin', Caroline?" and "There's a Long, 
Long Trail," both published by M. Witmark 
& Sons and both of them representing the 
type of splendidly successful songs, artis- 
tically and commercially, with which the 
name of this house is identified so dis- 
tinctively. Quartettes everywhere are. us- 
ing both these numbers with the happiest 
possible results. 



VICTOR WOODS WITH WTTMARK'S 

Victor Woods, for several years with 
Cbas. K. Harris, has joined the sales force 
of M. Witmark & Sons. He will cover the 
territory between New York and Omaha. 



"WITMARK"— NOT "WHITMARK" 

The music publishing firm of M. Wit- 
mark & Sons has been in existence for 
more than twenty-five years. The name 
is known the world over. It has adorned 
the title-page of millions upon millions of 
copies of music. And yet, in spite of all 
this, newspapers conducting music pub- 
lishers' departments persist in speling the 
name "W-h-i*t-m-a-r-k." 



NEW PUBLISHER 
Al Piantadosi has joined the ranks as 
a music publisher and will shortly hang 
out his sign announcing the event in 
some prominent spot on Broadway. 



GIVING SUNDAY CONCERTS 

Hans Bartsch has engaged the Bendix 
Ensemble Trio for the Bandbox Theatre 
to give a series of Sunday concerts. 



TO PUBLISH COHAN SONGS 

Billy Jerome, who in conjunction with 
Jean Schwartz has written many song 
successes, has finally induced George M. 
Cohan to embark in the music publishing 
business. 

The new concern, of which Billy will 
be president, have opened up handsome 
offices in the Strand Theatre building. 
All of Mr. Cohan's compositions will be 
released by the new firm. 



FISCHER HAS ANOTHER 

Fred Fischer doesn't confine himself ex- 
clusively to writing hits for the Leo Feist 
Company. His wife presented him with a 
bouncing eight and a half pound boy 
last week. Fred says, "I will have a 
staff of composers myself some day." 



BROCKMAN'S NEW SONGS 
James Brockman, who recently joined 
the ranks as a music publisher, has just 
released two new songs, both written by 
himself. One is an Irish ballad entitled, 
"Tm Building a Bridge for Ireland," and 
"All Over You," a novelty ballad. Both 
songs are of the better grade and are be- 
ing featured by several feature head- 
liners. 



ABLES WITH MORRIS 

Eddie Abies has signed with the Joe 
Morris Music Company to assist Joe Hol- 
lender in the professional department. 

Ruby Cowan is now associated with the 
Broadway Music Corp. as writer and to 
assist in the professional work. 



BROADWAY'S HAWAIIAN SONG 

At the Colonial Theatre last week Willie 
Weston featured "Gachi Hachi Wicki, 
Wacki Woo," and it went over for one of 
the hits of his performance. 

The Broadway Music Corp. has made 
this number their leader. 



A HARRIS BALLAD 

"All I Want is a Cottage, Some Roses 
and You," the latest Cbas. K. Harris bal- 
lad, is being featured by many of vaude- 
ville's biggest acts, including Van & 
Schenck, Al Herman, Dooley & Sales, 
Primrose Four and Ad Hoyt's Minstrels. 



JOLSON INTRODUCES NEW SONG 

Mose Gumble made a flying trip to Phila- 
delphia last week to hear Al Jolson intro- 
duce "Mammy's little Coal Black Rose," 
at the Lyric Theatre. 

Jolson made such a good impression with 
the song that he will make it one of his fea- 
tures. 



Paul Tietjens, the young composer and 
pianist has been engaged as musical direc- 
tor for Maude Adams whose new piece 
"A Kiss for Cinderella," will be seen in 
New York around the holidays. 



Herman Timberg, who is appearing in 
"The Passing Show of 1916," has con- 
tracted with the Messrs. Shubert to write 
the score of a musical comedy. Mr. Tim- 
berg started his stage and musical career 
as a member of one of the Gns Edwards 
vaudeville acts. 



Sharps and Flats 

By TEDDY MORSE 



Wanted, a new or second-hand instruc- 
tion book on "How to Yodle." 

After watching the 1916 model of the 
Cubs machine play ball, and noting the 
varying emotions on the manager's coun- 
tenance, we now know where that popu- 
lar expression came from — "A Tinker's 
damn!" 

Just for novelty's sake won't some Bong- 
writer, or publisher, grow a nice set of 

whiskers ! 

The Long Island R. R. has spent thou- 
sands of dollars on warning signs at their 
grade crossings, which is nothing compared 
to what the publishers have spent on the 
warning that has headed their "profes- 
sional" copies for years. And, may we be 
allowed to ask, Who ia being warned? 

May be those "Eat and Grow Thin-ners" 
aren't powerful when it comes to the in- 
fluence they can exert. George Broad- 
hurst, who, you'll admit, is a fairly 
clever as well as a successful playwright, 
wrote a pretty good comedy with popular 
Frank Mclntyre as the star. But un- 
fortunately the play was called "Fast and 
Grow Fat," and the "Eat and Grow Thin- 
ners" would have none of it and put it 
out of business in two weeks. 

But ifs a great thing (the book we 
mean). A friend of ours took off two 
pounds in four days, and he happened to 
figure out, at that rate, he would be u 
grease spot in exactly twelve months. 
The' slightly worried, he's still at it. 

Where do those amateur Ukelele players 
go when they want their instruments 
tuned? 

The term "Brassie" should not be con- 
fined to golf. It fits the song business so 
welL 

It used to be called the "eooch," then 
the "wiggle"; later on came the Texas 
Tommy"; "Salome" had its run, and now 
we get the same old thing all over again 
under the name of "Hawaiian." 

The Sweetest Melody of All: «T didn't 
know you were broke. Here's that ten I 
owe you." 

The Calliope! That was tome instru- 
ment. Remember when it used to lead 
the circus parade, and could be heard for 
miles? How the horses would prance; 
dogs would run away, with their tails be- 
tween their legs, and the kids used to 
hold their hands over their ears at the 
first blast out. of it. It was certainly 
sweet and soothing — then. Like the 
Grand Opera soprano we heard last win- 
ter — well live on the fond recollection ■ 



Have you ever heard of a 
wasn't a hit? 



that 



Have yon ever heard of an act that 
wasnt a riott 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



NEW YORK'S THREE GERMAN 

THEAT RES OPE N TO PUBLIC 

Style of Entertainment Runs to Straight Comedy With a 

Musical Show at the Irving Place — A Ludwig Fulda 

Play that Fails to Find Any Degree of Favor 



The German theater season is now well 
under way, performances being given in the 
Teuton language in three different play- 
houses. 

The first shot was fired with the opening 
of the Yorkville Theatre, followed in quick 
succession by the Irving Place and the 
Bandbox. 

As daring his last season Director 
Rschrrmn, of the Yorkville, is offering a 
varied programme, consisting of two 
sketches, a two-act dramatic playlet and 
solo numbers by Mizi Gizi, Ernst Naumann 
and Rudi Bahe. Of the three sketches, the 
more pretentions one, "Beregisa" (pre- 
viously presented on the English-speaking 
stage under the title of "A Pair of White 
Gloves"), is too brutal an affair to be 
pleasant, but high praise must be expressed 
for the splendid acting of Mizi Gizi (Mrs. 
Rachmann) in the "lady of the gloves," 
which, by the way, in her case were black 
ones. Also Herr Feist did very well in the 
part of the disagreeable Russian general. 

Of the other two sketches "Das Strumpf- 
band" ("The Garter") tries in vain to be 
witty, and the efforts of the cast, mainly 
'Emil Berla, Richard Feist and Amanda 
Blame were worthy of a better task. 
"Treller & Co.," the two-act playlet, is one 
of those innumerable affairs, the plot of 
which is partly laid in a hotel, affording the 
various actors a chance to escape their 
respective husbands and wife at the very 
last moment. However, the acting was all 
that might be expected and thereby saved 
the situation. Of the solo numbers, Mizi 
Gizi's was acclaimed with the greatest en- 
thusiasm, well-deserved, especially as far 
as her "Matter Erde" was concerned. Ernst 
Naumann was good, and especially his 
"Alle Vier" ("All four of them"), a little 
dramatic poem, touched the audience deeply. 
Rudi Bahe was funnier than ever, first as 
journeyman and then as "Hamfatto, the 
Actor," though the latter's monologue might 
well be toned down somewhat. 

The Irving Place, still under the direction 
of Rudolf Christians and Hans Bartsch, 
was the second German house to open, the 
offering being a four-act musical comedy 
"Wie Einst im Mai" ("As Once in May"), 
music by Water Kollo and Willy Bred- 
schneider, book by Rudolf Bernaner and 
Rudolf Schanzer. This was a recognized 
"hit" abroad, and the ensemble containing 
a good many new and splendid actors. It is 
to be regretted that in spite of this the 
house on the second night was half empty. 



The play, the four scenes of which are all 
laid in Berlin and its suburb Schoeneberg. 
is very clever, contains a large number of 
pleasing song and dance numbers, and the 
music is very charming. 

The stage management by Herr Marlow 
was splendid, and the costumes as well as 
sceneries were of a splendor and character- 
istic note not often displayed at this play- 
bouse. Amongst the newcomers the tenor 
Heinz Lingen won recognition instantly 
and at the close of the performance bad 
succeeded in making himself "the talk of 
the town" — or at least that part of it 
which is German. He has a pleasant voice, 
is a good actor, splendid dancer, and dis- 
plays so much vivacity and adaptability 
that one cannot go wrong in promising him 
a brilliant career. His partner, especially 
in the duet "unter den Linden," which was 
hailed enthusiastically and had to be re- 
peated, Eduard Kepler also found favor at 
once. Amongst the female new members of 
the troupe the soubrette Magda Szecsy was 
the favorite, and it was a pity indeed that 
the play afforded her only one scene in 
which to display her abilities. She is a 
fiery Hungarian, of very attractive appear- 
ance, and she alone would be sufficient to 
prove how ridiculous all rumors of famines 
in the countries of the Central Powers are. 
Ellen Dalossy, the second new soubrette. is 
a good singer, excellent dancer and good 
dresser, and fine actress, though her suc- 
cess might have been even greater if she 
was a little prettier. Betty Jung did very 
well in the part of au antiquated 
maiden. Of the old members of the cast 
Christian Rub easily carried off the honors 
of the occasion. He was exceedingly funny 
in the part of Baron Methusalem, first as 
a boy of fourteen, then a man of thirty- 
four, in the third act seventy-four years 
"young," and finally at the ripe age of 
ninety, but each time (with the exception 
of the first act, of course) just in the act 
of acquiring a new spouse. Annie Rub- 
FBrster, Otto Meyer, Ernst Robert, Hertha 
Schoenfeld (who looked exceedingly pretty 
and distinguished) and Flora Arndt were 
all good in their minor parts. A word of 
praise must be said for the chorus which, 
though small, was letter perfect, well 
drilled and well dressed. 

The enterprising managers of the Irving 
Place also direct the destinies of this little 
house, which was number three on the 
opening list. The offering was a so-called 
comedy by Ludwig Fulda. Were it not for 



the name of the author the play would have 
little to recommend it. In the entire offer- 
ing there is not a single character of real 
flesh and blood and not one possible situa- 
tion. 

The cast contained quite a number of 
newcomers, bat it would be entirely unfair 
to judge them after their impossible rdles 
in this impossible "Lustspiel." The prin- 
cipal part was played by Grete Felsing, a 
young lady of quite a reputation abroad, 
but who in this production plainly showed 
that she is not very familiar with the art 
of wearing her clothes well ; perhaps this 
characteristic seemed essential to her for a 
portrayal of the "new woman." Her part- 



ner Emil Hess did much for the part of 
architect Imhof. Fran Claire in an elderly 
part was excellent, in fact her appearance 
marked the only chance the audience had 
to smile. It is to be hoped that we see 
more of her in the near future. 

Other newcomers were Wilbelm Muclban 
and Bruno SchlegeL Smaller parts were 
taken care of by Aranka Eben, Hans Dnter- 
kircber, Ernest Holsnagel, Iffl Engel, Marg. 
Tarau, Marg. Christians, Selma Weber, 
Flora Arndt, Una Haenseler and Curt 
Manthei. Grete Meyer, though an old and 
undisputed favorite of the patrons of the 
house, was., unable to do anything for the 
part allotted her. 



Wot «8tb St. Phone Brrint 46. 

in. it 8.20. Mats. Wefl. k Sit. 2.20. 

OllTer Moraeo'i great liozhUu wctxu 



CORT 

UPSTAIRS i DOWN 



By Frsserlet 4 Faili Hsttsa. 
Diaastlsa" v>i eo-iirsan •( 



•f 

"Tin Great 



"Vssn 

Imr.' 



B. F. KEITH'S 

PALACE 

Broadway & 47th St. 
Mat. Dally at 2 P. M. 

25, SO and 75c. 

Every Ki[bt 

23 3O-T5-S1-S1.50 



JOSEPHQfE TIOTOR, 
WB3M STORY. Greater 
Morgan Dancer*. Henry 
Lewis. Howard A Clark, 

Cbas. E. Eran*. Cbaa. 

Abearn, Page, Hack & 
Mack, Current News Pic- 
torial. 



BELASCO 



West 44th St. Exes. 8.30 
Mats. Tours. & Sat. at 2.20 



2d YEAR 



DAVID BELASCO presents 



THE BOOMERANG 

"Booms laughter market."— EVE. MAIL. 

R| * I IT1/V B'WAT & 42d STREET 
M. /» Aj Jl \M Continuous from noon dally 

" ' W S HART In 

"THE RETURN Of DRAW' KAN" 

CHARIJE CHAPLTN TH "THE PAWKBHOP." 
RIALTO ORCHESTRA and SOLOISTS. 

r I TINC 17 THEATRE. W. 42d St. Era. at 8.30 
Ci LI I HUE. Mats. Wed. and Sat. at 2.30 

A. H. WOODS presents 

CHEATING CHEATERS 

Br MAS MARGIN. 



GEO. M. 



THEATRE, B'WAT ft 43d 



cohan's s. war mm > we *- * 

BXAW A ERLANQER Managers 

"USES'"" SEVEN CHANCES 

A comedy, by ROl COOPER SIEGRCE. 

"Exceptionally Funny" — World 

DsTPIini If THEATRE. W. 42d. St. Bra. at 8.30 
KXrUDUl Mats. Wed. and Sat. at 2.30 
A. n. WOODS presents 

HIS BRIDAL NIGHT 

With (he DOLLY SISTERS 

By Lawrence Rising. Revised by Margaret Mayo. 

GAIETY TSSEtSST 

TURN TO THE RIGHT 

By WINCHHLL SMITH and JOHN E. HAZZABD 

HIPPODROME 

MANAGEMENT CHARLES DILLINGHAM 
Nlgbta at 8.15; Mat. erery day, 2.15. 

. "THE BIG SHOW" 

STAGED BY It. H. BORNSIDB 

With tbe Incomparable PAVLO WA 

NEW ICE I MAMMOTH I 100 NOVELTIES 

BALLET I MINSTRELS I 1000 PEOPLE 

World's biggest show at lowest prices. 



new uBUKMmssrg&fiBSia 

KLAW & ERLANOER'S New Maalcal Comedy 

MISS SPRINGTIME 

By EMMERICH KALMAN. Composer of "SARI." 

UYTTaCafalfcl THEATRE, West 44th St. 
lllJilSUll Svo. ?JO. Mat.. Wed. & Sat. 

"The Gladdest Play la All toe Glad 

World. ' ' — Tele gram . 

POLLYANNA 

COHAN & HARRIS ,F SHSS» T 

Erea. 8.15. Mats. Wed. * Sat. at 2.13. 
COHAN & HARRIS 
present 

A Drama by CYRIL HARCOCRT. Author or "A 

Pair of Silk Stockings." "A Lsdy'a Nam*." Bte. 

i 

F'l II T#TarM W.4«th8t. Ets. at 8.20 
WILLIAM »»»" JR. pnsants 

"ARMS AND THE GIRL" 

A Comedy br GRANT 8TKWABT and 
ROBERT BAKER. 

FMPIRF B'WAY A 4Mb ST. Bra. 8.18 
■• *** ■ ■ ■*• «J Mats. Wed. A Sat. at 2.1S 

CHAS. FROHMAN CO Manager 

CHARLES FROHMAN Presents 

MARGARET ANGLIN 

CAROLINE *^SSr" 



THE INTRUDER 



In tbt Kew 
Comedy 



LYCEUM 

CHAS. FROHMAN CO. 
presents 



43th St. * B'way. En. 8.13 

Mat.. Than. A Bat. 2.1S 

OTIS SKINNER 



IN THE AMERICAN COMEDY 
By 



MISTER ANTONIO 



BOOTH TABKINGTOK 



COLUMBIA THEATRE 

BWAY., <7th STREET. N. Y. 

FRED IRWIN'S BIG SHOW 

CIVILIZATION 

"Stupendous and Wonderful.**— Trlcune. 

PARK THEATRE *]%".,?*£? 
BASE BALL 

National League 

POLO GROUNDS 

NEW YORK 



WANTED, AX OlMCE, FOR 





GIRL SINGERS— ICE SKATING TEAM— FREAKS— CABARET ORCHESTRA— MIDGETS FOR 

CIRCUS AND ALL KINDS VAUDEVILLE FEATURES 

State fall p articul ar* and send material in first letter 

Address RICHARD PITROT, Exclusive South American Manager, 47 W. 28th Street. N. Y. City 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 




October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




is 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



ACTORS PLAN 

WHITMAN'S 

DEFEAT 

UNITED IN THEIR DETERMINATION 



Desirous of defeating Governor Whitman, 
principally because he signed the Walker 
Agency Bill, the Actors* Equity Association 
l>as called a general meeting to be held 
in the Hotel Astor, at which measures will 
be adopted with this end in view. 

In the past there have been theatrical 
men who not only took an interest in poli- 
tics but were the recipients of political pre- 
ferment, the late Charles Boyt, the play- 
wright, being a striking example. 

During the last Presidential campaign 
many managers and actors became ardent 
campaigners for Woodrow Wilson, and none 
can say their influence was not felt. 

With that in mind the members of the 
Actors' Equity Association and those of the 
White Rats, are going to use their influence 
in the reverse ratio, as to Whitman in the 
coming Gubernatorial election, and throw 
tbeir support to Judge Samuel Seabury. 

A bulletin given ont at n receut council 
meeting of that organization announced 
that : . 

"A political committee, consisting of John 
Cope, chairman, and Richard A. Purdy and 
Paul N. Turner, respectively treasurer and 
attorney of the society, has been appointed, 
whose duties shall be to awaken all actors 



if. Xew York State, who are qualified to 
vote, to the pressing need of their registra- 
tion. The White Rats Actors' Union will 
b:- requested to appoint a similar committee 
to act jointly with ours to this end. All 
actors resident in New York will be asked 
to register and vote, and in justice to 
their interests they must not support 
Charles S. Whitman." 

The reason for the opposition to Governor 
Whitman, according to a prominent member, 
"is the selfish and contemptuous attitude he 
displays toward the theatrical profession." 

The differences between the Actors' 
Equity Association and Governor Whitman 
oiiginated over his signing of the Walker 
Agency Bill without so much as giving the 
actors an opportunity to present their side 
of the case. The Walker Bill is designed to 
legalize the split commission for vaudeville 
agents as well as the giving a "statement in- 
stead of a written contract" to an actor, 
when the latter can not be given conveni- 
ently. 

The Equity Association and the White 
Rats feel that their grievance is a just 
one. They think that they are of sufficient 
strength to command the respect of even the 
State Executive, and they intend to take the 
"bull by the horns" in the endeavor to prove 
tliey are entitled to this respect. 



TO DEMOLISH FOX HOUSE 

The City Theatre, William Fox's vaude- 
ville house on Fourteenth Street, is soon 
to be torn down. This was found neces- 
sary in order to permit the city to open 
a street through the theatre site for a 
continuance of Irving Place, from Four- 
teenth Street to Thirteenth Street. 

The City is located on the south side of 
Fourteenth Street and cuts off Irving 
Place at that juncture. The house seats 
about 2,900 people, and was originally 
built by the late Timothy D. Sullivan. 
At present it is owned by the Sullivan 
estate and leased from them by Fox. 



CINCINNATI EXPECTS BIG YEAR 

Ci.vcixnati, Oct. 2. — With the opening 
of the Grand Opera House yesterday the 
theatrical season 1916-17 i-. on in full 
blast: Fine attractions are booked at all 
houses for the season and record breaking 
business is predicted. 



NEWARK ORPHEUM LEASED 
Newark, N. J., Oct. fc. — It is locally re- 
ported that M. S. Schlesigger has leased 
the Orpheum Theatre to the International 
Circuit management and the bouse will 
soon be re-opened after several months of 
vacancy. 



MUSKOGEE'S NEW PICTURE HOUSE 

Muskogee, Okla., Sept. 30. — Daniel 
Meyers, of McAlester, has let the contract 
for a new motion picture house at Mus- 
cogee. The house, which will be known as 
the Strand, will be strictly up-to-date and 
will seat 650. 



THEATRES CHANGE HANDS 

McAlester, Okla., Sept. 30.— The Mc- 
Alester Theatre Co. has taken over the 
Iiusby and Yale-Majestic Theatres. The 
latter will be used exclusively as a pic- 
ture house. The Busby will play road 
attractions, vaudeville and feature pic- 
tures. 



BLOCH TO CONDUCT ORCHESTRA 

Ernest Bloch has been secured by Maud 
Allan to conduct the symphony orchestra 
for her second American tour this season. 



BURLESQUER A MOTHER 

Helen Eakins Nolan, formerly of the 
Liberty Girls, presented her husband with 
a baby boy on Sept. 23. 



MAX1ME ELLIOTT SELLS HOUSE 

The home of Maxime Elliott Goodwin, 
nl 320 West End Avenue, has been sold to 
un operating firm as a speculation. The 
dwelling is a handsome four-story struc- 
ture which was vacated by Mrs. Goodwin 
several years ago. 



"UNFORGOTTEN" 

THE BEAUTIFUL NEW SONG HIT. 

Recalls our Happy Careless School Days of the Past, but a Grassy Covered 
Grave in the Churchyard on the Hillside Speaks the Present. 

BOTH SOLO AND MALE QUARTETTE CHORUS 
By F. ROY McCLUSKY Canfield, Ohio. 



WILL H0SSITHCS PtRSONAUY^TEnED^toNG^IIITS^FORTHE NEW SEASON f 

WALKIN THE DOG 

THErSEHSAYBONAl'' HIT OF THE YEAR ? By SHELTOW BROOKS writer of "SOME OF THESE days"* 



A CREAT " J OY tendCCI IDIENCE 8QNC- iLLIAMS and WHITE 



YOU NEVER* CAN TELL" "YOUR GREAT BIG BABY SMILE' 



AWoi s- -.-.■ >_...> I ALEXANDER-fWI iETTaTMs "WE OFTHHE BTO" 



u 



THERE'S A RO$E IN THE WORLD for US ALL 

ONE OF THE BEST VAUDEVILLE BALLAD 'HITS" In Years! By W. R. WILLIAMS and NEWTON ALEXANDER — A Posltlvo"Hlf 



79 



"BROWN SKIN 

Another Novelty Hit" The Slning Ono-atep— Something Quite NEW 



ORCHESTRA "HITS"— IS cents each ANY 3 for 40 cents 
"WALKIN' THE DOC" Fox-Trot ("BROWN SKIN" One-Step 
"A SUMMER'S NIGHT" Waltz I " J E L L Y ROLL BLUES" 
"THE BULL PROC BLUES" and "SAXOPHONE RAO" 3 "Hits" from "CHIN CHIN" 



PROF. COPIES of the above for RECENT PROGRAM — Address all Mail to WILL ROSSITER "The Chicago Publisher" 71 West Randolph Street, CHICAGO, ILL 



THE ASHES 
MY HEART 

BV 

EDITH BLINN 



THE ASHES 
MY HEART 

'bv ' 

EDITH BLINN ; 



A GREAT BOOK IS A GREAT COMPANION 

either at home, on the train or in the dressing room. If you 
are looking for a lifelong companion, get a copy at once of 

lEHB'lEfcT 

By EDITH BLINN 
The best critics in America proclaim this the best New Book 
in America, Ask your bookseller or send $1.35 postpaid to 

Mark-Well Pub. Co., 145 W. 45th St., N. Y. 



THE ASHES 
MY HEART 

k. BV * 

EDITH BLINN 



THE ASHES 
MY HEART 

' BV 

EDITH BLINN 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



FIELD'S MINSTRELS 

MAY GO TO HAVANA 



Mardi Gras Week Likely to See Troupe 

in Cuban Capital. Company Now 

Touring South to Good Buiintu. 

The A. G. Field Minstrels, which are 
playing iu the South are doing good busi- 
ness, with sell outs at night and matinees. 
In fact business has been so big that Mr. 
Field has decided to make the one night 
stands two nighters, the two night stands 
three nighters, and a number of cities 
where the show has always played for 
three nights will become week stands. 

The annual banquet usually held on 
Oct. 6 in commemoration of the establish- 
ment of the company, will be given in 
December at Columbus, Ohio. This 
change is made at the request of many 
who have attended these banquets here- 
tofore who could not attend should it be 
given Oct. 6 on account of the distance. 

There is a rumor, that will not down, 
to the effect that the AI. G. Field Min- 
strels will play an engagement in Ha- 
vana; Cuba, during Mardi Gras week. 



BOSTON TO SEE TREE 

Sir Herbert Tree will open his new sea- 
son in Boston on Oct. 15 in "King Henry 
VIII." Other plays which he will include 
in his repertoire on tour are "The Merry 
Wives of Windsor" and "Richard IE." 
Following engagements in Chicago, Phila- 
delphia, Washington, and other leading 
cities, Sir Herbert will play a brief season 
in New York, during which he will present 
"Richard II." and "The Newcomes." 

The Actor-manager's American engage- 
ments will end in January, and he will 
then return to England to resume direc- 
tion of His Majesty's Theatre. He recently 
acquired the English rights to "The Great 
Lover," which he will present in London 
in the spring. 



HERBERT-HAUERBACH 
OPERA 

Victor Herbert and Otto Hauerbach are 
collaborating upon an operetta, which will I 
be produced early in the new year by Jo- 
seph Weber. It will be the first time that 
Messrs. Herbert and Hauerbach have 
joined bands in the writing of musical 
plays, the former having been heretofore 
associated with Henry Blossom and Glen 
MacDonough, while Mr. Hauerbach has 
worked with Rudolf Friml. 

It will be Mr. Weber's first production 
since "The Only Girl," which was pre- 
sented at the Lyric Theatre in the fall of 
1014. 

SHOW FOR SWEDEN 

Julius Brammer, Alfred Grunwald and 
Robert Winterberg, authors of "The Girl 
From Brazil," the musical comedy now in 
its sixth week at the Forty-fourth Street 
Theatre, and which was known in the 
original German as "Die Schtinc Schwedin" 
(The Beautiful Swede), have disposed of 
the Swedish rights to the piece to Herr 
Alfred Ranf of the Royal Opera House, 
Stockholm. 

As the cost of aniline -dyes and other ma- 
terials used in the preparation of an elab- 
orate musical comedy production is so pro- 
hibitive in Sweden, owing to the war, and 
as news of the great success of the Shnbert 
production of "The Girl From Brazil" is 
already known in the theatrical' circles of 
Sweden, Herr Ranf cabled the Messrs. 
Shubert last week for permission to present 
an exact reproduction of the musical com- 
edy, as it is offered in New York. It is his 
plan to have the scenery painted, the cos- 
tumes designed and executed, in fact, all 
parts of the Swedish production fashioned 
in America in the same manner as pre- 
sented at the Forty-fourth Street Theatre. 
Herr Ranf expects to produce "The Girl 
from Brazil" in Stockholm early this win- 
ter. 

SINGER, CANDIDATE FOR SHERIFF 

Franklin G. Hill, known to his friends 
as "Big Frank" Hill, is the Democratic 
candidate for Sheriff of Nassau County. 
Mr. Hill, who was formerly a prominent 
light opera singer, retired from the stage 
a number of years ago and engaged in the 
automobile tire business. ' 



"RED DARKNESS" COMING 

A drama by Arturo Giovannitti, en- 
titled "Tenebre Rosse" ("Red Darkness") 
will be produced Tuesday night, Oct. 10, 
in the People's Theatre, 201 Bowery. The 
play, which is said to be daring in tech- 
nique and subject, was originally written 
in English and called "As It Was in the 
Beginning." Mimi Aguglia, the Sicilian 
actress, who is here studying English pre- 
paratory to playing on the English-speak- 
ing stage, will help produce the play. 



CHOSE OPENING OPERA 

"Andrea Chenier," by Giordano, which 
has not been heard in New York in several 
years, will be the opening opera of the 
Boston National Grand Opera Company's 
season at the Lexington Avenue Opera 
House, which begins on Nov. 6 and lasts 
one week. 

The leading rfilcs will be sung by 
Giovanni Zenatello and Mine. Luisa Vil- 
lmii. Other singers who will appear dur- 
ing the stay at the Lexington are Miss 
Maggie Teyte, Miss Maria Gay, George 
Balkanoff, Tamaki Miura, Riccardo Martin 
and-Auguste Bouilliez. 



FRAZEE SHOW LEAVES 

The newly recruited company of "A Pair 
of Queens," the H. H. Frazee farce, has 
left for the wild and woolly west, pre- 
paratory to opening their road engage- 
ment at Kansas City on Sunday night. 
Adelyn Bushnell has replaced Kathleen 
Clifford in the cast, and the other mem- 
bers comprise Harry Stubbs, Ida Stanhope, 
Thomas Emory, Hugh Cameron and Maud 
Eburn. 



BOSTON THEATRES BAR CHILDREN 

Boston, Sept 30.— A new outbreak of 
infantile paralysis caused Mayor Curley 
to issue orders forbidding children under 
sixteen years of age in all places of amuse- 
ment Of course the greatest sufferers are 
the "jitney" pictures houses, many of 
which depend wholly on children for their 
matinee attendance. This ruling went into 
effect Thursday. 



BROWN ENGAGES OLVER 

Chamberlain Brown has engaged Hal. 
Olver to take charge of the publicity de- 
partment of the Chamberlain Brown, Inc., 
Agency. Mr. Brown has decided to elab- 
orate on his present system of personal 
press and publicity service, and arranged 
with Mr. Olver, who has been running a 
publicity bureau of his own. 

Mr. Olver at once closed his offices and 
moved over to the Fitzgerald bnilding. 



» 



Positively, Absolutely, Emphatically. 
The Big Time Sensational Song. 

"DONT 

FORGET ME 

By the Writers of "Baby Shoes," and "Down Among the Sheltering 

Palms." 

An Excellent Single, a Wonderful Double, and a 
Marvelous Trio or Quartet. 



A New Thought For An Irish Song 
am) 




v 



A BRIDGE 

a IRELAND 



By the Author of "As Long As the Shamrock Grows Green." 

A Truly, Really, Remarkable, Irish Ballad. The 
Title Speaks for Itself. 



Published by the 



JAMES BROCKMAN MUSIC 
PUBLISHING COMPANY 

145 West 45th Street, New York City 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



MANY ARRIVALS OF 

NOTED OPERA STARS 



Singer* and Dancer* Coining Preparatory 
to Openings of Various Operatic 

Productions 

Quite a number of operatic artists ar- 
rived here last week to take part in va- 
rious productions and many more are ex- 
pected to follow. 

Lucien Muratore, singer, is back from 
Italy, arriving on the steamship Dante 
Alighirri. Mme. Muratore (Una Cava- 
lieri) will follow shortly and is expected 
Oct. 8. 

Pierre Monteaux, who was permitted to 
leave the French army, was a passenger 
on the Rochambeau. He will conduct the 
music for the Russian Ballet at the Met- 
ropolitan. 

The general manager of the Chicago 
Orand Opera Co., Cleofonte Campanini, 
was also on the liner, with Rita Kornia 
Ope, prima donna from the Metropolitan 
Opera, House, who is to sing with his 
company for three weeks. 

Another arrival from the war zone was 
Auguste Bouillez, Belgian baritone, who 
will join the Boston-National Grand Opera 
-Co. Marie Claessens, singer, with the Bos- 
ton Opera Co., and Pilado Sinagra, tenor, 
of the Mancini Opera Co., were also pas- 
sengers. 



JAMS KINDNESS COSTLY 

Tabbytown, N. T., Sept. 30. — Elsie 
Janis said to-day that she will hereafter 
place a ban on tramps. Recently a gentle- 
man of the road called at the actress' back 
door and asked for a cup of coffee and a 
sandwich. He received a good breakfast. 

After he had gone Miss Janis missed 
her Pekinese dog. Princess Mousmee, given 
her by friends. She advertised, and S. G. 
Harris, a florist, reported seeing a tramp 
-■■11 a Pekinese dog to the chauffeur of Miss 
Catherine Barnes, of Ridgefield, Conn., for 
$5. Miss Janis and her mother motored 
sixty miles to the Barnes home, and found 
Princess Mousmee curled up on a silk pil- 
low before the fireplace. 



ARCHIE NOT INJURED 

Cleveland, O.. Sept 30. 
New York Clipper: 

There is no truth in the report that I 
was hurt in an automobile accident. I 
never felt better in my life. Sorry such a 
report should get around as I have been 
dooded with telegrams from many friends, 
and circulars from the best undertakers in 
the business. 

With best wishes for your fine paper, I 
am. With mnch health, 

"Lmu" Will Archie. 



ACTORS' GUILD TO BUILD 

There will be another home for actors 
hereabouts within the next year or two. 
according to the plans of the Catholic 
Actors' Guild. 

The organisation, which is composed en- 
tirely of Catholic members of the stage 
profession, beaded by Jerry Cohnn, Wilton 
and James Lacksje, Fred Niblo, Andrew 
Mack. Chauncey Oleott and Elisabeth 
Mnrray. is planning an unusually active 
season of entertainments and benefits to 
establish the nucleus of a' building fund, 
and the officers of the guild are sanguine 
of having enough money on hand to begin 
birHding before another year has passed. 



DESTINN CAN'T RETURN 

It is not likely that Emmy Destinn will 
he heard this season with the 'Metropolitan 
Opera Company, it has been learned, be- 
cause she is being detained by the Prussian 
military authorities. 

Charles L. Wagner, her representative 
in America, declared last week that he had 
been unable to communicate with her on 
account of the censorship maintained by the 
British. Homer Samuels, her concert ac- 
companist, is on his way here from Stock- 
holm without her, Mr. Wagner said. 



SOMETHING NEW IN PHILA. 

PH TT . Anrr . P HiA, Oct 2. — The Adelphia 
Theatre has a new experiment in view for 
Oct 12 when a morning performance of 
"Experience," starting at ten o'clock, will 
be given. 

This, it is claimed, will be the first ever 
for the city of Brotherly Love. 



MANAGER CELEBRATES 

New Orleans, Sept 30. — Thomas C. 
Campbell, in charge of Klaw cV Erlanger's 
interests here, recently celebrated the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of his active resi- 
dence in this city. Twenty-five years ago 
he came to New Orleans to take charge of 
Klaw & Erlanger's interests, which were 
then centered in the old Academy of Mumc 
and the St Charles Theatres". In 1887 he 
built the Tulane and the Crescent Thea- 
tres, of which he is still manager. 

Klaw & Erlanger have invested about 
$65,000 in the remodeling of the Crescent 
and Tulane Theatres, and Colonel Camp- 
bell, as he Is known, has booked the Inter- 
nationa] Circuit attractions for the entire 
season at the Crescent 



CHANGE ST. LOUIS THEATRE 

St. Louis, Sept 30. — The Coliseum is 
undergoing a number of changes, necessary 
for the visit of the Ellis Opera Company 
on Nov. 1 and 2. A new stage, 50x90, 
composed of seventy sections of three sizes, 
i< being built 

The cast for the two bills, "Carmen" and 
"II Trovatore," will consist of Geraldine 
Farrar, Helen Stanley, Rita Kornia. Lu- 
cien Muratore, Clarence Whltehill, Leon 
Rothler, Emmy Destinn, Louise Homer, 
Alma Peterson, Horgan Kingston, Glovani 
Polese and Constantin Nicolay, with a 
chorus of sixty, a ballet of sixteen, with 
Albcrtina Rasch as premiere dameutc, and 
an orchestra of sixty picked magicians, 
nnder the leadership of Campanini. 



BOSTON MANAGER NAMED 

Boston, Sept 30. — Lawrence McCarty 
will manage the Boston Opera House this 
season, its first as a playhouse, having 
formerly been the home of music only. It 
will open early this month, and two at- 
tractions already scheduled are the Ballet 
Russe and "Hip, Hip, Hooray." 



OLEAN THEATRE PROGRESSING 
Oijcan, N. Y., Sept 80. — The theatre 
being built in this city by the Bordonaro 
Bros, is nearing completion: The seating 
capacity will be 1,000 and the stage wfll 
have a 34-foot opening. S. D. Black will 
be manager. 



MINNIE CHRISTIE ILL 

Minnie S. Christie, has been oper- 
ated upon for appendicitis, at the High- 
land Hospital, Jfall River, Mass. She will 
be pleased to hear from her friends. 



WANTED MUSICAL COMEDY PEOPLE FOR 

EDDIE BLACK CO. 

BUOU THEATRE, ATLANTA, GA. 

One bill a week, one show a night no Sunday work. Good chorus girls wanted 
at all times. Those who wrote Owensboro, Ky., write here, care 

Mgr. BUDDIE McMUXAN, Bijou Theatre, Atlanta, Ga. 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN 

THE PICKERT STOCK CO. fijffinffi M -'VMSf & 

1913-1014 season and paid royalty In adrance on It to Darcy and Wolford. 

On April 17, 1916, we contracted for the play asain for summer season of 16 weeks, and also paid 
In royalty In advance to Darcy and Wolford. 

Id August we negotiated for the play again, bnt didn't renew our contract because we learned "Two 
Stocks" bad already contracted for aald play for New York State, and as we play some of the same 
time the other two do we didn't want "House of lies" as we had already played it once over the time. 
We still have contracts In our possession, the signing of which would have given as the play for oar 
Fall season if we bad so decided. 

The Pickett Stock. On. baa an entirely new list of high claas royalty plays, arranged by our New York 
Representative, Geo. W. Wlnnett, and the managers say "they're the beat bills we ever bad." 

The rickert Stock Co. played Haven's Theatre, Olean, last week, and gave as good satisfaction as 
some of the bigger companies. Manager Bitner will furnish programs to all who wish them, and If 
yon must know will give yon our full week's receipts. 

Managers who are receiving letters from Darcy and Wolford or any of our competitors about our 
plays may write Geo. W. Wlnnett, 037 Knickerbocker Building, New York, as to. our Royalty Rights 
(Paid In Advance) before booking 1 the show,. By mail we are sending onr entire route to Darcy and 
Wolford for their Information and Information of Managers. 

THE PICKERT STOCK CO. 

Toe s how w ith all High CUss Royalty Plays. Plenty of scenery and 5 Vsudeville Acts nightly. 
GEO. W. wnrHETT, New York Representative, KIT Knickerbocker Building, IMS Broadway. 



PLEASE WIRE 
REMITTANCES' 
WHEN WIRING US 
ADVERTISEMENTS 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

HAWAIIAN MUSIC 

"On the Beach at Waikiki" 

The sensational Hawaiian eonir success. 
Just the sons; to give the "Punch" to 
your Act. The wonder song; of the year. 
Your audiences will crave it. Now ready 
tor professional distribution. Send for Or- 
chestrations. No charge to bona fide 
artists. 

NOTE— We publish fully 90 per cent, of 
the best Hawaiian Songs and Hulas. We 
advise you to investigate while the craze 
for Hawaiian Music is on. 

Agents far Bergstrom Music Co.'s 
Publications 



Sherman.lllay 
fcCo."* J 

SAN FRANCISCO 



FREE TO PROFESSIONALS 

"My Mothers Cradle Song" 

Sweetest lullaby ever written. Send program 
or letterhead — no postals. 

Chrisman Pub. Co., Union, Mo. 

AT UBERTY 

After Oct. 7, account tent show closing. Man, 
juveniles, gen. bus., double trap drums. Age 
33. Height 5 ft. 6; weight 13a Wife, juveniles, 
ingenues, singing specialties. Age 21. Height 
5 ft. 2; weight 120. Address: W. LEROY, 
care Gordinier Co., Stronghurst, Illinois. 

VAUDEVILLE SINE HIT 

"I WANT TO GO".X 

J. I. IEED ausic rus. co., Asttii. Tost. . 



FOR SALE, 



Swtll set cottar*. Trick sill. 
Otto. Pump. Table. Lot or prop- 
erties. auscellantoDB ccstmecs, 
etc. Address 
ACME SCESIC WaiKS. IS MM An.. tr**Uya. ■- V. 

AGENT— AT UBERTY 

The "Regular" Agent is at liberty, just closed 
season of 20 weeks on Wm. F. Lewis Stock Co. 
snd made good, too. Prefer show going south. 
Know tent rep game like a book. Try me. 
Salary all yon can afford, aa I deliver the 
goods. W. H. TIBBILS, Csntropolia HotaL 
City. Mo. 



YES, NEW 

EVERY LINE IN 

THE NEW No. 2 

McNALLY'S 
BULLETIN 

PRICE $1.00 

Gigantic book of 132 pages of solid com- 
edy. It contains material that will give 
you an entire new Act or else bulla up 
your present one 

McNALLtTS BULLETIN No. Z contains 
17 SCREAMING MONOLOGUES. For 
Hebrew, Irish, Black and White Face, 
Dutch, etc. 

It GREAT ACTS FOR TWO MALES. 
Each act an applause winner. 

• ROARING ACTS FOR MALE AND 
FEMALE. They'll make good on any 
bill. 

22 SURE-FIRE PARODIES. On sll of 
Broadway's latest Song Hits. 

A COMEDY SKETCH. Entitled "AN- 
XIOUS TO GET RICH." It's the FUN- 
NIEST SKETCH in Vaudeville. 

McNALLVS MERRY MLSTRELS. Con- 
sisting of six corking FIRST PARTS, 
ending- with a screaming Finale. "NOT 
GUILTY." 

A TABLOID COMEDY AND BURLESQUE 
entitled, "IT'S YOUR WIFE"; also hun- 
dreds of Cross- Fire Gags and Jokes and. 
additional Comedy Surprises. Remem- 
ber the price of McNALLY'S BULLE- 
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WANTED IMMEDIATELY 

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October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



NEW YORK TO HAVE 

THEATRE OF THRILLS 

Patterned After Grand Guignol of Paris, 
It Will Present Playlets Calculated to 

Shock. Wul Begin with 

French Works. 

Before the current theatrical season is 
out New York will have a little playhouse 
patterned after the famous Grand Guig- 
nol of Paris. An old stable in Thirty- 
fourth Street between Second and Third 
Avenues is to be reconstructed into an 
intimate theatre with a seating capacity 
of 289, which will bring it within the 
building regulations for theatres of the 
smallest size. 

The dinginess of the building will be 
preserved for the sake of atmosphere, 
the approach to the auditorium will be 
through a dark passage, and rough 
benches will be provided for seats. 

The theatre will follow the policy of 
the Grand Guignol and produce playlets 
calculated to thrill or startle. In fact, 
a number of the playlets of the Mont- 
martre institution have been obtained for 
presentation, and Carrie V. King, an 
American writer who lives in Paris, will 
sail Saturday for New York with some 
of the manuscripts. The theatre will b« 
ready for occupancy about Jan. 1. 



formulated by this actor and his man- 
agers, Klaw & Erlanger and Geo. C. 
Tyler. These plans include the appear* 
a nee of Mr. Arliss in a new version of 
"The Professor's Love- Story," J. M. Bar- 
rie's play in which the late E. S. Willard 
met with such success. Mr. Barrie will 
make the new version of his play. 



Virginia Strang, the child actress, claiming 
she was too young to work under the child 
labor act. Judge Addams has her case 
under advisement Meanwhile Miss Strang 
is at her borne in West Forty-fourth Street, 
Cleveland. 



BARRIE PLAY FOR ARLISS 

When George Arliss, at the first New 
York performance of 'Taganini," a few 
weeks ago stated that in the course of 
the season he would appear in two or 
three other plays, little attention was 
paid to the statement. 

It now transpires that the utterance 
of Mr. Arliss was an intimation of plans 



ELKS HONOR MANAGER 

Oakland, Cal., Sept. 30. — Oakland 
Lodge, No. 171, of the Elks, gathered Sept. 
21 to attend a farewell to Harry E. Cor- 
nell, manager of Pantages' local house, who 
left during the week for Minneapolis. 

Cornell will be succeeded by Robert G. 
Dady. Mr. -Cornell goes East to become 
manager of Pantages' new house in Minne- 
apolis. 

STORM CANCELS FAIR 

Charlottesville, Va., Oct. 2. — There 
will be no fair held here this year, the 
dates for the Albemarle County Fair hav- 
ing been canceled. 

At a meeting of the directors of the Al- 
bemarle County Fair Association recently 
the following resolution was passed : "Ow- 
ing to the damage done by the storm and 
water to the grounds on which the Albe- 
marle County Fair was to be held Oct. 17- 
20, and the unavoidable delay in getting 
the necessary repairs made in time for the 
dates set, it is the sense of the directors of 
the association to call off the fair for this 
year and to authorize the holding of the 
fair in 1917 on such dates as Virginia's 
Fair Circuit may select." 



NEW TORONTO MANAGER 

TORONTO, Sept. 30. — Fred W. Bnsey, a 
veteran showman who spent two years 
managing Madame Calve in her tour of the 
world, built and operated the Savoy Thea- 
tre in San Francisco, was manager of Nat 
Goodwin for some years, and for twenty- 
three years was with Sells Brothers and 
Bamum's circuses, wss recently appointed 
manager of the Gayety Theatre in Toronto, 
Can., succeeding Thomas R. Henry. 



"JEFF" FOR MAUDE 

Cyril Maude will appear late this month 
in a new comedy, called "Jen"," dealing 
with life in a small town in Canada near 
the border line. With the exception of 
Muriel Martin Harvey, Mr. Maude will be 
supported by an all American cast This 
is due to the fact that the characters in 
the play are of the Northern New England 
type, with the exception of the roles taken 
by Mr. Maude and Miss Harvey. 



HALT CHILD ACTRESS 

Cleveland, O., Sept. 30. — The Juvenile 
Court has put a stop to the appearance of 



COURT SETS PRODUCER FREE 

Harry De Laney, a lawyer and producer 
of fashion shows, was discharged because 
of insufficient evidence when arraigned be- 
fore Magistrate Deuel Sept 27, in Jeffer- 
son Market Court, charged by Kenneth 
Palmer, a realty broker, with having passed 
a worthless $00 check De Loney's arrest 
on Monday prevented the opening of 
"Clothes," a fashion show, at the Forty- 
eighth Street Theatre. 



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.>2 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



up <SEi]j8$p®g ! >*m 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 




BY DR. MAX THOREK, Chicago 

Surgeon-in-Chief American Hospital; Consulting Surgeon Cook 
County Hospital; Consulting Surgeon Sheridan Park Hospital, 
Chicago; Surgeon White Rats and Actors Fund, etc., etc 

These articles ara written exclusively for the NEW YORK CLIPPER. 
Questions pertaining to health, disease, hygiene, self-preservation, pre* 
ventioo of diseases and matters of general interest to health wQl be 
answered is this column. ADDRESS ALL INQUIRIES TO DR. MAX 
THOREK, AMERICAN HOSPITAL, CHICAGO, ILLS. Where space will 
not permit or the subject is not suitable for an open answer, letters 
will be sent to the applicant p er so n ally. Dr. Thorek should not be ex. 
pected to diagnose or prescribe in these "^'"m-t for Individaul diseases. 



DIET FOR DIABETICS 



1 recently have received a number of 
inquiries relating to the diet of diabetic 
people. It seems that there are quite a 
tew of these cases in the profession. The 
ijuestion of diet in these instances has been 
i serious proposition with the afflicted and 
in fact this factor is looked -upon by ntedi- 

■ nl authorities as the most. important one 
in the treatment of the disease. 

An exclusive diet on any pabulum, no 
matter what it be, is bad.; It may be per- 
sisted in for a short time but the patients 
-non tire of it, the monotony drives them 
to desist from proper feeding and the re- 
sult is not at all desirable. The carboby- 
.1 rates (the starches) are the one class of 
roods that the diabetic fears, and justly 
-<>. Yet even this class of food may be 
allowed in graded- quantities, depending 
upon a number of factors. The most im- 
portant of these is whether or not the sys- 
tem digests that sort of food. This is 
best ascertained by an examination of the 
urine, which shows the presence or ab- 
sence of grape-sugar (glucose) and in 
what quantities. 

There are plenty of physicians who 
make a special study of the diabetic ques- 
tion of this disease and unless one has a 
thorough knowledge of the many phases of 
the disorder and its peculiarities, its proper 
treatment is questionable. 

Now, as a general proposition, it may 
be stated that diabetics should partake 
»f articles of diet which contain no car- 
bohydrate elements whatever, or very little 
of such. To the first class belong all varie- 
ties of fresh and salt meat, liver excepted, 
elear meat soups, poultry, fish, shell-fish, 
butter and eggs, fats and oils and cheese. 
As belonging to the second class may be 
mentioned the green vegetables, such as 
cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, 
string beans, onions, cucumbers, tomatoes, 
lettuce, escarole, spinach, chicory, water- 
cress, dandelion, beet-tops, asparagus, all 
nuts except chestnuts, all the acid fruits, 
and jellies (unsweetened) prepared from 
meat-juices and gelatin. 

It ia true that many of the substances 

■ ■numerated contain sugar, but that is not 
'^rape-sugar. The various sugars and 
starches which they contain are more easily 
i-onverted than glucose and consequently 
are taken care of by the organism. For- 
tunately milk-sugar is of this class and 
milk may therefore be freely allowed to 
the diabetic. 

In regard to bread, it may be said that 
the toast of whole-wheat bread twenty-four 
hours old is preferable to gluten or graham 
bread. Reynold Webb Wilcox, an author- 
ity, makes the following statement: "All 
the so-railed health foods, with which the 
author is acquainted, for the use of dia- 
betics, are deliberate frauds." Bread made 
from almond flour is highly recommended. 

Butter may be eaten by diabetic pa- 
tients, but its quantity should be limited. 

Beverages — Tea. coffee and cocoa, with 
cream or milk, and sweetened with beet — 
not cane — sugar is permissible. Many 
people use saccharin as a sweetening agent 
but this should not be indulged in more 
than one-eighth grain quantities to the cup 
of beverage. An excess of saccharin is 
likely to cause a constant disagreeable 
sweetish taste in the mouth, which is as 
objectionable as it is undesirable. 

All sorts of malt-liquors are strictly pro- 
hibited on account of their sugar contents. 
Cider and other fermented beverages be- 
long to the same class. The wines that 



contain only a very small quantity of 
sugar, such as Burgundies, Bordeaux, 
Rhine and still Moselle wines, may be 
allowed in moderation. Allow plenty of 
water. 

A remarkable form of treatment has of 
recent years been instituted, with con- 
siderable success, the potato treatment. 
This is said to be useful in all class of 
cases. One to two pounds of this vege- 
table may be eaten daily with the result 
of diminishing the thirst and the quan- 
tity of sugar in the urine. It is followed 
by an improvement in the general condi- 
tion of the patient. If a diet of bread is 
resumed, the symptoms at once recur, 
only to disappear on the return to 
potatoes. 

Joslin is an authority on this subject. 
The following recipes and menus taken 
from the work of that authority may aid 
many: 

1. — Bepco cakes. Each cake is equiva- 
lent to one egg. Hepco flour 4 2-3 ounces; 
eggs two; cream 40 per cent (2 ounces) ; 
butter \y 2 ounce; make twelve cakes. 

2. — Lyster muffins — equivalent to one 
egg. Lyster flour 3% ounces; two eggs; 
3 ounces of 40 per cent cream; 2 ounces 
of butter; make twelve muffins. 

3. — Bran biscuits for constipation. 
Bran, 2 ounces; % teaspoonful of salt; 
1-5 of an ounce of powdered agar; 3 1-3 
ounces of cold water. The bran is tied 
in a cheese-cloth and washed under a cold, 
water tap, until the water returns clear. 
This washes out the starch. Add the agar 
to the water and bring to a boiling point. 
Add to the washed bran the salt and hot 
agar solution. Mold into two eakes. 
Place in a pan on oiled paper and let it 
stand for half an hour. When firm and 
cool bake in moderate oven for thirty or 
forty minutes. 

4. — Bran cakes for diabetics. 2 cups of 
bran; 1 ounce of melted butter; 2 whole 
eggs; 1 white of an egg; 1 teaspoonful of 
salt ; water. Wash all starch from the 
bran as directed above. Wrin^ dry. Mix 
the bran, well-beaten whole eggs, butter 
and salt. Beat the egg white very stiff 
and fold in at the last. Shape with knife 
and spoon into three dozen cakes. Flavor 
with cinnamon or similar non-sugar con- 
taining material. 

5. — Diabetic lemon jelly. 1 ounce of 
lemon juice; 1 2-3 ounces of water; 1 
drachm of gelatin; saccharin to sweeten 
cream 1 ounce. Soften the gelatin in a 
part of the cold water. Heat the remain- 
ing water and lemon juice and pour over 
the gelatin. Stir until dissolved. Add 
saccharin and strain. 

6. — Diabetic ice-cream is made as fol- 
lows; 40 per cent cream — 3 ounces; 1-3 
ounce of water; I egg; saccharin; flavor; 
make a soft custard of the egg. I 2-3 
ounces of the cream and water. Whip the 
remainder of the cream and fold into the 
custard. Saccharin is added to the cream. 
Flavor and freeze. 

Many persons like vegetables. Many of 
these "contain large quantities of starch. 
The authority above referred to recom- 
mends in these cases, thrice-cooked veget- 
ables which are prepared as follows: 

The vegetables are cleaned, cut up fine, 
soaked in cold water and strained. They 
are then placed in a large square of double 
cheese-cloth and tied up, but not com- 
pressed. The bag of vegetables is placed 
in fresh cold water and the water is placed 
on the fire and heated to 150 degrees. 



BECOMING DEAF. 
Mr. S. M-, Jersey City, N. J., writes: 

Dear Doctor : I am forty-eight years 
of age and am becoming rather deaf. I 
pay a good deal of attention to cleanli- 
ness of the ears. I have tried hot olive 
oil and other remedies without relief. Can 
you suggest something that would relieve 
met Thanks. 

REPLY. 

A great many people entertain the idea 
that deafness is due to accumulation of 
dirt in the ears. While in a sense this 
may be true, deafness usually results from 
disorders of the highly delicate mechanism 
of the inner ear and in order that it be 
improved or cured it is necessary to at 
first establish the cause of the trouble and 
eliminate it. An ear-specialist (otologist) 
will, after a thorough examination, be 
most competent to advise you what to do. 
Other methods are guesses pure and sim- 
ple. Be examined and go after the condi- 
tion right. 



GETTING FAT. . . 
B. H., Lynchburg, Va., writes: 
" Dear Doctor: I am seeking your ad- 
vice and information through The Cupper. 
I am with a stock company and am get- 
ting fat in certain parts of the back 
(lower back). All other portions are pro- 
portionate and do not seem to share in the 
putting on of fat. The trouble is getting 
to be disfiguring and interferes with my 
work. Please advise me what to do to get 
rid of this trouble. Many thanks. 
REPLY. 
Turkish baths, followed by vigorous 
massage of the portions of the body af- 
fected, will render excellent service in your 
case. Compression by somewhat tight 
bandaging during the night will also be 
of value. Do not take patent medicines 
advised to reduce fat, they may injure you. 
Take the baths twice a week, not oftener 
than three times. Limit the quantity of 
fluid you are taking. Dry diet is 
preferred. 

YAWNING. 

MRS. R. N., Little Sioux, la., writes: 

Dear Doctor: For the past year I 
have been suffering with spells starting by 
my yawning. Gradually "these yawns be- 
come more intense and finally wind up by 
my becoming very sick to my stomach. 
These spells usually manifest themselves 
during my work in the evening and at 
night. They do not last over forty or per- 
haps thirty minutes. They gradually wear 
off. If they come on when I am on the 
stage water runs out of my eyes and nose 
and the yawning keeps me from reading 
my lines. I am very energetic but nervous. 
Have tried many things without avail. 
Please advise me through The New York 
Clipper what to do. Many thanks. 
REPLY. 
Your trouble is purely a nervous' mani- 
festation. I would suggest that you have 
the lining of your nose cauterized. (Any 
good nose and throat specialist will do that 
for yon without keeping you away from 
your work.) Keep your bowels open. 
Take a tablespoonful of the following 
preparation, every three hours beginning 
after your noon meal: 

Tincture asafetida 2 drachms 

Tincture valerian amnion 2 drachms 

Aq. Camphor .6 ounces 

LEAD POISONING. 
MR. L-* K. X, Philadelphia, Pa., writes: 

Dear Doctor: A brother of mine 
(twenty-nine years of age) is suffering 
from lead-poisoning. I have just found 
out about it yesterday. I am a singer and 
constant reader of The Cupper. I -will, 
therefore, be obliged to you if you will tell 
me through that publication whether or 
not the disease is curable. 
REPLY. 

That depends upon the degree of lead 
intoxication. If not too far gone it is cur- 
able. The sooner treatment is instituted 
the better. If no organic trouble resulted 
and treatment is begun before the poison 
had a chance to destroy vital parts, the 
outlook on the whole is favorable. 



BROKEN KNEE CAP. 
RUSSIAN DANCER, New York, writes: 

Dear Doctor: I have been the victim 
of a peculiar twist of my left leg while 
doing a Russian dance which resulted in 
my fracturing the knee cap. I was in bed 
for many weeks and the cap did not heal. 
An X-Ray picture shows that it is badly 
broken and the fragments are quite apart. 
My bookings, of course, had all been can- 
celled. I am getting different advice from 
my friends and one suggests this and an- 
other that, and I am all mixed up. I can- 
not walk and I am worried sick. Have 
decided to ask you what to do and hope to 
receive an early reply through The 
Clipper. Best wishes. 

REPLY. 

Do not fool around but have the knee- 
cap repaired by an operation. I am sure 
everything else has been, tried and failed. 
Now then, why procrastinate? You are 
making a living from the dexterity of 
your limbs and you cannot afford to take 
chances. Have a good surgeon wire the 
knee cap for. you and do the things that 
are essential for the re-establishment of 
good joint function. 

LOCOMOTOR^ATAXIA. 
M. L. P., Washington.-T^C, writes: 

Dear Doctor Thorek : Please let me 
know, through The Cupper, what the 
outlook is in a case of locomotor ataxia. 
Can it be cured? Many thanks. 
-REPLY. ■ 

The course of locomotor ataxia is es- 
sentially chronic It may extend over a 
great many years. The first stage lasts 
from a few months to many years. The 
second stage may develop rapidly or 
slowly. The third stage is terminal. 
Cases of. apparent arrest of the disease 
have been reported. The progress of Ihe 
disease may, in favorable cases, be ar- 
rested, checked, or at least delayed. If a 
specific condition is responsible for the 
disease (as is usually the case) and if the 
disease is taken bold of early, the out- 
look is much better than in neglected 



STONE IN THE KIDNEY. 
WHITE RAT, Cincinnati, O., writes: 

Dear Doctor: I have just been pre- 
paring to start on my season's engagements 
when I was suddenly taken ill with vio- 
lent pains in the right side. I was then 
in St. Louis. The doctor was called and 
said I had appendicitis. He called in 
two more physicians and they agreed that 
it was the appendix which was at fault. 
After freezing it four days I got better. 
I came home and was seized with another 
attack. I Bent for another physician who 
took an X-Ray picture and fonnd it was 
no appendicitis at all but a litle stone is 
shown on the picture, trying to find its 
way from the kidney to the bladder. I 
would have been in a fine fix had I let 
the 'first fellows take care of me, wouldn't 
I? Before I decide anything definite I 
would like to hear from you in The CLIP- 
PER and I wish you would advise me what 
to do. Please let me hear from you soon. 
Many thanks. 

REPLY. 

You certainly have a careful physician 
now. Yon are not the only one in whom 
mistaken diagnoses are made. Cases like 
yours are frequently puzzling and a stone 
in the ureter will often simulate appen- 
dicitis. I would suggest that you. leave 
matters alone now for a while. It may be 
that the stone will work its way through. 
If not, it will of course have to be re- 
moved. You ought to be grateful to your 
present physician. The position of. the 
ureter on the right side in relation to the 
appendix, is so close that mistakes like in 
your case are not infrequent. 

MRS. M. SHERDAIN, New York.— I 
have answered your letter to address given 
but it returned as insufficiently addressed. 
Please let me know your wherea bouts and 
I will re-address it. MRS. W. SHERRY, 
Amagonsett, L. L — Your letter baa been 
answered by mail. FRED. — I will, be in 
Philadelphia the last week in October at 
thr "S#aevue-Stratf6rd Hotel. 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



The Sowl that will putjoufactovtf 

The Hit of ' 

THE FOLWES 5^1916 



LYRIC BY 



GENE BUCK 



MU/1C BY 



tow JEROME KERN 



A FEATURE 
WITH EVERY 

HEADL1NER 



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A BALE AD 
BEYOND 
COMPARE 



PUBLISHED BY 



\ 



TBHARJVtr & FRANCIj; DJ&Y & HUNTER^ 

62 WE^TT 45™ */TKEET, NEW YORK,. 




34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



FRENCH OPERA CO. 

PLAN SEASON HERE 



Antoine K. da Vmlly Will Brine Entire 

Company (ran Paris and Give 

Season in This Country. 

Another grand opera company is contem- 
plating invading the already well supplied 
grand opera field this season. With the 
Metropolitan, the Boston National, the 
Chicago, the Ellis- Farrar-Destinn combina- 
tion, the Interstate, the San Carlo, the Los 
Angeles, the Royal Italian Companies and 
the Aborns, one would think that music 
lovers would have enough of this form of 
entertainment. 

The latest addition will be M. Antoine 
K, de Vally, an impresario of Paris, who 
announces that he is going to give a gala 
season of French grand opera right here in 
Xew York, under the auspices of the 
French Government, the Paris Grand Opera 
and the Opera Comique, with a company 
cf artists which will include nearly every 
singer of prominence on the operatic stage 
in France. 

M. de Vally says that he has been of- 
fered several opera houses here and in 
other cities for his French company and 
that he has been assured of the support 
or* the French-American colony, the mem- 
bers of which, he says, will subscribe lib- 
erally for his season. He chums to. have 
the co-operation of the French Government 
in the undertaking. 

He plans to faring over his entire organi- 
zation from Paris, with four conductors, 
six stage directors, principals, chorus and 
corps de ballet. It is his plan to give 
French opera exactly as it is presented in 
Paris. 



DANCERS BUY HOUSE 

The Ford Sisters (Dora and Mabelle), 
who are dancing in "The Passing Show of 
1916." at the Winter Garden, purchased a 
home at Bath Beach, last week, and pre- 
sented' it to their mother. Mrs. Ford was 
herself a dancer, having, with her husband, 
under the name of Ford and Forrester, 
danced her way around the world for 
twenty years. 



Joe H. Lee. who for many seasons baa 
been prominently identified with "Billy the 
Kid" company, and recently finished a suc- 
cessful summer season with Pawnee Bill's 
Pioneer Days Wild West, win enjoy a short 
visit to Major Lil lie's (Pawnee BUI) Buf- 
lafo Ranch at Pawnee, Okla., before re- 
turning east. He has been re-engaged for 
the Pawnee Bill Show for the 1917 summer 
season. 



REHEARSING ON FOUR STAGES 

The rehearsals for the New Winter Gar- 
den production, which is to follow "The 
Passing Show of 1916," began Monday and 
occupy the stages of fonr Shubert theatres. 
The Winter Garden stage will be nsed for 
the setting up and perfection of scenic and 
electrical effects of the new show. The 
principals will be at one theatre; the bal- 
let at one, and the chorus at another. 



A NEW PRODUCING FIRM 

George M. Severe, the well-known black- 
face comedian, has formed a partnership 
with M. W. Kallesser and will shortly 
send out on tour Mr. Kallesser'a three-act 
comedy drama, "The Ingrate," with Fran- 
cis Keeley and a strong supporting com- 
pany. The company is now in rehearsal 
and win open about Oct. 15. 

The new producing firm has ready for 
production two other pieces, "What Might 
Have Been" and "A Millionaire for a Day." 
Phil York will be the business manager of 
"The Ingrate." Ellis Antkes has been ap- 
pointed New York representative. 



Harry Liston, the old time comedian, 
writes me that he is still in harness anil 
very much to the good. He states that 
he recently toured with Max Erard and 
Maskelyne's Mysteries. 



LADIES' DAY AT FRIARS 

The Friars have sent out announcements 
of '■Ladies' Day" at the Monastery, No. 
110 West Forty-eighth Street, on Monday, 
Oct. 9, from two to six o'clock p. m. Each 
member will be furnished with two tickets 
on receipt of the names of his guests. 

At four o'clock a concert will be given 
in the Auditorium, at which four eminent 
artists will appear; Albert Spalding, violin- 
ist; Rudolph Ganz, pianist; George Bar- 
ren*, flute virtuoso, and Andre Benoist, 
accompanist. These artists are all mem- 
bera of the Friars, and the announcement 
of their appearance at this concert ensures 
a large and brilliant audience. 



OLCOTT REFORMS 

Interest in the forthcoming appearance 
of Channcey Olcott, noted Irish singer, in 
the new play by George M. Cohan, "Honest 
John O'Brien," is widespread, in view of 
the fact that Mr. Olcott wil not sing even 
one song in the production. Needless to 
say, the new role will be awaited with 
eagerness by his army of admirers. Mr. 
Olcott plays the part of a good-natured 
Irish-American gambler, and in his sup- 
port are Willette Kershaw, Grace Goodall, 
Mary Ramsey, Calvin Thomas, Joseph Kil- 
gour, George Sidney and others. 

"Honest John O'Brien" opened in De- 
troit on Monday evening of this week. 



LITTLE CLARICE A SOLDIER 

Clarice Snyder, seven years old, has been 
engaged by the Shuberts for the role of a 
little soldier in "Her Soldier Boy." 



"DEVIL'S HARVEST" IN BOSTON 

Boston, Sept. 29. — Castle Square, the 
erstwhile home of the John Craig Players, 
will be the scene of "the Devil's Harvest" 
on Monday, under the auspices of the In- 
ternational Circuit. Nat Griswold will ap- 
pear in the leading role. This, is the play 
in which Lefler and Bratton are making 
their re-entry into the production field. 



FELT OKLAHOMA STRIKE 

Some independent Chicago agents with 
acts scheduled to play Oklahoma City kept 
the wires hot Saturday when acts sent to 
the strike-bound city balked. One promi- 
nent agent, with a famous girl water act, 
got notice that the girls, who were not 
members of the A. A. A., refused to work 
because they feared violence. He wired 
that they must adhere to their contracts, 
but most of the day passed in uncertainty, 
as the girls agreed to play in one wire and 
refused to do so in the next. 



REVIVE "THE POETASTER" 
PnTSBUBQH, Oct 2. — William PoeL 
founder and director of the Elizabethan 
Stage Society, has been engaged by the 
Carnegie Institute of Technology to coach 
the students of the dramatic arts depart- 
ment in a classic production of Ben John- 
son's "The Poetaster." His engagement 

will last for three weeks. 



BOBBIE ALLEN ANSWER 

Bobbie Allen, in private life Mrs. Jack 
Hunt, please communicate with Mrs. Mae 
White, 310 N. Rand St, Charleston. W. 
Va. 

Have good news for you. 



HARDY MANAGER OF MODERN 

Pboytoekce, B, I. Sept 30. — Marl- 
borough Hardy, long identified with the 
show business, has been appointed manager 
of die Modern Theatre, in this city. The 
house is on the International Circuit and 
is doing excellent business. Mr. Hardy 
formerly was with James A. Hearn, and 
came to Providence from Newark. 



GADSKI RE-PLACES DESTINN 
San Fbakctsco, Sept 30. — Johanna Gad- 
ski sang the role of Aida this afternoon at 
the performance of that opera at Erring 
Field. Emmy Destinn, who, it was reported, 
would sing the role, could not be secured. 



HORNING ASSISTANT MANAGER 

Reading, Pa., Sept 30. — Robert Horning 
advertising man at the Hippodrome, has 
been promoted to the position of assistant 
manager of the Hipp-drome and Orpheum 
Theatres, here. Both houses are under the 
management of Geo. W. Carr, representing 
the Wilmer & Vincent interests at the two 
theatres here. 



HELEN TRIX'S 

FEATURE SONG IN 

"CASTLES I1V THE 

at the 44th St. Theatre, New York, is the wonderful number 

1 Want To Be Wooed By A Toreador" 

By Herman L. Gantvoort and Rupert M. Graves 

Professional singers write for copy of this new song hit 

The Karczag Pnb. Co., 62 West 45th St., N. Y. 



GEORGE 
M. COHAN 



wishes to announce that all 
musical compositions from the 

GOHAN PEN 



will be published by 



. 



THE WILLIAM JEROME 
PUBLISHING CORPOR'N 

Strand Theatre Building New York City 

Between 47th and 48th Street, on Broadway 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



SONG WRITERS MAY COME AND SONG WRITERS MAY GO BUT 





■UN* 



just simply can't make his songs behave- They will insist upon being HITS. '■" Gee, that ,VGN TILZER guy is lucky. Look at the 
hits he has. I never had any real luck in my life. It's hard work in giving -the public what "they want. My -beat pal wouldn't 
sing a sorig for Trie if it didn't make good, and I wouldn't; expect him to. : _ I always try to give you new ideas. ; I've never imi- 
tated another writer; Right now I've got the greatest bunch of songs I've ever had at one time. Look them over.- They're 
just a year ahead of the rest. NOTE: I -was the first publisher to use this -white oh black "ad" naw they're all— —"; 



OUR BEAUTIFUL HAWAIIAN SONG THAT IS SWEEPING THE COUNTRY 

ON THE SOUp SEA ISLE 

- Not an imitation but aberration ; with beautiful harmony for duet; /quartette, or trio. Also beautiful obligato. A sun 

ByfJHARRY VON; TILZER 



A BEAUTIFUL BALLAD DIFFERENT FROM THE REST 



THERE'S SOMEONE MORE LONESOME THAN YOU 



Lyric by LOU KLEIN 



The greatest punch poem.'with this ballad you've' ever heard. 



A BRAND NEW IDEA IN MARCH BALLADS 



Music by HARRY VONHL7.ER 



THROUGH THESE WONDERFUL GLASSES OF MINE 

This song looks like one of the biggest hits we've «ver. had. 'Any amount of; comedy, - topical - and loi'al choruses .ready now.. 
Lyric by JACK MAHONEY 1 Music by HARRY VON TILZER 



THE MOST-NOVEL SONG ON THE MARKET 



/SHE ALWAYS DID^ 
...si THE MINUET ' -,. 

One of those different songs that <.nly come from the House of HARRY. VON TILZER ~ - 

Lyric by STERLING & MORAN ; ^ ^/ ; ^ Music by HARRY'VON TIL7ER 



A MELODY SONC LI KE " SOMEBODY 'KNOWS" THAT YQULL JUST LOVE TO SING ' 

"YOU WERE JUST MADE TO ORDER FOR iWE 



Lyric by JACK MAHONEY 



A great double for boy and .girl" with beautifr.l obligato; 



ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A GREAT COMEDY SONG?: 



sic Kj HARRY- VON, 1 ILZER 



Sometimes You Get A Good One and Sometimes You Don *t 



• K . ANDREW B. STERLING 



Lois of extra verses./" Great "for": t^tHei* male or female 



Music by HARRY VONT1LZER 



A BETTER SONG THAN "THE GREEN GRASS GREW ALL AROUND" 

" With His Hands in His dockets and His Pockets in His Pants " 

, Lots of comedy verse's that will riiak^ your audience , ln,u§li . out Joud." r". 



ANOTHER CINCH HIT ' .". 

"Since Mary Ann McGue Game Back from Honolu" 

;- A regular HARRY VONTILZER novelty song. Lots of laughs. . ' •-*""■..■"' 



AL JOLSON'S RIOT SONG 



"On The Hoko Moko Isle" | I Sent My Wife To The Thousand Isles 



HARRY VON TlLZiRMUSlG PUBLISHING CO. 

„rvn»«TF,N^p,„f m„ m 222 West 46th Street, Wew York City 



36 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



BURLESQUE 

Columbia Wheel 

AI. Reeves Bis Beauty Show — People's, 

Puila.. Oct. 2-7; Palace, Baltimore, 9-14. 
Behman Siiow — Grand, Hartford, Oct. 8-7; 

Jacunes. Waterbury. Conn., 9-14. 
Ben Welch's — Star, Cleveland, 0„ Oct. 2-7; 

Empire. Toledo. O., 9-14. 
Bon tods — Cmplre, Toledo, O., Oct. 2-7 ; 

Lyric, Dayton. 0.. 9-14. 
Bostonlana — Gaiety. Omaha. Neb., Oct 2-7; 

Open 9-14; Gaiety, Kansas City. Mo., 

ltt-21. 
Bowery Barlesqaers — Empire, Newark, Oct. 

2-7; Casino, Philadelphia. Pa.. 9-14. 
Burlesque Review — Casino, Pbila., Oct. 2-7; 

Bronx, New York, 9-14. 
Follies of the Day — Corinthian, Rochester, N. 

X.. Oct. 2-7: Bastable. Syracuse, N. Y.. 9- 

11; Lumbers, mica. 12-14. 
Globe Trstteri — Jacques, Waterbury, Coon., 

Oct 2-7 ; Newburgh, N. Y. and Poughkeep- 

sle. N. Y., 9-14. 
Golden Crooks — Olympic, Cincinnati, Oct 

2-7: Columbia. Chicago, 9-14. 
Hastings' Show — Gaiety, Montreal, Can., 

Oct. 2-7 ; Boston, Mass., 9-14. 
Hello, New York — Orpheum, Paterson, N. J., 

Oct 2-7; Empire, Boboken, N. J., 9-14. 
Hlp-Hlp-Hooray Girls — Open Oct 2-7; Ga- 
iety, Kansas City, 9-14. 
Howe's Kissing Girls — Gaiety. Toronto, Can.. 

Oct 2-7: Gaiety, Buffalo. N. Y„ 9-14. 
IrwlrTs BlB Show — Colombia, New York, Oct 

2-7; Casino, Brooklyn, 9-14. ■ 
Liberty Girls — Columbia, Chicago, Oct 2-7; 

Bercbel. Oes Moines, Iowa, 8-11. 
Maids of America— Flalnneld, N. J„ Oct. 2; 

Perth Amboy. 3: New Brunswick. 4; Park. 

Bridgeport, Conn., 6-7; Colonial, Prort- 

deare. 9-14. 
Majesties — Gaiety. Boston, Oct 2-7: Colum- 
bia. New York, 9-14. 
Marlon's Big Show— Star and Garter, Chi- 
cago, Oct.- 2-7 ; Gaiety, Detroit Mich.. 9-14. 
Merry Bounders — Casino, Boston, Oct 2-7: 

Grand, Hartford. 9-14. 
Midnight Maidens — Palace, Baltimore, Oct 

2-7; Gaiety, Washington, 9-14. 
Million Dollar Dolls — Cohen's Newbargh, N. 

Y., Oct 2-4; Cohen's, Poaghkeepsle. 6-7; 

H. * S. New York. 9-14. 
Meltfe Williams' Show— Empire, Albany, N. 

Y.. Oct 2-7 : Gaiety, Boston, 9-14. 
New York Girls — Gaiety. Kansas City, Mo., 

Oct 2-7; Gaiety, St Louis, 9-14. 
Pnsa Pass — Gaiety, Pittsburgh, Oct 2-7; 

Star, Cleveland, 9-14. 
Rag Doll In Hsgland — Colonial, Providence, 

Oct 2-7 ; Casino. Boston, 9-14. 
Roseland Girls'— Bastable, Syracuse, N. Y., 

Oct 2-4; Lnmberr. Utlca, 6-7; Gaiety, 

Mootroal. Can.. 9-14. 
Bom Bydell London Belles — Lyric, Dayton, 

O.. Oct 2-7: Olympic. Cincinnati, 0., 9-14. 
Sidman'a Own Show — Empire, Hoboken, N. 



J.. Oct 2-7; Peoples, Philadelphia, Pa., 

9-14. 
Sightseers — Gaiety, Washington, D. C, Oct 

2-7: Gaiety. Pittsburgh, Pa., 9-14. 
Some Show — Gaiety, Detroit Oct 2-7; Ga- 
iety, Toronto, Ont., 9-14. 
Spiegel's Revue — Empire, Brooklyn, Oct 2-7 ; 

Park, Bridgeport, Conn., 12-14. 
Sporting Widows— Casino, Brooklyn, Oct 2- 

7; Empire, Newark. N. J., 9-14. 
Star and Garter — Gaiety, Buffalo, N. Y., Oct 

2-7; Corinthian, Rochester, N. Y.. 9-14. 
Step Lively Girls— Gaiety. St. Louis, Oct 

2-7; Chicago, 111.. 9-14. 
Twentieth Century Maids — Bronx, New York, 

Oct. 2-7 : Orpheum, Paterson, N. J_ 9-14. 
Watson's Beef Trust — Bercbel. Dea Moines, 

Iowa, Oct 2-5; Gaiety, Omaha, Neb., 9-14. 
Watson A Wrothe — H. & S., New York, Oct 

2-7 ; Empire, Brooklyn, 9-14. 

AMERICAN CIRCUIT 

Americans — Academy. Jersey City, N. J., Oct. 
2-7: Gaiety. Philadelphia, Pa.. 9-14. 

Auto Girls — Century, Kansas City, Mo„ Oct 
2-7; Standard, St Louis, Mo., 9-14. 

Beauty. Youth and Polly — Majestic, Indian- 
apolis, Ind., Oct. 2-7; Buckingham, Louis- 
ville, Ky.. 9-14. 

Big Beview of 1917 — MarshaUtown, 5; Ce- 
dar Rapids. 6 ; Ottnnvwa, 7 ; Century, Kan- 
sas City. Mo., 9-14. 

Broadway Belles — Empire. Cleveland, Oct 
2-7: Erie, Pa.. 9-10; Ashtabula, O.. 11; 
Park, Yonngstown, 12-14. 

Cabaret Girls — Lyceum, Columbus, O.. 2-7; 
Zanesvtlle, O., 10; Canton, O., 11; Akron, 
O., 12-14. 

Charming Widows — Lafayette, 6; South 
Bend, 6 ; Gary, 7 ; Gaiety, Chicago, I1L, 
9-14.. 

Cherry Blossoms — Gaiety, Minneapolis, Oct 
2-7 ; Gaiety, St. Paul, Minn., 9-14. 

Darlings of Paris — Gllmore, Springfield, 4-7; 
Howard. Boston. 9-14. 

Follies of Pleasure — Buckingham, Louisville, 
Ky.. Oct. 2-7 ; Lyceum, Columbus, O., 9-14. 

French Frolics — Akron, O., 6-7; Empire, 
Cleveland, O.. 9-14. 

Frolics of 1916 — Howard, Boston, Maes., 
Oct 2-7: New Bedford, Mass., 9-11; 
Worcester, Worcester, Mass.. 12-14. 

Ginger Girls — Open, Oct 27; Englewood, 
Chicago, 9-14. 

Girls from Joyland — Gaiety, Brooklyn, Oct 
2-7 ; Academy, Jersey City, N. J.. 9-14. 

Girls from the Follies— -Majestic, WOkes- 
Barre, Pa., 6-7; G. O. H.. South Bethle- 
hem, Pa., 9; Orpheum. Easton, Pa, 10; 
Grand, Trenton, N. J., 12-14. 
' Grown TJp Babies — Hudson, Schenectady, 
6-7; Blnghsmton, N. Y., 9-10: Norwich, 
11; International, Niagara Falls, N. Y.. 
12-14. 

Hello Girls— Gaiety, Chicago, 2-7; Majestic, 

Indiana polls, Ind., 9-14. 



Hello, Paris— Savoy. Hamilton, Can., 2-T; 

Cadillac Detroit Ht ^^ 

High Life Girls — Star. St Paul, Oct 2-7; 

Duluth, Minn., St Cloud, 9; Mankato, 10; 

Waterloo, 11; MarshaUtown, 12; Cedar 

Baplds, 13; Ottomws. 14. 

Lady Buccaneers— Cadillac. Detroit Oct 2-7 : 

..Open, 9-14; Englewood, Chicago, 16-21. 

Lid Lifters — New Bedford and Worcester, 
Oct 2-7; Gardner, Mass., 9; Greenfield, 
10 ; Amsterdam, 11 ; Hudson, Schenectady. 
12-14. 

Military Maids — Star, Toronto, Can., Oct 
2-7; Savoy, Hamilton, Ont, 9-14. 

Mischief Makers — Penn Circuit Oct 2-7 ;■ 
Gaiety, Baltimore, 9-14. 

Monte Carlo Girls — Park, Yonngstown, O., 
2-7; Penn Circuit 9-147 

Pace Makers — Standard, St Louis, Oct 2-7: 
Terre Haute. Ind., 9-11 ; Lafayette, 12 ; 
South Bend, 13: Gary, 14. 

Parisian Flirts — Gaiety, Milwaukee, Oct' 2-7 ; 
Gaiety, Minneapolis, Minn., 9-14. 

Pat White Show — International, Niagara 

_ Falls, N. Y.. 6-7 : Star, Toronto, Ont. 9-14. 

Record Breakers — Olympic, New York, Oct 
2-7: Majestic, Scranton, Pa., 9-14. 

September Morning Glories — Gaiety, Phila- 
delphia, Oct 2-7 ; Shamokln, Pa., 9 ; Shen- 
andoah, 10; Majestic, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 
12-14. 

Social Follies — Trocadero, Philadelphia, Oct 
2-7; Olympic New York, 9-14. 

Tango Queens, Majestic, Scranton, Pa., -2-7; 
Gaiety, Brooklyn, 9-14. 

Tempters — Star. Brooklyn, Oct 2-7; Hol- 
yoke, Mass.. 9-11 : Springfield, Mass., 12-14. 

Thoroughbreds — Gaiety, Baltimore, Oct 2-7; 
Trocadero, Philadelphia, Pa., 9-14. 

Tourists — Englewood, Chicago, Oct 2-7; Ga- • 
iety, Milwaukee. Wis., 9-14. 

U. S. Beauties — Grand, Trenton, N. J. 4-7. 

SUPPLEMENTAL ROUTE 

"An Old Sweetheart of Mine" — Indianapolis, 

"Bird" of Paradise"— Lyric. Cincinnati, 1-7. 
Fields, Lew— Milwaukee. 1-4. 
"Fear Market The"— Newark. N. J, 2-7. 
"Fair and Warmer" — Ford's, Baltimore, 9-14. 
"Her Soldier Boy" — Lyric, Philadelphia, 

Pa., 2-7. 
Graham. Oscar — Hamlin, Tex.. 4 ; Anson, 6 ; 
- Ro tan, 6 ; Roby, 7 ; Sweet Water, 9 ; Thar- 

ber, 10; Strawn, 11; Whitney, 12; Hllls- 

boro. 13: CooUdge, 14. 
"Lost In New York"— Albany, N. Y.. 6-7. 
"Pair of Silk Stockings" — Lyric, Cincinnati, 

0„ 8-14. 
"Peek's Bad Boy" (Benner & Herman, men.) 

— New Lisbon, Wis- 4; Lodl, 8; St ought on, 

6 ; Whitewater, 7 ; EvansvUle, 9 ; Berrldere, 
m., 10; Brodhead, 11; Arlyle, 18. 
"PoUn" — New Garrick, New York. 9-14. 

"Bobinson Crusoe, Jr." — Academy, Baltimore, 
2-7. 



Twin Beds," Western Co. (A. 8. Stern ft Co., 
nigra. 1 — Kingston, Ont, Can_ 4 ; B roc krU le. 
6; Renfrew. 6; Cornwall. 7; Ottawa, 9. 

Tellegra, Lon — Academy, Baltimore, 9-14. 



9: 



xeuegrn, loo — Academy, Baltimore, 9-14. 
Tempest; Marie— Broad, Pblla., 2-14. - 
"Dncle Tom's Cabin," Kibble's — Springfli 

O., 7; Hamilton, 8; Connorsrtlle, Ind.. _ 

Greensburg, 10 ; Columbus, 11 ; Seymour, 

12: Washington, 13; Vlncennes, 14. 
War field, David — Ford's, Baltimore, 3-7: 

Knickerbocker, New York, 9, lndef. 
Jewett, Henry, Players — Copley, Bostos. 

indet 
Wallace, Morgan, Players — Sioux City, la.. 

lndef. 
Desmond, Ethel, M. C. Co. — Abbeville, La.. 

1-7. 



"WITHIN THE LAW*' NEXT 

Al Wood's remarkable money maker. 
"Within the Law," has been leased t» 
Vitagraph. 

A flve-reeler will be made under taa 
direction of Fred Thompson. 



PICTURES FOR MUSEUMS 

The movies have succeeded in breaking 
into high brow company, according to ta* 
Bulletin of the Metropolitan Muieum of 
Art, which states in a- descriptive artiess- 
that "the cinema will in future be nulls** 
for the purpose of preserving edncatJoaal 
and scientific researches. 

The New York Metropolitan and Art 
museums throughout the conn try will hSss 
after maintain film libraries. .... 

WANTED FOR THE ANGELL 

STOCK CO. No. a 

People in All Lines: Juvenile Man. Who Caa 
Play Some Leads; Man for Heavies; Man ssr 
Characters; Ingenue; Woman to Play Sssae 
Leads : Other ' Useful People, Doing ' Gs*4 
Comedy Specialties, Write. Two Companies. 
Can Use People at All Times. Write or Wire- 
Lowest Salary. TOE ANGELL, Park Theatre, 
46th and Butler Sts., Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Song With The Best Punch Line Ever Written 



"I Gould Make a Million Years of Love to You 



XIV 



ssmm 




By BOBBY HEATH 



ARTHUR LANGE 






The March -.'Ballad Hit With; a Great Lyric, a Tuneful Melody and a Great Punch Line. 



ls.it a wonder this son? : s a hit? 



Great Double Version and Patter Chorus. 




MIKE MORRIS, General Manager ' JOE HOLLANDER. Professional Manager 

MILT STEVENS 14^ W 4^th ^.T^^ ^ Atlantic City 

Traveling Representative l'*«> VV .iDUI 3 1., V%. * . V* f * 1029 g oard Walk 

PHILADELPHIA^ 136 X 9th St. CHICAGO : Grand Opera House Bldgl BOSTON: 230 Tremont St- 

ARCHIE FLETCHER WALTER WILSON ■ JACK MENDELSSOHN 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



37 



COLONIAL 

The Colonial has set some pace during 
the past three weeks for it to follow dar- 
ing the season. The bill this week is easily 
the best shown so far. The honse was 
packed, standing room being in evidence 
Monday night. 

The laughing hit of the bill was scored by 
Wells, Norworth and Moore, with Santly 
and Morton winning a close second. 

Emily Frances Hooper and Herbert 
Marbury opened with a song and dancing 
and considering the spot scored. What 
the team really needs is a little more 

time to put it in the proper shape. Miss 
Hooper is a dainty miss, who is exceed- 
ingly graceful, while Marbury lends much 
class to their work. 

As a novelty team Frank Parish and 
Peru are there. Monday night the crowd 
simply wouldn't let them go off. The boys 
dance, juggle, jump chairs, stand on their 
heads, fall into barrels, and numerous 
other stunts, all performed with care and 
cleverness. Here is an act that stands 
alone and can make good on any bill. 

Tom Kerr and Stiff? Berko, and their 
talking violins have improved wonderfully 
since their last New York appearance. 
They seemed to have acquired much more 
ease and inconsequence walked away with 
a fair size hit. The flirtation carried on 
with the violins as the mouthpiece made a 
clever piece of work. What they really 
need is a better selection of songs. 

Gas Edwards and his company, includ- 
ing "Georgie" and "Cuddles," seemed to get 
a lot of fun out of their work, but the 
audience didn't enthuse until Gus intro- 
duced a war song with the assistance of an 
old Grand Army man (a plant) in the 
orchestra. The trouble with Gus* present 
act is that it ia net up to the usual Gus 
Edwards standard. "Georgie" gave some 
really remarkable impersonations and de- 
serves great credit, while little "Cuddles" 
had equal success with one of Man Hal- 
perin'a. The present Gus Edwards act is 
a disappointment, -several changes being 
necessary before -!£ passes the board. of 
censors. . i 

The intermission- opened with the real 
laughing hit of the show, when Wells, Nor- 
worth and Moore began to pnt over a bunch 
of hoop???. There Isn't much class to the 
act, it doesn't require it AS one of the 
boys has to. do .la to slap his partner, on the 
face and the audience laugh. Some com- 
edy. The. girl has a pleasing singing voice 
and knows how to use it, also looking stun- 
ning in a pretty gown. The boys get away 
with a couple of songs in great shape. It 
is a dandy act- in any position. 

Mrs. Geae Hughes and Company In one 



of Edgar Allan Woolfs sketches called 
"Gowns," pleased immensely. Mrs. Hughes 
doesn't let a chance get away from her, tak- 
ing advantage of every opportunity. The 
rest of the company had suitable roles and 
gave good performances. 

Santly and Morton then followed and had 
the crowd with them from the start. Mor- 
ton's excellent comedy efforts combined with 
Sandy's piano playing is good for a "clean 
up" on any programme. 

Nicca Valieri, in Spanish dancing and 
presented by Payson Graham, held down 
closing position. While she is far from be- 
ing "The Mew Otero," as the programme 
states, she is clever and does all her special 
dances in a graceful manner. An excellent 
stage setting and several beautiful cos- 
tumes helped along the good work. 

Tom Edwards, assisted by Alice Melville 
and Skeet Gallagher and Irene Martin 
showed new act, and a full review will be 
found in our New Act department. 



MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Davidson (Sherman Brown, mgr.) — Lew 
Fields In "Step This Way" wtll be the attrac- 
tion first half of week of Oct. 1. 

Majestic (J. A. Hlgler, mgr.) — BUI week 
of 2: Claude Gllllnirwater, Milton De Long 
Slaters, The Mevako's, Primrose Four, James 
HleaUen, Bee Ho Gray and Ada Somerville. 
Kenney and Hollia, D'Amore and Douglas and 
Orphean) Weekly. 

Shcbebt (Canlggemayer, mgr.) — Sbubert 
Stock Company. 

Gatttt (Cbas. Fox. mgr.) — Parisian Flirts 
week of 1. followed by The Tourists. 

Emfbxss (H. Goldenberg, mgr.) — Stock 
Burlesque. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

Passoms' (Fl. C. Parsons, mgr.) — "Ka- 
tJnkaj" 2-4 : "The Blue Envelope," 6-7 ; "Fair 
and warmer," 8-10; "Prince of Plhwn," 13- 
14 ; Lew Fields; In "Step This Way,'* 19 ; 
Mrs. Flake, ln"Erstwbile Susan, 20-21. 

Gxand (Daniel Scullen, mgr.) — The new 
Bebman show, week of 2. 

Paucs (William D. Aacougb, mgr.) — BUI 
2-1: The Paynes, Fred Weber and company, 
Spencer, Charter and company. Carson and 
Wlllsrd and Bobby Heath and company. For 
0-7: Marde and Hunter, Stetson and Hnber, 
Sam Uebert and company. Fern and Davis 
and Merles' Cockatoos. 

Pom's (A. J. Vannl, mgr.)— BUI 2-4: 
judge and Gale, Savannah and Georgia, Mel- 
ody- Four and Cecelia Wright, Hendrlx and 
Padola and "Heart of a Ttalsf." For 5-7: 
Esse and Dutton. Armstrong and Strooae, Mr. 
and, Mrs. Gordon WUde. Mary Norma n, Mel- 
ody Monarchs and Maids. 

HaarroBD (E. H. Jennings, mgr.) — Inee'a 
"Civilisation," week of 2, marking the return 
of the house to pictures after the closing of 
Cecil Spooner and her players. 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Tkllsttb Shubibt (Leo C. Teller, mgr.) — 
"Justice" this week. Oct. 8: Jane Cowl In 
"Common Clay." 

! Bcshwicx (Benedict Blatt, mgr.) — BUI 
week of 2: The World Dancers," Flanagan 
and Edwards, Arthur Deagoa, Truly Snattack 
and Martha Golden, Charles Leonard Fletcher. 
Hugh Herbert and company, Merlan's Can- 

ges, Oonne and Albert, Guxmanl Trie and 
■the News. 

! Moxtioi (Lonla Werta. m»r.) — "Fair and 
Warmer" week of 2: "Justice" week of 9, 
"Hto Grande" week of 10. 

! OarHCtrsl (H. A. Daniels, mfr.i — Bill week 
of 2 : Nat C. Goodwin, Emms Cams and 
Larry Cornier, Jack Wilson, The PoncUlo Bis- 



ters. "The Age of Reason," Four Danubea, 
Thos. Swift and company, Gallagher and Mar- 
tin, Parish and . Peru and Hooper and Mar- 
bury. 

Gkaxtj Opera House (Cbas. Daniels, mgr.) 
Barry Clay Blaney In "In Walked Jimmy'' 
this week. 

Casino (Wm. F. Rife, mgr.)- — The Sporting 
Widows this week. Fred Irwin's Big Show 
next week. 



I'll Show You 



Easiest Way 
For You 

TO BK.Lt A VAUDMllf PFRFORMFR 

Vtlasslt lifarsants ItlM Fist W 

IQrtifSN, 732 frilly Hdf„ CHKA60, ILLINOIS 

PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liberty St., 7 A. M. to II P. M. 

and at Midnight with aO ss p s ss 

IS MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. 8d St. 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E. P. Agent 
14*t BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



Madison's Budget No. 16. 

PRICE ONE DOLLAR THE .WORLD OVER. 
Jammed with original, anre-ara fan. including 
12 original monologues, 8 great acts for 2 males 
and T for male, and female; a bright Irish 
comedy. 10 woodertol parodies, « craessrjaek 
mlnstrel first-parts, a aereamlng tabloid comedy. 
besides hundreds of new gags, sidewalk bits 
Pries SI. Back Issues 

Combination price of 
1.S0 . JAKES MAM- 
80V, 106S THIRD AYZBTUZ, WXW YORK. 



and useful flll-ln jokes. 
aU gone except No. IS. 
No. IS and No. IS la : 



Everybody's Drinking Them 

1786 ^ I J* 1916 

5tout 

fBw^ ARE YOU? 
C H. Evana A Sons, Hudson, Nsw York 

Wanted Repertoire People 

Specialties prefarrad. State lowest sal- 
ary. Appearance, reliability, sobriety 
abaolutely essential. Salary sure. See- 
son's engagement. 

GUY ASTOR 

225 Center St., Findlay, Ohio. 

WANTED 

For New Vaudeville 

Young man, eomedlaa, atast be feed nlanlat and 
experience stager. Slim sgnr*. set svar s ft. a 
in. Female lmptraooator prtftrret. 

Address JtlCHAiD KTRST, «T West toil St.. 
Vsw York City. 



Wanted-Young Leading Man -n. Woman 

Wardrobe, ability, asaetiHsl Cars. Work Florida all winter. Week end. State 

age, salary, whet experience, etc. Or no answer. Wire or write. 

EARL HAWK BIG STOCK CO., Sheffield, Ala. 

WANTED DRAMATIC PEOPLE 

AD Unas, jnrloding director and agent. Repertoire. Week stands. State if ye» 
do specialties. 

L. A. EARLE, Manager, Georgetown (Brown Co.),0« 



THIS WEEK; PORTSMOUTH. WEEK OCT. I. 



WANTED QUICK YOUNG INGENUE 

lassdassg Woman, for Walter Davis Stock Company 

SEND PHOTOS. MAKE SALARY LOW. ITS SURE. H 

ADAM W. FRIEND, ■ * 1 

Grand Op*rra House, Herkimer, N. Y. 



Wanted Musical Comedy Stock People 

FN ALL LINES — SISTER TEAMS. SPECIALTY PEOPLE, PRINCIPALS, CHORUS 
GIRLS. Those who wrote once please write again. CsajafSf OPENS TWstrsday, 
OCT. 5. PEDLEY & BURCH Theatrical Co., Grand Theater, Oweasahoro, Ky. 



\ »' .qe 



MISS DOROTHY JARDON 

IS FEATURING THE UNIVERSAL WALTZ SONG SUCCESS— 



YOU HAUNTING WALTZ 

By FRANCIS POPY (Founded on the Famous "Sphinx" VeJse) 

Published for Low, Medium and High Voice — Orchestration* in all keys. 

Chappell & Company, Ltd., 41 E. 34th St., New York 




38 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



STRIKE BOARD FAVORS 
OKLA. ACTORS 

{Continued from page 4) 
appointment of a State Board of Arbitra- 
tion and Conciliation, which after a thor- 
ough investigation of causes leading to 
the strike has handed down the following 
report: 

"This case came on for hearing upon re- 
quest of the officers of the Oklahoma Fed- 
eration of Labor and publication of the 
fact that the managers had requested arbi- 
tration through the Oklahoma City Cham- 
ber of Commerce and Ed. S. Vaught's con- 
firmation thereof, who is president of the 
Chamber of Commerce. 

"This board upon being duly convened 
heard the statement of the complainants in 
the case, through counsel Mr. Giddings, to 
wit: That they were willing to arbitrate 
all of their differences and abide by the 
decision of this board, and the statement 
from the defendants, through counsel, Mr. 
Johnson, to wit: That they were unwilling 
to submit the matters in controversy to 
arbitration, and further that they would 
not be bound by any action of this board. 

"Whereupon the Oklahoma State Board 
of Arbitration and Conciliation determined 
that, by reason of the strike existing, the 
public and city especially, were suffering 
inconvenience and injury, -and proceeded of 

its own motion to make this investigation, 
of which these findings and recommenda- 
tions are a result. 

"Witnesses were heard on both sides of 
the case upon oath, and the board, under 
the statute authorizing its action, submits 
the following recommendations, .which we 
believe will contribute to. a fair and 
equitable settlement of the differences 
which constitute the cause of this strike. 

"The facts in the case as presented by 
the evidence, appear to this board as fol- 
lows: Some time during the month of 
July, or the latter part of June, the stage 
employees of this city, who at the time 
were employed by the defendants, in this 
case, presented a contract to the theatre 
managers to cover the ensuing year; that 
they were unable to come to . an, agree- 
ment as to the terms of the contract sub- 
mitted, and a strike was declared on or 
about July 20. At .this time there was in 
existence in this city what is known as 
the .triple alliance, composed of motion 
picture operators, musicians and stage' em- 
ployees, and the musicians and motion pic- 
ture operators -were on strike in sympathy 
with the stage employees in a short time, 
and about this time there was formed what 
i3 known as. the.' quadruple alliance, which 
consists of the motion picture - operators, 
musicians, stage employees and members 
of the White Bats Actors' Union of Amer- 
ica, and the White Bats Actors in accord- 
ance with the terms of this alliance like- 
wise went on strike in sympathy with the 
stage hands, and when they did so, the 
quadruple alliance demanded a union shop 
for all four crafts. 

"The board will deal first of all with 
the local situation, which involves the 
stage employees, motion picture operators 
and musicians. 

"We recommend that the stage em- 
ployees and local managers enter, into a 
contract embracing- the following points: 
That nothing hut union stage employees 
be employed in the city in theatres con- 
trolled by the above managers; that the 
rate of wages be increased $3 per week, 
in accordance with the demand of the stage 
employees at the time of the strike, which 
r.^akes the rate of wages as follows: Mas- 



ter carpenters $24 per week; property 
managers $18 per week; assistant carpen- 
ters $18 per week, the said week's work 
to consist of seven days. 

"We further recommend that the hours 
of work be so arranged by the managers 
that it will be unnecessary for stage em- 
ployees to report before eleven o'clock 
a. m., that they have proper relief periods 
for lunch and supper and that they be not 
required to work later than 10:30 p. m. 

"We further recommend that all of the 
employees who were formerly employed 
by the managers in this city, including 
members of the stage employees, motion 
picture operators and musicians' union be 
reinstated at once, as outlined in the fore- 
going, without prejudice, and that within 
forty-eight hours after a settlement of 
this part of the controversy, that a com- 
mittee representing each of the three or- 
ganizations mentioned and the managers, 
meet in conference and draw up a contract 
for each of the organizations, embracing 
the terms and conditions of employment at 
this time, and herein recommended; said 
contracts to run for a period of one year 
from the date of said meeting, or longer if 
desired by the parties thereto, so that the 
contracts will expire simultaneously, and 
bo that the management and the men will 
not be confronted with sympathetic strikes 
arising from the fact that the organiza- 
tions affiliated under one general head will 
in the future be negotiating contracts at 
different times. 

"We recommend as to the condition of 
employment under the quadruple alliance 
first, that all actors who appear .in this 
and other cities in the State, be employed 
by the managers under the terms and pro- 
visions of an. equitable contract, which 
shall embrace substantially the following 
points: The artist should forfeit to the 
manager a reasonable portion of his salary 
.in case the artist fails through any fault 
of his own to appear as per contract or on 
account of sickness or accident. The man- 
ager should be allowed to cancel the en- 
gagement because of the inebriety or the 
suggestive act or word of said artist. The' 
manager should not pay for any services 
not rendered by said artist by reason of 
the theatre being closed through fire, pub- 
lic authority or .any reason, beyond the 
control of the manager. The' artist should 
present the act or specialty in the custom- 
ary manner for the number of perform- 
ances required daily and, at the times re- 
quired, and should fhot .appear in any act 
or specialty in any theatre within' a rea- 
sonable, time .of Any prior engagement in 
the city. The said artist should comply 
with all reasonable rules and regulations 
prescribed by the manager, and the usual 
billing matter, including photographs and 
cuts, should be placed in the hands of the 
management a reasonable time before the 
beginning of the engagement, and should' 
they fail so to do, the manager should have 
the necessary cuts and billing matter pro- 
duced and the cost of same should be de- 
ducted from the actors' compensation. 
Should the artist- cancel any engagement 
or any part thereof, they should pay as 
liquidated damages to the manager a sum 
equal to the salary they are .to receive, 
and we recommend that in case any act 
proves unsatisfactory or insufficient, that 
the local manager, hold his hooking agent 
responsible and not the act or actors. This 
provision would make possible a play or 
pay contract. We are satisfied from the 
evidence placed before us that the actors 
have been grossly imposed upon by man- 



SOCIETY'S LATEST DANCE CRAZE 

LONDON TAPS 

Now being taught and danced everywhere 
THE OFFICIAL MUSIC IS 

A BROKEN DOLL 



London's Song Sensation 



Piano Copy (but.), with full dancing 
description 30c. 



Orche.tr. (11 * P.) 25c 



T. B. HARMS CO., 



62 W. 45th ST. 
NEW YORK CITY 



WANT PEOPLE, ALL LINES 

Permanent Stock, Two a Week, No Sunday Shows 

All must have wardrobe, ability and appearance. Must send photos. Don't mis- 
represent. State age, height, weight and salary first letter. 

MEN— Leads, Characters, Comedian, Gen. Bus., Artist and Bit*. 
WOMEN — Leads, Characters, Soubrettes and Heavies. 
Photos returned. Salary sure. Tickets yes, to people we know. 

Address STRAND THEATRE, Mobile. Ala. 

STRAND AMUSEMENT COMPANY, INC., UBBBB3 



W A N TED AT ONCE 

For Rep. , Must Join on Wire 

JUVENILE LEADING MAN; YOUNG INGENUE WITH 

SPECIALTIES 

STATE AGE, HEIGHT, WEIGHT AND SALARY 
' Wire BANCE & NEWTON, 6620 Wads Park Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 



r%W jk '\J , C t WANTED FOR THE 

rLAYb poli stock theatres 

We will produce New Play, by Well Known Authors and Manuscripts by New Authors win 
receive prompt attention. Can also use good New. VaudevHle Manuscripts. 

JAMES THATCHER, Gen. M S r., Stock Drpt.. MOO Broadway. N. Y. 



&L~2n 




Jj,Ktcr,aMfjbm(ft»>iS 



warn 

mm 

mm: 



W ANTED 

FOR THE 

CUTTER STOCK 



CO. 



A young, clever, heavy man. Send photo, pro- 
grams . and state lowest salary. 
DICK FOOTE and MALCOLM CLIFFORD 
WRITE. Glad to hear from regular troupers 
at all times. 

WALLACE R. CUTTER 

Oct. S-S-7— Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

Week Oct. t— Saugertira, N. Y. 

WANTED 

Ingenue woman,' soubrette, comedy old 
woman, character woman, clever comedian, 
juvenile man, comedy old man, juvenile woman 
for our No. 2 small one-nighter playing east- 
ern time. All must do specialty. Can use man 
to run stage and play parts, also piano player 
who can donble stage (prefer, woman). Address 

Frederick Bros. Attractions, 

Baton Rouge, Oct. 9; Jackson, Miss , Oct. 10; 
Greenwood, Oct. 11. After that Lancaster, Pa. 



.HOT USED SY 

EVERY TOM, DICK and HARRY 

It Cash $1-50— Tears Way 

Ertry Sketch, ■mdom. rtrtiy. suc-WsJi Bit, 

Gat. Etc.. taataiase la 

LONDON'S 

VAUDEVILLE BUDGET 

IS SURE FIRE STUFF 
LONDON'S VAUDEVILLE BUDGET FOR 
Season 1916-17 eaatalas 
6 SKETCHES FOR 2 MALES. Iritk. Ditts. lists, 
jtw. Ecctatrk. Silly KM asl lass. 8 MOaO- 
LOGtJES. «M Mala. Drtaa. Trans, fas. Black asl 
Eccaatrk. 7 SKETCHES FOR MALE AMD FE- 
MALE. Difch. HaMnuBatts. Mala Inatmaanaa. 
Black. Hitrtw, Iruk. Eeuatric. TABLOID. GAGS. 
BITS. 12 WMSwfal PARODIES. PRICE J1.50. 
as. anaty sack If act tatMM. THE BEST BUDG- 
ET IK SHOW BUSINESS. BBDEB QUICK. . 
LOBDOI'S VAUDEVILLE BUDGET. 
' CRILLT BLOC. CHIGAGR ' 



AT LIBERTY 

JACK E. STEWART 

For Per. Stock or first-class rep, or one- 
nighter. Characters and Gen. Bus. Age 32. 
Height 6 ft., weight 170. Wardrobe and ability. 
526 Ml Elliott Ave.. Detroit.' Mich. 



ACTS 



PLAYB. 8KETCHES, WEnTEM, 

SCENARIOS and MSS. REWRITTEN. 

E. I. GAMBLE. Pbvywrlabt 

' M v ir psU, Ohio. 



:tober 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



39 



(Continued from page 38.) 
ra in cities in this State, and that the 
nagers have been imposed upon by cer- 
l booking agents of other States. 
As to the proposition of theatre man- 
ra using nothing but members of the 
ite Rats Union, the board does not 
1 qualified at this time to pass judgment 
m this important issue, by reason of 
fact that Oklahoma City is one of a 
in of cities on circuits which are booked 
foreign concerns or booking agents, lo- 
ad outside the State, and we therefore 
ibt the feasibility of imposing upon 
managers in Oklahoma City this duty, 
understand that the managers have in 
past operated with a closed shop in so 
as the local men are concerned, and 
t it is possible to carry out such a con- 
:t with the White Rats Actors' Union, 
on account of the conditions_before 
itioned, we can see that the matter is 
stionable and we believe that if a thor- 
;h trial is given it will demonstrate 
sther or not the plan is feasible. 
We further recommend that in the in 
ace of the triple alliance, a plan of 
itration be embodied in each contract, 
stantially as follows: That -whenever 
Tic vance exists between any manager 
any of his employees, the employees 
the manager shall first try to adjust 
h differences; if they fail, a committee 
■n the organization and from the man- 
rs be appointed and if they fail, the 
tie alliance select one man, the man- 
rs select one man, those two to select 
bird and disinterested party, one not 
nected in any way with the line of 
mess involved, who shall, for the pur- 
es of carrying out this agreement, con- 
ute a board of arbitration, whose find- 



ings eliall be binding on all parties con- 
cerned, and we further recommend that in 
any negotiations under this proposed arbi- 
tration plan, that a complete record be 
kept. 

"We are convinced from the testimony 
presented before this board, and after a 
thorough examination of the contracts un- 
der which the managers procure the acts, 
that the contract in universal use in this 
country is unjust, both to the actor and 
to the management. We recommend to 
the State legislature that it enact such 
laws as will protect the actors and man- 
agers operating in the State of Oklahoma. 

"We further find from the evidence pre- 
sented, the existence of a combination that 
controls managers and actors throughout 
the United States, and we recommend to 
the United States Congress that the proper 
laws be enacted to regulate the booking 
agent or those employed by, through or 
under him and his contract, which we 
believe will be of mutual benefit to both 
the actor and the manager." 

As to the report of the White Rats los- 
ing ground and members Mr. Mountford 
was not slow in denying the same. 

An examination of the minute book for 
the four- last meetings disclosed prolific 
applications, up for first, second and third 
readings, and showed that new members 
are coming in at every initiation in most 
encouraging numbers. "Besides," said Mr. 
Mountford, "dues are fully paid up, despite 
statements to the contrary." 

In support of this contention, the writer 
was permitted to glance at the bulging 
cabinet containing the index cards of mem- 
bers in good standing only. We noticed 
that Mr. Mountford is one Of these. He 
further said, "I want to point out how 



utterly unreliable any list of members 
supposed to be in the hands of any out- 
sider would be." 

"The list is divided into four sections 
and each section is in charge of a dif- 
ferent account, one division being devoted 
to the A. A. of A. In order to secure a 
full list, an unauthorized person would 
have to 'get next' to at least six persons, 
as I am the only one who kriwa the full 
membership. The cabinets are transferred 
to the vaults at the close of each business 
day to prevent any burglar from securing 
this list. 

"The White Rats and International Exe- 
cutive and other officers are kept tolerably 
busy looking after the interest of their 
members. The officers and members are in 
perfect harmony and we have yet to no- 
tice any desire for a flocking away from 
us that is hoped for in certain directions." 



WALLACE CO. FOR SHARON 

W'elliamspokt, Fa., Sept. 30. — The Ches- 
ter Wallace Players closed their fourteen 
weeks' engagement at Vallamont Pavilion 
recently, and on Oct. 9 Mr. Wallace and his 
company open at Sharon, Pa., for an in- 
definite engagement. 



FEIBER A SHEA CLOSE 

Akbon, 0., Sept. 30. — The Feiber & Shea 
Stock Co. brought its engagement at the 
Colonial Theatre to an end, and the house 
opened Monday with vaudeville. 

Here's to The New CLIPPER 

JERRY HART 

with "A HOUSE OF CLASS" 



AlboleneI 

rrmoTM make-up eislly tad quickly be- 
cto» It Is fire from water and ill sticky 
material. It cuts the (rcase paint ttutantlj. 
prolonged application Is not necessary. 

Put up In 1 
am) 3 aa. 
tubes to at 
the Bile- co 
box. also In 
Vj iod 1 
lb, rans. by 
ill first -elan 
dru&xljis and 

clnUm t d 
nuke-op. 
Sample fr*a 

McKESSQn & nUBtslNS, 91 Fa'ttia Stf'sLY. 



WE KNOW HOW 

To Deliver tbe Best Theatrical Good», Costumes. 
Tights, Trimmings, etc. Our lately revised 
Catalogue sent free to any address. 

REFERENCES-OUR CUSTOMERS. 

FRITZ SCHOULTZ & CO. 

1* W. LAKE ST., CHICAGO. ILL, 

Largest Stock in tne Country for Amateur and 
School Plays. 



WANTED 



2 Female Cal-arel sinter* $13 ■ week, must be 
full of pep. Hr»t claaa bout*. Addresa 

HARRY DEAN. Har.. Hotel Adam*. 
Cleveland, Ofeio. 

WANTED 

Younc "»' ful actor not over 5 ft. 8 for general 
businns at once. Tell all. Management Affiliated 
Lyceum Bureaus. CLUTCH KAIXOSY. 10 ETSJLS 

St., Auburn, N. T. 

Wanted, All Round Wild West 
People— Carlisle Wild West 

GRATZ. PA. 



F-OUR WONDERFU 



66 



There's a Bunm.li Girl A'Calling 



99 



(IN BURMAH BY THE SEA) 

A New Hawaiian Song with a Haunting Melody 



66 



Aiii Wiedersehn but Not Good-Bye 



99 



Semi-high class number. A wonderful, effective solo with a climax that will insure innumerable encores. A great song 

to show off the voice 



u 



99 



We're in love With the Same Sweet Girl 

A new style "Mother" song. A decided novelty. Just the number to brighten your act 
Free copies to recognized artists. Send a recent programme. Regular copies on sale at all 5 and 10c stores and wherever 

sheet music is sold 



66 



I Found You Among the Roses" 

A charming heart ballad suitable for any style act 

OVER A HALF MILLION COPIES SOLD * 

56W.45thSt. 
New York City 



Philadelphia Office 
700 Parkway Bldg. 

EARL BURTNETT, Mgr. 



Ay Stasny Mus ic (c,. 



40 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



PHILADELPHIA 

The new openings, week of Oct. 2, lire 
Marie Tempest in "A Lady's Name," at the 
Broad, and Clifton Crawford In "Her Soldier 
Boy," at the Lyric. 

Bboad (Nixon & Zimmerman, nigra.) — 
Marie Tempest In "A Lady's Name," started 
Sept 30, a two week' stay. 

Lraic (Leonard Blumberg, mgr.) — Clifton 
Crawford gave his first local view Oct 2, of 
"Her Soldier Boy." 

Adcxphi (Leonard Blumberg, mgr.) — "Ex- 
perience," started Sept 2, tbe fifth week of 
Immense returns. 

Gabsick (Chaa. C. Wanamaker, mgr.)— 
"The Hoose of Glass" began Its second week 

Fobeist (Nixon A Zimmerman, mgrs.) — 
"Sybil" started second week 2. 

Chxstnot Stbot Opeda Housa (McCar- 
thy ft McSweo, mgra.) — "The Birth of * 
Nation" engagement has been extended for 
two weeks longer. 

Walwdt (C. G. Strakosh, mgr.) — "Little 
Peggy O'Moore," 2-7. 

Knicke»bockib ( Win. w. Miller, mgr.) — 
"Madame Spy," 2-7. 

Oih-hkum (Homer Lloyd, mgr.) — Clifford 
Hippie In "Shameen Dhu." 

B. F. KaiTH's (H. T. Jordan, mgr.) — The 
playlet "The Four Husbands" la featured 
week of Oct 2. Others are Raymond and 
Bain, Mnrlel Worth, Genevieve Cliff and com- 
pany, Whitfield and Ireland, Hana Hanke, 
Loney Haskell, Apdale'a Circus and moving 
pictures. 

Nixon (Fred'k. Leopold, mgr.) — Bill 2-7: 
Lamberti, Maurice Samuels and company, 
June Mills, Da Fries Troop*. Hugo Latgena 
and moving pictures. 

Globe (Sablosky A McGnrk, mgra.) — Bill 
2-7: California Boys. Svengall and Helena, 
Schwarts Bros.. Scott and Markee, Ed. Gear, 
Alvln and Williams, Dow and Dow, Jones 
and Gray, Carroll Gillette Trio, McDonnell 
and Rowland and moving pictures. 

Wm. Pbnr (Win. W. Miller, mgr.) — Bill 
2-4 : "Marcelle, ' Tommy Bar, Taltes Colle- 
gians, Tbe Stantons and the film "Toe 
Tboroughbred." For 5-7 : "The Boarding 
School Girls," Ingles and Bedding, Mcintosh 
and company. Brown and McCormlck and 
the Sim "Gretcnen the Greenhorn." 

Kbtstohi (W. W. Taylor, mgr.)— Bill 2-7 : 
Barney Williams and company, Jim McWll- 
llams, J. Edward Lessig and company, 
Simpson and Dean Marrle Sparrow, William 
Wissen and company and moving pictures. 

Cboss-Kitj (Jaa. J. Springer, mgr.)— BUI 
2-4 : Modenna Opera Company, Goldsmith 
and Plnard, Tanning and Foster, Wlllard ar 1 
Bond, Thornton and Gorlow and Bob Tip 
and company. For 3-7 : "A Romance of the 
Underworld,'* Carlisle's Circus, Anger and 
King, Four Pallettes, Three Harmonists and 
moving pictures. 

Colonial (Harry 8. Smith, mgr.) — BUI 
2-7 : Charles J. Harris and company, The 
Langdons, Jones and Johnson, Nancy Fair, 
Joe Browning and moving pictures. 

liHAHD (W. D. Wegefarth, mgT.) — Bill 2-7: 
Woodrow, "SeDtember Mom," Hall and Ec- 
ker, Jenka aac' Allen, Macormack and Wal- 
lace, The NorvcUes and moving pictures. 

Alltohsnt t James Harklna, mgr.) — BIU 
2-1 : Bonnie Sextette, Arthur Havel and com- 
pany. Winston Duo, Bert Murphy and Fred 
Renelll. For 5-7: Lament's Cowboy Min- 
strels, Rice and Franklvn, Blcknell and Glb- 
ne.v. Jimmy Dunne and Daily Bros. 

Casino (W. M. Leslie, mgr.)— Jacobs and 
Jermon Burlesque Review 2-7. 

Gatbtt (Job. Howard, mgr.) — The Social 
Folllee, week of 2. 

Tbooadbbo (Robert Morrow, mgr.) — Hello 
Broadway Company 2-7. 

Peoples (Frank Abbott mgr.) — Al Beeves 
Beautv Show, 2-7. 

Dr Mont's (Frank Dnmont mgr.) — There 
were two funny skits provided by Domont'a 
Minstrels last week that amused One bouses. 

8TANI.BT (Pictures)— "The Intrigue," 2-f. 
"The Storm." 3-7. 

BCOKKT (Pictures) — "The Hidden Scar," 
2-4, "Tbe Dawn of Love," 8-7. 

Abcadia — "Manhattan Madness," 2-7. 



est City Trio, "At Ocean Beach," and Cun- 
ningham and Marlon. 

Gordon's OltMfia (John E. Comerford, 
mgr.) — Week of 2: Woods Musical Trio, 
"Motoring," Baker's Comedy Company ; Bor- 
stal Troupe and others. 

Scollay So. Oltkpia (J. J. McGalnness, 
mgr.) — Week of 2: The Wlleys, Parlor Car 
Trio, The Cleveland*. Six Stylish Steppers, 
and "When We Grow Up." 

Majxbtic (E. D. Smith, mgr.) — Week of 
2 : Picture, "Is Any Girl Safe?' 

Globe (Frank Meagher, mgr.) — Week of 
2 : Picture. Clark Kimball Young "The Com- 
mon Law. 

Walobok'S Casino (Chaa. Waldron, mgr.) 
— Week of 2 : Spiegel's Merry Bounders with 
Abe Reynolds and Geo. F. Hayes. 

Gaiety (Geo. B. B. Batchelder, mgr.) — 
Week of 2: Majestic*. 

Howard (Geo. B. Lothrop, Jr., mgr.) — 
Week of 2 : Follies of 1917, Jean Flnneran, 
Felix Thelbanlt Dayton Family. Telegraph 
Foot. Crouch and Richards and Jim Dixon. 

Bowdoih So. (Al. Somerby, mgr.) — Week 
of 2: Morris Monkey Land Circus, Marlowe. 
Meyers and Murray, Al. Fairbanks and 
CharUe Crafts. 



BOSTON 

CortaT (H. W. Pattee, mgr.) — Henry Jew- 
ett Players opened Sent 30 with "Ton Never 
Can Tell," which will also ran week of 
Oct 2 

shdbbbt (E. D. Smith, mgr.)— Week of 2: 

"Katlnsa," last week. 

Y> Wilbur (E. D. Smith, mgr.) — Week of 
2 : "Very Good Eddie" continues. 

Plymouth (E. D. Stair, mgr.) — "The 
Silent Witness" started Its second week. 2. 

Pabk So. (Fred E. Wright mgr.)— Week 
of 2: Last week of "Hlt-tne-Trafl-HolIday." 

Colonial (Cbas. Rich, mgr.) — Week of 2: 
Ziegfeld's Follies, third week. 

Hoi-us (Cbas. Rich, mgr.) — Week of 2: 
"Rio Grande" opens. 

Castle Sq. (Phillip Lavlne, mgr.) — Week 
of 2 : International Circuit's "The Devil's 
Harvest" 

Tsimost (John D. SchoeSel. mgr.) — Week 
of 2: Laat week of Ince's "Civil lxatlon." 

KsrrH's (Robert G. Larsen, mgr.) — Week 
of 2 ; Jack Norwortb, Toots Paka, George 
Kelry, Lovenberg- Sisters and Nearv Bros., 
Thomas Dugan and Babette Raymond, Billy 
Schoen ana Elisabeth Mayne, Alexander 
Bros, and Camilla's Birds. 

Loiv's Ouanm (Victor J. Morris, mgr.) 
— BUI 2-4 : Forest City Trio, Scanlon and 
Press, Cunningham and Marlon. Lew Welch 
and company. Chaa. McNaughton and John 
F. Conroy and Diving Models. For 8-7: 
Bradley Trio. "The Cat Came Back." Ley 
Wells and John F. Conroy and Diving Mod- 
els. 

Loew's St. Jambs (Jos. Brennan, mgr.) — 
Bill 2-4 : Frank!* Fay, Bradley Trio, "The 
Cat Came Back," Gertrude Long and Spen- 
cer Ward. For 5-7 : Scanlon and Press, For- 



SAN FRANCISCO 



"Intol- 



Columbia — Dark week of Oct 1 
erancc" beginning 8. 

Conr — "The Birth of a Nation" continues. 

Alqazab — Eva Lang, John Holllday and 
the stock company 1q "The Man Inside,'' 

WOt? It (\f 1 

Ohphecm — BIU week of Is Nora Bayea, 
Evan-Burrows Fontaine, assisted by Kenneth 
Harlan and company, Jacques Plntel, Balzer 
Sisters, James Kajiyaaoa, Webb and Burns, 
Demarest and CoUette, Violet Dale and Or- 



pbeum Motion Pictures. 
Em puis s — BUI week of 1 : 



The Randalls, 



Bromley and Pearson, Dooley and Nelson, 
SpIsseU Bros, and Mack. Electrice, Jack M. 
Lewis and the feature film of "Parity." 

Pantares — BUI week of 1 : Lucy Lncler 
Trio, Holmes and Wells, Royal Hawallans, 
Perntkoff Rose Troupe, Garclnettl Bros, and 
moving plctnrea. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Ltbic (C. Hubert Heuck. mgr.) — "The Bird 
of Paradise" opens a week's engagement Oct 
1. This will be followed by "A Pair of Silk 
Stockings" 8. 

B. y. Keith's (Ned Hastings, mgr.) — 
James B. Carson Is featured week of 1. Others 
are Blossom Seeley, Chung Hwa Four, "Forty 
Winks," O'Bonrke and Gllday, Eadle and 
Bamsdon and Togan and Geneva. 

EMpar.HH (George Fish, mgr.) — The vaude- 
ville bill headed by "The Paris Fashion Shop" 
week of 1 includes Charles Sweet the Penn 
City Trio, Fregol and company, the Gregorys 
and the Apollo Trio. 

PaoFLg'H (Charles McDonald, mgr.) — "The 
Early Birds," with James E. DalTey In the 
principal role, open a week's engagement 1. 

Olympic (H. H. Hedges, mgr.) — Billy Ar- 
lington heads the entertainers of the Golden 
Crook week of J. 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Stab (P. C. Cornell, mgr.) — May Robson In 
"The Making Over of Mrs. Matt?' 2-4 ; Cyril 
Maude in "Jeff." 5-7: Mrs. Flake In "Erst- 
while Susan," week of 0. 

Tecs: (Messrs. Bhubert, mgra.) — "Go to 
It" returns 2-4: "NotO," 5-7; "The Cinder 
ella Mas," week of 0. 

MajbsticiC. F. Lawrence, mgr.)— "Matt 
and Jeff's Wedding, 2-7; "The Heart of 
Dixie" follows. 

Shbu's (H. J. Carr. mgr.) — Current Nan 
Halperln, Creasy and Dayne. Leigh and Jones, 
Hopkins and Axtell, Mlrano Brothers, Valen- 
tine and Bell, De Pace Sextet and Weber and 
DtchL 

Lybic (H. B. Franklin, mgr.) — Week ot 2. 
Wolfe, Evans and Holiday, Font! Bonl 
Brothers, Tbe Brunnells, Bond Morse and 
. Vanfleld and Rene. 

Olympic (Bruce Fowler, mgr.) — Dick Mad 
doz and company, Fonr Bomana, Edwards and 
Louise, Newport and Sttrk and The Marendos. 

Academy (Jules Michaels, mgr.) — Musical 
Comedy continues. 

Gayety (C T. Taylor, mgr.) — Star and 
Garter Show week of 2, followed by Sam 
Howe. 



PHONES— Home: 231s INTERVALE. OFFICE: 4*4S BRYANT 

BILLY SHARP 

STRAND THEATRE BUILDING 

SUITE Zl» 

PRODUCER AND STAGE DIRECTOR 

PRODUCTIONS NOVELTIES VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

Wanted-- To Join On Wire 

Tall, Young, Good Looking Juvenile Man, Ingenue), General Business Man, and Artist 
to play General Business. This is the biggest traveling stock in Canada. Has not 
do»ed in four years. Make salary low, as it is rare. Hnrry Bla i ai n g. wire. 

Wire WILL VANCE, Tweed, Ontario 

Wanted for Happy Lou Whitney 

AND ASSOCIATE PLAYERS 

A fashion plate organization; carrying a sixty-foot car of scenic equipment. Up in 
fifty latest stock releases. Twelve weeks at Saginaw, Mich.; sixteen weeka at An- 
derson, Ind. Stock houses wire. Managers playing one or two bills a week, write. 
WELSH cfc WALBOURN, Week Oct. 9, Coldwater, Mich. 



SONGS and BALLADS of DISTINCTION 

IDEAL FOR USE IN HIGH-CLASS VAUDEVILLE. 
AND SUITABLE FOR ALL VOICES 

COME TO THE DANCE 

HERBERT OLIVER Km F. G. A. (MSS. C 

ENCHANTED GLADE (THE) 



(FLORID 
WALTZ 

SONG) 
Keys F. a A (MSS. Orch. in A) 



LOIS BARKER 



Key* F, Ab. (Orch. In Ab) 



GARDEN OF YOUR HEART (THE) 



FRANCIS DOREL 



Keys F. Ab. Bb. (Orch. In all keys.) 



I ADORE THEE 

FREDERIC KNIGHT LOGAN 
Keys F, A. (Orch. ta an k*ys.) 



LOVE BELLS 

FRANCIS DOREL ' 
Keys C, Pb, Eb, F. (Orch. ha Eb.) 



IN AN OLD-FASHIONED TOWN 

W. H. SQUIRE 



Kara Db. Eb, F. C (Orch. In all bays.) 



WHEN MY SHIPS COME SAILING HOME 



FRANCIS DOREL 



Kara F, G, Ab, Db. (Orch. to G, Ab, Bb.) 



NUTHIN' 

By LIBBIE DAVIDSON CARPENTER 
Eb. G, Bb. (Orch. to G.) 



SWEETHEART 

By LILY STRICKLAND 
Eb, F, Ab. 



ALL SONGS, 30c. Net Each. 

Postage 2c. 

(M.S.S. Orchsstratlons for Hire only.) 



ORCHESTRATIONS,25cNetE*ch 

(For a limited parted only.) 
* - Postage 3c 



BOOSEY & CO., 9 East 17th Street, NEW YORK 



F. 



HAVILAND'S 



I ENSATIONAL 
IONG 

'uccess 



"AT THE END OF A BEAUTIFUL DAY" 



BY WILLIAM H. PERKINS 



HiC Mf Witt ttC "lOti interest Then are millions of people today. 
_ ... Who are seeking to find out the way, 

Tie sot? that ytt .wc" sffeMmSfe. 

«• ___ _aal _ . .. Or within the blue depths of a true woman's eyes. 

lit Set? Will I IBM There are some that want riches and pow'r. 

And they seek for them 'most ev'ry hour. 
How I wiah tbey but knew that tor happiness 
There is only eat way, and 111 tall it to you. 



Tie LYBrC tefis He stwy 

Put it in your act and be convinced that it 
IS the song suc ce ss of the day. Copies and 
orchestrations in all keys are ready. 



Chorus 
At the end of a beautiful day. 
If you're fled, 'cause your heart seems to say. 
That you've been true and kindly, 
You've righted a wrens;, 

And you've given your amUea to bete ethers alone, 
If there*a somebody"e bin dam of care. 
That you're willing and ready to share. 
Then your heart's made of geld; 
And your ioys are untold. 
At the end of a beautiful day. 



F. 



HAVILAN Dffi 

128 W. 48th St, New York 

NOTE THIS NEW ADDRESS 



Our best wishes to the "new" Clipper in its "new" heme foes with this announcement 



Ri't&rvlii 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



41 



VETERAN MINSTREL 

IN PHILA. ASYLUM 



Hughey Dougherty Is Refuted Admiuion 

to Lob Angeles Institution. Brought 

Back and Ii Under Observation. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 2. — Hughey Dough- 
erty, the veteran minstrel, was brought back 
from California last week a mental wreck 
and it is feared that he will spend his re- 
maining days in an insane asylum. 

Last Summer a fund was made up to send 
him to his adopted daughter, Mrs. Evalina 
J. Hr.tiuian, at Lios Angeles. Shortly after 
his arrival there his mind began to give 
way and as Mrs. Buttman was unable to 
provide for his care in a private asylum 
a a effort was made to place him in a State 



NOW READY 



THE | CUPPER 
RED BOOK 

[ AND DATE BOOK 

For Season 1916-1917 
It contains the names and addresses of Man- 
agers, Vaudeville and Dramatic Agents in New 
York. Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia Pitts- 
burgh, San Francisco. Canada; Music Pub- 
lishers; Theatrical Clubs and Societies; Mov- 
ing Picture Firms, and other information. 

Sent only on receipt of 2c. •tamp, accom- 
panied by a coupon cut from THE NEW 
YORK CLIPPER. 



COT OUT AND 
Send this Coupon and 2c. stamp for a 
copy of 

THE CLIPPER RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 
(For l»!f-ltl7> 

To THE NEW YORK CUPPER 

MM Broadway. Naw York 



institution. Here the State refused as be 
was not a citizen of California, so that 
the only thing to be done was to ship the 
veteran back to Philadelphia. 

He is at present in Kirkbride's Asylum 
under observation, but he will be sent 
shortly to the State Asylum at Norristown. 

BUILD DP YOUR ACT 

And Double Your Income 

WITH 

DEAGAN 

Aluminum Chimes 
Pizzicato Nablmbas 
Marimbaphones 
Electric Una-Fons 

AND OTHER MUSICAL 
NOVELTIES 

Write for List of Show-Room Bargains. 

J. C DEAGAN 

Deaaan Buildin* 42*3 Ravanswood Ave. 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

ALICE DE GARMO 

IN VAUDEVILLE 




B.F. Keith's Circuit of Theatres 

A. PAUL KEITH, President. E. F. ALBEE, Vlce-Pras. A Cm. Mgr. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Booking Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 



W. S. CLEVELAND 

WANTS THE BEST IN VAUDEVILLE 

Suite at, Ordway Bldf- 2ST Mark.t 3U NEWARK. NEW JERSEY. PHONE «S MARKET 



WHY DON'T YOU 

Get my prices if you need new material? 

Interview by appointment. Write today. 

WILL GILLICK. 105 E. 89th Street, Naw York 



Big Time Acts 



PABODIES. etc C&Ulof for 
fUap. Ezclurif* work don*. 
Terms for lUnp. 
MARY THAYER, tm Broad St, Pror, R. 1. 



THANKS TO DICK KEARNEY 

RAYMOND INEZ 

F»AII>JE & NESBITT 

WERE A HIT AT THE COLUMBIA THEATRE, NEW YORK, SUNDAY, SEPT. 24th. 

WHAT VARIETY SAYS— Pain* and Nasbltt «ava th. bill it. initial Hash of class with « 

flirtation act in "ona." Tba (ui is attractive, also »•". and knows bow to cany karsalf. 
The man la thoroughly capabla, and taay kava froundad thoaa fsatursa with a clean, 
ori-inal routine. WYNN. 

PERMANENT ADDRESS. HOTEL NORMANDIE, NEW YORK 



HE GAVE YOU "I DIDNT RAISE MY BOY TO BE A SOLDIER," "PEG 0* MY HEART," "MANDALAY," ETC 

Alfred Bryan's Greatest Success Is 

/vivd i broke: ivtv 



6 6 



ALL OVER YOU 

lft Ve «e READ THIS MASTERPIECE choru. 



*f 



And so you're going to leave me, an other' a 

won your heart, 
And toll me with a smile, door, that you and 

. I must part; 
Have you mo moon forgotten, all I gave up for 

you? 
They told me I'd regret it, and now I know it's 

true. 



ALSO MAKES WONDERFUL 



All over you, I left my home, dear; 

All over you, I went away. » 

All over you, and you alone, dear, 

My poor heart aches, both night and day. 

All over you my friend* have left me, 

You took away the emuhine too; 

I went home with shattered pride, 

All alone knelt down and cried, 

And I broke my mother's heart all over you. 

DOUBLE NUMBER 



II 



MOYSHA MACHREE 



39 



GREAT NOVELTY COMEDY SONG 



II 



WE WANT WILSON IN THE WHITEHOUSE" 



STIRRING MARCH SONG— SURE FIRE 



IF YOU LOVE A "BLUE" MELODY SEND FOR 

"I MISS YOU MORE EACH DAY" 



•-WATHAIM" and 



sveral oth 



FOR CLASSY DOUBLE ACTS 

••ivrv LXIVIN' LOU w 



«« 



KENDIS," 145 W. 45tti Street, 1M. V. 



42 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



MLaJBaJSl M J 

In onUr to avoid mistake* and to insure the 
prompt deiverjr erf the letters advertised in this 
lJet, a POSTAL CARD must be sent requtstins 
us to forward your letter. It must bo signed 
with your full name end the address to which 
the letter is to be sent, and the Una of busi- 
ness followed by the sender should be men- 




GENTLEMErrS LIST. 



Please mention the data (or number) of the 
CUPPER In which the letters sent for were 
advertised. 

LADIES' LIST 

Hmaloa, Both 
Kinder. Anns 
KnovltoD. Pearl 
La DCS. lime. 
La Moot. Tbeltna 
Lelts, Mabel 
McDotrcald. DoDJe 
Mitchell. Edna 

Uatsaa. atarjork 

Nelson. Wllda 
Otdct. Emms 
Patterson, tome 
Pesraoo. Ions 
Putnam. Alice 
Hadcllffe, Mm F. 
Kawson, Helen 



Andry, Ails 
BroviKlle. Mm. 
J. D. 

Can-, Blanche 
Castle. Jane 
Cbillonrr. 

Catherine 
Oars, DolUs 
Clarke. Dolly 
Coleman. TrWe 
Dare. Mas M. 
Delmar, Carious 
Ford, Mn. Harry 
Grant. Mn. H. 
Cobb. G. a 
Hasuocs, Mildred 
Hern don. Agnes 



Bkhardson. Anna 
Boberts, Mm. Bob 
Kobeaoo. ErbS 
Robinson. Elsie 

Soul. Louise 
Sharer. Prances 
Stewart. Oute 
Settle, Mae 
Sytra. Lauretta 

Thompson. Miss 

E. T. 
Vaschtoo. Jane 
Wesley. Both 
Wnltoore. lollta 
Woods. Birdie 
Tata, Edns 
Tones, Jean 



Armstrong, CLyde 
BsrlD* A Wilson 
Berry, Ace 
Berry. Ace C. 
BnUDts, J. 
Boyle. Jack J. 
Brooks, Geo. V. 
Browning, Billy 
Bony. J. B. 

Clortr, Chaj. 

coiiins, rrsok 

Colrflk. Jaa. U. 

Conroy. Jaa 
CrssforU, Jack 
Creeaoo, Walter 
Dean. BUI 
De Wolff, 1st 
Ecdes, Wm. 
Elliott. Mai C. 
Famum. Ted 
Faye. Bod 
Foote-Dieh 
Galard, Al 
Cantoer. Ota L. 
Clesson. T. L 
Glenn. Fred 
Glynn. Jr., W. c. 
Gore. B. L. 
Gnth. Harry 
Hall. Held 
Hammond John 
O. 



Harris, Bay 

Hssley. Jaa. H. 

Hebron. Jas. H. 

J. J. 

r. p. 

Gen. 
Hoghes. Junmle 

Jack. Bert If. 

James, Wm. 
Keith. C 8. 
KUDride, Percy J. 
King. Cbas. 

Lace, B. H. 
Lafferty, Grant 
Lassere, Jim 
Leczters. Morlta 
Leonard 4 Louie 
Ughtfoot, Andrew 
nut H. i". 
Logan, Clarence 

W. 
Loots. Billy 

Martin, KarionS. 
latthrwl. Lew 



. U. E. 
Msyo A Vernon 
UcCtaker. Frank 
McGrath. Joe 
Middle too. 
Geo. W. 
MooeUe. Fred 



Marpby. H. 
Francis 

Nelson, Walter 
Nestell. Ed. BL 
Nlner. Ed A 

Juliet 

Ott, Bob 

Phllloo. Arhllle 
Poll. John 
Pomfrey , Victor 

Pmssrr, BCCtK 

Bcklaw, Jack 
gome, Jas. Ed. 
Bumn. Gordon 
Baffin. Gordon W. 
Stanley, Arthur 
SteUmAn, Wc. G. 
Stooe. Billy 
Taiwan. Jostin J- 

Itndelro. Mr. 
Torelll 
Townsend, Francis 

Wan. Joe 
Weaver. Edwin 
Weeier. Edwin 
White. Mittnew 
Whiteside. Jack 
Wilson. Billy J. 
Winters. Sid A 
DoHy 



SEE NOTICE AT HEAD OF LIST 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Esousn's (Ad r, Miller, mijr.) — "An Old 
Sweetheart of Mine," week of 2. 

Mcbat (Nelson G. Trowbridge, mgr.) — 
Bcritcin-Xatlonal Grand Opera Company, 13-10. 



Keith's (C. R. Eggleston, mgr.) — Bill wee* 
of 2: Mack and Walker. Una Clayton and 
company. Deeiy and Steele. Two Tom Boys, 
Clifford Walker. Jones and Sylvester, AM 
Japanese Mystery Trio and Baker and Janle. 



WANTED- MUSICIANS 

A Leader Who Can Arrange. How many times have yon read an "ad" like this? Can YOU 
arrange? If so. this will not interest you; but if not, send 2c. stamp for trial lesson. Three 
trial lessons free. If not then convinced you'll succeed, yon owe us nothing. TAUGHT BY 
MAIL SUCCESSFULLY, PRACTICALLY, RAPIDLY. You mast know the rudiments of music 
ana mean busi ness , otherwise don't write. 

WIlCOX SCHOOL OF COMPOSITION „„ t £ T.XKSi.'Sr?-* «, 



H. B. MARINELLI, Ltd., Inc. 



WANTED IMMEDIATELY 



Principals-Comedians-Artists 

WHO CAN ACT, SING and DANCE 
Important to AUTHORS-COMPOSERS-INVENTORS 

of ail descriptions, who care to get quick action on any kind of material they 

may consider sui table for VAUDEVILLE PRODUCTIONS conditionally that 

sun* is NEW— ORIGIN AI SENSATIONAL or up to date. 

CALL— PHONE— WRITE OR WIRE TO 

H. Bo MARINELLI. Ltd., Inc. 

1465 Broadway Bryant CUZ New York City 



TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY 

AL REEVES HP 

Seems like old times to be Breaking House Records and the most flatter- 
ing newspaper criticisms I've gotten in years and complimented by every 
house manager so far this season. 

Opened in Hartford and got $600 more gross than I did last year. Danny 
Scullen, a regular manager, says, "A beautiful, clean, classy show, full 
of life and novelty." James Clancey, of Waterbury, says : "200% better 
than last year." The answer : I did $900 more gross and broke the Mon- 
day, Tuesday and Wednesday record of the house. Played Newburg 
and Poughkeepsie and did the second largest three days at each house. 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Cohan say: "We saw nine shows this year. and yours 
is "much the best and the handsomest equipment of any show we've 
seen :" Played Hurtig & Seamons to a splendid week's business, consid- 
ering the terrible condition of the car strike. Harry- Seamon says: 
"Al, you have a good show and should get a lot of money this year." 
Played Watson's Theatre, Paterson, and broke the Monday and Satur- 
day Night record. Did $850 more gross than I did last year and with a 
little luck in weather and a holiday I would have taken the house record 
away from Dave Marion. 

Mrs. Billy Watson saw my show Tuesday night and said it was one of 
the best laughing shows she ever saw and raved over my girls and cos- 
tumes. 

Opened Monday, Sept. 25th, at Hoboken and got this season's Monday 
Mat. and Night record. Treasurer Martin Johnson after hearing the 
reports of my show, bet me ten dollars that I'd do the banner week by 
five hundred dollars. The answer :-He won his bet. 

YOUR OLD PAL. AL. 



Wanted for the Kirk Stock Co. 

COMEDIAN AND mCENUE.WTH SPECIALTIES 
Others write. Wardrobe, Ability, Sobriety Absolutely Essential. 
ROSCOE AND K1NSETTH, Sheboygan, Mich., October 9-14 



IT' 



VrVJIM 



IOINNER 



tf 



** 



ANY OLD NAME IS A 
WONDERFUL NAME 

(IF IT LABELS A WONDERFUL GIRL) , 

Lyric by WILL J. HART Music by BILLY VANDERVEER 

Great for Single, Double, Trio or Quartette. All Keys Ready. Write, Wire or CalL 
STILL THE SEASON'S SENSATION BOTH BY • ~ A BALLAD THAT WILL LIVE 

" HE'S GOT A BUNGALOW" GR °- ' TH "SOMETIMES THE DREAM COMES TRUE 

AND GROWING BIGGER WARD (FROM "COUSIN LUCY") 

PUBLISHED BY 

BERNARD GRANVILLE PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. 

NEW YORK: 154 Wast 45ti St. CHAS. LANG, Gen. Mgr. BOSTON: 218 TmusI St 



October 7, 1916 



THE JiEW YORK CLIPPER 



43 



TO THE PROFESSION 



1 INCH— ONE COLUMN 

$2.00 one time 

$22.00 12 time. 

$42.00 24 times 



2 INCHES— ONE COLUMN 

$4.00 one time 
944.00 12 time* 
$84.00 24 times 



For 63 years THE NEW YORK CLIPPER has been 
America's recognized theatrical newspaper. 

Long before the columns of the daily press were 
opened to news of the theatre, the CLIPPER offered a 
medium through which the actor could seek and obtain 
recognition. 

Through its powerful influence, the CLIPPER was an 
important factor in compelling national recognition of the 
American actor and the importance of his art. 

The CLIPPER is the only newspaper in the world that 
covers the entire theatrical field. 

Its circulation is world-wide! It is read in every coun- 
try of the globe ! It can be found upon the news-stands of 
London, Paris, Sydney and Petrograd. 

Every theatrical agent and manager in the entire 
English-speaking world reads the CLIPPER. It has for 
over three-score years been the actor's advertising me- 
dium. Every artist of note has used its columns for that 
purpose. 

The CLIPPER has done more to bring manager and 
performer into close touch with each other than all the 
rest of the theatrical newspapers combined. 

With the present issue, the CLIPPER appears in new 
and up-to-date form. 

Its news service has been greatly augmented, and this 
department will be its foremost feature. 

The value of the CLIPPER as the advertising medium 
of the profession is greater today than ever before. 

A standing card or a display announcement will con- 
vince you ! 

The CLIPPER offers the artist the following attrac- 
tive advertising rates: 



THESE 
RATES FOR 
PERFORMERS 
ONLY 
LIBERAL 
DISCOUNTS 
ON LONG- 
TIME 
CONTRACTS 



\ 



1 INCH— TWO COLUMNS 

94.00 one time 

944.0O 12 times 



2 INCHES— TWO COLUMNS 

98.00 one time 

984.00 12 times 



1 INCH— FOUR COLUMNS 
98.00 one time 
988.00 12 times 7 



44 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7. 1916 





TRIANGLE INAUGURATES BIG 

FILM D ISTRIBU TION CHANGE 

Metro Figures in Latest Arrangement for Betterment of Mar- 
keting Conditions. Independent Exchanges Also 
Largely Concerned in New Releasing Plan 



The Triangle Film Corporation will 
put into operation this week an entirely 
new plan of distribution, encompassing 
within its broad scope changes of a nature 
more radical than any introduced thus far, 
in the past and present method of market- 
ing feature films. 

The participation of the countrywide sys- 
tem of Metro exchanges in the Triangle's 
new releasing proposition, while as yet 
officially unannounced owing to certain rea- 
sons of business expediency, is rather a 
foregone conclusion. When the plans of 
the two picture making corporations now 
formulating reach the completed stage one 
of the numerous merger tales that recently 
engaged the attention of those who like 
to predict future events in filmdom, will 
become a reality. 

The producing activities of Triangle and 
Metro will continue independently as in 
the past, the aole combination of interests 
being in the centralization of their distrib- 
uting facilities. An important feature of 
Triangle's departure is the fact that inde- 
pendent exchanges will be enabled to ally 
themselves hereafter with that concern, 
through a carefully devised franchise 
arrangement 

These franchises will be awarded to the 
highest bidders during the next fortnight, 
the first having been purchased by Alfred 
Weiss, for the territory covered formerly 
by the Triangle's New York office. Weiss 
who was at one time general manager of 
Triangle, paid $500,000 for the valuable 
local distributing privilege. 

Further details of President Harry 
Aitken's plan of procedure are incorporated 
in the appended statement issued to the 
press. 

The Idea on which we are now work- 
ing tends in two directions — first, toward 
the independent ownership of exchanges 
through which Triangle films will be sup- 



plied to theatres, and, second, toward a 
constant increase in the number of smaller 
exchanges within each general exchange 
district. 

"It is not unnatural that the opportunity 
to conduct a business of their own should 
be attracting the most vigorous and able 
film men the country over. 

"The exhibitor in any district will not 
(when this system is thoroughly installed) 
be dealing with the agent of a distant con- 
cern, but with the owner of a nearby inde- 
pendent business. 

"The whole cbaDge, while it seems a 
radical one, is as a matter of fact a natural 
development caused by the demand on the 
part of the exhibitor for better service, and 
on the part of the public for better film. 

"While no formal announcement has 
been made and the plan was discussed more 
or less intimately only about ten days ago, 
we are getting telegrams from every part 
of the country from the kind of men the 
exhibitors like to deal with, asking for an 
opportunity to become an independent ex- 
change owner, handling Triangle film." 

That the executives, representative at 
least of two-thirds of Triangle's producing 
constituents, are fully in accord with the 
new order of conditions, is plainly evi- 
denced in their attitude, as amplified in in- 
dividual expressions of confidence. An- 
nouncements endorsing President Aitken's 
idea have been given out by Adam Kessel, 
president New York Motion Picture Com- 
pany : Tom Ince, general manager Kay- 
Bee Films, and Mack Sennet, general man- 
ager Keystone. 

D. W. Griffith so far has not com- 
mented on the situation, unless Harry Ait- 
ken's announcement can be considered in 
the light of a representation of his view- 
point. This conclusion may be plausibly 
arrived at, when the close business rela- 
tions of the above mentioned axe realized. 



PECK BUYS INTO GENERAL MARGUERITE CLARK SIGNS 



Fred S. Peck, the Boston woolen man 
whose millions have been behind the East- 
ern Film Corporation for the past two 
years apparently with rather slender re- 
sults, it is reported has purchased 52 per 
cent, of the General Film Company's com- 
mon stock. 

The Fastern concern situated in Provi- 
dence, R. I., is understood to be more or 
less of a fad with the Boston capitalist. 
Recently the Eastern has been making the 
Vim Comedies for the General Program 
under an arrangement with Melies, Louis 
Burnstein and Mark Dittenfass. all inter- 
ested in the Vim franchise. 

While the general stock control purchase 
could not be positively verified it is entirely 
probable that Peck would spend any amount 
of money to secure the proper releasing 
facilities for his Eastern product, the bet- 
ter part of which reposes on the shelves of 
the Providence studio. 



Notwithstanding various rumors con- 
cerning the future acting plans of diminu- 
tive Manruerite Clark, the internationally 
popular little screen star will continue 
under the management of the film concern 
with which she has been connected since 
she entered the realms of picturedom. 

Miss Clark renewed her contract with 
the Famous Players Film Co., Sept. 25, 
and will be seen as heretofore in roles be- 
fitting her well developed talents. 

J. Searle Dawley will be assigned to 
produce all of her forthcoming feature 
releases, the first of which is entitled 
"The Bigamist." Miss Clark is one of 
the very few actresses receiving a weekly 
remuneration reaching four figures. 

That she is entitled to receive an un- 
usually large stipend' for her histrionic 
efforts is attested by the fact that she has 
few, if any, equals as an individual box 
office attraction. > 







Timely Picture Topics 



Pearl White is going to take chances in 
another Pathe serial. It is a "Prepared- 
ness" affair. 



Mary Pickford has declared herself as 
an exponent of the modern efficiency idea. 
Wallace Powers says so. 



Fox is making a Scotch storr. Pretty 
chilly weather for kilts once those Fort 
Lee zephyrs start blowing. 



Louise Huff of tl e Famous Playeis tried 
to drive her Stutz car over a Maple tree 
at Riverdale, last week. The tree is 
still standing. The car is standing still. 



Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree says the 
movies ore great for educational purposes, 
but for purposes of dramatic entertain- 
ment, — oh, well! Wonder if Sir Herb's 
Hamlet picture had anything to do with, 
his opinion. 



A deaf and dumb school has sent Mabel 
Normand an "eloquent" tribute in apprecia- 
tion of her screen efforts. 



Sam Spedon left for Chicago Saturday. 
He has something big on tap for the Windy 
City film men. 



Bertram Bracken has been engaged to 
direct for the Lewis J. Selznick enter- 
prises. He made some big box office suc- 
cesses for William Fox. . - 



A fine literary atmosphere was created 
at the Strand, Friday morning by the at- 
tendance of Winston Churchill and Booth 
Tarkington at the trade showing of "The 
Crisis." 



Marie Shotwell who ma "e a hit in sev- 
eral Thanhouser productions has signed 
with the Frohman Amusement Company. 



Henry J. Brock, the World rights film 
buyer, has purchased "The Crimson Stain 
Mystery" for Great Britain. 



World Film will reissue "Without a 
Soul," formerly called Lola. Clara Kim- 
ball Young will be seen in the leading role. 
The picture is two years old. 



Variety Films, Inc., will distribute "My 
Country First," a preparedness feature 
made by Tom Terriss. 



Valentine Grant is backing a movement 
to show motion pictures to military prison- 
ers. The first exhibition will be held next 
Sunday at Castle William, New York Bay. 



VITA REDUCES STOCK 

The Vitagraph Company made a further 
reduction in the number of players regu- 
larly employed in stock at the Flatbush 
plant last week. 

Naomi Childers, for the past four years 
a Vita favorite, and nine other players of 
minor importance were given the cus- 
tomary two-weeks* notice. 



DIRECTORS' ASS'N 

MAY MEAN UNION 

Manufacturers Are Uneaxy Over Situa- 
tion and Epidemic of Labor Strikes 
Adds to Fears 

The organization of a picture directors' 
association in New York last week contains 
a suggestion that the producers of cellu- 
loid theatrical entertainment may shortly 
joins the ranks of unionized abor. Mur- 
dock MacQuarrie, a former Universal direc- 
tor, was delegated by his California con- 
freres to represent them at the deliberations 
preceding the formation of the new asso- 
ciation. 

MacQuarrie, who journeyed across the 
Continent from Los Angeles to look after 
the interests of the Coast defenders, sought 
to allay the fears of New York film manu- 
facturers regarding the possibility of the 
directors affiliating with a .labor organiza- 
tion. He denied any such plan of a defen- 
sive or offensive nature was contemplated 
and declared the aims 'and purposes of the 
picture makers were fully included in their 
constitution as contained in the following 
excerpts: 

1. To maintain the honor and dignity 
of the profession of motion picture directors. 

2. To cultivate the usefulness, and to 
exert every influence to improve the moral, 
social and intellectual standing of all per- 
sons connected with the motion picture pro- 
ducing business. 

3. To cultivate social intercourse among 
its members. 

4. To aid and assist all worthy dis- 
tressed members of this association, their 
wives, widows and orphans. 

Join the Artcraft Grcle! 

In Building for the Future the 
Progressive Exhibitor In- 
stinctively Books the "New 
Superior Productions of 




Hundreds of LEADING 
THEATRES Will Present 
These Productions by Arrange- 
ment with 

ARTCRAFT PICTURES 
CORPORATION 

729 Seventh Avenue, New York 
And in 15 Other Cities 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



45 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"THE COMMON LAW" 

SELZNICK. SEVEN SEELS. 
Released by Selmick Enterprises, Inc. 

STORY— Adapted from the novel by Rob- 
ert W. Chambers. Modern problem 
play with Borne sex interest inoffen- 
sively and more than capably handled. 
Studio life and modern society en- 
vironment. 

DIRECTION— By Albert Capellani. Ex- 
tremely competent. 

ACTION — Interesting throughout. Quick- 
ens at proper time. 

SITUATIONS — Strong dramatically. Hu- 
man. 

ATMOSPHERE— Very good. 

CONTINUITY— Unbroken. 

SUSPENSE— Keen and of the natural 
sort. 

DETAIL— Well taken care of. 

COSTUMES— Miss Young is richly 
gowned in scenes calling for elaborate 
wardrobe. 

ACTING — The star gives an impressive 
performance. 

PHOTOGRAPHY— High class. 

LIGHTING— Very artistic. 

EXTERIORS— Carefully selected. 

INTERIORS— In accord with the action 
at all times. 

Remarks. 

The Common Law" affords Clara Kim- 
ball Young an opportunity to display her 
excellent acting abilities to the best pos- 
sible advantage and her part fits per- 
fectly. The story moves evenly to a 
highly dramatic climax and the situations 
are builded naturally and with a fine per- 
ception of the novel's requirements. It 
is entertainment of the high class variety. 

The sets are constructed with an eye 

to detail and beauty and the entire pro- 
duction shows an effort to give the pub- 
lic a picture out of the ordinary. 

Taken all in all the picturization of 
"The Common Law" furnishes an evening 
of pleasant entertainment to the average 
audience and the acting of Miss Young 
meets the expectations of her most ardent 
admirers. 

Box Office Value. 

Good for three days or longer in the 
big houses. Strong advertising. 



"THE CONQUEST 

OF CANAAN" 

FROHMAN. FIVE REELS. 
Released by Art Dramas, Inc. 

Cast. . 

Ariel Tabor .». .Edith Taliaferro 

Joe Louden. Jack BherriB 

Judge Pike Ralph Delmore 

Mamie Pike Marie Edith WeUt 

Claudine Gene La Motte 

Happy Pear .• Jack Hopkins 

Norman PUtcroft. Walter Biers 

Nashville Corey ..Thomas Weid 

Mike. Ben Hendrick* 

STORY— Human interest drama with 
small town locale. Pretty love story 
runs throughout. Adapted by Tony 
Kelly from the novel by Booth Tark- 
ington. 

DIRECTION— Competent. 

ACTION— Moves 'evenly. 

SITUATIONS— Pleasing and natural. 



ATMOSPHERE— Small town idea con- 
veyed in good shape. 

CONTINUITY— O. K. 

SUSPENSE — Of the mild variety. 

DETAIL— Very good. 

COSTUMES— Bight. 

ACTING— Jack Sherrill and Edith Talia- 
ferro featured. Good. 

PHOTOGRAPHY— Good. 

LIGHTING— O. K. 

INTERIORS-Good. 

EXTERIORS— All right. 

Remarks. 

"The Conquest of Canaan" makes good 
screen entertainment of a rather light 
sort, bringing out some excellent work 
on the part of Jack Sherrill and Miss 
Taliaferro in the leading roles. The story 
is pleasing, and to its credit, it must be 
added, natural. Technically it leaves 
nothing to be desired. The small town 
locale furnishes opportunity for good 
character drawing, and the human inter- 
est element is well developed. 

The adventures of the small town boy 
with progressive and clean ideas and his 
victory over the dishonest element keep 
things moving in good style. His rise 
from a worthless character to winning 
the love of Ariel Tabor is carried out 
naturally. On the whole this is an en- 
tertaining feature. 

Box Office Value. 
Two days with a fair amount of adver- 
tising. 



"THE CRISIS" 

SELIG. TEN REELS. 

Released by Sherman-Elliott, Inc., on State 

Right Basis. 

Cast. 

Judge Silas Wright George W. Fawcett 

Colonel Comyn Carvel Matt B. Snyder 

Virginia Carvel Bessie Eytan 

Stephen Brice Thomas Santtohi 

Stephen Brice" 's mother. .Eugenia Besserer 

Clarence Coif aw Marshall Neilan 

Eliphalet Hopper Frank Weed 

Capt. Leice Brent Will Nachin 

Abraham Lincoln Sam D. Drane 

General W. T. Sherman Cecil Holland 

STORY— A drama of the Civil War. 
Taken from the widely read novel of 
the same name by Winston Churchill. 

DIRECTION— By Colin Campbell. Shows 
the touch of a superior hand. 

ACTION — Finely timed and with a proper 
appreciation of the dignity of the sub- 
ject. 

SITUATIONS— Highly dramatic with a 
preponderance of pathos. 

ATMOSPHERE— Accurate. Shows care- 
ful attention and thought. 

CONTINUITY— Smooth for the best part. 

SUSPENSE— Strong and of the natural 
sort. 

DETAIL — Painstakingly looked after. 

COSTUMES— Of the Ante-bellum period. 
Accurate. 

ACTING— Wonderful. A cast of real 
artists containing many prominent 
names. 

PHOTOGRAPHY— Fine. . 

LIGHTING— Effective. . 

INTERIORS— True : to, the .period por- 
trayed. 

EXTERIORS— Very good. 



Remarks, . . 

"The Crisis," filmed from the popular 
novel of Civil War days by Winston 
Churchill, is a finely constructed and ex- 
cellently directed picture of the strife 
and trouble which beset the country when 
the line between North and South was 
sharply drawn. 

The tragic elements of the story are 
brought out in highly dramatic manner 
and the picture should find a ready re- 
sponse in the heart of every true Amer- 
ican. The work of George W. Fawcett, 
Thomas Santschi, Marshall Neilan, Bessie 
Ey ton, and in fact that of the entire cast, 
is superb. The characterization of Lin- 
coln by Sa-n Drane is well nigh perfect, 
and stands out. 

With fine heart interest, exciting battle 
scenes and a story of historical import- 
ance, "The Crisis" may be ranked as a 
first class feature film of magnitude. It 
is superior in several ways to "The Spoil- 
ers." That is saying a great deal. 

Box Office Value. 
Good for a week's run. or longer in the 
large houses. Of course advertising of 
the big kind on this one. 



"SOMEWHERE 

IN FRANCE" 

TRIANGLE. FIVE PARTS. 

Released Oct. 2 by Triangle. 

Cast. 

Marie Chaumontel Louise Glaum 

Lieut. Charles Ravignac . . Howard Hickman 

General Andres Joseph J. DoicUng 

Madame Benet Fanny Midgley 

Captain Henry Ravignac. Jerome Storm 

Herr Vogel George Fisher 

Captain Pierre Thierry Carl VUman 

STORY— Melodrama dealing .with the 
present war. Adapted for the screen 

by J. G. Hawkes from the story by the 
late Richard Harding Davis. 

DIRECTION— Up to the Triangle stand- 
ard. 

ACTION — Not a dull moment. 

SITUATIONS — Keep the audience guess- 
ing. 

ATMOSPHERE— Great, showing a thor- 
ough knowledge of the locale. 

CONTINUITY— 0. K. 

SUSPENSE — Strong, increasing with tell- 
ing of story. 

DETAIL — Fine. 

COSTUMES — Modern; military for .bet- 
ter part.' 

ACTING — Excellent cast headed by Louise 
Glaum and Howard Hickman. 

PHOTOGRAPHY— Good. 
. LIGHTING— Right 

EXTERIORS — Well chosen. 

INTERIORS — Finely constructed and con- 
vincing. 

Remarks. 
"Somewhere in France" is remarkable 

for the fact that it contains not a single 

war scene, contenting itself by dealing 

strictly with the adventures of a feminine 

spy in the person of Louise Glaum, and 

her final capture by the brother of the 

man whose disgrace and death she caused. 
Howard Hickman as the French officer 

who brings the vampirisb Louise to justice 

has a most suitable role for his talents. 
The story is interesting at all times, keep- 
ing the spectator in a condition of pleas- 
ant suspense np to the final moment. 
. The local color in this picture is im- 
mense, and the workings of the warring 
sides are entertainingly set forth without 



recourse to the customary battle scenes. 
Strictly neutral in its attitude, "Some- 
where in France" is a timely and accept- 
able war play. 

Box Office Value. 
Suited to any class of house and can 
be played at least three days. Strong 
advertising. 

"THE STRAIGHT 

WAY" 

FOX FIVE PARTS. 
Released Oct. 1 by Fox. 

Cast. 

Mary Madison .' Valeska Suratt 

John Madison Herbert Heyes 

Dan Walters Glen White 

Nell Madison Claire Whitney 

STORY — Modern melodrama possessing 
some Bex interest. Written for screen 
by Will S. Davis. 

DIRECTION— By Will S. Davis. On the 
whole competent. 

ACTION — Moves unevenly. Good and bad 
in spots. 

SITUATIONS— Of the highly melodra- 
matic type. 

ATMOSPHERE— Good. 

CONTINUITY— Rather disjointed. 

SUSPENSE— Fairly well maintained. 

DETAIL— Good. 

COSTUMES— Modern. Miss Suratt wear* 
beautiful creations. 

ACTING— Will do. The star shows im- 
provement. 

PHOTOGRAPHY— O. K. 

LIGHTING EFFECTS— Average. 

EXTERIORS-Good. 

INTERIORS— Suitable. 

Remarks. 

Valeska Suratt seems to improve with 
each successive effort, and her work in 
"The Straight Way." aU things consid- 
ered, is not bad. The picture has a va- 
riety of punches and furnishes enough 
thrills to suit the average lover of ex- 
citement on the screen. 

The story is ordinary, with a fair 
amount of sex interest. It lags in action 
at times, and is a trifle bard to follow. 
For picture melodrama it will do. 

Technically the director has done very 
well. On. the whole "The Straight Way" 
measures up to the general run of Fox 
productions. 

Box Office Value. 

Good for the smaller class of houses for 
two days. Fair amount of advertising con- 
centrated on the star. 



NATIONAL VAUDEVILLE 
ARTISTS LOCATE 

Lease Clubrooms at 48th Street and 
Broadway. 
Nelson, Lee and Green have leased for 
Samuel K. Jacob* space in the building 
1587-89 Broadway, southwest corner of 
Broadway and Forty-eighth Street, New 
York, to the National Vaudeville Artists, 
Inc., Eddie Leonard, president, and Henry 
Chesterfield, secretary. 

The club will occupy the entire third 
floor of the premises having a frontage of 
51 feet on Broadway by a depth of 140 
feet on Forty-eight Street, as an execu- 
tive office and club rooms after the comple- 
tion of alterations which are estimated to 
cost $20,000. The lease is for a term of 
eight years. 



4., 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 



"THE RAGGED 

PRINCESS" 

FOX. FIVE PASTS. 

Released Oct. 2 by Fox. 

STORY— Comedy drama with a rural 

locale for the most part. Light and 

wholesome. 
DIRECTION— O. K. 
ACTION — Maintains an even speed. 
SITUATIONS— Natural for best part. 
ATMOSPHERE— Very good. 
DETAIL— Right. 
COSTUMES— Modern. 
ACTING — Up to the mark. 
LIGHTING— 0. K. 

Remarks, 
June Caprice, the star of "The Bagged 
Princess," improves visibly with each suc- 
ceeding effort and her work in this picture 
is wholesome and pleasing. The story 
gives her the role of a drudge in a county 
institution for children from which she 
finally runs away only to fall into the 
hands of a "city chap," who is frustrated 
in the nick of time by June's country boy 
lover. 

The comedy relief in this story is very 
. pleasing and gives little Jane Lee a chance 
for ^ilHiah pranks which will be relished 
keenly by the average audience. 
Box Office Value. 
Two days in towns of 30,000 or over. 
Fair advertising. 



"PLAIN JANE" 

LNCE. FIVE REELS. 

Bs tWMi Sept. 25 by Triangle. 

Cast. 

Jane. "The Orphint" ... .Bessie Barriieale 

Mr. "John Sophomore Adams" .Charles Ray 

BtheUa Ratkbone Mabel Johnson 

Frederick Verttner W. Bnrgermaster 

Nora O'Grogan Fanny Midgley 

STORY— Written for screen by C. Gardner 
Sullivan. Play of modern life. Good 
theme well developed. 

DIRECTION— By Chaa. Miller. Excellent. 

ACTION — Absorbingly interesting. 

SITUATIONS— Logical. 

ATMOSPHERE— Good. 

CONTINUITY — Smooth. 

SUSPENSE — Strong. 

DETAIL— Good. 

COSTUMES— Right. 

PHOTOGRAPHY— Of the best. 

LIGHTING— Exquisite. 

EXTERIORS— Good. 

INTERIORSr-Good. 

Remarks. 

"Plain Jane" is essentially a human 
tale of every day life, with the action re- 
volving around two persons of widely 
different characteristics and setting forth 
the world old theory of "love will find a 
way." in delightfully expressive terms. 
Bessie Barriscale is seen in the introduc- 
tory scenes as a winsome little slavey 
whose natural beauty of face and form is 
unnoticed because of several reasons, the 
principal one being her own untidiness. 

Chaa. Ray, that inimitable young actor 
of vacillating weaklings, plays a college 
boy of the familiar type, whose ego ex- 
ceeds his brain faculties by a wide margin. 
Technically a well nigh perfect picture. 

Box Office Value. 
Three-day attraction. Suitable for any 
class of noose or spectators. Advertise 
Barriscale and Ray. 



" 'DRAW EGAN'S 

RETURN" 

INCE. FIVE REELS. 

Released Oct. 2 by Triangle. 

Cast. 

"Draw" Egan Witlicm 8. Hart 

Poppy Louise Glaum 

Myrtle Bvckton Margery Wilson 

Arizona Joe Robert McKim 

Mat Buckton , J. P. Lockney 

STORY — Western melodrama of frontier 

days. 
DIRECTION— Competent in all depart- 
ments. 
ACTION— Snappy all the w,.y. 
SITUATIONS— Keenly dramatic 
ATMOSPHERE — Convincing at all times. 
CONTINUITY— Intelligently carried out. 
SUSPENSE — Tense and holding. 
DETAIL— O. K. 
COSTUMES— Western. 
ACTING— Good. 
PHOTOGRAPHY— High class. 
CAMERA WORK— Technically right. 
LIGHTING— Good. 
EXTERIORS — Fine Western views. 
INTERIORS— Few but well built. 
Remarks, 
One of the best Western roles yet as- 
signed to W. S. Hart is that of the "Dad" 
man who is reformed through the love of 
a decent girl. In the position of town 
marshal, is threatened with exposure of 
his past by a former pal. 

Hart plays the part with just the proper 
light and shade and his scenes with the 
girl when he gives himself up to her 
father are most effective. The usual 
happy ending is brought about through 
the decision of the town-folks that Hart 
is better needed to keep peace and order 
in their midst than he is in jail. 

The sub-titling is intelligent and at 
times affords relief from the tenseness of 
the drama. The picture is real entertain- 
ment, furnishing a true insight into the 
days when the frontier was governed by 
the faction which could shoot quickest. 
Box Office Value. 
Three-day attraction in good sized 
towns. Play-up Hart and type of story. 



"WANTED A HOME" 

BLUEBIRD. FIVE REELS. 

Released Oct. 2 by Bluebird. 

Cast. 

Mina Roger* .Mary MacLaren 

The Widow Nannie Wright 

Gladys Grace Johnson 

Gtoen Marian Bigler 

Harvey Qorman Charles Marriott 

Dr. Prine .JocJfc Mulhall 

Dr. Cary ^_.Dana Ong 

RoberU Erne** Shields 

Cal Morgan Ketopie Morgan 

STORY— Written by Lois Weber for the 
screen. Modern melodrama. ' Foolish 
story made enjoyable by acting of star. 
DIRECTION— By the Smalleys. Will do. 
ACTION— Monotonous. 
SITUATIONS— Mechanical. 
ATMOSPHERE— Fair. 
CONTINUITY — Even. 
SUSPENSE— Lacking. 
DETAIL— Fair. 
COSTUMES— Modern. 
PHOTOGRAPHY— Average. 
LIGHTING— Average. 
EXTERIORS— O. K. 
INTERIORS— Right. 

Remarks. 
"Wanted a Home" presents one of the 
very few actresses currently appearing in 



picture plays produced by any branch or 
department of the Universal organization, 
possessed by more than passable acting 
ability. Mary MacLaren is the bright 
particular star of this rather tame affair 
called by courtesy a drama. In the Blue- 
bird feature entitled "Shoes" she gave a 
remarkably good performance for one so 
young and inexperienced. 

Her work in this picture is even better 
and constitutes about the only redeeming 
feature of the outlandish conglomeration 
of puerilities arranged in sequence and 
masquerading as dramatic action that, 
considered in the light of good screen en- 
tertainment, makes "Wanted a Home" a 
wearisome mile of celluloid. 

Box Office Value. 
While this is all ordinary at best Mary 
MacLaren should put it over sufficiently 
well to make it a fair one day card for 
the smaller houses. Advertise the star. 



"JAFFERY" 

FROHMAN. FIVE REELS. 
Released Sept. 26 by 'International Film. 

STORY— Adaptation of E. K. Locke's 
Novel of the same name. Melodrama of 
love and adventure. Entertaining nar- 
rative that holds. 

SCENARIO— By Anthony P. Kelly. 

DIRECTION— By George Irving. Highly 
artistic 

ACTION— Moves along nicely. 

SITUATIONS— Well played. 

ATMOSPHERE— Good. 

CONTINUITY— Even. 

SUSPENSE— Properly sustained. 

DETAIL— Right. 

COSTUME — Accurate. 

PH0TOGRAPHY-4Very Good. 

LIGHTING— Pleasing. 

EXTERIORS— Good. 

INTERIORS— Good. 

Remarks. 

Very often "best sellers" do not lend 
themselves particularly well to visualiza- 
tion. Sometimes it is because there is a 
superabundance of dialogue and in other 
instances the fault lies in the fact that 
the action lacks variety, sometimes occur- 
ring in one dwelling house, a seaside hotel 
or on shipboard. 

"Jaffery" is one of the exceptions. Its 
scenes are of the constantly changing sort, 
its characters real human beings and its 
action consistent with life as we know it. 

The picture has been adequately pro- 
duced as far as sets and mechanical neces- 
sities are concerned and the acting is 
highly meritorious as a whole. 

C. Aubrey Smith scores in an intel- 
ligently played characterization. Eleanor 
Woodruff discloses herself as a genuinely 
talented artiste in a difficult part, and 
Florence Deshon seen as a hoyden who 
refuses to accommodate her ways to those 
of the staid Londoners with whom she is 
forced to associate registers a decidedly 
pleasing impression. 

Box Office Value. 
Suitable for high grade houses. Adver- 
tise this as a screen version of E. J. 
Locke's best and most recent novels. 
Feature C Aubry Smith and bill Miss 
Woodruff and Deshon strong. 



SCORES NATIONAL CENSOR 
BOARD 

Com. Bell, of the N. Y. License Bureau, 
paid his respects to the unofficial National 
Board of Review, formerly known as the 
National Board of Censors, in an inter- 
view published in the metropolitan dailies 
last week. 

Mr. Bell also declared himself as against 
the principle of official Federal or State 
censorship, regarding the first as futile 
and unnecessary and the latter as an en- 
croachment on the local police supervision 
over immoral and degrading performances. 

Bell's utterances on the censorship ques- 
tion were occasioned by Justice Cohalan's 
order upholding Bell's action in barring the 
white slave picture, "Is Any Girl Safe," 
from the screens of the greater city. 

The License Commissioner seemed par- 
ticularly wrought up over the passing of 
"Is Any Girl Safe" by the National Board 
of Review. In a letter addressed to Secy. 
W. M. Covell of the unofficial body, he in- 
formed that person of the exact state of 
his feelings concerning the board's action 
in allowing the objectionable picture to get 
by. 

Bell's opinion of the Board incorporated 
in the Covell communication summed up 
the situation concerning "White Slave" 
pictures in a nutshell, when he said, "Had 
Is Any Girl Safe* been permitted to be 
exhibited, it would have opened the door 
for all the flood that would be sure to 
follow." Which happens to be just noth- 
ing but the truth. 



BAGGOTT BREAKS RECORD 

King Baggott, erstwhile Universalite, 
broke the house record of the Victoria 
Theatre, Rochester, last week where he 
appeared in person four times daily. 

The Victoria played to $0,500 on the 
week, with a maximum seating capacity 
of 1,800. Baggott doing a monologue and 
playing on a percentage basis received 
$1,000 as his share of the gross. 



FOOLED THE CRITICS 

The New York trade paper critics uni- 
versally panned "The Shadow" of H.T 
Past," a Pathe feature with Lina Cavalieri 
starred, when the picture was shown pri- 
vately six months ago. 

Now the Pathe folks are gloating over 
the fact that the critics were all wrong, 
the Cavalieri feature having turned out 
to be a record breaking box office attrac- 
tion. 



r 



Three hundred clergymen saw Tom 
Ince's "Civilization" at the Park, last 
Friday. They all thought it a great spec- 
tacle. 



f METRO 
<$ PICTURES 

are the Box Office . 

Pictures because 

every Metro Star 

is a Box Office Attraction 



The Newer, Better, Finer 
Productions are demanded 
by tte Pablic. 



v< 



Grv* ttem 




October 7, 1V16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



47 



"THE QUEST OF LIFE" 

FAMOUS PLAYERS. FIVE PARTS. 

Released Sept. 25 by Paramount. 
Cast. 

Maurice Bretton M. Maurice 

Ellen young Florence Walton 

Alec Maplet on Julian L' Estrange 

Percy Royal Byron 

Baronti Daniel Burke 

Ellen's father Russell Batlett 

Ellen's mother Mrs. William Bechtel 

STORY— Modern, with settings in and 
about New York. Built especially as a 
vehicle for stars' dancing. Human in- 
terest drams. Written for screen by 
Edward Goulding and Gabriel Enthoven. 
DIRECTION— Adequate. 
ACTION— Fairly interesting. 
SITUATIONS— Conventional but well 

handled. 
ATMOSPHERE— Good. 
CONTINUITY— A little uneven in spots. 
SUSPENSE— Sufficient for this type of 

story. 
DETAIL— Good. 
COSTUMES — Modern. High class and 

costly. 
ACTING— Fair. 
PHOTOGRAPHY— Artistic and up to the 

mark. 
LIGHTING — Effective. 
EXTERIORS — Not many but pleasing. 
INTERIORS— Pretty sets. 
Remarks. 

This picture is designed primarily as a 
vehicle for the dancing of Maurice and 
Walton, ball room exponents of the terpsi- 
chorean art. It meets the necessary pur- 
pose well and in addition tells a fairly 
interesting story. The dancing of the two 
stars is handled to the best possible ad- 
vantage and registers strongly, a thing 
which up to the present has seemed diffi- 
cult of accomplishment in the films. 

The story moves along evenly for the 
best part and holds the interest, with the 
exception of a few rather draggy spots. 
Glimpses of roof garden and cafe scenes 
will' please out of towners. On the whole 
The Quest of Life" furnishes pleasing 
entertainment of a light nature, with the 
dancing feature well brought out. 
Box Office Value. 

Should go big out of town, especially 
in smaller cities. Good for two days with 
fair amount of advertising. 

Alan Hale, one of the screen's best vil- 
lains is going to work for Fox. Hale looks 
like a Scandinavian, bnt isn't. How can 
he be when his name in private life is Mac 
Caragban. 




WILLIAM A. BRADY 

in association 
with 

WORLD 



PICTURES 

ALICE BRADY 

in 

THE GILDED CAGE 

Directed by HARLEY KNOWLES 



"ANTON THE 

TERRIBLE" 

LASEY. FIVE PARTS. 

Released. Sept. 30 by Paramount. 

STORY — Modern melodrama with the lo- 
cale in Petrograd and Siberia. 

DIRECTION— Adequate to the need* of 
the script. 

ACTION — On the whole maintains a fair 
pace. 

SITUATIONS — A trifle forced at times. 

ATMOSPHERE — Great and most convinc- 
ing. 

CONTINUITY— Smooth. 

SUSPENSE — Works up to a strong pitch. 

DETAIL — Accurate in every way. 

COSTUMES— Russian of the modern 
period. 

ACTING — Excellent, especially that of 
Theodore Roberts, the star. 

PHOTOGRAPHY— Up to the standard of 
the best Lasky artisticness. 

LIGHTING — Some fine effects in the first 
reel. 

EXTERIORS— Carefully chosen. 

INTERIORS — Fine looking and correct. 

Remarks. 

While the situations are a trifle me- 
chanical at times, the story of "Anton 
the Terrible" makes most entertaining 
melodrama and the character study of the 
cruel and inhuman chief of the secret 
police by Theodore Roberts is most vivid 
and impressive. 

Anita King and the rest of the cast 
do creditable work. The Russian soldier 
whose sister is betrayed by the Grand 
Duke swears vengeance, the twist of fate 
which gives him the power he has waited 
for and the baffling of his revenge by Sis 
own mother form an interesting plot. 
The climax is powerful and the picture 
as a whole will hold the average movie 
fan. Technically an excellent production. 

Box Office Value. 

Two days in towns of 30,000 or over 
with fair amount of advertising. 



"A CORNER 

IN COLLEENS" 

LNCE-TRIANGLE. FIVE PARTS. 
Released Oct. 2 by Paramount. 

STORY — Modern comedy drama with lo- 
cale entirely in Ireland. 

DIRECTION — Good, with proper attention 
to detail. 

ACTION— Smooth tempo, and works up 
at just the right time. 

SITUATIONS — Natural and convincing. 

ATMOSPHERE — Excellent. 

CONTINUITY— Unbroken. 

SUSPENSE — Worked up to a keen point. 

DETAIL — Proper in every respect. 

COSTUMES— Modern. 

ACTING — Realistic and of the best. 

PHOTOGRAPHY— Sharp and artistically 
handled. 

LIGHTING— O. K. Good effects. 

EXTERIORS— Very pretty and well se- 
lected. 

INTERIORS — Finely built and fitting. 

Remarks. 
"A Corner in Colleens" is a really de- 
lightful comedy drama with just the 
proper touch of excitement to quicken the 
action. The two leading characters are 
well chosen in Bessie Barriscale and 
Charles Ray, who play respectively an 
Irish ■ lass and an American boy. The 



story is drama of the light kind and the 

comedy relief clean and most wholesome. 
Ray mixes in a very pretty fight a la 
"Fairbanks'* with several of the Irish con- 
stabulary. The direction is a satisfying 
and intelligent, and technically the pic- 
ture has nearly a perfect score. A very 
entertaining feature. 

Box Office Value. 
Good for two days. Boost the stars 
and the title. 



"THE REWARD 

OF PATIENCE" 

FAMOUS PLAYERS. FIVE REELS. 

Released Sept. 30 by Paramount. 

Cast. 

Patience .Louise Buff 

Robert Penfield. . John Bowers 

Edith Penfield Lottie Pickford 

Mrs. Penfield ..Kate Lester 

Paul Dunstan Adolph Menjou 

STORY— Written for screen by Shannon 

Fife. Romantic melodrama. 
DIRECTION— By Robert G. Vignola. 

Good. 
ACTION— Interesting. 
SITUATIONS— Well constructed. 
ATMOSPHERE— Particularly good. 
CONTINUITY— Smooth. 
SUSPENSE — Fairly strong. 



DETAIL— Right. 
COSTUMES— Accurate. 
PHOTOGRAPHY— Up to standard. 
LIGHTING— Artistic. 
EXTERIORS— Well chosen. 
INTERIORS — Convincing. 

4 

Remarks. 

"The Reward of Patience" tells a pretty 
little story laid in the quaint environment 
of Quakerdom, with an occasional journey 
into the more sophisticated realms of sor- 
did society life. The picture has been 
technically well produced and the director 
supplemented the excellent work of the 
star Louise Huff by introducing several 
touches of effective atmosphere. 

John Bowers as the male partner of a 
disjointed matrimonial alliance played with 
intelligence and a nice degree of repres- 
sion. Lottie Pickford ably upheld tho 
good acting traditions of the Pickford 
family in the role of an unfaithful wife 
and a bunch of the cutest kids imaginable 
added the necessary human interest note. 
On the whole, a very pleasing feature. 

Box Office Value. 
Should pass acceptably as a two-day 
attraction in the smaller cities and make 
money as a full week card in the metro- 
politan centers, where its charm is more 
liable to be appreciated. Advertise char- 
acter of the story. 



*>V 



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TRIANGLE 

RELEASES FDR WEEK OF OCTOBER 8th 

WILFRED LUCAS 
IN "RUMMY" 

Triangle-Fine Arts 

A brilliant story of big-city newspaper life, 
this picture offer* a remarkable exhibition of 
character interpretation by the star, Wilfred 
Lucas. Starting: as s dapper, energetic, "live" 
reporter with a promising future, circumstances 
cause him to lose faith in his wife and he de- 
scends to the level of humanity, a shriveled, 
sodden wreck. 

His work is truly wonderful, and your pa- 
trons cannot tail to recognise it— and appre- 
ciate it. A big, strong, vital play fold In the 
Triangle way, Rummy win, without question, 
be one of your big successes. 

BESSIE BARRISCALE 

AND CHARLES RAY 

IN "PLAIN JANE" 

Triangle-Kay Be* 

All the world lore, • rommce — the pretty. 
simple tale of the love of ■ maid (or a man, and 
when your patron* have seen "Plain Jane and 
the way Bessie Barriicale win, the man of her 
choice they won't be able to help loving this 
picture. 

A dainty, sweet old-fashioned love-story, this 

Triangle Play win go right to the hearts of 
every audience — whether it be composed of 
young or old. 

If you want to take advantage of Bessie 
Barrucale's popularity, if yon want to "cash 
in" on the excellent work the has done in 

Jrevious pictures, watch carefully for "Plain 
rat," 

Keystone Comedies — 

Two 



corkers coming this week just aa good 



?iM£j 



<: 



48 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7. 1916 



f V 



:2s5>^ 



^^5^ 



*®&m 






Not a Matter of Whether 
But a Matter of Which 

The program has won out over the calch-as-calch-can schedule, for the same reason 
that Gibbon gave for Rome's decline — Because it deserved to! 

Every exhibitor, clear down to the man that has but a thousand dollars invested in 
his business, must free himself from the topsy/-turve$-dom of open bookings. 

THE PARAMOUNT PROGRAM 

which comprises two plays a week of 

FAMOUS PLAYERS 

LASKY 

MOROSCO 

PALLAS 

Gives you the greatest stars on earth in the greatest plays yet filmed. 

But that's not all! 

. . The Paramount Program establishes firmly for you a fixed cost, and without a 
definite knowledge of expenses an exhibitor builds on quicksand. 

The Paramount Program protects you — you are not caught in a free for all struggle . 
for patronage — you are not embarrassed by showing the same pictures, at the same time 
that your competitors show them — you are not straining your program till it creaks, by , 
giving inferior productions. 

Every Paramount Picture moves a few steps ahead on the Highway of Achievement. . 

If they had to be shown to an audience of the Gods— as the Greeks, believed they 
performed to — they could not be more complete, more artistic, more painstaking. 

Had you not better confer at once with 

your local Paramount Exchange and learn - ■■ 

• . all about Paramount's super-service ? 

\~S FOUR ElOimr FIVE. \*/ r-DTH/MEMUB \—^Sf FOHTYFmST SX 

NEW YORK. N.Y. 

" Greatest Stars on Earth'* 



ip£**3! 






;'• ■ 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



49 



"THE CHATTEL" 

VITA GRAPH. SIX PARTS. 
Released Oct. 2 by Yitagraph. 

[ Cast. 

Blake Waring E. R. Bother* 

Leila Bard Peggy Hytand 

itrt. Delavan Rote Tapley 

Sir. Bard .Charle* Kent 

STORY — Modern problem play dealing 
with a rich man's peculiar code of 
ethics in relation to his .domestic af- 
fairs, and the treatment of his -wife as 
a commercial asset rather than a per- 
son of flesh and blood. Written for 
screen by Paul West. 

DIRECTION— Excellent and with a fine 
appreciation of the touch necessary for 
a dignified handling of the story. 

ACTION— A little mechanical in spots. 

SITUATIONS.— Holding for the most 
part. 

ATMOSPHERE— Excellent and well con- 
veyed. 

CONTINUITY— Even. 

SUSPENSE— Just enough for this type 
of play. 

DETAIL — Eight in- every particular. 

COSTUMES— Modern and: proper. 

ACTING — Dignified and convincing. Mr. 
Sothern appears a trifle constrained at 
times. 

PHOTOGRAPHY— Very good. 

LIGHTING — Satisfactory.. 

EXTERIORS— Most "' beautiful. Form 
pleasing picture for the eye. 

INTERIORS— Massive and well con- 
structed. 

Remarks. 
"The Chattel" marks the debut of the 



eminent stage artist, E. H. Sothern in the 
films, and the vehicle in question is one 
befitting his dignity far every way. The 
slightly constrained work of the great 
star at times is no doubt due to natural 
unfamiliarity with studio work. Mr. 
Sothern's role of the wealthy husband 
who looks upon a wife as a chattel to be 
noticed or used at will is played convinc- 
ingly while the rebellious -and high strung 
young wife who finally brings him to a 
realization of what happiness really is, 
gives Peggy Hyland full scope for her 
acting abilities. 

The story is for the more sophisticated 
and intelligent motion picture audience, 
and on the whole provides entertainment 
of a rather heavy sort. Technically the 
production leaves nothing to be desired. 

Box Office Value. 
Three days in big cities with good ad- 
vertising of the star. 



UNIVERSAL DENIES RUMORS 

The Universal Company is all upset be- 
cause the rumor factory has been work- 
ing overtime turning out gossip concerning 
its current doings. Just to set things 
right before the film world Universal has 
issued the following denials: Ella Hall 
is not going to quit. Warren Kerrigan will 
not enter vaudeville for a long time to 
come, "Idle Wives" was not produced by 
the Anti-Vice_ Motion Picture Company, 
and Hal Reid's Republican campaign pic- 
ture scoring President Wilson was not 
made by the Big U. All right! Now let 
the earth revolve again. 



5:'rc packing 



in 




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*- pram 172 theatres in one territory— . 
*J fvanxl&Q theatres in &nather,ihis I 
is the full box office report on 

qt Mystery 

J ^eaiestprofii Tiding serial 

since the dawn of ihe screen . 

MAURICE COSTELH) 

The Master Star and Charming 

ETHEL GRANDIN 

in ihe iensc, exciting , my»ieriou«, " as* 
and fascinating drama of the decade 

Lbirecied hy AbveJized by 

t HAYES HUNTER Alberi PaysonTeihure 

Produced bribe EfiBOCRAPHCO, Prcsenicd by 

CONSOLIDATED FILM CORPTV 

azc«>kdjv»fcfe»* 
i482 Broadway 
New York 



BOOKING 
WOW AT 

MEIROlXCHANGES 



IxidilitGHrUTrr^suTTf ' v 



hnuTHvrara "Jon* swaTs 

ATfc2" 



HAS - EARNED $22000 IN OWtW 



53 pbwts wennnr Toamv cqwd 

ftWHC POOOWM 



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PFrVKPSMWrl WTOC PB06W1 

-JAFFHEV" 




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FPOUHAX FTATVPES 

jtfODucTio«r at eraurawremr 



TM THOtr MOTT tfCCKT 

Hut tyrxsufuro cv? pcoductiokt at KnuraMSSmr 

MONT*" MAKtBS TOO OTTliavTSRAND MHlBtTOR. 



NEXT 

BOOTH TARKINGTON'r 

DYNAMIC STODY Or ROMANCE AND ADVENTURE 

jTonqiest-Gnamt 

V^ [Dim wuAiroa jack sudwill 



MARIE WCUff, CALPH DOMOuE.MN U.rNDC1CM.aNEl»M0TT.iTc. 

NOW COMPUTE 

PCLEA91NG ARRANGEMENTS' ANl^OUNCED SHOPTLV 

IH PQCPARATION 

AuGunv* Thoma?' Dramwic Thundccbolt « 

" Tfie WITCHING HOUR 

oo()oo 

FROHMAN AMUSEMENT COWOMIWN 

W1UIAM L yuCCBIU. . PQCf. 

IS EAST Aift. STBCCT, NEW VDftK. 



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50 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 7, 1916 




New Victoria Hotel 

IN MITU/ VAD^ AT BROADWAY AND 
111 ilLYV 1UIUV LjONC ACRE SQUARE 

145 to 155 West 47th Street 

Th. Very Hart of New York" 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 

350 ROOMS 250 PRIVATE BATHS 

Every Modern Convenience European Plan Exclusively 

ABE MIERS, Manager of Cafe Drop in at any time 

Single rooms, hot and cold water Jl 

Single rooms, private bath pUI and up 

Suite, parlor, bedroom and batb $4 and up 

Suite, parlor, 2 bedrooms and bath SS and up 

The Best 50c. Dinner in New York 

C. A. HOLL1NGSWORTH New York City 

CLIPPER 
BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisements not exceeding one line in 
length will be published, properly classified, in 
this index* at the rate of $10 for one year (52 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be scut free to each advertiser while the 
advertisement is running. 

ASBESTOS CURTAINS AND PICTURE 
BOOTHS 

C. W. Trainer Mfg. Co., 75* Pearl St., Boston, 
Mass. 

CARNIVAL FRONTS AND SHOW BANNERS. 

D. C Humphry* Co., 91J Arch St.. Phila., Pa. 

MUSICAL BELLS AND NOVELTIES 
Edwin JL Street. 28 Brook St., Hartford, Conn. 
B. H. Mayland & Son, 54 Willoughby St., 
Brooklyn. N. Y. 

MUSICAL SPECIALTIES. 
J. C. Deagon, 3800 N. Clark St.. Chicago, 111. 

MUSICAL CLASSES. 
A. Braunciss, 1012 Napier Ave., Richmond Hill, 

PRINTING OF ALL KINDS. 
"Planet" Show Print 4 Eng. House, Chatham, 
Ont. 
SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 

Howard Tunic, 141 Burleigh St., Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

581-583-585 South High St.. Columbus. O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 

Amelia Grain, 319 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 

THE SINGING AND SPEAKING VOICE. 

Thco. Van Yorx, 21 W. 38th St., New York. 
Tel., Greeley 3701. 

SONG BOOKS. 
Wm. W. Delaney. 117 Park Row. New York. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co., 387 Washington St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

- THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Graves Hardware Co.. 47 Eliot St., Boston, 
Mass. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 

E. Walker. 309 W. 39th St., New York. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobson. 910 Prospect Ave., N. Y. C. 

WIGS. BEARDS AND MUSTACHES. 
Percy Ewing Supply House, Decatur, 111. 

CHANGE IN PRICES 

We beg to notify our customers and friends 
that owing to the conditions surrounding the 
paper market, which amounts almost to a 
lamine, we have been compelled to advance 
our prices. Notice is hereby given that all 
quotations and price lists bearing date prior 
to Sept. 15, 1916, are null and void, and are not 
the prices prevailing; at this time. Send for 
our new price list giving prices current now. 
Watch this paper for quotations from week to 
week. When paper market conditions return 
to normal our prices will be reduced in propor- 
tion. Please write us for quotations or any- 
thing you may need in theatrical type work. 

Gazette Sbow Printing Co. 

MATTOON, ILLINOIS, U. S. A. 



i MUSIC COMPOSED AND ARRANGED 

Chas. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati, O. 

IMPORTANT.-EVERETT J. EVANS. Com- 
poser-Arranger, makes a specialty of writing 
music for new authors, and assists publication. 
Send your poems or complete songs. Estab. 
1900. Suite 505, Astor Theatre Bldg., 45th and 
Broadway, N. V. 



OPPORTUNITY P ^fc.™ de EMANu£L 

and HEDWIG REICHER'S Courses of Dra- 
matic Instruction. Apply to 320 Central Park 
West, New York. Mr. Reicher is the founder 
of The Modern Stage in New York, Producer 
of G. Hauptmann's "Elga" at Garrick Theatre, 
1915; Ibsen's "John Gabriel Borlcman,** at 
Forty-eighth Street Theatre, 1915; Gerhardt 
Hauptmann's "The Weavers" at Garden Thea- 
tre, 1916. Students will be given parts to play 
in public performances during the Winter sea- 
son. Terms: Three Months' Course, 840.00 a 
Month. Special arrangements for private les- 
sons. Special arrangements for poor male stu- 
dents. Coaching tor Special Characters, Read- 
ing, etc. Apply only by mail. 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Engagements should be made now for the com- 
ing season. A real big metropolitan theatre. 
Suitable for Opera, Drama or Concerts. Stage 
completely equipped to handle large or small 
shows. Acoustics perfect. Can be leased for 
single performance, by the month or season. 
Apply to GEORGE W. MAGEE, on premises 
or telephone Oxford 5693, Boston, Mass. 



HKsCo.'Kf 

Uniform in Color and 
Quality Guaranteed 

Have You Used Our 
fJ A fZ Ftltn Grease Paint 
MV.CO .nd Powder 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



TIGHTS 

Cotton Heats, rey good aaal- 
lty. a pan-, 7Sc; Wonted 
Tisnts. swdtmB .eight, s 
pair, 82.00; Warned Tlsbts. 
hesry weight, i pair. 
82.T5: 80k Plaited TlzsU. 
(hnported). a pair. 82.50: 
Hesry 75 per osL 8Hk 
Tights la Wtiie, Flesh. Pint 
and Bed only, reduced from 
86.00 pair to 84.00. Pure 
SOk Ursu in Una White 
only, reduced from 88.50 a 
pair to 86.00- Starts to 
Batch, mm price at UtSta. 
Orders Filled FromjiUy. Clipper 
Cauloc Free on applieauoii. 
BEBNABD MANDL. 210-212 
W. M a rti *) o Street, 
CHICAGO. ILL 





THE BAUOTS 



Catalogue No 



6 



THEATRICAL GOODS 
Wis* 1 a 

Tights > - Catalogue No. 4 

Hosiery J 

Spangles ] 

Gold & Silver - 

Trimmings J 

Stage f r 

Jewelry J Catalogue No. 

GOLD and SILVER BROCADES 

SATINS and BEADS 

Catalogues and samples upon request. 
When asking for catalogue, please men- 
tion what goods are wanted. 

SIEGMAN A. WEIL 

S. W. Cea-. 27th St. awl aWkwa A»a.. HrwT«rk 
The Theatrical Supply Emporium 




enters Succeed. Why Can't Too! 

STAGE TRAIN INC 
Drtaa. Omtj. Yirirnnt. Stan Dut- 
ies ui raria rlay TinK- Technical 
and Practical Cannes. CeJeMtJe* who 

Ended under Mr. ATriene: Annette Kel- 
tomacn. Nora Bayes. Haael Dm, 
Joseph Saotley. Harry Piker. Hue. Dude, 
Mary Fnller. Dolly Sisters. Twlor Hatmes. 
Virtu Prescott. Eleanor Painter and 
others. Write for catalogue rvyl'rwAnt 
study desired. 

Alnea* Theatre School of Acting 

57th St, at Broadway, 

Entrance 225 W. 57th St, New Tors. 



SECOND-HAND 

GOWNS 



ONE NIGHT ATTRACTIONS 

For Thanksgiving, Xmas, and New Year's Day, at Springfield, Ohio, population 
60,000: Marion, Ohio, population 25,000, also have other open time for first-class 
attractions. Address GUS SUN, Springfield, O. 




QUICK 



Deliveries of CosftHnesJights and nigs 
We Are Manufacturers !&«££ c^gue 

awawawMssssasawawawMeal Our Rental Department Contains Over S,S4S Costumes. 

NOW READY! Jack Weber's Minstrel Joke Book 

No. 1. A Big Hit. 25c. Postpaid 

We carry four complete lines of Make Up 

CHICAGO COSTUME WORKS 5S-RV g^rnl? CHICAGO, U. S. A. 



PLAYS 



FOR STOCK, REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Books for home 
Negro Plays, Paper, Scenery, Mrs. Jariey's Wax 
gue Free 1 Free! Free! 
EL FRENCH. 28 West S8th St, New York. 



amusement 

Works, Catalo 

SAMU 



WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS, $5.00 

Big Bargain. Have been used. Also -a few 
Second Hand Innovation and Fibre Wardrobe 
Trunks, $10 and $15. A few extra large Prop- 
erty Trunks. Also old Taylor Trunks and Bal 
Trunks. 
Parlor Floor, 28 W. 31st St,, New York City 



SHOW PRINTING 

Type Posters at the Right Price - 

LETTER HEADS 

Contracts, Tickets, Envelopes, etc. Free Sam- 
ples. STAGE MONEY, 15c Book of Herald 
Cuts, 25c. 

CROSS & BANTA r fflfi. CHICAGO 



SEND FOR CATALOG 
■W..I.1 Ifli arlttaal Santas, emtaaw 

. ■ I - ■ . 

cor pnCssstjomi 



Good Printed 
PiolEssioral 
let tEf heads 



I a* was. * chars* of 10. aw 
- tew, antSharprtal 

> C Theatrical 

aOaCpWisraSt I tolfrkfirrl 1890 



I s aii i la , tsaSrrilcaas, 



■atsswatwkw- Tab 
waay doDacs m4 y«w 




Enlarged and Beautified 

MOUQUINS 

6th Ave., bet. 27th and 28th Sts., N. Y. 
MOST POPULAR FRENCH RESTAURANT 
PARISIAN CAFE. MUSIC 6.» P. M. to 1 A. M. 



ANDREWS, 506 S. State St, CHICAGO 



ARRANGING BUREAU 

ORCHESTRATIONS OF CLASS 

Transposing, Copying and Revising of Song Hss. 

COLUMBIA THEATRE BLDG. 

Pkooe C4C2 Bryant NEW YORK 

B B & B Special 

Wardrobe Trunk 

S Ply Fibre Covered 
N. Y.t Chas. E.'Mack, 1578 B'way €Afk nfl 
Chicago: Marshall Field & Co. T WlUU 

Send for Catalogue 
B B A B TRUNK CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 

TOUPEES, GREASE 
PAINTS, ETC. 

A. M. BUCH & CO. 

11* N. Ninth St., , Philadelphia 

NEARLY NEW 

Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Fall Dr**8, Tuxedo aid Prince Albert Suit* 

LUCY GOODMAN. 2315 S. State St., Chicago. 

FRANCES AGNEW 

INGENUE 

Address 78 MANHATTAN AVE, NEW YORK 

MUSIC ARRANGED 

PIANO, ORCHESTRA. Melodies written to 
song poems. W. H. NELSON, Astor Theatre 
Bldg., 1581 Broadway, JJ. Y. 



WIGS 



-r^s^ssi 



►ack or the NAME 
f^tes^K^BUiLT 

l? ^* 3 " ' No. 2; 

CIRCUS 
SPECIAL 

TRUNK 



;\^S3£SaaSB< : " 



TAYLOR No. 2 Circus Special Trunk 

is used exclusively by Rmgling's and 

Barnum's Circus. Best for the money. 

Send for 1916 Catalogue. 

C. A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 




CHICAGO 
NEW YORK 



28 E. Randolph St. 
210 W. 44th St. 



DYE DROPS 



4c. aq. ft. For 
our highest grade. 
Others ask 12c 

BAILEY STUDIOS. Trey, N. Y. 



WIGS 



For STRftT aad STAGE WfAR 

Made to order Iron $3 to $100. 
We Specialize In Stock Wljs. 

sfcttair*^**-* 



Yandevine Sketch- Ql M %# A Enter oJnmcntB, 
ea, Monoiosn*, Di*- ■*■ B W XPiDUmlueB, 
lug*, Bertutlost-, ■ ■»«•* ■ W Tableiui,l»rhl-, 
Commenn.-1114-iit Manoal, full of new J.i.-.t-*. plans, 
helps and f'i|ft;.'«t!ui.-. Folk Dance*, Mn«tlra»i Pit. eg, 
lilinstrel Material, MaVe-up Good*. Larpo CMiaioi? 
tree. T.M>eaL'oaiCo,, JJepu i 7 , Chicago 



CIRCUS and JUGGLING 

Apparatus, Rolling Globes, Clubs, Batons, 
Guns. Wire Walkers* Apparatus and Novelties. 
Stamp for catalog. EDW. VAN WYCK, 
Cincinnati. O. 



PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS, ETC. 

X. Y. PLAY BUREAU. 



mont 'Theatre, N. 
Stamp for catalog. 



Tre- 
aty. 



NEW DROPS, $10.00 

Painted to Order. Any size up to 15x20 feet, 
in either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water Colors. 
$2.00 deposit with each order. ScheH's Scenic 
Studio, Columbus, O. 



WIGS 



Human Hair, Irish. Dutch. Jr.. 75c ea. 
Sonbrette or Men's Dress Wig, 8 1. 00, 
81.SO; Netre.2Se..S0e.,7Sc.;nsBts, 
70c Instant shlnmenV. Crtaloc fnt. 
Paper Bab, Masts, .S'lmdtte. Prvna 
KLIPPEBT MFa,46 Cooper 6c.,N.Y. 



WIGS, TOUPEES, GREASE, 
PAINT, ETC. 

Send for Price List 
C SHINDHELM, 189 West 48th Si, N. Y. 

/♦.l /v/v/v Accident Insurance Policy, with 
tl llllllr.errnan Silver Identification Label. 
Jjl.UU If Total oost, S1.Q0 » year. Protects 
T'1 VV V Theatrical People. 
ATLANTIC KEOSTKT CO.. Mmn 8U*, ■iika.sd, Va. 



PLAYS 



CATALOG of Prof esslooal and AStatenr Flajs , 
Sketches. Mnnolocs. Klnstrel Jok es. Be dta- 
tlons. Xaxs-Cp Goods, Etc., sent faXE. 
DICE * FITZGERALD. 20 Aim St.. N. . T. 



October 7, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



SHAPIRO, BERNSTEIN & CO., LOUIS BERNSTEIN, President 



VAUDEVILLE ARTISTS an 
MOTION PICTURE PIANIST 



A new decided typical type of ballad. The nrstfsiowjFox Trot ballad ever written by the boys' who created ''Lonesbme Pine" 

and will' now start a new type of. song. 



THE 









By BALLARD MACDONALD and HARRY CARROLL 



THREE BIG SUCCESSES 



"I've lost My Heart 

in Honolulu" 

By COBB and EDWARDS 

A novelty syncopated raggy ballad— -one that will take your 
audience, by storm. 



A FAST SENSATIONAL RAG 



Mississippi D 

• By- MACDONALD and PIANTADOSi, 
The best opening or closing number ever turned but. 



AND THE '-I'GREAT STANDARD ENCORE GETTER 



THREE BIG NOVELTY NUMBERS 

Jhy Do They Make 
Girls Like You" 

By GOpDWIN and PIANTADOSI 
A marvelous double. Also female, version. 



A GREAT COMEDY SO 

The Ten Commandments 
of My Married Life" 

A BEAUTIFUL NEW BALLAD 



BABY SHOES" What I Owe You 



By GOODWIN and MOHR 



SHAPIRO, BERNSTEIN St CO., 2M ^ s Ul%tJ^ ET 



CHICAGO 
Grand Opera Mouse Blclg. 



v \! . , NEW YORK GITY 



FRISCO 

Pantages Theatre Bldg. 



Tbckbicu. Pans, Ncv York. 



Productions That Defy 



uCisoti. 



v . :: 



— Ready for Release — 

CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

IN ASfcVEN-PAKT PlCTUJUZATIONOF 

"THE COMMON LAW" 

By Robert W.Chambery 
Director General Albert Gvpellanis Matfefwork. 



— Nearly Complete— 

HERBERT 

TfemendousWes&ntationof 

NAZIMOVA 

Marion CiaiiW<?ntworths Vital Play 

"WAR BRIDES" 



*:■*?• '■ 



: .:-»>..;-^ 



— In the MakinfC— 

KITTY GORDON 

(Tn e Hon. Mrs. H:H. Berresford) 

In a Superh Screen Version of 

"VERAJHE MEDIUM" 

. 6v Richard IURBM Davis 

Produced Under The Supervision O*"* 

CM. (Broncho Billy) And.or.yon. 



WITH THESE SUPERLATIVE' ATTRACTIONS AS A NUCLEUS. 

SELZNICK PICTURES 

WILL EMIAROE Off Til WE ARE RELEASIHO EIFTY-TWO GREAT PRODUCTIONS A YEAR 

THERE WOJ. BE MO/>BOOflAM-SmP£Y A STBASY OUTPUT Of /ffCOMPABABlB FEATURES PROM MW 
THE EXHIBITOR WIU BE PBEE TO TAKE HIS PICK 



■> n> it* «" h» '" "* 'n en «»» '»» "» en "» m <«> **> 

■ NEW YORK 






THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



m in /»> <mi nil m m i 



m m ui nn /w 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 



OLSON 



Has at last^ifen us permission to release this song, and you can rest assured it "was not only welcome news to us, but a big 
surprise. "SWANEE RIVER" is not only AlJoIson's pet song, but it is his biggest hit in the show, so in spite of the many re- 
quests made by our friends for the use of the song in vaudeville, it looked as though it would be impossible to have it released 
until next season. "Swanee River" is the "song that took the place and filled the spot held by "Tennessee, I Hear You Call- 
ing Me," and if you have not been fortunate enough to hear Al JolsOn sing "Swanee River" in the show, take our word 
for it there is a great treat in store rf or you. We cannot tell you how much pleasure it gives us to be able to offer this won- 
derful song to you. 




BROADWAY MUSIC CORP., WILL VON TILZER, Pres.,145 W. 45th St., N. Y.C. CHICAGO: 145 N.Clark St. 



Copyright, 1916, by the Clipper Corporation. 



- Founded by 

FRANK QUEEN. 18S3 



NEW YORK, OCTOBER 14, 1916. 



VOLUME LXIV— No. » 
I'nif. Ten Cents 



WHITE RATS TO HOLD 

OPEN MEETING OCT. 24 

Whole Matter Between Manager and Performer Will Then Be 
Threshed Out and Decision Reached Regarding 
New Managerial Contract, It Is Said. Man- 
agers Hold Important Conference 



Despite the fact that the threatened 
crisis between the Vaudeville Managers' 
Association and the White Rats, which, 
it was stated in the club house of the lat- 
ter, would be reached during the past 
week, did not materia'ize, indications from 
both sides during the last few days, lend 
color to the opinion of many persons 
closely in tonch with the situation, that 
an open break between the two bodies has 
only been deferred and not by any means 
avoided. As a matter of fact, there are 
many students of the situation who fail 
to find any means by which it can be 
avoided, except the absolute surrender by 
either side, of claims which they have both 
stated were of the very first importance. 

That both the managers* and actors' or- 
ganisations realize the situation is gradu- 
ally tightening, became evident on Friday 
afternoon when the former called a meet- 
ing of all its members and the latter is- 
sued a call for an open meeting of all 
White Rats on Oct. 24. Both, it is said, 
were for the purpose of discussing the ap- 
proaching crisis. 

At the assemblage of managers, the only 
matter discussed, it was said afterward, 
was the new form of contract which that 
body will require all White Bats to sign 
after Oct. 31, which action is expected 
to bring about a "show-down" between the 
two organizations. Some of the members, 
it is said, were -strongly in favor of ex- 
tending the operation of the new contract 
to such an extent that all stage hands and 
musicians would also be required to sign 
it and thus bring on a test of strength be- 
tween the unions snd the association in all 
branches of the theatre, at once. But 
others, among whom were some of the 
more influential members, it is said, op- 
posed such action and the meeting finally 
adjourned without the scope of the con- 
templated action being broadened. 

The same matter, it is believed, will be 
taken up at the meeting which the Bats 
have called and a decision reached as to 
whether the members will or will not sign 
the new contracts when the first of next 
month arrives. 

Efforts to reach Harry Monntf ord, ac- 
tive bead of the White Rata in the dis- 
putes which the organization has bad with 



managers, and obtain information regard- 
ing the intentions of his followers in the 
approaching serious situation, were un- 
availing, it being repeatedly stated at the 
dab house that he was not in and con- 
siderable mystery being thrown about his 
possible whereabouts. 

Efforts to see him were made by mem- 
bers of the association, also, with the in- 
tention of inquiring why the usual adver- 
tising space used by him in a weekly the- 
atrical paper, to set forth the attitude of 

the White Rats and reply to the managers' 
assertions, was not used last week. In 
view of the fact that the crux of the fight, 
which has extended over several months, 
is now approaching, the abandonment of 
the space was looked upon as strange by 
persons both inside and outside of the or- 
ganization. But several of them, at least, 
were disappointed in their hope of seeing 
him and obtaining an explanation. 

The space in the journal has been paid 
for, it is said, at advertising rates, and 
one of the reasons reported for its discon- 
tinuance, is that the funds of the Bats 
were in such shape at present that fur- 
ther expenditures in that direction were 
deemed unwise. 

However this may be, the fact remains 
that the situation between the two bodies 
is slowly but gradually reaching a point 
where one or the other must give way and 
accept defeat on. all the demands which 
they have declared are absolutely necessary 
for their welfare and advancement. 

When that time cornea, it is expected 
that the' managers will stand as one and 
' either surrender or Sgbt as a body. But, 
if indications can be accepted as throw- 
ing any light upon an event that is still 
to be reached, the White Bats can hardly 
be expected to do likewise, and a aplit in 
the ranks would nor be a surprise to close 
observers of the situation. 

Many members Of the club, it is re- 
ported, are not in favor of combating the 
managers and when it is considered that 
they include some of the more powerful of 
tbe Rata, their influence is bound to be 
felt at the crucial moment. These mem- 
bers are mostly those who receive ample 
salaries from the managers and are, on 
the whole, satisfied with their treatment 
at the hands of the booking offices, etc. 



DONLIN A. McHALE BALK 
Mike Donlin and Marty McHale, booked 
at the Palace this week, refused to go on 
in number two position, Moore & Haager 
filling in. The team was rebooked for the 
same house later in the season. 



RICKARO MAY LEASE GARDEN 
Bickard & McCrackin, who conducted 
the Willard-Moran fight at Madison Square 
Garden, have pot in their bid for the lease 
of the structure it was revealed last week. 
They have outbid all competitors it is said. 



ACTORS LOSE VOICES 

Fred Clinton and Will Morrisey bad to 
cancel an engagement at the Winter Gar- 
den Sunday night on account of losing 
their voices, due to a cold contracted in 
Walerbury, where they also had to cancel. 



CIRCUS IN TRAIN WRECK 

Norfolk, Va., Oct. 9. — A train carrying 
tbe Buffalo Bill Shows was wrecked near 
here early yesterday morning. No persona 
were injured, but twenty-six horses were 
killed and baggage destroyed. The sbow 
will exhibit here tonight 



ALBEE AIDS HOSPITAL 

A check for (2,000 from Messrs. Keith 
& Albee, head of the" United Booking Of- 
fices, New York, was received last week, 
by Dr. Max Thorek, Sirrgeon-in-ebief of 
the American Theatrical Hospital, Chi- 
cago, as a donation for the new hospital 
building now rapidly nearing completion. 



FE1NBERG PREPARING REVUE 

Abe Feinberg will present a new revue 
called the "Girls From Maxims," with 
Jerry Delancy and the Delator Sisters as 
the principals 



PUCK HAS NEW ACT 

Harry Puck, little brother of Eva, has 
ordered a new act to be written by Edgar 
Allan Woolf. Puck is training each day 
to reduce, in order to do the dancing nec- 
essary in the new vehicle. 



DILLINGHAM GETS ANOTHER 

It became known last week that Charles 
Dillingham had acquired tbe American 
rights to "Wie Einst im Mai." now run- 
ning at the Irving Place Theatre. Mr. 
Dillingham is reported to be planning an 
early production of an English version. 



ROBBINS SIGN WITH BRADY 
Robert Bobbins, formerly of the vaude- 
ville team "Bobbins and Lyons," has 
joined Brady's new comedy by Montague 
Glass and Maurice Goodman, "Object Mat- 
rimony," playing Isaac M. Bader, "the 
buyer from Milwaukee." 



QUIRK SCREEN 
CLUB HEADJ 
AGAIN 

ELECTIONS HELD 04 NEW HOME 



In a spirited election that brought out 
the votes of only a small percentage of 
the members, "Billy" Quirk, actor and 
director, has been re-elected president of 
the Screen Club, the members thereby 
administering a sound rebuke to the so- 
called anarchistic element within the or- 
ganization. A majority of the popular 
ticket was placed in office with Quirk. 

The annual election was held in the new 
home of the Screen Club at 117 West 
Forty-fifth Street, possession of which was 
taken on Oct. 5. A complete list of the 
new officers for the coming year follows: 

President — William Quirk. 

First Vice-President— Edwin Care we. 

Second Vice-President — Paul Scardon. 

Third Vice-President— Oscar Eagle. 

Treasurer— Will C. Smith. 

Corresponding Secretary — Anthony Kelly. 

Recording Secretary — Robert E. Welsh. 

Board of Governors: E. K. Lincoln, 
Harry Solter, William F. Haddock, and 
Frank Carrol. 

Of an approximated membership of 660, 
it was estimated that 150 votes were cast 
during the period of ballotting. A much 
larger turn-out was anticipated, but the 
placing in the field at tbe last moment of 
an opposition ticket aroused the displeasure 
of many members, who stayed away from 
the polls. 

Tbe defeat of John N. Race for the office 
of treasurer by Will. C. Smith was tbe un- 
expected event of tbe evening. Mr. Race 
baa served in a similar capacity for the 
past year and has been a leading spirit for 
the betterment of the organisation since 
its inception. Editor and owner of the 
Fort Lee Sentinel and a prominent Jersey 
business man, Mr. Race has given his en- 
tire time for many months to tbe affairs 
of the Club. He was the prime factor in 
tbe leasing of the new home on Forty-fifth 
Street, and has been Instrumental ia many 
ways in raising the dub to its present high 
plane. He charges his defeat directly to 
the "anarchist" taction among the screen- 
era, who have looked with disfavor upon 
certain of his efforts during his adminis- 
tration as Acting Chairman of the Hoose' 
Committee. It was stated later that 
Mr. Race's resignation would be in the' 
hands of the Board of Governors before tbe 
month is out. 



J**: 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 



FOXANDBRENON 

WAGE LEGAL 

WARFARE 

SEEK INJUNCTIONS AND DAMAGES 



It was a race between Herbert Brenon 
and William Fox, to get before the courts 
laxt week, when each filed a rait against 
the other asking damages to the extent of 
hundreds of thousands of dollars, injunc- 
tions, etc. 

Hearings in both canes were held in the 
Supreme Court on Monday before Justice 
Pendleton who after listening to argu- 
ments reserved decision. 

On Friday week Supreme Court Justice 
Goff signed an order in the case of The 
Herbert Brenon Film Corporation and 
l.eww J. Selznick Enterprises, lac., 
against the Fox Film Corporation and 
William Fox, to show cause why . an in- 
junction should not issue restraining the 
Fox Company from using the name title 
'or words, "The War Bride's Secret" as a 
'title of any motion picture production. 

The Brenon Company claims that the 
Fox Film Corporation'!! picture production 
"The War Bride's Secret" is an infringe- 
ment of the Nazimova picture play "War 
Brides." The Brenon picture is founded 
upon Marion Craig Wentwortb's play, in 
which Madame ' Nazimova appeared in 
Vaudeville with much success last season. 
The Brenon picture will, it is claimed, be 
one of the most expensive productions seen 
'this year, and will be released early in 
November. 

Mr. Brenon based hia suit for infringe- 
ment on the assign meat to him of exclu- 
sive notion picture rights to the play "War 
Brides" by the ... author, Marion Craig 
Wentworth. 

The William Fox aoit. agaiast Herbert. 
Brenon fa for an injunction and $100,000 
damages, based on the. use on. his letter- 
head of the terms "extraordinary Brenon 
au rrn sssa " and "brilliant Brecon stars" in 
connection with productions released by 
the Fox Company and actresses who ap- 
ivnred therein. Mr. Fox 'seeks to enjoin 
Brenon 'from mentioning any of the pro- 
ductions be made or directed for Fox in 
advertising his new enterprises. 

The pictures in question are "Kreutxer 
Sonata," "Soul of Broadway,", "The Two 
Orphans," "The \ Clemenceau , Case" and 
others. While the actresses whose names 
appear on the. Brenon Company letterhead 
as "brilliant Brenon Stars'.' arc Valeaka 
Surratt, Theda Bars, Nance' ..QJN.eil, An- 
nette Kellermann and others. Running 
across the,, top, of the Brenon letterhead 
also appears the .line "Sole Originator, 
Producer, Author and. Director of "A 
Daughter of .the <Gods.'" ... 

■ These two suits follow closely upon the 
recent litigation between Herbert ' Brenon 
and William Fox,- in' which -Mr. Brenon, 
who had been connected.- with the Fox 
Company for some time, but recently sev- 
ered hia connection to start his own com- 
pany, brought action to compel Mr. Fox 
to place the Brenon- name as author on the 
film and ' advertising matter of "A 
Daughter of the Gods"' made in Jamaica at 
.> reported, coat. of $1,006,060. 



BOYCOTT CONTINUES 

There seems to be no immediate settle- 
ment in view between B. S. Moss and the 

Unions in the Prospect Theatre, Bronx. 
A boycott is on and unless something un- 
foreseen intervenes, the trouble is likely 
to last several weeks longer. 

The boycott has already extended to the 
other Moss houses. Picketing is going on 
at the Jefferson and before the end of this 
week the Hamilton, Regent and Flatbush, 
Brooklyn, will be affected. ' 



HUTCHINS SLOWLY IMPROVING 

Harry Hutching, scenic artist, who is in 
the Union Hospital, Fall River, Mass., is 
slowly recovering but the physicians do not 
expect him to be able to get out for six 
months. 



LETTER ABSOLVES 

COMER IN SONG ROW 



Howard Johnson Says He Gave "Poker 
Medley" to Emma, Cams' Partner. 

The controversy between Arthur Deagon 
and Larry Comer over tbe singing rights 
of Howard Johnson and Joe McCarthy's 
"Poker Medley" reached the climax on 
Monday when both performers appeared 
at the Colonial Theatre. 

Comer rehearsed tbe song and sang it 
at both afternoon and evening performances 
although both Deagon and his attorney de- 
clared that any attempt to introduce the 
song would be met by the service of legal 
papers in an injunction and damage suit. 

Deagon has openly accused Comer of 
appropriating one of tbe features of his 
act and as Deagon introduced the Bong a 
number of years ago many, believed that 
there was some merit to his claim but a 
letter received ' recently byr 'Comer from 
Howard Johnson throws additional light 
on the subject and completely .absolves' 
Comer from any charge of appropriating - 
the "Poker Medley." Johnson's letter is 
reproduced herewith : - :' J 

New York, Oct 6, 1916. 
Dear Larry: — . ■ 

In justice to you, I want to say that 1 
am very sorry that the present' controversy 
relative to tbe Poker Medley written by 
Joe McCarthy and myself has arisen. 

At the time I gave you the song, Mr. 
Deagon was not playing vaudeville, but 
was engaged in musical productions, and 
revues, I felt, under the circumstances that 
I had a right to give the song to you, 
which 1 did, without your .solicitation. 

I hope that Mr. Deagon and yourself 
will be able to get together in this matter, 
as it makes me feel very badly to think 
that inadvertently and unintentionally 1 
am responsible for the whole.mixup, which, 
as you can well imagine I sincerely, regret, 
as Mr. Deagon and yourself are both per- 
sonal friends of mine. 

Yours sincerely, 
Howard Johnson. 



BRONX THEATRE CAVES IN 

Twenty boys, who were using an aban- 
doned theatre in the Bronx as a play- 
ground, were buried in the debris when 
the theatre caved in' last week. Four of 
the boys had a narrow escape from death 
and the others were badly scared and 
shaken up. The playhouse was one started 
two years ago by Cecil Spooner, but after 
construction had proceeded as far as the 
first floor, was abandoned. 



HIPPODROME TO 

TEST SUNDAY 

LAW 



ATTORNEY SERVES NOTICE ON CITY 



The City of New York in its suit to 
collect a penalty of $500 from the Hippo- 
drome company for permitting a Sunday 
concert for charitable purposes to be given 
last January received something of a set 
back this week when Nathan Burkan, at- 
torney for the big playhouse, served notice 
that he would attack the constitutionality 
of the Sunday concert ordinance. In 
answer to the City's suit the Hippodrome 
company alleges that the present ordinance 
covering Sunday performances is in direct 
conflict with the laws of 1887, also known 
as the Charter of the Greater City of New 
York. In the ordinance approved March 
30, 1915, under which the Department of 
Licenses brought the suit, the right to 
give concerts on Sunday is not afforded 
charitable associations. The law of 1897. 
which has never been repealed, charitable 
Sunday performances are permitted. 

The performance which the License 
Commissioner objected to and upon which 
the suit is based, was given for the benefit 
of the newsboys of New York and the 
proceeds were turned over to charity. The 
commissioner in his suit alleged that the 
performance was "not sacred, but tragedy, 
comedy, ballet, opera, farce and negro 
minstrelsy," all of which is barred by the 
ordinance in question. 



TO SELL MUSICAL LIBRARY 

The estate of- Samuel P. Warren, who 
•for twenty-sis years was Organist of Grace 
Prostestant Episcopal Chueh. Broadway 
-and Tenth street, and regarded as the dean 
of American organists, will sell bis mus- 
ical libraries through the Anderson Galler- 
ies on tbe afternoons of October 26 and 
27. 



BALLET SEASON DELAYED 

Owing to the fact that Warslav Nijinsky 
injured one of his ankles last week and 
was therefore unable to conduct rehear- 
sals, the Serge de DiagbDeff Ballet Russe 
has postponed the opening of its season at 
the Manhattan Opera House from Oct. 9. 
to Oct 16. 



TIMONEY BUSY MAN 
James A TJmoney is a busy man, for, 
in addition to being the attorney for the 
White Rats, he has just been chosen as 
counsel for the Actors' Guild, of which 
Jerry Cohan is president. The duties of 
these organizations together with his ex- 
tensive practice among theatrical folks, 
caused him to refuse a judicial nomina- 
tion recently tendered him. 



MISS BINGHAM'S STAGE RETURN 

Amelia Bingham will shortly open in 
vaudeville in a new series of "Big Mo- 
ments from Great Plays." The offering 
is in preparation under M. S. Bentham's 
direction. The vaudeville season will 
mark Miss Bingham's return to the stage. 
She has been in retirement since the 
death of her husband, Lloyd Bingham. 



MR. LAZARUS HALTS SUDDENLY 

Theatrical folk were surprised this week 
to learn that the engagement of "Mr. Laz- 
arus" at the Booth Theatre was terminated 
abruptly on Friday, Oct. G. 

The members of tbe show were given no" 
advance notice, and the unusual action 
caused much talk among tbe cast. 

Henry Dixey has been tbe star of "Mr. 
Lazarus" since its opening a few weeks 
ago. The piece has been doing a fair busi- 



DIRECTOR MARRIES WRITER 
Will Adams, a motion picture director, 
and Thelma Parker Hull, a scenario writer, 
were married lost week by City Clerk 
Scully in City Hall, New York. 



PUBLISHERS TALK OF 

NEW ORGANIZATION 



Enormous Increase in Cost of Doing 

Business Causes Leaders to Look 

About for Means of Relief. 

The enormous increase in the production 
cost of sheet music is responsible for much 
of the "organization" talk which is going 
the rounds of the big popular music pub- 
lishing houses this week. The advances in 
the price of paper, inks, printing, etc., 
have been so frequent during tbe past few 
months that the publishers' margin of 
profit, always a small one, has been almost 
entirely wiped out. ""- ' 

So serious has the situation become that 
a number of the larger publishers have 
frankly stated that unless some means by 
which the cost of doing business can be 
reduced or the Belling price of sheet music 
increased, the outlook is extremely dubi- 
ous. 

In considering the curtailing of expenses 
the first and most important item the pub- 
lisher considers is the payment of singers, 
a condition which has long existed and 
which it is believed can only be elimin- 
ated by the formation of a strong organiza- 
tion of tbe leading houses. 

Several organizations which planned to 
deal with the paying of singers and. to 
curtail many of the expenses incidental 
with the publication of music have been 
formed in the past, but for one reason or 
another failed in their object and one by 
one passed out of existence. 

The right sort of an organization among 
publishers could undoubtedly accomplish a 
vast amount of good, but just how such 
an organization could he formed is a ques- 
tion. 



SET "LETTY" DATE 

A final date has at last been fixed for 
the New York premiere of "So Long 
Letty," Earle Carrol's musical snow. It 
will be seen by New Yc*kers for the first 
time on Oct. 30 at the Shubert Theatre. 

The Oliver Morocco success is now com- 
pleting a three weeks' run in Boston pre- 
paratory to its metropolitan debut. 

DREW'S OPENING DATE 

John Drew made his first appear- 
ance as Major Fendennis in the play of 
that name on Thursday evening, Oct. 12. 
The company supporting Mr. Drew in- 
cluded: Brandon Tynau, Edith Shayne. 
John S. 031101, Helen MaeKeHar, Alison 
Skipworth, Helen Mencken. Walter Kings- 
ford, Alice Chapin, Mary Worth. Lester 
Lonergan and Leonard wuiey. 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




HUGH D. McINTOSH WANTS 
ATTRACTI ONS FOR AUSTRALIA 

Robert Cately, Representative Here for Big Manager, on Still 

Hunt for Acts of All Descriptions — Finds That 

Demand Exceeds Supply 



Robert Cately, representative of Hugh 
D. Mcintosh, theatrical magnate of the 
Antipodes, is in New York booking head- 
line attractions and novelty acts for the 
Ricards Tour. He arrived last Wednes- 
day after an absence of two years, and 
states that the ever-increasing demand for 
American tarns in Australia forced Mr. 
Mcintosh to send a scout to this side for 
material. 

He will assist Chris. O. Brown, who 
looks after the American interests of the 
Ricards Tour, to secure an array of head- 
line and novelty acta for the coming Aus- 
tralian theatrical season. 

Cately, who was managing director of 
Harry Ricard's enterprises for eight 
years, is thoroughly conversant with con- 
ditions in the far-off land. He is also 
keenly alive to the existing situations on 
this side of the water. 

Dilating on the success of the revue 
idea in America, Mr. Cately aptly char- 
acterizes this form of entertainment. 

"A revue is a glorified cabaret. This 
particular amusement fad, has seized the 
pleasure-loving Australian firmly in its 
grasp. The big towns are revue crazy. 
The shows, while of course produced on a 
smaller scale than those of New York, are 
elaborate, and scenically compare favor- 
ably with their American original. 
: "The Ttvoli Follies Company, after a 
prosperous run in Sydney, is now en tour 
through New Zealand. Vera Pearce, an 
Australian stage beauty, is the feature 
attraction, supported by a company 
among which American performers are 
prominent. Edward Hutchinson who had 
much to do with the success of the Blue 
Paradise, is now on his way to Australia 
to produce a new Follies for the coming 
season in Sydney. It is planned to make 
this equally ar pretentious as the present 
Ziegfeld form of midnight diversion." 

Speaking of the demand at present for 
American novelty and headline acts for 
Mr. Mcintosh's circuit, Cately comments 
upon the scarcity of' available material 
for this purpose. 



"Thus far, I have not signed a single 
turn for our tours, but have several con- 
tracts in abeyance. ■ The names of the 
contemplated artists I am not now at 
liberty to divulge. It is my desire to book 
as many features as I can for November 
sailing, bnt the demand exceeds the supply, 
a rare condition aa you know in theat- 
ricals. 

"I am offering all performances ap- 
proached a contract for twelve weeks 
work, with an option of twenty weeks. 
There being no Sunday shows, the con- 
tract calls for six night performances and 
two matinees. Considerably easier than 
a tour over the American big time cir- 
cuits. All acts open in Sydney at the 
TivolL" 

As an evidence that theatrical condi- 
tions in general have not been affected 
by the war, Mr. Cately offers the an- 
nouncement that Hugh Mcintosh is at 
present erecting the only Roof Garden 
Theatre in the British Empire. The house 
in question will be in Brisbane, and will 
be the last word in general excellence of 
construction and appointment. 

"It is the intention of Mr. Mcintosh to 
establish personal headquarters in New 
York before the expiration of the present 
year. He has been influenced in this 
move by the insistent demand for Ameri- 
can entertainers of the Australian thea- 
tre-going public. 

"At present vaudeville bills in the Anti- 
podes consist chiefly of turns big and 
small from this side of the water. A 
few of the recent additions to the already 
well filled ranks of American artists are 
Jamie Kelly, The Skatelles and Merlin. 
These players left San Francisco on the 
26th of September and will open early in 
November." . . 

Mr. Cately will remain for an indefinite 
period in New York, co-operating with 
Chris. Brown in booking for the Ricards 
Tour. It is presumed the Australian rep- 
lesentative will await the arrival of Mr. 
Mcintosh in December, probably taking 
charge .of the New York offices to be 
established at that time. 



LOWE WORKING ON ACT 

Sesame of Love," a miniature musical 
comedy will be the initial production of 
the Maxim Lowe Corp. Leon De Costa, is 
responsible for the book and music Matt 
Woodward is writing the dialogue and 
lyrics. The cast of seven people includes, 
Fred Taylor, Olive Le Compt, Emil Agouat 
and Simone de Beryl with a chorus of ten 
girls. 

■ The act carries a musical director and 
crew. Two sets and very elaborate gowns 
are being prepared. Leon De Costa, will 
stage the production. 



LEO CARF.I.1.1 BACK 
Leo C. Carelli, inventor and producer of 
"The Violopbone, an electrical stage act, 
arrived from London Sunday, Oct. 1. The 
act has been a feature on the 
Moss & Stoll Circuit in Europe. 



GEORGE SIDNEY NUMBER TWO 

Mrs. Louis K. Sidney, wife of the mana- 
ger of Fox's Jamaica theatre, presented 
her husband with a nine pDund baby boy 
Oct. 4. The child has been named after 
his' uncle, George Sidney, of "Busy Iszy" 
fame. 



CLEVELAND'S BOOKINGS GROWING 

Aside from the list of clubs on the books 
of W. S. Cleveland, the amusement 
purveyor of Newark, N. J., his bookings 
for fairs still continue and the list of 
theatres he supplies with talent grows from 
day to day. His list of acts is also 
assuming formidable proportions. 



HALL AND SHERIDAN FEATURED 

Howard R. Hall and Vernie Sheridan are 
featured this season with Homer Miles' 
playlet, "Cheaters." The act opens on the 
Loew Circuit, Oct. 10. The rest of the 
cast includes Dixie Dow, Charles Dey, 
George Roberts and Charles Collins. Mr. 
Hall is manager of the act. 



MISS BREEN IN VAUDEVILLE 

Grace Breen will be seen in vaudeville 
at an early date. Miss Breen made her 
debut in Florence, Italy, at a concert given 
by the late Vincenzo Lombnrdi, who was 
her teacher for two years. She has also 
sung st recitals at Carnegie and Aeolian 
Hall. 



TALLMAN ON UNITED TIME 

Fred M. Tallman, the well-known pool 
player, has been routed for thirty weeks 
over the United Time, opening Oct. 9, at 
Keith's, Cincinnati. 




GEORGE AND LILLIAN DAWSON 

Booked solid on William Morris Circuit 
commencing week of 18th at Majestic 
Theatre, Utica, New York. 



NEW RUTH ROYE ACT 

Ruth Itove is preparing a new act with 
all exclusive material fur her reappear- 
ance at -the Palace in several weeks. This 
will be the first time that Miss Roye has 
appeared single without popular songs. 



MORRIS STILL 

PLANS NEW 

CIRCUIT 

TO SEE MOROSCO SOON 



Chicago, 11L, Oct. 10. — WllHam Morris, 
who is with the Eva Tanguay show Insists 
that there will be a vaudeville circuit 
through the west operated by himself and 
Oliver Morosco with whom he expects to 
have a long conference when he reaches 
Los Angeles, soon. 

Those familiar with vaudeville condi- 
tions scout the idea of another vaudeville 
circuit and insist that Morris is after pub- 
licity, but, on the other hand, there are 
many who believe that such a project la 
really under way. 

The statement that Morosco is with 
Morris in the plan Is held ont by many as 
a factor which would do much to make the 
project a success, as the favorite theatrical 
son of the Pacific Coast usually succeeds 
in whatever be undertakes. 

Some of his friends, too, point oat that 
he has controlled a yearning to eater the 
vaudeville field for some time and there- 
fore, expect to hear Important news soon 
after Morris reaches the Pacific, or else 
nothing more of the rumors. In other 
words, they expect the deal to either go 
through then or he dropped altogether. 



SINGER FOR VAUDEVILLE 

Grace Van Studdiford, of musical com- 
edy fame, will open Monday in Newark 
with her new vaudeville . turn. . The 
singer is "ironing it out" preparatory to 
a showing In the New York Wg-thne 
houses. 

Miss Van Studdiford will be rexnem- 
berod for her starring tours in the "Red 
Feather" and "The Golden Butterfly." 
Lionel Hein will direct the vaudeville af- 
fairs of the prim* donna. 



MERRIAMS ENTER VAUDEVILLE 

Qotsct, 111., Oct 5.— The Merriam Trio 
have finished their fair season and open 
here to-day for the Association. They have 
put Baby Zoe in school and will be known 
this season as Billy snd Eva Merriam, 
aerial acrobats. 

The Universal has engaged seventeen 
new players. Two weeks ago they let out 
thirty-four. 



OPENS SHORT VAUDEVILLE TOUR 

Cecil Cunningham opened a limited 
vaudeville season at Providence on Mon- 
day. She will shortly be seen in a new 
Klaw & Erlanger musical production. ■ 



NEW ACT IN THE MAKING 

A new act, composed of musical numbers 
that break up a little story, is being re- 
hearsed by Halsey Mohr and Lillian Floyd 
for presentation on big time about the 
middle of next month. 



SENNETTS AT NATIONAL 

Sennets' entertainers were at Loew*s 
National the entire week nnd received a 
cordial re-epti«m. 



TRIO SPLIT 

Harry L Robinson has left, the act of 
Kay, Bush and Robinson and sailed last 
week for London. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 




NEW ACTS 



INEZ MacCAULEY & CO. 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 
Style— Serio-comic sketch. 
Time — Eighteen minutet. 
Setting — Btirvgaknc in country. 
Value — With revision, vitt do. 

Archie Colby is responsible for the 
sketch which Miss MacCanley is show- 
ing for the first time around New York 
this week. The production was made by 
Joe Hart, which means that it is staged 
properly and with an experienced band. 

The story, while light, is entertaining 
and the entire act runs with a certain 
smoothness which coven op its slight de- 
ficiencies. 

A motion picture star looking for a 
quiet place to write a scenario hires a 
bungalow in the wilds from its owner. 
He tries to force her to marry him. stat- 
ing that the minister is on his way. The 
dialog which follows is bright for the 
best part, bnt can stand the injection of 
more laughs. The minister arrives, prov- 
ing to be a brain specialist who is caring 
for the lunatic bungalow owner. 

This part is well played by the actor 
in question. Miss MacCanley gets all 
possible from her present lines, and gives 
a most pleasing performance. This 
sketch, strengthened in the proper places, 
should prove a good vehicle for her. 



"THE DREAM OF THE 
ORIENT" 

Theatre — Jeferson. 

Style— Tabloid with scenic effects. 

Time — Twenty-five minuter. 

Setting— Special, two sets. 
Value— A strong feature act. 

"The Dream of the Orient" is a 
tabloid somewhat out of the usual run, 
and requires the services of a leading 
woman, three excellent dancers, four 
chorus girls, an orchestra leader and 
sn extra man, ten in ail- 
Before the curtain rise* the leader: 
takes the place of the house leader. 
The first scene shows a young man in 
an opium joint. He falls asleep and 
what follows is supposed to be his 
dream. 

The scene changes to a room in an 
Oriental palace, sparkling with tinsel 
and colored lights, and the young man 
finds tiiwmlf in the centre of half a 
dozen harem beauties who dance until 
he gets into the humor of it. What 
follows is supposed to be a series of 
dancing orgies. 

■ The young man and two of the 
women are exceptionally good, classical 
dancers. Another of the women has a 
soprano voice of fine quality which she 
knows how to use and the leader sings, 
in good voice, from the orchestra pit. 

All in all it is a very meritorious 
offering, the only flaw, if flaw there be, 
is that when the curtain falls the scene 
does not change hack to the opium den. 



RAYMOND & O'CONNOR 

Theatre — Proctor's Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Singing, dancing, talk. 

Time — Sixteen minutet. 

Setting — Special drop and interior. 

Value— Good for most any company. 

Raymond and O'Connor have gone to 
quite some expense and trouble in getting 
their present offering together, and with 
further playing will be able to hold down 
a position with the good ones. 

The turn opens before a special drop 
of the Board Walk at Atlantic City. 

An excellent rain effect is introduced by 
the aid of the screen and projection ma- 
chine. The talk needs looking after, and 
the male member of the act would do 
well to tone bis work down just a trifle. 
His partner presents a pretty appear- 
ance and dances, bat it would be just as 
well if she did not sing. Called a "Boil- 
ing Chair Flirtation," the act is clean 
and diverting for the best part. 

The finish with the girl in a most be- 
coming costume and the boy doing a tin 
soldier helped greatly in putting the of- 
fering across. The latter showed a nice 
voice and should add a song more ef- 
fectual for its display. On the whole, a 
pretty, but light turn, which can be 
quickened up somewhat. 



NATALIE ALT 

Theatre— Palace. 

Style — Songs. 

Time— Twenty -one minute*. 

Setting — Special. .-."... 

Value — A high class feature. 

Miss Alt, who was the star of "Adele," 
has a stunning array of gowns, a good 
repertoire of songs and an orchestra of 
twelve men with Leo Edwards, the com- 
poser, at the piano, to help her enter- 
tain her audience, and from the way it 
received her, she did it well at her ini- 
tial appearance. 

The orchestra is upon the stage with 
her, in a special drawing room interior 
and adds an atmosphere of class as well 
as good music to the offering. Miss Alt 
has a good voice which she knows how 
to use to the best of advantage and 
whether she sings alone or with Mr. Ed- 
wards, is pleasing. 

The audience, which remembered her 
for her appearance in "The Girl Who 
Smiles" as well as "Adele," set its ap- 
proval upon her act by recalling her 
three times. A slight criticism might 
be that the act could, be put over with 
a bit more speed, to advantage. 



EMMETT CORRIGAN CO. 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Dramatic Sketch. '• '- - V ■ .• 
Time— Tventy-cme minute*. ■. .> 

Setting^ — Special and good. V*. 2<. 

Value — The Corrigan Xante. . . % 
This act, aside from the fact that Mr. 
Corrigan, an actor of ability, has . the 
leading role, does hot impress one as 
being a great drawing card, because the 
thread of the story is too involved to 
be readily understood. 

It c on c er ns a diamond, from which 
; the act gets the name of "The' Van 
Lowe Diamond." Originally the proper- 
ty of a rich man, it is sought by an ad- 
venturess and her paramour even after 
' the owner has committed suicide be- 
j cause he found her love for him false. 
When the curtain rises, she follows the 
stone into the home of a man named 
Gregory, to whom it is left and there 
meets Corrigan, playing the part of a 
' valet. Through his ' shrewdness," the 
stone is saved, but the .story "is ' so in- 
volved and complicated that - the au- 
dience found it hard to follow it . 

Mr. Corrigan is a very good actor, hot 
even his art is hardly able to make the 
piece even moderately interesting. 



"THE DOCTOR'S ORDERS" 

Theatre — City. 
Style— Sketch. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting — Howe, full stage, boxed. 

Value — Witt do for the tm oiler homes. 
"The Doctor's Orders" is neither bet- 
ter nor worse than the average sketch 
as to construction. It discloses no novel 
theme, the main idea revolving around 
a man. who, convalescing from a six 
weeks' illness, is ordered by his physi- 
cian not to drink or smoke as either 
will affect his heart and kill him. As 
soon as the doctor departs the patient 
refuses to heed the orders and in spite 
of the efforts of the nurse and the man's 
valet, he smokes and drinks till he has 
a "jag." When the doctor returns he 
finds the man at the point of death. 



MRS. VERNON CASTLE SUED 
Mrs. Vernon Castle has been made .de- 
fendant in a suit brought by Hickman, Inc., 
the costumer, for $699. 

It is alleged the dancer's wife bought 
clothes to the amount of $1499 last 
December, thus far paving only $900 of 
the bill. 



BEN HARNEY & CO. 

Theatre— Jefferson. 

Style — Ragtime, playing, singing. 

Time— Eighteen minutes. 

Setting— House. 

Value — A real feature. 

Ben Harney has come back. He is 
the same Ben Harney he was when he 
introduced his ragtime singing twenty 
odd years ago. As a reminder of old 
times he sang what he said was his first 
song, "Mr. Johnson Torn Me Loose." 
He played in rag on the piano and sang, 
and his assistant, a colored man with a 
good resonant voice, helped him out 
from a position in the gallery. Later 
the "company" came down on the stage 
and proved that he, too, could tickle 
the ivories in lively fashion. 

A-nfl then to the playing of -his as- 
sistant Mr. Harney did some of his well 
known eccentric dancing. This was the 
real big hit of the Jefferson hill and the 
audience would not let - Mr. Harney go 
until he appeared and "begged off" with 
a little speech. 



AVON COMEDY FOUR 

Theatre — Palace. j ' ■. 

Style— Comedy. 

Timer- Thirty-three minutes. 

Setting— Special. » 

Value — Feature on any biU. 

The Avon Comedy Four is well 
known for its fun making ability, but 
it has never been more so than in its 
new offering. 

The scene is the kitchen of a restau- 
rant, where one of the four is the chef, 
one the proprietor, and the other two 
waiters. The complications that attend 
the serving of food, the ordering of 
supplies and the sudden illness of the 
chef furn<sb endless opportunities for 
the introduction of new jokes and gags, 
witty repartee and humorous harangues 
and discussions. Many of the laugh- 
making gaga proved to be original, 
which adds to their enjoyment by an 
audience. 

The act opens in three, the kitchen, 
but is changed to one, the waiting room 
of a doctor's office, where the chef goes 
for advice. It ends with the quartette 
singing in the way that has made them 
favorites. 

THE ALASKA TRIO 

Theatre— Palace. 

Style — Skating. 

Time— Eighteen minutes. 

Setting — Realistic Alaska. 

Value — A good feature. 

This trio, two men and a woman, 'do 
stunts on skates upon a stage covering 
that looks like wax and evidently 
serves their purpose just as well as the 
iciest ice that was ever frozen in the 
shivering North. One of the men 
dances, jumps in and Out of barrels, and 
performs leaps which require nerve as 
. well as agility. His feats in this di- '' 
recti on quite equal those: of any skater 
seen in this city, although it could be 
seen that he was hampered by the space 
limitations of the stage. 

All .three wear costumes that are not 
only becoming nut appear costly and 
are well supplied with changes. At the 
beginning and end of the offering, all 
execute fancy maneuvres over the 
glassy stage. 

GEORGE KELLY 

Theatre— Colonial. . 

Style — Dramatic sketch. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting— Parlor *et. 

Value — Ordinary. 

George Kelly is a capable actor, we 
will admit, and so is his support, Anna 
Cleveland and -"Nora O'Connor, Out all 
their clever work will not make a suc- 
cess of "Finders-Keepers," a sketch that 
has to do with a woman finding a pocket- 
book filled with money and who thinks 
it is justly hers in kesping it after 
she knows who the real owner is. 

The story is poorly worked oat and 
becomes tiresome at Esssss 

May TuBy ia responsible for the pre- 
sensation, bnt the author, whoever he 
or she may be, has constructed a rather 

._ poor vehicle for ATi- lT»rij»« jjtjj sjsj a 

vaudeville feature. . . ., . * 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




PALACE 

'With four new acts on the bill, the pro- 
gram at the Palace the past week offered 
wide diversion to vaudeville lovers, and 
even the most satiated variety appetite 
must have found something on it to give 
satisfaction. Beginning with a clever 
juggling and swinging ring act, it ran 
through songs, dances, comedy and drama 
to a skating act, in an Alaskan setting, 
that closed the show. 

After the opening picture, The Rials, a 
boy, a girl and 'a few' old hate, appeared 
and demonstrated that they are. experts 
on the swinging rings by doing stunts 
that not only required unusual strength, 
but dexterity as well and were well re- 
ceived. ■ 

Then came Moore arid Haager, who re- 
placed Donlin and McHale. These clever 
entertainers sing songs that are catchy 
and fit their personalities, ' a quality with 
which Miss Haager is plentifully supplied. 
Moore's stories, told, in the dialect of a 
Mississippi River negro) are humorous and 
brought out a hearty round of applause. 
Cecil Weston and Dorothy Clark were first 
chosen to replace the former giant and 
his partner, but they in turn had to be 
replaced by Moore and Haager. 

The Morgan Art Dancers played their 
third big week at the Palace and, judging 
by the way the offering was received, it 
can appear that much longer, an honor to 
which it is entitled on its merits. 

Only back from England two weeks, 
Jack Norworth made his first bow to 
Palace patrons and was accorded the wel- 
come that is usually extended to the re- 
turning wanderer. His' clever songs were 
well presented and afforded the audience 
a chance to applaud something other than 
himself. 

A sojourn in London often attaches an 
English air to Americans that is not al- 
ways pleasing on this side of the "water" 
and it cannot be said that Norworth has 
entirely escaped. The audience, however, 
accepted him as of yore and recalled him 
twice. ; " : 

A> Herman is always funny, but never 
more so than this week. In his own way, 
now in loud tones and then in soft ones, 
he went over the entire list of actors on 
the bill and made a few black-face ob- 
servations regarding each that were orig- 
inal, witty and funny. His work in this 
direction is similar to that of Jack Wil- 
son, which means that it gets the interest 
of his audience and plenty of laughs. His 
billing, in which he is called the "Assassin 
of Grief,*' is characteristic of his act. 

The first of the new acts was Natalie 
Alt, in a repertoire of songs in which she - 
had the assistance of Leo Kd wards. The 
Avon Comedy Four followed, with Em- 
mett Corrigan in "The Van Lowe Dia- 
mond," and The Alaska Trio, a skating 
act; winding up the list of those making 
their first appearance. A further descrip- 
tion of them all will be found in the New 
Acts department. 

Fred Debb conducted the orchestra in 
his usual efficient manner, ««Miwg much to 
the program. 



COLONIAL 

Emma Carus and Larry Comer walked 
away with the show here this week and 
sizing up the excellence of the program it 
sure is some stunt. 

The large audience, and it has a capacity 
one in the evening, gave this clever team 
a grand sendoff. Miss Carus seems to im- 
prove with age and is at her best singing 
an Irish Hawaiian number. Her gestures 
and facial expressions are simply artistic. 
Larry is also, there with his original method 
of. sending over songs. The dance at the 
finish in which. Miss Carus does some high, 
kicking surprised them. Altogether it was 
n big night for the pair. .... 

Second honors went to Ethel Hopkins 
in number two spot. With , no billing to 
speak of and in this, difficult position this 
little lady offered a selection of high-class 
numbers along with a popular song for an 
encore. Seldom has a single woman re- 
ceived such an amount of applause as was 
bestowed upon th s s talented young singer. 
She- has a beautiful high soprano voice and 
uses it with ease and skill. She has made 
a happy selection for her repertoire, each 
number being suited to her style of voice. 
She makes a fine appearance and has an 
abundance of personality and stage pres- 
ence. 

.What little comedy there was on the bill, 
was mostly supplied by Frances Nordstrom, 
William Pinkham &. Co., presenting, "All 
Wrong," a clever one-act playlet written 
by Miss Nordstrom. One of those affairs 
where a wife thinks she is being treated 
too well by her husband and in a dream 
she has visions of being roughly bandied. 
The sketch has many tense situations and 
is excellently acted by both principals. 

Florenz Tempest and Marion Sunshine 
offered, "A Broadway Bouquet," and 
strange aa it may seem didn't fare so well. 
It might have been owing to their selec- 
tion of songs, several of which were en- 
tirely nnsuited to their peculiar method of 
delivery. 

Ed Vinton with Buster, the dog with 
the college education had things all his 
own way., 

'Arthur Deagon, in songs, stories and 
flip flaps had no cause for complaint at 
the way he was received. Deagon gives 
an impersonation of a young lady visiting 
a mid-night cabaret for the first time and 
it was a work of art. His songs have been 
carefully selected and he knows bow to 
send them over for the best results. 

Wallace Bradley and Yvette Ardine, of- 
fering one of the few novelties now being 
shown In vaudeville, went over big con- 
sidering the team held down the opening 
spot. Here is an art with a little prun- 
ing will be a good second feature. Miss 
Ardine is a corking good toe dancer be- 
sides knowing how to sing a song properly. 

Kurds' Educated Boosters, with a small- 
size production performed stunts and many 
other novelties capably. It makes a dandy 
good closing' act and held them seated 
Monday night. 

George Kelly supported by Anna Cleve- 
land and Nora O'Connor, showed a new 
sketch called, 'Tinders— Keepers," a full 
review of which wfO be found in our new 
act column. 



AMERICAN 

An cutertaining and smooth running 
show at the above house on Monday eve- 
ning brought more than the usual mea- 
sure of appreciation from the Roof reg- 
ulars. „ 

For an opener. Math Brothers and Girlie 
sang and danced. The act is a trifle above 
the ordinary and gave the. bill an excellent 
start. . . i 

Closing the first half Eddie Foley and 
Lea Letnre & Co., present "A Bit of Scan- 
dal" sponsored by Roland West, the pro- 
ducer. With a most artistic set, fine light 
effects, and a chorus of really pretty' girls, 
Mr. Foley and Lea Letnre are about the 
most natural man and woman team we 
have seen in these parts in some time. 

Gaston. Palmer has the usual routine of 
juggler's tricks, all well performed, with 
a few original balancing feats which stand 
out. He is an easy worker. A natural 
and highly diverting sketch is finely played 
by Mr. and Mrs. Norman Phillips. 

Ads. mi; and Guhl, former German com- 
edians, now work in black-face. The ma- 
terial used while not strikingly original, 
is well handled but traces of their former 
German dialect creep in at timet 

The action of Lillian of Kaufman and 
Lillian in displaying a card-board figure 
hidden under her pretty Southern costume 
spoiled completely a good song number 
done by the two. 

Marie Russell fooled the majority of the 
"wise ones" with her excellent black-face 
make-up. Miss Russell sang five numbers 
and left them wanting more. A good 
single. 

The show was closed by Teohow's Cats. 



FIFTH AVENUE 

The audience at this house on Monday 
afternoon appeared to be in a state border- 
ing on "coma." Added to this, the show 
was an act short and it was necessary to 
fill in with a picture. 

But Nina Payne & Co. woke them up. 
Her dancing of four special numbers was 
a revelation in grace and artistry. The 
two male members assisting her fill out 
the act acceptably. 

King and King open with an equilibristie 
turn which is the equal of anything similar 
on the big time. The girl's work is little 
short of marvelous. 

Kirby and Rome, men dancers, failed to 
arouse the applause they deserved. Their 
routine of steps is excellent and the open- 
ing song rendered most pleasingly. 

Raymond and O'Connor have quite a 
vehicle for their singing and dancing ef- 
forts. (See New Acta.) 

Mabel Burke, the illustrated singer of 
the house, aroused a little enthusiasm by 
vocalizing "If I Knock the L Out of Kelly." 
The show really started when Tom Ed- 
wards and company appeared in his ven- 
triloquial novelty. Mr. Edwards is a mas- 
ter of the art, and his assistant, Alice 
Melville, has a beautiful double voice. 

Next to closing, Ben Ryan and Harriet 
Lee hit the bouse just right They regis- 
tered an emphatic hit. Ryan's quiet 
clowning is immense, and his handling of 
the "wise" stuff is vastly entertaining. 
Miss Lee looks nifty. 



CITY 

The usual Mouday afternoon attendance 
was in evidence at the opening show 
Oct. and a well arranged bill received 
its full meed of approval. 

Amedio proved himself to be one of the 
best accordionists that have been heard 
hereabouts in many moons and his work 
was so well liked that he was forced to 
respond to two encores and could easily 
have taken another. 

"The Boarding School Girls" is men- 
tioned in New Acta. 

Jolly Johnny Jones and company — a 
man wire walker and woman assistant— 
was a strong feature. Mr. Jones works in 
full dress and high bat and his perform- 
ance on the tight wire is both clever and 
daring. He does many of the feats 
formerly done by Caicedo and some others 
that are novelties. The audience showed 
its approbation with hearty applause. 
The woman assistant waa dressed as a 
messenger boy. 

Harry and Anna Seymour — man and 
woman — do a clever singing, talking and 
dancing act. He shines as a soft shoe 
dancer and the woman, who shows herself 
to be a real comedienne, givea imitations 
of Grace La Rue, Anna Held and Eddie 
Foy singing "Every Good Little Girl," etc. 
They scored a deserved success. 

The three Alverettes presented their 
acrobatic comedy act and met with their 
usual favor. 

"The Doctor's Orders." (See New Acts.) 

Neimeyer and McDonnell— man and 
woman — gave an act they called a revue 
in which they gave "Kitty and Jos," "A 
Hawaiian Romance," "Military Tommy," 
and finish with "Baseball Rag." 

Keough and Nelson— man and woman — 
an eleventh hour substitution, do a pleas- 
ing novelty act. 



JEFFERSON 

"Almost capacity" was the condition at 
this house Monday afternoon and a pleas- 
ing bill was well received. . ' 
— Doyle and Boyle, two men, one a 
female impersonator, did a good act. The 
female impersonator fooled the audience 
until the close when he removed his wig. 
Then tbey made him stng a number from 
"The Chocolate Soldier." The straight Is 
a capital soft shoe dancer. 

Barclay and Forrest — the man magician 
and the woman his assistant They do a 
clever magical act and received recogni- 
tion for their work. 

Daisy Leon found herself a warm 
favorite and her singing won favor. 

"The Master Move." (See New Acta.) 

Ben Harney and company "came back" 
after a long absence. (See New Acta.) 

Harry Thomson, "the Mayor of the 
Bowery," gave his political and miscel- 
laneous monologue and scored one of the 
big bite of the bin. 

The Karresses, two men, one straight 
and the other a clown, were seen In a good 
horizontal bar aet> 

"The Dream of the Orient," a tabloid 
of more than usual elaborateness. Is 
mentioned in New Acts. 

The programs presented at this theatre 
are becoming better each week and are 
worthy of the applause they 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 



LONDON 
PARIS 




NMW^ 



BERLIN 
SYDNEY 



LONDON AT A GLANCE 



London, Eng., Oct. 5. 

And now we are informed by Topsy 
Sinden that she expecta to return to the 
stage shortly. Everybody who known Topsy, 
and her friends an legion, remembers that 
aha was incapacitated through an accident 
to her knee while playing the principal 
girl role in "Tommy Tucker," the 1912 
pantomime at the Royal Court, Liverpool. 

Miss Binden, although she now walks 
well, fear* that she will never be able to 
dance again, and will confine herself to 
"acting parts.'* Her friends rejoice at the 
prospect of seeing ner once more behind 
tha footlights. 

The many 'friends of "Uncle" Joe Elvin 
extend ''their sympathy to him on the loss 
of fata wife. Mrs. Elvin, who died after 
a long illness, was for many years a foot- 
light favorite. She waa a member of the 
old Keegan-Elvin combination, and one of 
the original "Over the Sticks" Company at 
the Oxford. 

To this pdblic of to-day she waa best 
known as the helpmate of onr own "Uncle 
Joe." 

Arthur Roberta and Jimmy Learaiouth 
are recent ' additions to the cast of "look 
Who's Here!" and while only about a 
week with the show they are running the 
others In the company a race for public 
favor. 

When the new Palace revue is presented 
this month it will be called "Vanity Fair." 
Alfred Butt decided upon the change of 
name to avoid con diction with other pro- 
ductions bearing titles similar to that of 
"Blighty." 

Laura Cowie, of the "Potash and Perl- 
mutter in Society" company, has signed 
with the Ideal Film Company for the role, 
of Olivia in their picture version of "The 

Vicar of Wakefield." 

James Sole, who, as musical director, 
was a strong attraction at the Palladium, 
has been engaged by C. B. Cochran, for 
the St. Martin's, opening this month. 

Everbody's favorite, Ada Reeve, is play- 
ing a few engagements in and around Lon- 
don prior to starting on her tour of India, 
Australia and South Africa. 

Amber Wyville (Mrs. George Edwin 
Clive) has been obliged to cancel her tonr 
owing to serious' Illness. She is at the 
Castle Temperance Hotel. Lancaster. 

Charles Hawtrey seems to have a winner 
in his. new sketch, by Frederick Lonsdale, 
entitled "Waitfng at the Church." 

All her friends will be glad to learn 
that Marie Lloyd is rapidly recovering 
from her recent nervous attack. 

The new King's Theatre, at Oswestry, 
opened October 2. 



C. B. Fountaine, for years connected 
with the Mpss Empires, has been engaged 
as general manager of the Bandmann Cir- 
cuit in India and is on his way to Cal- 
cutta. 

Mr. Fountaine has had wide experience 
both as house manager and stage director 
and he goes well equipped to fill bis new 
position. It is recalled here that he was 
manager of the Empire, Edinburgh, when 
that house waa destroyed by fire and the 
great Lafayette met Us tragia death. 

On that occasion it was doe to Mr. 
Fountaise'a presence of mind that the big 
audience of 2,000 was able to leave the 
burning building without anyone being 
killed or injured. 

Manager Fountaine sailed Sept. 29 from 
Tilbury. 

"A Bun for His Money," Matheson 
Long's new comedy by Budolf Beater, was 
produced last Monday at the Royal, Not- 
tingham, and comes to the Strand, October 
12, succeeding "The Rotters." In the cast 
of "A Run for His Money" are Louie 
Pounds, Ben Webster, Herbert Bunston 
and Spencer Trevor. 

Charles B. Cohran's London production 
of "Half-past Bight," with some of the 
original company, will begin a provincial 
tour October 16 at the Royal, Plymouth, 
and later playing the Moss Circuit of Halls. 
Two performances of the revue will be 
given nightly. 

George Saker and Walter Hague have 
changed director's chairs, Mr. Saker suc- 
ceeding Mr. Hague at the London Opera 
House and Mr. Hague going back to his 
old position at the Shepherd's Bush Em- 
pire. 

Ernest Denny, who has been eighteen 
years musical director at the Argyle, Birk- 
enhead, now occupies the conductor's chair 
at the Tivoll, New Brighton, and is suc- 
ceeded at the Tivoll by W. H. Eveleigh. 

Owing to the incoming of "A Bun for 
His Money" at the Strand, "The Rotters," 
now playing at that house, will be forced 
to go on a provincial tour if another Lon- 
don theatre cannot be found for It. 

Thomaa Welch has secured the English 
rights to "A Pair of Queens," an EL H. 
Frasee production, recently at the Long- 
acre Theatre, New York. 

Albert E. Matt has succeeded Ernest 
Shackleton as musical director of the Hack- 
ney Empire. Mr. Shackleton has Joined 
the colors. 

Morris Harvey, of the "Pell Mell" cast 
at the Ambassadors, Joins the colon, and 
Nigel Playfair succeeds him. 

Alfred Byde, the well known actor, is 
lying ill with consumption. He is In 
straitened circumstances. 



The Princess Theatre, Crayford, better 
known as the Munition Workers' Theatre, 
lias been a success from the start. It was 
originally intended as a "recreation hall for 
munition workers," bnt has already de- 
veloped into .a well paying theatre with 
good attractions for the patrons. Among 
the coming bookings are: "The Rotters," 
"The Girl in the Taxi," "Our Flat" "The 
Second Mrs. Tanqueray," and "Jane." 

Since the first production of "The Beat 
of Luck" at Drury Lane, on September 27, 
the play has been running more smoothly 
with each performance. With a little 
blue penciling it has been knit more closely 
together and the action quickened, and al- 
together it looks like a "go." 

The curtain which, owing to the length 
of the performance, went up at 7.30 on 
the opening night, now rises about 8. 

Sir George Alexander will re-open the 
St James with a Christmas triple bill con- 
sisting of "Aristocrats," by Hastings Tur- 
ner; "A Traveller Returns," by Horace 
A. Vachell and "Miss Myers," and a 
duologue by "Q." Sir George will appear 
in two of the offerings. 

Manager Walter Williams, of the Royal, 
Cradley Heath, now owns the Empire of 
that place, and will book dramatic and 
musical comedy attractions. Edward Lucas 
is house manager. The opening occurred 
October 2. 

Wm. Poel, who has gone to the States 
to produce Ben Jonson's "Poetaster" for 
students of a dramatic class at Carnegie - 
Institute, Pittsburgh, Pa., expects to re- 
turn to London the latter part of No- 
vember. 

The reoent death at Ventnor of Janet 
Achurch, will recall to your readers that 
she visited the States in 1894, making her 
first appearance there at the Madison 
Square Theatre, New York. 

Frederick Harrison has engaged H. V. 
Esmond, by arrangement with "The" Girl 
from Giro's" management, for his forth- 
coming Haymarket production, "Mr. Jubilee 
Drax." 

Oroaaley Taylor, acting manager of the 
Grand, Birmingham, has an sw e r e d the call 
of his country and Is succeeded by G. Col- 
lins, of the Empire, Glasgow. 

The run of "Ye Gods," at the Aldwych, 
ends Saturday aa Sir Joseph Beecham 
brings bis opera company to that house 
next Monday. 

The Armitage & Leigh Dramatic Com- 
pany Is playing a month's engagement at 
the Grand, Brighton. 

The Birmingham Repertory Theatre, 
which re-opened last month, has been do- 
ing a record business. 



TIVOLI FOLLIES TOUR 

Sydney, Australia, Oct. 7.— Vera Pearce, 
the Australian beauty, is fceaatng the Mc- 
intosh Tivoll Follies Company on New 
Zealand tour' to big business. During ab- 
sence of company, Horace Golden and 
strong company are filling the Tivoli. 



DAREWSKI TO PUBLISH 
London, Oct. 9.— Herman Darewski, 
composer of the music of "To-Night* s The 
Night," "The Passing Show," "Gerard 
0000" and numerous popular songs, has 
Joined the ranks of London music pub- 
lishers. He will in future publish his own 
compositions as well as those of other well 
known writers. 

By cable he has secured the English 
publication rights of "There's A Little Bit 
of Bad In Every Good Little. GirL'" 



ANNIVERSARY OF "ROMANCE" 

London, Oct 6.— To-night marks the 
first anniversary of the London production 
of "Romance" in which Doris Keane has 
been starring so successfully. The run of 
the play has been uninterrupted and has 
reached the four hundred and eleventh per- 
formance. Johann Matheson, the compo- 
ser, has written a song entitled "Ro- 
mance," in honor of the occasion. 

"CHTTRA" PLEASES MUNICH 

Bkbuk, Oct 6.— The new play by Sir 
Rabindranath Tagore, the British-Indian 
poet was produced this week at the Munich 
Theatre for the first time and was well 
received. 

Tagore, it will be remembered, was 
awarded the Nobel Prise for Literature in 
1913. . 



"THE GREAT LOVER" FOR TREE 

Ltmwm, Oct 7.— Sir Herbert Tree 
sends word from the States that he win 
end his American tour In January and 
return to London to appear at His 
Majesty's in "The Great Lover." "Chu- 
Chln-Chow" Is the present attraction at 
this house. 



NOTABLES ARE RETURNING 

Pabih, Oct 7. — Caruso, Gatti-Caaaaa* 
and Miss Elisabeth Marbury sailed for 
New York today on the French Line 
stsamshlp Lafayette. . 



ED AND JACK SMITH RETURNING 

London, Oct 8.— Ed and Jack Smith, 
now playing all the principal houses in 
London, ' will return to the states very 
shortly. *• i 



AUSTRALIA LIKES THEM 

Sydney, Ana.— The Hale Hamilton 
Myrtle Tannehill Co. continues at -the 
Criterion with "Get-Rich-Quick WaUlng- 
ford" still the bill. H possible tins has 
proved more popular than the company's 
previous offering, "Too Many Cooks," and 
big business has prevailed ever since its 
opening on September 9. Australia cer- 
tainly likes American-made shows, and Mr. 
Hamilton has established himself as a. 
favorite.. 

The Royal Comic Open Co. is still at 
Her Majesty's giving a round of revivals ot\ 
the lighter musical shows. 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




EVA FALLON has signed (or the title 
role in revised version of "The Regular 
Girl" in which Ralph Hen will star. 



Founded in UB by Frank QuMn 

Published by the 

CUPPER CORPORATION 

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1604 Broadway. New York. 
OKLAND W. VAUGHAN, EDITOR. 
John F. 'Edwards, 
Frederick C. Mufler, 

Associate Editors. 



NEW YORK, OCTOBER 14, 1916. 



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ism Broadway, New York 
BagUtpred Cable Address, "Authoutt." 



OTTO KRTJGER has withdrawn from 
the cast of "Seven Chances" to join Cohen 
4 Harris' "Buried Treasure" company. 



sals in her tiny theatre, which she calls 
"The Nine O'clock Theatre." 

WALLIS CLARK is to be seen in the 
sensational screen version of "Twenty 
Thousand Leagues Under the Sea." 



THE East- West Players have begun re- 
hearsals of their one. act playlets. 



ISOLDE MENGES. the girl violinist, 
makes her American debut, Oct. 25, at 
Aeolian Hall. Maud Allen will direct her 
tour. 



NAT GRIS WALI) has been engaged by 
Leffler & Bratton to play the leading role 
in "The Devil's Harvest" 

LORIN RAKER replaces Donald Gal- 
laher in "The Silent Witness." 

ALICE FLEMING will play the lead 
opposite Robert Edeson in "Thy Brother's 
Keeper," which Rush' and Andrews will 
produce. 

MRS. MARIE BDDWORTH PEAR- 
SALL last week presented to the Actors' 
Fund Home a life-size production of the 
most famous oil portrait of Junius Brntna 
Booth, the elder. 



EARLE BROWNE hag succeeded Philip 
Merrivale in the role of John Pendleton 
in "PoUyanna." 

MARTHA MAYO has signed for a 
leading role in "A Popular Girl." She 
replaces Marie Horton. 



NMINSKY will be the Faun in De- 
bussy's "L'Apres Midi d'une Faune" when 
done at the Manhattan Opera House. 



YVETTE GUILBERT will be seen 
at Maxine Elliott's Theatre in recitals dar- 
ing November and December. 



OZA WALDROP celebrated her return 
to town last week by narrowly escaping 
being run over by a Broadway car at 
Times Square. 



LUIA MAROELLE AND BENJAMIN 
KAUSER have signed with Julia Arthur 
for roles in "Seremonda." 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MAN- 
AGEMENT. CIRCULATION, ETC. RE- 
QUIRED BY THE ACT OF CONGRESS 
OP AUGUST 24, 1912. M 

Of New Yobs . CUnsj, published weekly at 
New York. N. V.. f cr October 1, 1916. 
State of New York 1 
County of New York J «• 

Before me, a Commissioner of Deeds, in and 
for the State and county aforeaaid. personally 
appeared Orland W. Vaugban, who, having been 
duly sworn according; to law, deposes and says 
that he is the Editor of the Nsw Yoas CLirrsa, 
and that the following is, to the best of bis 
knowledge and belief, a true statement of the 
ownership, management (and if a daily paper, 
the circulation), etc, of the aforesaid publication 
for the date shown in the above caption, re- 
quired by the Act of August 24, 1912, embodied 
in section 443, Postal Laws and Regulations, 
■ printed on the reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the pub- 
. lisher, editor, managing editor, and business 

managers are: 

Publisher. Clipper Corporation, 1604 Broadway, 
New York City. 

Editor: Orland W. Vaughan, 1604 Broadway, 
New York City 

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Business Managers: None. 

2. That the owners are: (Give names and ad- 
dresses of individual owners, or, if s corpora- 
tion, give its name and the names and addresses 
of stockholders owning or holding 1 per cent 
or more of the total amount of stock.) 

. Orland W. Vaughan, 1604 Broadway, New 
York City. 

John F. Edwards, 1604 Broadway, New York 
City. 

. Frederick C Mutter, 1604 Broadway, New 
York City. 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, 
and other security holders owning or holding 
I per cent or more of total amount of bonds, 
mortgages, or other securities are: (If there . 
are none, to' state.) None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving 
the name* 'of the owners, stockholders, snd se- 
curity holders, it any, contain not only the list 
of stockholders and security holders ss they ap- 
pear upon the books of the company bnt also, 
in cases where the stockholder or security holder 
appears upon the books of the company as trus- 
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of the person or corporation for whom such 
trustee hi acting, ia given: also that the said two 
paragraphs contain statements embracing affiant's 
full knowledge and belief as to the circumstances 
and conditions under which stockholders and 
security holders who do - not appear upon the 
books of the company as trustees, bold stock and 
securities in a capacity other than that of s 
bona fide, owner; and this affiant has no reason 
to believe that any other person, association, or 
corporation has any interest direct or indirect 
in the said stock, bonds, or other securities than 
as so stated by him. 

5. That the average number of copies 'of each 
issue of this publication told or distributed, 
through the mails or otherwise, to paid subscrib- 
ers during the six months preceding the date 

shown above is (This information is 

required from dairy publications only.) 

Obuutd W. Vadcbam, 

Editor. 
Sworn to snd subscribed before me this 2nd 
dsy of October, 1916. 

ISKAj.] ' • Joseph Stbaoss, 

• : Commissioner of Deeds, New York City. ' " • 
New York County Clerk's No. 170. New York 
Register No. 18071. Residing In New York 
County. Commission expires March 28, 1918. 



TlHE NEW CLIPPER OFFICE RS 

The New Uptown Offices of 

THE NEW YORK CUPPER 

both business and editorial, are in the heart of 
the theatrical district The Business Office 
address is 

No. 1604 BROADWAY 

The Editorial Rooms are at 

No. 732 SEVENTH AVENUE 




SCHUYLER LADD will play his original 
role of the Daffodil in "The Yellow Jacket" 
when that play is revived next month at 
the Cort Theatre. 

THE management of the Princess has 
installed a tea room for the benefit of its 
patrons. 

DANGER WILBERT DUNN, of the 
Winter Garden, will become a society en- 
tertainer this Winter. 

PHILIP MERRIVALE haa Joined 
Lauretta Taylor's company. 

GIUSEPPE CREATORS and his band 
will give a special concert Sunday, Oct. 29, 
at the New York Hippodrome. 

JOB JACKSON, tramp bicyclist, ia 
now with "The Big Show" at the New 
York Hippodrome. 

STAFFORD PBMBEBTON baa been 
engaged by Mand Allan to dance with her 
on her tour. 

"THE ARTIST AND THE MODEL" 
ia a new dancing specialty introduced by 
Welly and Ten Eyck, at "The Boll Ring." 

SIGNOR MART1NKLLI, tenor of the 
Metropolitan Opera Co.. baa returned from 
a three months' toor of Sonth America. 

HELEN FREEMAN baa began rehear- 



THE "Pierrot the Prodigal" benefit at 
the Booth Theatre realised a snag sum for 
crippled soldiers. * 



"HIP, HIP, HOORAY" is ready for the 
road. 



MRS. CHARLES DILLINGHAM has a 
pet lion. 



ON November 1 David Belaaeo will be- 
come Interested with the Charles Frohman 
Company in the direction of the Lyceum. 

LENORE ULRICH will he seen in a . 
new American piny at the Lyceum after \ 
the holidays. 

HENRIETTA GOODWXN baa re- ! 
earned to New York after* few weeks' 
stay at her Summer home at Babylon. 
aVsV'V : ; ' ; 



THE principals in Anna Held's "Follow 
Me" Company include: Boy Atwell, Letty 
Yorke, Win. P. Carle ton, Georgia Drew 
Mendum, Wllmer Bentley, Edith Day, 
George Eagan, Mabel Weeks Claflin and 
Paul Porcaal. 

FRANK E. TOURS will conduct the 
orchestra of "Follow Me." 

E. H. SOTHERN'S toor in "If I Were 
King" will begin, November 0, in Provi- 
dence, R. L 

ED WYNN will remain a leading mem- 
ber of the New Winter Garden show when 
"The Passing Show of 1018" goes on the 
road. 

VIOLET BARNEY will play the lead 
in "Lady Qodlra'a Ride" when M. T. Mid- 
dleton'i production ia made this Fall. 

MABFT. BROWN ELL is playing the 
lead In "Jnst a Woman," this week in 
Newark, N. J. 

ROBERT CRAIG will play the Welsh- 
man in "The Merry Wires of Windsor." 

JOHN HARWOOD AND ARLEEN 
HACKETT have signed with William Fav- 
eraham for "Getting Married.'* 

HERMAN TIMBERG has signed with 
the Shuberts to writs the score for a new 
musical comedy. 



LBNORA SPARKB8, the English 
soprano, of the Metropolitan Opera Co., 
returned last week from England. 



SIDNEY MATHER will again be with 
R. H. Sethern in "If I Were King." 



E. H. SOTHERN'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY;' 
"The Melancholy Tale o* Me," baa been' 
published by the Messrs. Scribner. ■ - 



DELORES LEON has replaced Edith 
Lamor.t as prima donna of "The Rowland 
Girls," a Tabloid. ' ' 



HARRY O. SOMMERS was kept busy 
Monday night greeting friends who wel- 
comed him on his return to 'the 'Knicker- 
bocker as business manager. 



CHRISTIANS AND BARTSCH gave ft-, 
professional' matinee of "Wie Kinet Iro 
Mai,'?. at the Irving Place Oct. 10. 



ARTHUR SHAW has signed with Mr. 
and Mrs. Cob urn for their ten November- 
matinees at the Cort Theatre. | 



WM. H. THOMPSON will make Us ' 
forthcoming vaudeville tour under the di- 
rection of M. 8. Bentbam. ■••..: •■'■■ i 



NAN HALPERIN opens at the Palace, 
New York. Not. 6, for a two weeks' stay. 



"ZACK" was placed in rehearsal by 
John D. Williams last week. Its op 
date Is Oct. 80. 



"FIFTH AVENUE DBSIQNa^r 
NIGHT" occurs Oct, 12 at Maxine ETBott's 
Theatre. .••»:• . 

."THE SHOW OF WONDERS," tail 
new Winter Garden Show, will be given 
all next' week at the Bbubtrt Theatre, New- 
Haven, Conn. 



To Every Professional in Drama, 
cat Comedy, Vaudeville, Burlesque, Circus . 
or Carnival. This is yo*r newspaper. Wa . 
want yon to know that The. Cum't 
columns are open, for the publication of . 
any subject matter of interest to your , ' 
profession and sll . communications will . u 
receive prompt and Careful attention. 

Confine the subject matter, of your let- . 
ten to news. . . . . , . . .- ; , • , 

Persona] "Boosted or fKjioeks" are not .. ( 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October. 14, 1916 




CENTURY THEATRE'S ADVENT 
THREAT ENS WIN TER GARDEN 

Dillingham & Ziegf eld's Acquisition Likely to Contest Supremacy 

of Shubert Resort. Engagements for die Century Include 

Some of die Most Popular Players Before the Public 



The Winter Garden, which has heretofore 
basked in the sunlight of its supremacy, 
is threatened with competition — competi- 
tion which bids fair to test the best 
resources of its owners to combat it. 

The advent of the Century Theatre as 
a home for "bis" shows, has given the 
management of the older resort something 
to worry about, and the engaging of many 
stellar celebrities for "The Century Girl" 
by Dillingham & Ziegfield has not lessened 
the Shubert worry one whit. 

Only a comparatively few years ago 
New York could not boast of a single 
house where big spectacular productions 
were made. Of course there have, been 
spectacles of all kinds and descriptions 
ever since the establishment of the theatre 
here, but it was not until the New York 
Hippodrome was conceived by Frederic 
Thompson a decade or so ago that the 
public realised what a really big produc- 
tion was, and the very bigness of the first 
Hippodrome show fairly took away our 
breath, and it was months before we got 
over the habit of talking about it. 

We knew that London and Paris each 
hod immense house* specially erected for 
immense shows, but that meant little to 
us. And when we saw the first Hippo 
show it appeared like a veritable fairyland 
with dazsling splendor and undreamed-of 
gorgeousness. 

So long as Thompson & Dundy remained 
at the helm the Hippodrome continued to 
be the hone of gigantic productions 
When this firm withdrew the public said 
"the Hippo is through." 

But the public was wrong. The Shu- 
berts stepped in and took np the thread 
just where Thompson & Dundy dropped it. 
The standard of shows was maintained ; 
in fact it seemed as though each show 
exceeded in bigness and gorgeousness Its 
immediate successor. 
- When, finally, the Shuberts relinquished 
the Hipp management Charles Dillingham 
assumed control of the big playhouse, and 
bis Brst offering, "Hip. Hip, Hooray," was 
acclaimed the best and most wonderful of 
the shows given at the home of best and 
most wonderful shows. 

Meantime New Yorkers had settled 
in their tracks and bad come to look upon 
tbe big shows at the "big house" as a 
matter of course. Tbe Shuberts had built 
the Winter Garden 'and the revues at this 
resort were in the "big" class, and in place 
of becoming satiated with the addition we 
welcomed it 

During the same period the Ziegfeld 
"Tomes" was born and this, too. from the 
first, assumed a position of importance 
among the big spectacular offerings. 

This was tbe position the latter part of 
last season when the announcement was 
Masoned forth that Charles B. Dillingham 
and Floreni Ziegfeld had taken a long 



term lease on tbe Century and would make 
it the home of big revues. 

The public knew what these two man- 
agers were capable of. Mr. Dillingham had 
shown bis work in "Hip, Hip, Hooray," . 
and the various editions of the Ziegfeld 
"Follies" were sufficient proof of Mr. Zieg- 
feld's ability. The public, however, never 
worries itself, about the outcome of any 
amusement enterprise and therefore just 
waited. 

Not so the managers. The ' wise ones 
shook their heads, notwithstanding tbe 
Dillingham success at tbe Hippodrome. 
Even tbe Messrs. Shubert seemed to have 
little faith in a possible success at the Cen- 
tury and they were the ones likely to be 
most affected, for the Winter Garden, 'at 
Broadway and Fiftieth street, is about 
midway between the Hippodrome, at Sixth 
avenue and Forty-third street, and the 
Century, at Central Park West and Sixty- 
second street. 

It was not until within the past few 
weeks that the magnitude of the Dillingham- 
Ziegfeld enterprise at the Century has 
dawned upon theatrical New York. The 
simple announcement that tbe name of 
the show would be "The Century Girl" of 
course meant little, but as the names of 
principals were made public in rapid suc- 
cession managers were aghast at the salary 
list the names represented. 

Sam Bernard, Leon Errol, Harry Kelly, 
Frank Tinney, Irving Fisher, Eddie Foy 
and seven little Foys, Stan Stanley, Doyle 
& Dixon, Harry Langdon, Gus Van and 
Joe Schenk. Lawrence Haynes,- Hazel 
Dawn, Elsie Janis, Marie Dressier, Mar- 
j'orie VDUs, Gertrude Rutland, Helen 
Barnes and the Barr Twins are names to 
conjure with from a manager's viewpoint. 
Tbe list reads like the programme of an 
all star bill for some important benefit 
performance — not -a -list of players to be 
seen nightly in a regular offering. 

So formidable did the array of names 
appear to the Shuberts that they realized 
that something must be done if they did 
not want the Winter Garden to be caught 
in the jam between the Hipp with "The 
Big Show" and the Century with "The 
Century Girl" and crushed- out of ex- 
istence. 

Of course the Winter Garden is estab- 
lished in public favor which the Century 
is not, and the Winter Garden- shows have 
a nation-wide reputation because of their 
gorgeousness and also because of the clever 
performers in them. But in . no Winter 
show has there appeared so formidable a 
list of stars as that announced for "The 
Century Girl." 

The Messrs. Shubert, to prove that they 
are alive to the threatened situation, have 
bent their energies toward the engaging^ of 
more star players than they have ever pre- 
sented in a Winter Garden show. 



"BURIED TREASURE" CAST 

"Buried Treasure," a comedy by Rida 
Johnson Young, with a reorganized com- 
pany, will open its season in Ailentown, 
Pa., Oct. 17 under tbe management of 
Cohan & Harris. 

The cast includes: Edith Taliaferro, 
Zelda Sears, Adele Holland, Ernest Stal- 
Iard, Charles now Clark, Charles Broun, 
Elmer Grandin, Lincoln Plumer, Edward 
Snader and Westcott B. Clarke. * 



NEW HODGE PLAY 

LIGHT, SIMPLE 

ENTERTAINMENT 



MISS TAYLOR IN NEW PLAY 

Atlantic Cot, N. J., Oct 6. — Laurette 
Taylor appeared here tonight In the first . 
presentation of "The Harp of Life," by 
J. Hartley Manners, in which she will be 
seen in New York in November, after a 
short tour. George C. Tyler, who is asso- 
ciated with Klaw and Erlanger in the 
management of Miss Taylor, was present. 
The company includes Violet- Kemble 
Cooper, Folliot Paget, Lynn Fontaine, 
Philip Merivale, Dion Titberadge and W. 
T. Ferguson. ,.•'.•■ 



"BOOMERANG" FOR CHICAGO 
"The Boomerang" readied its five hun- 
dredth continuous performance Oct. 3, at 
the Belasco Theatre, playing to almost ca- 
pacity nightly. It concludes its run here 
Oct 23, and after a few weeks on tour 
will open an engagement at Fowler's, Chi- 
cago, Nov. 13. 



MOROSCO ACQUIRES NEW PLAY 

Oliver Morosco has accepted for produc- 
tion a new play, "Amarilla of Clothesline 
Alley," a dramatization of Belle K. Marg- 
ate's story of the same name. He will 
give it a production "early in the new year 
in San Francisco. 



"FRECKLES" CO. MEMBER MARRIES 

Toledo, O., Oct. 7. — Chester Reed, a 
member of the "Freckles" company (East- 
ern) , and Mary Kraft were married here 
last week. 

NEW ACT FOR "BACKFIRE" 

Since the opening, on Oct. 2, of "Back- 
fire," a new fourth act has been written and 
substituted for the one seen at the first 
production. 



T1DMARSH RETURNS TO DRAMA 

Ferd. Tidmarsh,* who for the past two 
years appeared in leading roles with the 
Metro, Equitable and Famous Players, has 
returned to the stage and is now playing 
the leading role in "The Woman Who 
Paid." 



"ANNABELLE" SEEN 
"Good Gracious Annabelle" - is being 
given a two- weeks' try on t in Boston; after 
which, if th« public likes it, a Broadway 
hearing may be looked for as soon as a 
theatre can be obtained. In the cast 
are: Lola Fisher, Walter Hampden, May 
Vokes, Edwin Nicander, Walter Regan, 
Harry Bradley, Helen Lee and Roth 
Harding. 

SUPT BECOMES MANAGER 

Pxttsbtjbsh, Pa., Oct. 9. — Dave Smith, 
the popular superintendent of the- Harris, 
has left that theatre to become manager 
of the Bellevue, one of Rowland & Clark's 
finest pictare houses. 



"FIXING SISTBB," a four-act 
comedy drama.. by Lawrence 
Whitman, produced Wednesday, 
October 4, at Marine Elliott's 
Theatre. 

CAST 

John Otis. : . . .William Hodge 

Lord Haggett Hamilton'. Deane 

Judge Willard ....... Charles Canfleld 

Abbey Sexton . Miriam Collins 

Mrs. Marlon Ellsworth! Jano Wheatley 
Lady Waftoi.. .......... .Ida Vernon 

Irving .•>..•-. i... .•....•.George Lund 

Mary ...Rosalie Sinclair 



"Fixing Sister," the new vehicle in which 
William Hodge is appearing this season un- 
der the direction of Lee Shubert, is one of 
those airy trifles which please because of 
its simplicity but which could hardly exist 
without the personality of the star. 

Since the days of "The Man from Home," 
Mr. Hodge has ranked among New York's 
most popular of footlight favorites, but in 
the play above mentioned the author suc- 
ceeded in furnishing Mr. Hodge with a play 
having human appeal and this, added to. 
the personality of Hodge made a combina- 
tion strong enough to hold public interest 
for several seasons. 

In "Fixing' Sister," the author has not 
been so fortunate, for he has furnished Mr. 
Hodge with a work which can only be 
praised by saying it let light, clean, harm- 
less entertainment. ■* In it there is no human 
appeal and even tbe heart interest does not 
ring true. Even the characters, with the 
exception of that played by the' star, are 
poorly fashioned, the "villain" and his ac- 
complice being so palpable that the audience 
"discovers" them tbe moment of their first 
entrance. Then, too, the author, not be- 
lieving in surprises,- keeps the audience 
posted as to what is going to happen and . 
succeeds, making the "raid," at the climax 
of act three, fall flat. > 

In the story, John. Otis has come from 
Kansas City to New York to rescue- his 
sister, Mrs. Marion Ellsworth,, from the 
Philistines, who are no others than Lord 
Haggett and Lady Waf ton. These two are 
'trying to swindle Marion out of $100,000, 
and incidentally Haggett while making love 
to. Marion is planning elopement with Abbey 
Sexton, whom John loves. , 

Marion's house has been made a gambling 
den with Haggett always the winner. To 
cure his sister, John, with the aid. of -Judge 
Willard, arranges a "fake" raid, which is 
polled off to the consternation of everyone 
but tbe Judge and John. Haggett is ex- 
posed; Marion -learns that she loves the 
Judge, and Abbey flies to John's arms. 

Mr. Hodge was as good .as he always is 
and that means "great." His support was 
adequate. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY 

Herald — Bat tain plot. 

Tribune— "Fixing Sitter" it simple. 

Times — Thin but' amusing. 

World — Good actor, tad playwright. 

American — Clear, clean, clever comedy. 



MacDOUGALL IN LEGIT- 

W. H. MacDougaH formerly with Ralph 
Here in vaudeville is now playing Cyrus 

Martin in "It Pays To Advertisr.**- 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




BROADHURST PLAY 
FULL OF INTEREST 
. AND HUMAN APPEAL 



"RICH MAM I'OOR MAN"— A tear- 
act play by George Broadhurat. pro- 
duced at tbe Forty -eights Street 
Ifceatre, Oct. S. 

CAST. 

Bayard Tarlck John Bowere 

Henry Mapleaon William B. Hack 

Peter Beeaton Brandon Hunt 

Decourcy Llojd Frank Weaterton 

David Lloyd Rudolph Cameron 

John T. Backoa Bmmett Shackelford 

Richard Crane Coatea Gwynne 

Calvin Arthur Fitzgerald 

Mlaa Beeaten Marie Walnwrlght 

Mr.. BhelTln ...atarcla Harrla 

Mlaa Haiti...., Georgia Lawrence 

Mrm. Deconrcy Uoyd Emily Flrxroj 

Mrs. TUney .Jeaal*- Ralph 

Sylvia Jeaatm..... .......Helen Crane 

Linda Hunt Oeraldlne. Beekwltli 

Ban Region Wallace 



"Rich Man, Poor Man" is one of those 
so-called "book plays,". being founded by 
George Broad hurst from the story of the 
same name by Maximilian Foster and 
published in serial form in The Saturday 
Evening Pott. But unlike many dra- 
matizations it is a well-made play. It has 
well drawn characters, logical situations 
and a strong heart interest. It is well 
written, co n tains bright lines and is de- 
cidedly Interesting. 

Mr. Broadharst ranks among 1 oar best 
playwrights and he can generally be de- 
pended upon to furnish good entertain- 
ment in his plays. His "Rich Man, Poor 
Man**' is no exception to this rule. He 
interests his audience from the very be- 
ginning of the first act and holds atten- 
tion till the very end. 

The characters are well drawn. They 
are real flesh and blood beings who appeal 
to your better feelings, touching your 
heartstrings with their sorrows and mak- 
ing you smile with them in their moments 
of joy. And this is what makes the play 
interesting. Its appeal is so genuine, so 
gripping in its force, that yon find your- 
self interested in spite of yourself. 

Of the players Marie Wainwright prob- 
ably comes in for first honors. Hers was 
the finished performance of the finished 
artist that she is. 

Georgia Lawrence, as Miss Hultz, was 
excellent. She made a great deal of the 
girl who judges everyone by his "class." 

Jessie Ralph made a capital character 
of Mrs. Tilney, and Regina Wallace made 
Bab a very lovable girl. 

Brandon Hurst gave a masterful por- 
trayal of Peter Bees ton, and Win. B. 
Mack was good as Henry Mapleaon. 

Jobn Bowers as . Bayard . Varick was 
miscast. Rudolph Cameron did well as 
David Lloyd. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY 

Herald— Artificial, but pleases. 
Times — An absorbing play. 
Tribune — Tedious play. 
Sun — Four unconvincing acts. 
American — Wing favor. 



"SHIRLEY KAYE" SEEN 

Atlantic Citt, Oct. 10. 

Elsie Ferguson and the company en- 
gaged for her- support by Messrs. Klaw 
and E Hanger appeared here for tbe first 
time in the new comedy, "Shirley Kaye," 
at the Apollo Theatre last evening. 

The players associated with Miss Fergu- 
son in "Shirley Kaye" are Lee Baker, 
Mrs. Jacques Martin, William Holden, 
Kitty Brown, George Backus. Corinne 
Barker, Ronald Byram, Eleanor Gordon. 
Victor Benoit, Helen Erskine, Douglas 
Paterson, William Lennox and Albert 
Brown. 

NEW "NEWLYWED" SHOW 

Leffler & Bratton are preparing to 
launch a brand new musical comedy en- 
titled "The Newlyweds Grownup Baby." 
This will be a new version of the famous 
cartoon success "The Newlyweds and Their 
Baby." The only characters retained in 
the new piece will be Lovey and Dovey, 
otherwise Mr. and Mrs. Newlywed. Na- 
poleon, the baby, or Snookums as his 
parents lovingly referred to him, has now 
developed into a grown up boy whom his 
companions nick name "Happy Nappy." 

There will be two companies presenting 
the piece, one on the International Circuit 
and the other the principal one nighters. 



ARRANGE MACKAY BENEFIT 

Arrangements are in progress by Daniel 
Frohman, Marc Klaw and Joseph Brooks, 
representing the Actors' Fund of America, 
for. a monster testimonial to F. F. Mack ay, 
the oldest actor in America, and now in 
his 85th year. This is to be a tribute by 
the Actors' Fund because of Mr. Mackay's 
thirty years' services as the chairman of 
the Executive Committee of the Fund, 
which dispenses $70,000 a year for the 
sick and disabled in the theatrical profes- 
sion. 

The testimonial will take place at the 
New Amsterdam Theatre on Friday after- 
noon, November 24. It was intended to 
take place last spring, but was postponed. 
All the leading stars in the profession will 
, be invited to assist. 



RUSHVILLE THEATRE BURNS 

RbsnviLLE, ID., Oct. 5. — The Princess 
Theatre, here, was completely destroyed by 
fire yesterday morning. When the. flames 
were discovered at 2.30 a. si., the entire 
interior of the theatre was ablaze. 

The origin of the fire is a mystery and 
the city and county officials have started 
an investigation to determine it. if pos- 
sible. The loss is placed at $10,000. 



PRODUCING "MAID TO ORDER" 

The Castle Producing Company will 
send on tour on October 12 the musical 
comedy "Maid to Order." The cast will 
be headed by Rose Botti. Others in it 
are Sallie Stetnbler, Harry MacDonough, 
Jack McClelland, Sydney Hamilton, Jack 
Lawler and the Russell Sisters. 



FORTY-EIGHTH STREET IS 

NEW THEATRICAL CENTER 

With the Playhouse, the Cort, the Forty-eighth Street, the Long- 
acre and the Friars' Club on Either Side, It Is the 
Pivotal Point of New York's Theatres 



TEAROOM AT PRINCESS THEATRE 

The new tearoom, built under the stage 
of the Princess Theatre, opened last week, 
when tea was served for the first time at 
this theatre, between the acts of "Very 
Good. Eddie." 



"KING OF NOWHERE" AGAIN 

Lou-Tellegen is appearing again this sea- 
son in "A King of Nowhere." The com- 
pany is playing at the Academy, Balti- 
more, this week and after a few more weeks 
on tour, will go to Chicago for a run. 



Forty-eighth street is destined to be- 
come the centre of New York's theatrical 
district, if the present trend of managers 
to build playhouses on or near that thor- 
oughfare is any criterion. 

There are at present located on Forty- 
eighth street the Longacre, west of Broad- 
way; the Forty-eighth street, the Play- 
house, the Cort and the Friars' Club east 
of Broadway, and by the middle of Febru- 
ary, 1917, there wil' be one more, for Ed- 
ward F. Rush is about to build a theatre 
on the site adjoining the Cort. 

Besides this there are located at tbe 
present time in the district bounded by 
Forty-fourth street on the south ; Eighth 
avenue on the west; Fiftieth street on the 
north, and Sixth avenue on the east, 
eighteen of New York's first class theatres. 
In other words, within six blocks from 
north to south and two blocks from east 
to west more than half of the first-class 
theatres of this city are located. 

And there are more to come for, besides 
the Rush Theatre there are two others be- 
ing built in this district, which will be un- 
der the Shubert banner. So great is tbe 
desire of the threatre builder to get in this 
select section that at the present time 
there are few. sites available for theatre 
purposes to be had. There are many pieces 
of property hereabouts held either by pur- 
chase or by option by either managers who 
intend to build or speculators who hope to 
sell to theatre builders. 

At the present rate at which playhouses 
are going up in this district it is safe to 
predict that within the next ten years two- 
thirds of the leading dramatic houses in 
the metropolis will be there. Its location 
warrants it and with the completion of 
the new subway it will be even more ac- 
cessible and therefore more desirable for 
amusement places. 

What' a transformation has occ ur re d in 
this city In two and a half decades? Who 
would have thought twenty-five years ago 
that New York's Rialto would be as far up- 
town as Forty-eighth street? 

In those days Fourteenth was the cen- 
tre of our theatrical activity. The Mad- 
ison Square Theatre on Twenty-fourth 
street had established itself as a leading 
playhouse, through a course of evolution 
in the process of which it was successively 
devoted to miscellaneous shows, variety 
and minstrelsy. 

On the west side of Broadway, in tbe 
vicinity of Twenty-sixth street there was 
a theatrical exchange in which the late 
Charles Frohman, Brooks & Dickson, and 
other managers, who later attained prom- 
inence, bad offices or desk room. Tbe the- 
atrical centre of New York was moving 
up town ; that is it was preparing to. 

The Fifth Avenue, Herrmann's, Daly's, 
Wallack's, Bijou. Garden, Lyceum, Stan- 
dard, Park (later HeraM Square), Gar- 



rick, Casino, and Broadway were the real 
leading up-town theatres of that day. 
Gradually the Rialto had extended itself 
until, at the opening of the Empire, 
Broadway and Fortieth street, is ex- 
tended np to this point. Then followed 
the Knickerbocker. 

As the theatre builder moved upward 
so did the Rialto and by 1896, twenty-third 
street was considered down town, from the 
theatrical viewpoint. 

In that year theatrical circles received 
their greatest shock, for it was In 1896 
that Oscar Hammersteln, against the ad- 
vice from bis friends and against an prece- 
dent, took the plunge that landed the Olym- 
pic (now Loew*s New York and the Cri- 
terion) on Broadway, taking in the front- 
age on that street from Forty-fourth to 
Forty-fifth street 

At this time there was one theatre on 
Forty-second street, the American. But it 
soon had another bnilt by Mr. Hammer- . 
stein on the comer of Seventh avenue and 
Forty-second, after he bad been literally 
thrown out of the Olympic. This he called 
tbe Victoria, which, eventually became 
America's representative Music Hall.. This 
he followed with the Republic which ad- . 
joined it, and on the roofs of these two 
houses he built his famous roof garden. 

His next Forty-second street theatre 
was the Lew Fields (now the Harris) 
and then theatres on that street grew up 
like mushrooms. The Lyric, New Amster- 
dam, Liberty. Eltinge and Candler all 
found place there. 

Meanwhile, beyond Forty-second began 
to have a more rosy appearance to the 
managerial eye. The Astor was built for 
Wagenhalls & Kemper, the Hudson for 
the late Henry B. Harris, the Lyceum for 
Daniel Frohman, tbe Globe for Charles 
Dillingham. The Stnyvesant (now Be- 
lasco) for David Belasco. ' The various 
Shubert threatres, which were built in 
such rapid succession that it was a difficult 
matter to keep 'track of them, tbe two 
Brady bouses. Playhouse and Forty-eighth 
street, Wintbrop Ames* Little and Booth 
Theatres, and tbe Cort, etc. 

It will be seen by this, that in a quar- 
ter of a century, the theatrical map of 
New York City has been not only com- 
pletely changed but, moved from Four- 
teenth street to Forty-eighth— thirty-four 
blocks. And there is every likelihood that 
there it will remain for years to come. 



HANS BARTSCH, THEATRE 
MANAGER 

Hans Bartsch, the American representa- 
tive of the large German music publish- 
ing and producing house of Felix Block 
Urban, is the new manager of the Band 
Box Theatre.- He has engaged the Ben- 
dix Trio to give a series of Sunday night 
concerts at the honse. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 




IRWIN MAKES 
CHANGES IN 

BIGJ5H0W 

NEW BILL AT CASINO 



Tom Grady was kept busy last week 
arranging a new routine for Fred Irwin's 
Big Show. Rehearsals were held all 
Saturday night at the Columbia for a 
new first part to be shown at the Casino, 
Brooklyn, this week. 

The Sherlock Sisters had previously 
been placed in a different spot on the bill. 

George Gould, Roy Gordon and Frank 
Stanley have been replaced by Bob Ster- 
ling, Mr. Clare and John W. Sherry. 

Fred Irwin has always been in the lead 
of producers, and although the show as 
presented at the Columbia last week was 
far from satisfactory to Mr. Irwin the 
business was very good, flsjjajhhasj with a 
large Saturday night. It is safe to say 
that the show will be marked O. K. before 
long. 



ZJEGFELD ENGAGES MRS. REEVES 

ajsjsji Fowler (in private life Mrs, Al 
Beeves) has been specially engaged by F. 
Ziegfeld for the new Dillingham and Zieg- 
feld Production at the Century Theatre, 
New York. 

She has been rehearsing for the past 
two weeks and will do a small bit, and her 
dance in the Big Cafe Scene. 

Mrs. Beeves was formerly a member of 
burlesque organizations including the Al 
Beeves Shows. 



THE MAJESTICS 
HOLD THEM IN 

TO THE FINISH 



WAR PICTURES AT DALY'S 

All rumors as to the future policy of 
Daly's Theatre were set at rest by the 
announcement last week that the thrilling 
motion picture "Fighting for Verdun" 
would begin an indefinite run at the house. 
The picture had its first public showing 
Sunday afternoon, Oct 8. 



RECORDS ARE GOING 

Al Reeves is keeping up his pace. He 
broke the record at the Peoples, Philadel- 
phia, last week. The "Darlings of Paris" 
had a hummer at Holyoke and Springfield. 



ACTORS HURT IN GUN FIGHT 

Edward Belli, an Italian vaudeville 
actor, was mortally injured with two bul- 
lets in his back and Louis Badolati was 
shot in the leg as a result of a gun fight 
which took place in the Italian Garden 
Restaurant in the old Occidental Hotel. 
The cafe owner, at whom the assault was 
directed, was killed. 



COURTESY REIGNS 

AT THESE STANDS 



A NEW SENSATION 

"Mary on the Merry Go Round," a 
novelty Invented by Asa Cummings, is creat- 
ing, talk with the Star and Garter Show. 



ALL IS LOVELY 

Jas. B. Cooper has returned from a tour 
ot the Columbia Circuit houses and reports 
the entire wheel In excellent shape. 



WESTON ON REGULAR WHEEL 
Dave Vine and Loella Temple have been 
replaced by Bluch Cooper, with Bert 
Weston. 



MICALS SHOW NOT CLOSED 

Sam Micals informs us that the report of 
bis company closing was an error. His 
show is breaking records on the I. B. C. 



ANOTHER MISCHIEF MAKER 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. A R. Montgomery 
(Anna Healey) an eight-pound baby girl, 
st their home in Maple ton Park, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. Ray Montgomery is with the "Mis- 
chief Makers" this season. 



Frank Freeman Has a Few Words to Say 

About Managers That He Met 

Along; the Line. 

Frank E. Freeman writes from Roches- 
ter, N. Y-, that he has finished at Detroit, 
Buffalo and Toronto, and puts in a good 
word regarding the courtesy which reigns 
supreme at those three Columbia stands. 
Here are his endorsements: 
"John M. Ward is the manager of the 
Gayety, Detroit, and is very much in evi- 
dence at all times. He is very liberal with 
printers' ink and seems to know his 
audience. 

"Don't forget Charles Taylor, another 
able live wire manager at the Gayety, Buf- 
falo. You will find him the first man on 
the lot in the morning and the last one 
off at night. 

"Of course you remember our old friend 
Fred Buasey well. I want to tell you I 
spent a very pleasant week with him in 
Toronto, and you can bet your last dollar 
that if ever there was a manager that 
was on the job, it is our friend Bussey." 

Frank is ahead of the "Star and Garter" 
show. 



POSTPONES OPENING 

Without giving any particular reason 
the opening of the Park Place Theatre, 
Newark, N. J., with burlesque by Ben 
Kalin has been indefinitely postponed. 



JOSE TAYLOR REHEARSING 

Josie Taylor is putting over her sum 
bers with the "Darlings of Paris." 



BURLESQUERS LOSE MOTHER 

Bather Burton, mother of Jack and Joe 
Burton, died Oct. 20. 



LEAVES S1DMAN SHOW 
Maxwell Sargent closed with the Sid- 
man Show Oct. 7. 



Billy Watson filled the two lay off days 
at the Lyceum, St. Joseph, .Mo. 



MORRISON JOINS SHOW 

Maria Donia and Walter Morrison have 
joined "The Twentieth Century Maids." 



Florence Bennett and Frank De Mont 
are specially featured in this week's pro- 
duction at the Columbia, New York. Miss 
Bennett" appears to excellent advantage in 
no particular role, but in all of the bits 
and numbers assigned to her, especially in 
the specialty with Paul Cunningham. A 
number of the other principals stand oat, 
all combining to give a most enjoyable 
performance. 

Lyel La Pine is a newcomer in bur- 
lesque, who with his eccentric character 
impersonation impressed very favorably. 

Frank De Mont, as Otto, a German, 
contributed a laughable character of a 
familisr type, yet original in many ways 
and in his acrobatic talking act with John, 
Kelt, be deployed into a different line al- 
together and surprised with his versatility 
as a tumbler and a bead and hand bal- 
ancer and eccentric dancer. Mr. Eeit was 
an able partner and the team stopped the 
show for awhile, answering demands for 
bows and encores. Mr. Eeit also did a 
rube letter carrier for a number. 

Gracea De Mont has a pleasing ex- 
pression. Louise Alexander sings prims- 
donna selections in clever style. May Pen- 
man is a pleasing blonde and Nardine 
Grey, Florence Emery and Lucell Cullen 
did their bits to general satisfaction. 

Paul Cunningham qualified as a first 
class straight and earned encores for his 
several songs. The talking and singing act 
with Miss Bennett was full of laughs and 
the songs and recitation all hit the mark. 

Doc Dell played a "bum" in the first 
part, and also made a hit in his eccentric 
dance and the song "Creation of a 
Woman." During the rendition of this 
number, the various portions of the 
woman's charms were exhibited through 
slits in the curtains, finishing with <m . 
ensemble of faces, for the chorus. 

The opening scene shows a special arch, 
which is used for the various sets through- 
out the show, of which an ice palace set 
is the most attractive. . 

A burlesque recitation on "a horse race 
with Wm. La Pine as the jockey war a 
laughable burlesque. An octette with 
dance of all nations was a hit, also the 
opening number in which the girls carried 
mail boxes. 

Frank De Mont and Gracea De Mont 
did a funny garage bit A recruiting 
scene had a lot of laughs. Broadway 
showed pathos and humor. 

Lyle La Pine and Emery Florence in 
their specialty talked and sang principally 
about frogs. His "Dry Town" song had 
some clever lines. 

Miss Bennett did a laughable intoxica- 
tion bit- with Mr. De Mont. In the cake 
walking number led by Florence Emery, 
one of the girls, Miss Brown, caused a 
number of encores by her clever antics. 
The Fashion. Girl number by Miss Ben- 
nett led up to the patriotic finish, show- 
ing representatives of different nations in 
peaceful reunion, presided over by Colom- 
bia, who sang about the absolute independ- 
ence of America. 



A clever skating specialty opened the 
second act Snowballing and Doc Dell's 
specialty followed. After Cunningham 
and Bennett's specially, the "Reducing 
Teacher" scene had funny interviews of 
La Pine, with the stuttering, the laughing 
and the crying girls, and the Bag number 
led by Miss Bennett showed some startling 
gymnastics by the girls. 

College Nonsense was the title of the 
Kelt and De Mont act, and the conclud- 
ing scene showed Hawaii, with the Wakeia 
and the Lukis in profusion singing the 
seductive Pacific Ocean Strains. La Pine 
and Dell earned many encores for their 
clever foolishness, burlesquing the present 
Hawaiian craze. 

The costuming for the show shows many 
novelties in design and combination of ma- 
terial. 



PHIL. THEATRE BAN LIFTED 
PHrtapEtPHiA, Oct 2. — The Philadel- 
phia health authorities lifted the ban Sept 
30 on the admission of children to theatres, 
which had been in effect for several weeks 
owing to the infantile paralysis epidemic 
The order hit the popular priced houses 
and the picture shows very hard and the 
new order gives the show people a chance 
to get some of their money back. All the 
houses are now doing good Dullness 



Burlesque Notes 



Rumors of a new stock house in oppo- 
sition to the Union Square thus far have 
not been verified. The location of a new 
theatre in the vicinity would be problem- 
atical, as the tendency there is to tear 
down rather than build. 



ABB REYNOLDS has cemented his re- 
lations with the Spiegel firm by an ex- 
tension of his contract 



ED JEROME is working with Harry 
Ferst. 



AL MARTIN has returned to the Vic- 
toria Stock at Pittsburg- 



MAB KELLY has joined the Tango 
'Queens. Ethel Green closed Sept. 30. 
Jack Dempsey has also closed. 



ERVCsG 0*HAY is playing straights 
with the Globe Trotterss. 



THE SOCIAL FOLLIES are filling their 
first Metropolitan date at the Olympic, 
New York,' this week. 



HKIII WILLIAMS, at the head of 
the organization under her personal direc- 
tion and a production put on by her, will 
visit the Columbia New York week. Her 
sensational bandit scene with Frank 
Fanning remains one of the features. 



FRANK (BUD) WILLIAMSON is doing 
straight and characters with the "Lid 
lifters," who are using the book of the 
former Bebman Show. 



MATINEES will be given at all the 
Burlesque Houses on Columbus Day. 



October 14, 19.16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 





ORCHESTRAL NOVELTIES 
FOR "SO LONG, LETTY" 



Now Instrument* Will Bo Introduced and 

• Complete Re-arrangement of the 

Orchestra Effected. 

When the new Oliver Morosco musical 
play "So Long Lett?" gets to New York 
on Ocf, 30, metropolitan theatre goers will 
see some real novelties in the orchestral de- 
partment of t b e production. Earl Carroll, 
who is responsible for the music of the 
piece has introduced in the orchestra pit 
a collection of instruments, musical and 
otherwise, which are bound to create some- 
thing of a sensation. In addition to the 
customary instruments of the orchestra he 
has arranged for saxaphones, banjos, oca- 
rinas and a full sized mariambaphone. 

In addition to this the orchestra will be 
arranged in, just the opposite manner from 
that which has prevailed since its intro- 
duction into the theatre. The drama in- 
stead of being placed at the extreme right 
end of the orchestra pit will be at the left 
and the string bass section will be at the 
leader's, right 

"So Loiig Letty" is now at the Shubert 
Theatre in Boston and after a three week's 
eng agem ent- will comer to- New- York. 



A VICTOR HERBERT JEWEL 

Victor Herbert has opened bis cabinet 
of musical gems on many occasions and 
has given them to an admiring and appre- 
ciative public with rare prodigality. Never 
did he select a jewel of more sparkling and 
radiant beauty than when he took from 
that magic cabinet the melody of "Kiss Me 
Again" and gave it to the world, tucked 
away in the score of the opera, "Mile. Mo- 
diste." "Kiss Me Again," with its alow 
waits refrain at once became the rage, and 
it has never ceased from that day to this 
to grip music lovers with its extraordinary 
power of fascination and appeal. Mr. 
Herbert and Henry Blossom, the writer of 
the lyric, adapted the song for general use, 
with the result that artists in every field 
of entertainment, concert, vaudeville, Chau- 
tauqua and Iyceum, are using "Kiss Me 
Again." The song is published by M. Wit- 
mark A Sons. 



BROADWAY'S PHILA. OFFICE 

Will Von Tilzer added another line to 
his ever increasing chain of offices last 
week when he opened a Philadelphia 
branch in charge of Jack Mil] e at 923 Wal- 
nut street 



THE NEW LEADER 

Robert Wolfe Gilbert, Jr., is leading the 
orchestra in the ballroom atop the Audu- 
bon Theatre in New York. Gilbert Jr. is 
the youngest brother of L. Wolfe Gilbert, 
the lyrist 



NEW VON TILZER NOVELTY SONG 

Harry Ton Tflxer has just completed a 
new novelty song entitled "Since Mary 
Anne McCue Came Back From Honoln." 



Bob Miller, of the Jos. W. Stem forces, 
1» the happy fatter of a bouncing eight- 
pound boy. 



THE NEW SUNSHINE 

Harry Carroll and Ballard Macdonald 
seem to have struck upon a hit idea in their 
latest offering, "She Is the Sunshine of 
Virginia." The song has also been arranged 
as a one-step and is being played nightly 
in all the restaurants and cabarets in New 
York, besides being featured in a goodly 
share of the vaudeville houses throughout 
the country. Shapiro, Bernstein & Co. are 
the publishers. 



GRAFF AND GRANT 

FORM PARTNERSHIP 



Successful Writers Launch Several New 

Songs. Water*on, Berlin & Snyder 

to Publish Them. 

George Graff, Jr., and Bert Grant, two 
of Melody Lane's most successful writers 
have formed a songwriting partnership 
and have a number of new songs ready 
for publication. 

Each has well known song hits to his 
credit with other writers. Grant wrote 
"Rocky Road To Dublin/ - "Knock the L 
Out of Kelly," and "Meet Me At Twi- 
light," while Graff is responsible for "The 
Sands' of the rteserC»"-"When-"TriSh- Eyes 
Are Smiling" and others.,' 

Waterson, Berlin & Snyder will publish 
the songs of .the new partnership,- the first 
numbers being "Since You Have Told Me 
You Love Me/' and "You Don't, Have to 
Come From Ireland to be Irish." 



SONGS AND BOOKS 

"Can a songwriter be a book publisher," 
is the) title of a new play including Jeff 
Branen the lyrist, is now playing a lead- 
ing part. Jeff is exploiting a new book by 
Edith Blum entitled, "The Ashes of My 
Heart," and from present indication is 
meeting with fairly good success. 



NEW RECORDS OF STERN SONGS 

Pathe Co. have made phonograph rec- 
ords of the following numbers for their 
forthcoming, catalogue. 

"My Own Iona" and "Out of the Cradle 
Into My Heart," "Loveland," "The Dance 
O* The Dollys," and "Pierrot and Pier- 
rette." Joseph W. Stern ft Co. are the 
publishers of these songs. 



CLEVER SONG IN NEW ACT 

Reports from the west indicate that 
Whiting and Burt have in their new act, 
one of the best vaudeville turns presented 
this season. The book and lyrics of the 
act are by Edgar Allen Wolfe and Burt 
Kalmar, with music by Harry Von Tihser. 

One of the features of the act is a new 
novelty song .entitled "I'm A Twelve 
O'clock Fellow In a Nine O'Clock Town." 



A BIG HARRIS SEASON 

Singers of -ballads, are crowding the Har- 
ris office to get "All I Want Is A Cottage, 
Some Roses ft You," "It's A Long Long 
Time Since I've Been Home" and "Come 
Back" (Let's Be Sweethearts Once More). 

In Mr. Harris's long career in the music 
business, he has never had a catalogue to 
compete with that of 1916. 



BROADWAY'S NEW RELEASE 

The Broadway Music Corp. have just 
announced the release of Al Jolson's fea- 
ture song, "Down Upon the Swanee River." 

Jolson has used this song as an exclusive 
number in his latest show with marked suc- 
cess and it was only after great effort that 
Will Von Tilier induced Jolson to let him 
release it to the profession. 



KORNHEISER IN BOSTON 

Philip Kornheiser, professional manager 
of the Leo Feist house, attended the open- 
ing performance of "So Long Letty" in 
Boston . on Monday night. 



MUSIC FOR BERNHARDT 

Theo. Bendix, has signed contracts with 
Win. F. Connor to furnish the "Bendix 
Ensemble" Octette for the Sarah Bern- 
hardt tour, beginning October 9 in Mon- 
treal. Louis Edlin has been secured as solo 
violinist and conductor. 



TO THE BUILDERS 
OF MELODY LANE 

By JAY AITCH. 

Why should wr co to Memphis? 

Why bo to New, Or loan*? 
Why abould we go below the line 
' To have tbosc dreamy dn?ama? 
Oar graw» U just as green up here 

Our treed gl*e loti of shade. 
Our sod ts Just tbe ume old suu 

"Carme only one la made. 

Why should we ko to Nashville 

Tt> get something to eat, 
When we can go to Coney Isle 

And buy it on tbe bcacb? 
-*' Just 'tell 'era 'bout some snow and Ice 

And akatlnc on -the pond; 
Jomc tell 'em 'tout the folks up north 
- When you bnlld another song. 



RECORDING W1TMARK SONGS 
Two remarkably effective records have 
just been made for the Colombia Phono- 
graph Company by Orville Harrold, the 
demand for whose work in this form con- 
tinues to grow with leaps and strides. The 
two songs selected by Mr. Harrold are both 
by those successful and prolific writers, J. 
Ketrn Brennan and Ernest R. Ball. The 
first is "My Wonderful Love For Thee," 
which Mr. Harrold interprets with a finish 
and fervor second to none ; and the other 
is, "Tou're the Best Little Mother God 
Ever Made" — probably the best song on this 
theme ever written. Both these beautiful 
numbers are published in sheet music form 
by M. Witmark ft Sons. 



DONALDSON RETURNS 

Walter Donaldson has returned to his 
desk in the Broadway Music Corporation, 
after a rest-up in the mountains. 

Walter brought back two new songs that 
will shortly be released by bis firm. 



"JUST ONE DAY" 

Joe Hollander, professional manager for 
the Joe Morris Co. has his entire staff 
working on "Just One Day.". Joe is mak- 
ing this song his feature number for the 
season. 



J. H. REMICK. Df NEW YORK 
Jerome H. Remick, bead of the music 
publishing firm of J. H. Remick ft Co., is 
•pending the week in New York. 



Sharps and Flats 

By TEDDY MORSE 



There's a little town in Maine called 
Harmony, 
It's the place I've searched for many 
years in vain ; 
Don't care what it may be like, it's the 
name appeals to me, y 
That little town called Harmony in 
Maine. 



David W. Griffith certainly "screen 
slams," the "up-liftcrs" and reformers, 
and never loses an opportunity to point the 
finger of ridicule and scorn at hypocrites 
in general. He also is an educator of some 
abil'ty, for didn't be send everybody digging 
Into their dictionaries when he announced 
the name of his new film triumph — 
"Intolerance." 



The first item on the steak and chop 
list at the new Child*' restaurant, next to 
the Rialto Theatre, reads this way: 
"Childs' Beefsteak, 40 cents." We or- 
dered one. It was. 



A hint from our singing teacher, 
not vocalize through your proboscis.' 



"Do 



The Old Timer would like you to know 
this is tbe way he figures it out: 8oms 
men deserve success. Some have success 
thrust upon them. Others become song 
writers. 



Who sells good beer? Who has peanuts 
on the tables? Who entertains until the 
early hours of the morning? Ask Dad 
(Phila.). He knows. 



George Graff, Jr., One of those raretias 
nf the music business — a lyricist who 
rhymes — evidently speaks from experience, 
for he remarks thusly: "Songs are writ- 
ten, bits are made." 



If this fellow gets through the heavenly 
gates then there's a chance for ns. Wis 
mean the inventor of these expressions: 
"You said it," "You said a mouthful,'' 
and "Yon said something." 



Chinese Blues, Honolulu Bines, Hesita- 
tion Blues. Why not change the color to 
Rhode Island Reds, Wisconsin Whites or 
the Pennsylvania Pinks? 



The legal machinery of the City of New 
York has stepped in and curbed the lusty 
lunged peddler. , No more will yon hear 
the mournful cries thro' the streets of 
Melody Lane of, "Here yon are, Nice, fresh 
Rags!" "Manuscripts for sale. Two for 
a nickel." 



"Al." Gerber said it, so you can hold 
him responsible. "A song writer is like a 
magician. He's always got something up 
his sleeve." And this one. "Just because, 
a song is a hit with the 400, doesn't neces- 
sarily indicate that it will sell only 400 
copies." Too bad, too. "Al." otherwise 
is a nice young fellow. 



BURLESQUE MAGNATES ON BOTH 
WHEELS ARE WE LL SATISFIED 

Columbia and American Circuits Report Conditions of Houses 

and Shows to Equal Those Existing During Record 

Years and Heyday of Amusements 



President J. Herbert Mack, of the Colum- 
bia. Amusement Company, when inter- 
viewed recently, expressed himself as 
greatly pleased with the present conditions 
existing on the wheel, and stated that he 
is expecting great things of the season. 

One commendable fact which he pointed 
out particularly is the absence of any 
necessity for a tour of the Board of Cen- 
sors. 

Reports which have been coming in con- 
cerning the shows from all of the house 
managers which have' had the opportunity 
to Judge, have been so favorable that very 
few changes have been required, and those 
only in reference to minor faults. The 
Board of Censors, consisting of Messrs. 
Mack, Seribner and Waldron, have there- 
fore postponed their trip usually made by 
them at this time for an indefinite period. 

Reports as to the -business conditions 
existing throughout the circuit have also 
been most gratifying. Hartford, Water- 
bury, Bridgeport, New burg, N. Y., and 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where burlesque has 
been but a recent proposition, are giving 
splendid returns due, no doubt, to the in- 
creasing business prosperity. 

At the Olympic, Cincinnati, the receipts 
are steadily increasing, as well as at the 
Lyric Dayton, Ohio. 

The new producers which have acquired 
franchises for this season are giving excel- 
lent satisfaction in the way of productions, 
and their attractions are not falling be- 
hind many of the old established firms on 
the circuit. Every manager seems to be 
putting his beat foot forward in the mat- 
ter of cast and equipment, and the results 
show the wisdom of such a policy. 

Arthur Sidman, Arthur Pearson and 
George Belfrage have produced satisfactory 
attractions. Jack. Singer has divided his 
forces into two sterling business getters. 
Fred Irwin is on deck with his two shows 
under the formerly well known titles. 
Barney Gerard baa two organizations pro- 
duced in his own style, and Mollie Wil- 
liams is given due credit of putting on her 
winning attraction since the retirement of 
Bob Manchester. 

The other producers, including Al 
Reeves, who has always been well up in 
the front lines; Jacobs and Jermon, the 
prolific amusement providers; Hurtig and 
Seamon, with their well-known favorites; 
Max Spiegel, who is establishing a record 
in the cost of his equipments; Gus Hill, J. 
Herbert Mack, Jean Bedini, Wm. S. Camp- 
bell, Harry Hastings, Dave Marion, Sam 
Howe, Charles H. Waldron, Billy Watson, 
Ben Welch, and all other producers inter- 
ested have shown that go-ahead spirit 
necessary to continue burlesque as one of 
the most staple divisions of the amuse- 
ment business. 

Burlesque has drawn on all departments 
of the show business for its constituents, 



and from burlesque has gone forth many a 
Broadway star. 

The clientele of burlesque includes some 
of. the best element, especially since bur- 
lesque houses occupy sites in the centers 
of the biggest cities, such as the Columbia, 
New York, and the Columbia, Chicago; 
houses that compare favorably with the 
best edifices devoted to dramatic, vaude- 
ville or motion pictures. At all perform- 
ances many ladies are in the audience, a 
clear indication of the quality of the per- 
formances, aa all managers and perform- 
ers have long ago learned that offensive 
material is not necessary to draw the 
crowds. 

The inducements to investors in the bur- 
lesque business have created keen eompe- 



The shows are in keeping with the 
bouses and prices, and are reported to be 
giving satisfaction along the line. With 
the exception of two casts which had to 
be changed entirely, and some others re- 
quiring "one or two substitutions, they 
stand as originally constructed. No ad- 
verse criticism 'as to. the policy has de- 
veloped so far. " I 

Business in the old burlesque houses con-, 
tinues big, and the new experiments in 
burlesque bookings have all proven profit- 
able variations and additions. With the 
exception of the I. and M Circuit, which 
breaks the jump between St. Paul and 
Kansas City, all the one-nighters are giv- 
ing ample returns for the labor and ex- 
pense involved in playing them. Duluth, 
Minn., is particularly good. 

In the Haste™ towns the wave of pros- 
perity washes over the burlesque houses, 
and all of them are playing to six hundred 
and over. Gardner and Greenfield, Mass., 
are among these winners. 

Some recent changes are the addition 
of Camden, N. J., for three days, eliminat- 
ing Shamokin and Shenandoah, two towns 
which had been also showing good returns. 

The Penn Circuit is cleaning up. 




DIRECTORS OF COLUMBIA AMUSEMENT CO. 

Left to Right, Standing — Jules Hurtig, John G. Jermon, Gus Hill, Charles H. Barton, 

R. K. Hyniclca. Sitting — President J. Herbert Mack, Sam Seribner, 

Charles H. Waldron. 

tition for possession of franchises, as a 
live-and-let-live policy has been decided 
upon on the part of the house managers 
on the entire circuit towards the traveling 
shows. Extras have been dispensed with 
entirely, and the show managers know ex- 
actly what the expenses will "be at each 
stand. Additional outlay for extra adver- 
tising or features to draw depend upon 
his own sense of liberality or speculation. 




THE AMERICAN CIRCUIT 

In this division of the burlesque busi- 
ness, known formerly as the "Number Two 
Wheel," conditions are assuming a more 
rosy hue each day. 

The new officers of the circuit, including 
Judge M. Muller. GeoTge Peck, Harry 
Leoni, are greatly pleased with present 
conditions and future prospects. ' 



Joe Kdmonds has succeeded Jack Demp- 
sey with the "Girls from Joyland." 

Jack Reid and his Record Breakers are 
at the Olympic, New York, this week. 

BiUie Hill, who closed with the "Maids 
of America," is to be married shortly. 

Dan *Dbdy has opened new offices for 
his producing business. 

Irene Meara has joined the "Hello Paris" 
Company in place of Beatrice Darling. 

Irwin's "Majesties" will be at the Colum- 
bia, New York, next week, with Florence 
Bennett, Frank Deucont, .Paul Cunning- 
ham, May Penhan, Jane Crew and Nadieu 
Grey. 



JACK REID COMPANY 
LIVES UP TO ITS TITLE 
OF RECORD BREAKERS 

At the Olympic, New York, last week, 
this time Jack Reed put in a full week 
with his troupe Of ;Burlesquers in a per- 
formance that pleased large audiences at 
every show. 

There was a tendency. to "eooch" some- 
what, but it was restrained at the critical 
moments, several, members lending them- 
selves readily to this form of divertise- 
ment. 

The opening dark scene shows the 
Statute of Liberty holding' aloft her light, 
while the chorus in showy striped suits go. 
through a march with the song "Let us 
Have Peace." Ella Gilbert impersonates 
Liberty. 

A talk fay Babe La Belle and Vincent 
Dusey treats on men and women: Then 
Mr. Dusey in his song "If I Ran a De- 
partment Store" ; Introduces models posing 
in windows, showing the latest styles.'' Aa 
old fashioned rope dance was done by 'the 
Webster Bisters. 

At the Ball Game Lneelle Ames plays 
the captain, and the girls had a lot of 
fan throwing soft bass balls into the audi- 
ence for a lot of encores of the 'fVUjf. 
Ball" song. 

The Chinatown scene bad Mr. Dusey as 
an officer singing "Life Is What You Make 
It," while various characters passed by, in- . 
eluding Jack Reed' as the "Information 

Kid." "''*V."'.. ;'■'( - 

Nat Young was' a funny Hebrew, al- 
though he used forcible exclamations at 
each one of Reed's Jokes. "War War 
War" 'was sung by Miss Startzman and . 
Reed. A September Morn song led by 
Lucelle Ames in a clinging Union suit,, 
was good for numerous comebacks. 

After intermission Alvora, the premier 
dancer came on for his repertory of step- . 
ping and the girls went through a program 
including "The Dance of Roses," ."The 
Dance of the Sultan" an Oriental quiver; 
"Dance of Nations." Between times Al- 
vora with changes of costumes soloed ef- 
fectively, doing the dance of the "Siva 
Siva" and an "Eccentric." 

The costumes for the entire show are 

very showy. . . * ... 

, The Paramount Trio, Kemp Sisters and . 
Tag Wetherford had a pleasing specialty. 
The girls sang "Dangerous Boy" and Mr. 
Wetherford's imitations went over nicely. 

For the. burlesque Mr. Reed was in a 
rough makeup and got many laughs for his 
qnainti remarks. Nat Young dispensed 
more heavy Jewish comedy and Bob 
Startzman and Mr. Dusey assisted. 

The Exercise song was well worked up 
especially by the girl at the end. who ex- 
ercised overtime. "Knock the L out. of 
Kelly" and "Pretty Baby" were good 
numbers, also "Dance With Me," and the 
"Winter Time Tableau." , 

The chorus includes Sally Holllns, 
Marie Kemp, Kittle Hollina, Toots Kemp, 
Irene Gardner, Doris DeLoris, Edna 
Orsech, Bobby McDart, Nell Carter, 
Peggy Hope, Amy Adrienne,' Mae Brown, 
Elizabeth Wilhart, Maggie White, Nellie 
Webster, Jeane Morton, Minnie Webster, 
Marion Williams, Mary ■ Smith, Conine 
Lyle. :. -.-:•■>•, ■• . • WtwT: '■■■: 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 



CIRCUS 



CARNIVALS 



PARRS 



FAMOUS TRACK 

SOLD FOR 

PARK 

TO BE PATTERNED AFTER CONEY 



Zjob Anqixxs, Oct. 9. — It baa be- 
come known here that Mis. Anita Bald- 
win, who inherited the historic Santa 
Anita race track from "Lucky" Baldwin, 
has accepted an initial payment of $400,- 
000 upon the property from men in the 
amusement world who propose to torn It 
into a huge park. 

The selUng price of the. property has 
been given out aa ?l,5OO,0OO. , 

The plan of these men is to build upon 
the property a splendid amusement attrac- 
tion for next season. Although little in- 
formation could be gleaned as to details, it 
has been learned that the proposed ven- 
ture will be modeled after Coney Island 
of New York in many respects, and the 
former race track is at present undergo- 
ing' many radical changes preliminary to 
its transformation. Among the proposed 
plans are a casino. 

Los Angeles, at present, boasts a park, 
but the contemplated new one will far ex- 
ceed anything yet attempted in this line 
in the West, as a permanent institution. 
It has always been doubtful whether a 
Coney would make money here and it is 
not entirely without some trepidation that 
people in the amusement field are regard- 
ing the present venture. 

The men, interested, however, seem to 
have the necessary «mmi»t«i backing, aa 
well as confidence that an amusement 
park such as they contemplate should 
draw wen here. 



SEARCHING FOR ASSASSIN 

Dunn, N. C, Oct. 7. — An endeavor is 
being made to locate the man who recently 
shot and killed Everett Wheeler, manager 
of the dancing show with the Lange Model 
Shows. 

To date the nwmmrtn has eluded the au- 
thorities. 



CARNIVALS ALLOWED IN CAIRO 

Oaxbo, 111., Oct. 9. — First-class carnivals 
will now be permitted to show In Cairo, 
an ordinance to that effect having been 
passed last week. Sol A Rabin's United 
Shows are here this week, the first carnival 
to play tills town in two years. 



CIRCUS OPPOSITION DROPPED 
Macon, G*-, Oct 9.— The State Pair 
A ssociation, which has opposed the use of 
Central City Park by Ringling Bros.' circus 
on Oct. 19, has withdrawn its objections 
and the circus will be allowed to exhibit 



FAIR DATE SET 

Jaspeb, Ala., Oct. 2. — The Walker 

County Pair, which for several years baa 

'boasted of producing the best county fairs 

in the South, has announced its fair dates 

for Oct 18-21, to be held In this dry. 



FINN GOES WITH CAMPBELL 

Chicago, Oct 7. — J. G. Finn has signed 
as general manager of the Campbell's 
United Shows for the Winter season. 

He held a similar position with the Nat 
Reiss Carnival for some time and had 
been connected with the late Nat Reiss for 
fifteen years in his various amusement en- 
terprises. 



WASHBURN SHOWS AT FAIR 

Augusta, Ga., Oct 9. — The Leon Wash- 
burn Shows will be the amusement at the 
Georgia-Carolina Fair, to be held here 
Nor. 18-18. 



NEW FACTORY FOR 

THE H. C EVANS CO. 



Building to Be Devoted to the Manufac- 
ture anal Sal* of Carnival Goods of 
All Kinds and Descriptions 

The recent purchase by H. O. Evans of 
property at 1022-28* West Adams street, 
Chicago, presages big doings by H. O. 
Evans & Co. in the near future. Ground 
will be broken the latter part of this month 
for the erection on die site of a factory. 

The old quarters of this firm have been 
crowded to the. limit for some time past, 
the manufacturing by the firm of carnival 
goods being carried on faster than they 
could be stored. As a consequence it has 
been necessary to secure storage space 
elsewhere. 

The new building, which is calculated 
to take care of the constantly increasing 
business of this firm, will be 75 by 126 
feet, four stories high, modern and fire- 
proof, with windows extending from the 
floors to the ceilings. There will be about 
96,000 feet of floor space in the building 
which win be occupied solely by H. C. 
Evans & Co. for the manufacture and sale 
of all kinds. of carnival goods. 

It is expected that the building will be 
under roof by January 1, and the firm 
plans to take possession by March 1. On 
the completion of the building Mr. Evans 
intends to give s big "blow-out" for bis 
many friends in the amusement business. 



QUARANTINE WONT HURT FAIR 

Nashua, N. H., Oct 7. — All reports to 
the contrary, the New Hampshire Indus- 
trial and Agricultural Association Fair, to 
be held here next week, will not in any 
way be affected by the quarantine estab- 
lished in many localities in the East This 
city has not had a case of infantile paralysis 
and there is, therefore, nothing to prevent 
all concerned making this the biggest ever 
which, from the present outlook, it promises 
to be. 



STUTTGART ANNUAL FAIR 

The Rise Carnival will be the leading 
novelty of the Stuttgart, Ark., annual fair 
to be held Nov. 6-10. On Nov. 8 will be 
held a monster industrial parade and on 
the following day there will be an auto- 
mobile parade. Then for the last day there 
will be a parade of school children. Prom 
the opening; to closing date the patrons win 
be kept on the Jump to see everything, as 
there will be special events every night 



BIG EXPOSITION 

STARTED IN 

SOUTH 

* 1,000,000 VENTURE AT GULFPORT 



Gultpobt, Miss, Oct 7. — An exposition 
for which one million dollars wUl be ex- 
pended in grounds and buildings has 
aroused much interest here. 

The occasion will be the Mississippi 
Centennial Exposition to be held in Gulf- 
port beginning Oct 18, 1917 and dosing 
May 1, 1918, and 9126,000 has been ap- 
propriated by special act of the Missis- 
sippi Legislature, for a representative 
State Building. Work on the site has al- 
ready begun. 

The city of Gulfport and Harrison 
County, which will profit by the exposi- 
tion, have promised a contribution of 
$300,000 for buildings and other necessary 
work. The Federal Government has ap- 
propriated $75,000 for the transfer and 
installation of its San Diego exhibit and 
$500,000 wiU be furnished by the Exposi- 
tion Company for improvement ■ 

The exposition will be held in a hun- 
dred-acre enclosure with Its frontage 
along the shore of the Gulf of Mexico. 

The venture is receiving the support of 
aU classes and is expected to furnish a 
splendid opportunity for attractions of all 
sorts to get bookings several months in 
length. 



PREPARING FOR FAIR 

Foplak, Mont, Oct 10. — The officials of 
the Big Two-in-One Fair are preparing for 
next year's fair and will announce their 
1917 dates to the amusement world shortly. 
The fair just held, Sept 14-16, was re- 
ported to be a big success. - 



INJURED PERFORMER RECOVERING 

Genoa, Neb., Oct 7.— Mrs. Katy Robot- 
tas, who was injured recently during her 
performance as a member of the Bobettas 
Trio, feature act of the McDonald Bros.' 
Circus, is slowly recovering. It will be 
some time before she can resume work. 



PLAN ELECTRICAL EXPOSITION 

Louifivnxr, Ky., Oct. 9. — The second an- 
nual Electrical Exposition, given by the 
Louisville Jovian League, will be held at 
the Armory, Dec. 4-9. Free vaudeville is 
planned and many high class entertainment 
features. 



PETITION FOR FAIR GROUNDS 

Chickasha, Okla., Oct 9. — The business 
men of this town want a permanent fair 
grounds established here and have selected 
a committee who have been circulating a 
petition for that purpose. 



CLYDE SHOWS CLOSING 

Danbukt, 111, Oct. 7. 
After completing a very successful sea- 
son The World at Home Shows, owned 
by James T. Clyde, win go Into winter 
quarters at Streator next week, where they 
win remain until April IB. 



JOHN BRUNEN NOT GUILTY 

MrtviON, Pa., Oct 7.— John Brunen, 
owner and manager of the Mighty Doris 
Shows, was found not guilty on a chares 
of killing a man at Mt Carmei last July. 

It was shown that Mr. Brunen acted in 
self-defense. 



DOMINION SHOWS 

IN TRAIN CRASH 

Cars Carrying Carnival Company Leave 

Track at Memphis, Taaau. but 

Members Escano Injury. 

Memphis, Tout., Oct 9.— A Frisco 
special train, carrying concession men sad 
the Old Dominion Carnival Shows, which 
had just completed an engagement at the 
Tri-State Fair, left the track a few miles 
east of this city last Wednesday morning. 
Several of the passengers received painful 
injuries, but Engineer Stamper was the 
only one to suffer serious injury. 

The shows hsd enjoyed a very prosper- 
ous engagement here and the next stop 
would have been Birmingham. The train 
pulled out alright but had only proceeded 
a few miles when there was a crash and 
the engine left the rails. 

The occupants of the coaches were thrown 
from their bertha and seats and for a time 
it was thought thst there was a big loss 
of life. 



REPAIRING FAIR BUILDINGS 

Jackson, Miss., Oct 9.— Repairs oa the 
buildings at the Stats Fair grounds, which 
were recently burned by fire, will be com- 
pleted in time for the opening of the Stats 
Fair set for Oct 23. 



COL. SEELEY OPERATED ON 

CoL Charles W. Seeley is recovering 
from the effects of an operation for cancer 
on the Up, performed by Dr. Ringaley, of 
Rome, N. Y., and expects to be 
again by Nov. 1. 



NEW BUILDINGS FOR STATE FAIR 

Seztaxobia, Miss., Oct 9.— The sew ex- 
hibition building, which is rapidly nesrlng 
completion, Is being built for the Tata 
County Free Fair, to be held here, Oct 
18 and 19. 



BRADY LEAVES PATRICK SHOWS 
Owen A. Brady, for six years «i"«"t«tvd 
with the B. H. Patrick Show*, has left that 
organization and intends putting oat his 
own show next season. 



ALVIN GREEN FINISHES TOUR 
Bbocxtoh, Mass., Sept 80. — AMa 
"Rube* Green finishes his round of N. & 
Fairs here to-day, and will be la Nov 

York shortly. 



READY FOR LAPIVAI FAIR 

Lapivai, Idaho, Oct 9. — Everything Is 
In readiness for the opening of the Laptral 
fair, to be bald Oct 18 and 14. 



JONES SHOWS BOOKED 

SbwBOBT, La-, Oct 10.— The , 
J. Jones Exposition Shows have contracted 
to f urn Uh the attractions at the : 
Stats Fair, Nor. 1-8. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 




STOCK TO OPEN 

NEW LONDON 

THEATRE 

FINE REPERTOIRE IS CHOSEN 



New London, ConiL, Oct 9. 

The new Play House, which has been 
constructed here, will be dedicated to the 
spoken drama and permanent stock at a 
formal opening next Monday night. Octo- 
ber 18, when the Turner-Hammond Play- 
era present "Rebecca of Snnnybrobk 
Farm." . ''t.' 

"Bought and Paid For," "Kick In," 
"The Blue Envelope," and other standard 
plays are to follow, for the house seems 
to fill a long felt want in New London's 
amusement Geld, and bids fair to have a 
long and prosperous career. 

This is Clara Turner's home, and her 
friends and followers are legion. The 
company is assembled and busy with daily 
rehearsals under the direction of James 
Hammond. 

Miss Turner and Mr. Hammond have 
worked hard getting the company into 
shape and, from the way rehearsals are 
progressing, fine performances can be ex- 
pected and will be heartily supported by 
the residents of New London and the sur- 
rounding country. 



FORMER STOCK MAN HURT 

Denteb, Colo., Oct. 7.— Rex A. S. Mc- 
Cb.1I, formerly in repertoire in the Middle 
West, sustained serious injuries recently, 
while speeding a friend to the bedside of 
his dying father. 

The machine in which they were riding 
was wrecked, throwing Mr. iloCall under- 
neath the car. He will recover, it is an- 
nounced* 



COLLIER PATIENT IN HOSPITAL 

Chicago, Oct. 7.— Frank Collier, of the 
Kelly & Brennan Company, who under- 
went an operation recently at the Ameri- 
can Hospital, is rec o v eri ng. 



LEADING WOMAN IN PRODUCTION 

HUa Morgan, who . recently closed as 
leading woman of the Hila Morgan Stock 
Company, has joined the "Little Peggy 
CMoore" show on the International Cir- 
cuit. 



RUTH HALL OPENS NEW SEASON 

dram Hrtx, N. J., Oct. 9. — Ruth Hall, 
after a short rest at her home at Glen 
Falls, N. Y-, will open her Winter season 
of permanent stock here, under the direc- 
tion of George Damroth, in a repertoire of 
Broadway's biggest successes. 



HARDINGS ANNOUNCE BIRTH 
Kansas Crrr, Oct. 7. — Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Harding announce the birth of a 
baby girl Oct. 2 at their home here. 
Mr. Harding is doing a line of character 
comedies with Wilbuck's comedians. 



SAVIDGE PLAYERS SCATTER 

Watite, Neb., Oct. 9.— The Walter 
Savidge Players, under the direction of Al 
C. Wilsou, touring the State of Nebraska 
in their canvas theatre^ will close their 
season of twenty-two weeks here Oct. 
2L . '•«... 

Al C. Wilson, director and heavies. May 
Wilson, characters and general business, 
and Master Lawrence Wilson, child roles 
and specialties, will go to Kansas City to 
visit relatives for a few days before join- 
ing a permanent stock for the Winter. 
Oscar L. Prather and wife, T.fllinn 
Prather will go to Madison, Neb., to visit 
relatives. Dick Elliott, comedian, will go 
to Chicago. Marvin Landrum and wife, 
Marie Hardwick, .win .go to their home at 
Quincy, III. Fritz Adams will hit the 
trail in Chicago. Ed. Henderson and 
wife, Anna Neilsen will go to their home 
at Omaha. Jas. McGlue, advance agent, 
will probably hie hjmaeli to the Windy 
City. Mr. Savidge will Winter here and 
will devote his time to booking the show 
for the coming season. 



NEWS NOTES 



Murphy's Comedians opened their win- 
ter season of stock Oct. 9 at the Opera 
House, Bakersfield, Cal. "The Escape" 
and "Brewster's Millions" will be early 
attractions. 

"The Traffic" has been selected by Wil- 
liam Wood, for week ending Oct. 21, at the 
Hudson, Union Hill, N. J. 

Ed Redmond is playing a special two 
weeks' engagement at the White Theatre, 
Fresno. CaL, offering two bills a week. 

"Everyman's Castle" scored such a big 
success last week at the Alcazar, San Fran- 
cisco, that the management decided to keep 
the piece on for another week. 

L. Verne Slout after spending a month's 
vacation in Michigan, has rejoined the 
Clifton Mallory Lyceum Players at Au- 
burn, N. X. 

Jack R. Lane has recently joined the 
Flora De Voss Stock Co. 

The Edna Parks Stock Co., under the 
management of Jack Edwards, will dose 
its summer season in Macon, Ga., in a few 
weeks and will probably go to Tampa. 
Fla., for an indefinite run. 

The German Stock Co. opened ita sea- 
son in Cincinnati at the Grand Opera 
House, Oct 8, with "Die Selige Exzellenz." 
Performances are given every Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Maddocks 
(Laura Mae Park) closed with the Oliver 
Eckhardt Players, Oct 7, and will take 
a much needed few weeks' rest after one 
solid year and a half stock. 

"The Admirable Crichton" is (he at- 
traction by Henry Jewett's company at 
the Copley Theatre, Boston, Mass., this 
week. Next week the company will play 
"The Importance of Being Earnest." 



MYRKLE-HARDER OPENS IN YORK 

York, Pa„ Oct. 7. — The Myrkle-Harder 
Stock Company opened an indefinite en- 
gagement at the Broadway Theatre, Mon- 
day. 



NEW CIRCUIT 

AFFECTING 

STOCK 

INTERNATIONAL CUTTING IN 



It has not been without interest and 
anxiety that stock managers an over tne 
country have watched the evolution of the 
International Circuit. ... 

It was to be expected that the new ven- 
ture would cut into the receipts of stock 
companies and after a month's trial of the 
circuit, in cities .where both attractions 
hold forth, a decrease in tie attendance al 
stock houses is being reported. 

Communication with several Btock man- 
agers during the past week elicited a half- 
hearted admission that their business' was 
hurt by the introduction of the 'new cir- 
cuit 

Yet while they have been affected, stock 
managers are more optimistic of their 
chances of withstanding this rival than 
they were 'at first This may be due to 
the fact ' that some ' of ' the International 
houses are being dropped from' the circuit 
and that such theatres and the' cities in 
which they are' located have always been 
good for stock. 

The rumor of a possible elimination of 
more houses from the circuit is being cir- 
culated and many stock managers hope it 
is true. 



STOCK STARS MARRY , 

Oaklasd, Cal, Oct. 7. — Orpheum audi- 
ences last week had occasion to note the 
realistic love scenes between. Justina 
Wayne, leading lady, and John Lester 
Blake, leading man, in "Under Cover." 
The romance that saw its beginning in the 
love scenes of a drama culminated in a 
wedding. 

Both are members of the Orpheum Stock 
Company. The wedding took place Sept 
20. Dak? has been leading man. of various 
eastern companies and more recently of the 
Corse-Payton Company of Springfield. " Mr. 
and Mrs. Blake have taken np a residence 
at the Hotel Oakland. 



PLAYING FAIR DATES 

The Wolverton Stock Company has been 
booked for six fair dates in Texas. The 
company's tent has been enlarged and 
three hundred seats added. 

Roster follows : J. C Wolverton and L. 
H. Gerrard, owners and managers ; Ade- 
line Knight, leads ; Bertha Wolverton, 
soubrette; Susie Mae, characters; Mrs. L. 
H. Gerrard, ingenue : Mrs. H. M. Cooke, 
second business: Harry Cooke, comedian; 
Frank Stolle, heavies; T. J. Connelly, 
characters ; L." Gerrard, leads, and Paul 
Adams, juvenile. 



EDWARDS- WILSON TO OPEN SOON 

Lewisbubo, O., Oct 9. — The Edwards- 
Wilson Co. is now making all preparations 
for the. season in the opera, bouse which 
opens here .October 10. A complete line of 
new scenery is being painted and new 
plays are be,ing rehearsed. . 



MORE STOCK IN MOBILE 

Mobile, Ala., Oct. 9. — It is rumored 
here, and rumor is well founded, that 
W. B. Waddle will, in a short time, incor- 
porate a new enterprise to be known as 
the Princess Amusement Co., with capital 
stock of $5,000, to operate road shows, 
tent shows and floating theatres. An op- 
tion has been secured upon two buildings, 
either of which can . be ready within a 
month or six weeks. 

The company will feature Jewell Kelly 
and Rose Morris in stock, with vaudeville 
between the acts. - . . 



MRS. EDWARDS RECOVERING "/ 
1 RicHitor.D, Irro., Oct 9. — Mrs. Ebert 
Edwards (Henrietta Wilson) is at the 
Reid Memorial Hospital, having undergone 
an operation which proved to be more seri- 
ous than was at first anticipated. She is 
now 'doing nicely and expects to be. back in 
the 'cast when the Ed wards- Wilson Co. 
opens its season October 10. 



ST0CKLETS 



ALDKID PIERCE and SYLVIA SUM- 
MERS have closed their engagement in 
Omaha, Neb., to rejoin Dubinsky Bros., 
St Joseph, Mo., opening Oct 8, in "Within 
the Lew." . 

"The Ghost Breaker" is the offering this 
week at . the Princess, Des Moines, la., 
under . the management of Elbert & 
Getcbell. 

"The Trail of the. Lonesome Pine" is 
the selection, of O. D. Woodward for this 
week at the Denham, Denver, Colo. 

"Mary Jane's Pa" will be Offered week 
ending. Oct 21 at the Hyperion, New 
Haven, Conn. This is the only Poli stock 
company open at the present time. 

"The Deep Purple" is playing the 
Spooner, "The Melting Pot" at the Els- 
mere, and "The Conspiracy" at the La- 
fayette, New York City this week. 

"The Regeneration" will be produced 
week ending Oct 21 by the Wilmer & Vin- 
cent Stock Co. at the Orpheum, Reading, 
Pa. 

"In the Bishop's Carriage" is the offer- 
ing for the first three days this week at 
the Alhambra, Ogden, U., under the man- 
agement of H. E. Skinner. 

"The Hawk" will be the offering week 
ending Oct 21 at the Shubert, St Paul, 
Minn,, under the management of F. C. 
Priest Guy Durrell is looking after the 
stage. 

"Alias Jimmy Valentine" is the attrac- 
tion this week at the Tootle' Theatre, St 
Joseph, Mo., by the Dubinsky Stock Co., 
and the same week at the Princess, Sioux 
City, la. 

"Tess of the Storm Country" is the 
offering this week at the Imperial, St. 
Louis, where Gene Lewis has installed a 
stock company. 

"The Deep Purple" will be the offering 
week ending Oct 21 at ' the Somerville 
Theatre, Somerville, Mass., under the man- 
agement of Cecil Owen. 

The second company ' of "The ■ Bine 
Paradise" is .in rehearsals. " 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




FOR ADVERTISING 

RATES, PHONE 

RANDOLPH 5423 



CHICAGO SEES 

PREMIER OF 

NEWJPLAY 

RUSH AND ANDREWS HAVE HIT 



BROWNE ACQUIRES "AFTER" 

Maurice Browne has announced a sub- 
stitution in the piece to open his Little The- 
atre on Oct. 17. Allan Monkbouse's "Mary 
Broome" will be presented instead of Gals- 
worthy's "Joy" as was originally planned. 
Browne has also obtained the rights to 
"After," a new play by Frederick Brueg- 
ger. 



"Where the Rooster Crows," a new 
drama of the Charles Hoyt type, written 
by A. N. Ranee and produced by Rush 
and Andrews of New York, opened at the 
Playhouse Monday night and registered 
what many persons declared was a pro- 
nounced hit Certainly, if laughs count 
for anything, the piece should have a long 
ran. 

"Where the Rooster Crows" deals with 
country folk of the human kind such as 
Hoyt' loved to portray. . Its first act shows 
them at the bungalow of some city folk, 
the second in an old barn, with hay and 
horses and the third back in the bungalow 
again. In all of them, though, is the 
quaint humor, the touching pathos and the 
queer turns of character, that distinguish 
New England country folk.. 

This type of comedy, which the antbor 
so cleverly portrays, is of the kind that 
appeals and is enjoyed, so that "Where 
the Rooster Crows" is expected to accupy 
the Playhouse for some time. The at- 
tractions at other theatres are: 
■ Cohan's Grand (Harry Ridings, mgr.) 
— 'The Great Lover," second week. 
. - Garrick (John J. Garrity, mgr.) — "The 
Princess Pat," 'second week. 

Illinois (Bollo- Timponi, mgr.) — "Pom 
Pom," sixth and last week. 

Powers (Harry Powers, mgr.) — "Please 
Help Emily," fourth week. 

Olympic (George C. Warren, mgr.) — 
"Common Clay," sixth week. 

Princess (S. P. Gerson, mgr.) — "The 
Unchastened Woman," Becond week. 

Cort (U. J. Hermann, mgr.) — "Fair and 
Warmer," tenth week. 

La Salle (Harry Earl, mgr.) — "Where 
Are My Children?" picture, eleventh week. 
Columbia (E. EL Woods, mgr.) — Week 
Oct, 8; "The Golden Crook." 

Hay market (A. H. Moeller, mgr.) — 
Week Oct. 8; "Midnight FoIkW 

Star & Garter (C. L. Walters, mgr.) — 
Week 8; "The Liberty Girls." 

Gayety (R. S. Schoenecker, mgr.) — 
Week 8: "The Charming Widows." 

Englewood (J. W. Whitehead, mgr.)— 
: Week 8: "The Ginger Girls." 

Orchestra Hall — Oct. 11 to -Nov. 11 : 
"Rnrlon Holmes" Travelogues." 

Colonial (Norman Field, mgr.) — "The 
Birth of a Nation," pictures, third week. 



POUCE "KID" REFORMERS 

That the Chicago police are becoming im- 
mune to unfounded reformers' attacks on 
burlesque, is shown by the manner in which 
women of the Chicago Church Federation 
were sent from one department of police to 
another when they endeavored to bring 
about the arrest of Mae Mills, of the Fol- 
lies of Pleasure Co., at the Gayety, Chi- 
cago, last week, claiming that an indecent 
dance was indulged in during the play's 
progress. 



STRIKE ACTS 

BARRED BY 

AGENTS 

NAMES PLACED ON YELLOW SHEETS 



MISS FORTUNA INNOCENT 
Cecilia Fortuna, whose arrest under a 
charge of purloining a trunk containing 
the outfit of the George Jupiter troupe 
of acrobats was reported at Hamilton, O.. 
reached Chicago Oct. 6 with an affidavit 
establishing the fact that the case never 
reached court, because there was no cause 
for action, inasmuch as the young lady 
had taken only property belonging to 
herself. 



• OPERA PLANS FORMED 

According to advance information, this 
season's Grand Opera at the Auditorium, 
when it opens in November, should have 
a smoothly working program, as Director 
Campanini has laid out a definite program. 



Harmony Notes 



The way the big acts at the Palace or 
Majestic put over numbers which publishers 
rely upon, frequently marks the difference 
between what is merely a good seller and 
a terrific hit. 

. Some of the "plugs" that . mast have 
helped publishers in their work of popu- 
larization might be mentioned: Ray 
Samuels, singing "There's a little Bit of 
Bad in Every Good Little Girl." Miss 
Samuels put it over in a natural, easy 
manner that got line-for-line laughts from 
the audience. Also Orville Harrold, sing- 
ing "I Lost My Heart in Honolulu." The 
fact that Harrold is a high-class tenor 
made the use by him of a song seeking 
popularity on the regular market very 
effective. 

Conlin & Parks Trio, dancing "WaJkin* 
the Dog," also helped that number and the 
effort to standardize it 

At the Majestic: Lou Holtz did good 
work for "I Sent My Wife to the Thou- 
sand Isles" and "They Called it Dixie- 
land," and Irwin & Henry have used "Old 
Fashioned Garden in Virginia" consistently < 
for sometime. 

Edmund Braham, writer of over five 
hundred instrumental numbers, is now in 
Chicago, after spending several years in 
the Dakotas and Canada. Braham is again 
applying himself to composing. 

Arthur N. Green, best known for hit 
recent endeevor to start a brokerage pro- 
position in songs between the writer and 
singers, has returned to "straight" writing, 
having placed several numbers with big 
firms. 

Mrs. Mabel J. Reed committed suicide 
at the Hotel Raleigh, Chicago, last week, 
because a friend's success in having a song 
published led ber to write lyrics which she 
could not dispose of. Several of her poems 
hinting at the "New-thought" theory of 
life had been sufficiently strong to find a 
market in magazines. 



A direct result of the recent actors' 
strike in Oklahoma City was felt last 
week when a list of acts was placed on 
the yellow paper second sheets of Chicago 
booking offices. This list is said to be 
the direct result of the action of those 
performers who refused to take the re- 
quired stand in the recent Oklahoma 
strike. 

During the trouble several of the thea- 
tres in Oklahoma City were kept running 
and it is said that many acts booked 
through Chicago agencies refused to take 
the place of the performers who struck. 

The list referred to is said to contain 
the names of all such performers who have 
thus gained the displeasure of the W. V. 
M. A. and it is believed that none on the 
list will be used except in the direst ex- 
tremity. 

Bookers outside of the W. V. M. A. and 
the U. B. 0. complain that this puts them 
at a disadvantage, but it is believed that 
Western managers are for the ruling to a 
man and there is not likely to be any 
change in it. 

There were good bills at local theatres 
last week. Ruth St. Denis' original dance 
conception, which ran considerably over a 
half hour made the Palace eight act bill 
run considerably longer than usual. Mar- 
tin and Fabrini, Mayo and Tally, for- 
merly members of the Empire City Quar- 
tet, Mary Gray's - German monologue, 
Mason and Keller's "Married." Leo Beers, 
The Volunteers and Robbie Gordon made 
up the bill. 



Pedrini and his trick monk opened. 
Johnny Small and his cute sisters were 
well liked. Buch Brothers captured all 
honors. Countess Xardini with her piano 
accordeon was another big bit. Fung 
Choy Co. with their special songs, dia- 
logue and costumes created a big impres- 
sion. Greene, McHenry and Deane ripped 
things up with their comedy piano offer- 
ing. The Gordon Highlanders proved a 
fair closer. 

. Mile Olive proved a capital opener at 
the night shift. Argo and Virginia were 
well liked. McWattera and Melvin, with 
their comedy dramatic offering, pleased. 
La Verne and Degmar went well. l.u 
Seals Sextette was the feature of the pro- 
gram and deserved it. Norwood and Hall 
were the applause hit of the bill. Fred 
Zobedie and Company with splendid acro- 
batic offering held the audience to the 
finish. 

Tbe Wilson Avenue Theatre took on a 
new lease of life, as business was beyond 
the expectations of the management. 
Horton and La Triska opened. Mabel 
Johnstone, the best lady ventriloquist in 
vaudeville, went over with a bang. . John 
Thorne and Company in "The Defective" 
pleased. 



The capacity audience which attended 
tbe first performance of the week at the 
Majestic found an exceptionally well put 
together bill beginning with Carl Rosini's 
brief but cariosity arousing magic presen- 
tation. 

Raggs and Ryan followed and Robert T. 
Haines and Co. presented a fine sketch en- 
titled "Enter, A Stranger." Lloyd and 
Britta' talking and dancing act commanded 
attention. ' Stan Stanley and his relatives 
furnished twelve minutes of solid fun and 
the Lightner Sisters and Alexander came 
back witb their clever talking and piano 
act. Stella Mayhew witb Billee Taylor at 
the piano scored her usual success. Tro- 
rato played the violin and was heartily 
applauded. Consul, the great monkey en- 
tertainer, closed the bill. 

At McVicker's the headliner was "The 
Rod Heads." "The Ten Dark Knights," 
ten colored boys and girls that furnish 
mirth, song and dance. Lucille & Cookie. 
Fred Hildebrand. nut comedian; Delmore 
& Lee, a spectacular acrobatic act; the 
Lowries, Cecil Jefferson and Dawson. 
Lannigan & Covert also appeared. 

At the Great Northern Hippodrome, 
shows were not up to expectations, al- 
though from a variety standpoint the day 
shift was much better than the evening 



News Briefs 



! 

Chicago ticket-scalpers are watching 
Jndge LandU' inquiry into gambling con- 
ditions in Chicago with great interest, be- 
cause they fear tbe judge's attention .will 
soon be centered on speculating. Several 
of the gambling houses now under the 
judge's eye are also headquarters for pur- 
chasing "scalped" tickets. 

Previous endeavors have been made to 
stamp out ticket scalping in Chicago, but 
the condition is general. There is little 
objection to the kind of scalping that 
merely results in selling a choice seat at 
a slight increase, but the sale of advertis- 
ing gratuities at half-rate is declared to 
be a force for undermining tbe prosperity 
of local theatres. 

Jack Boyle, of Howard A Boyle, a 
vaudeville team, was stricken with in- 
fantile paralysis at tbe Saratoga lintel last 
Wednesday. He was taken to the Ameri- 
can Hospital. 

Janet Allyn. wife of Albert Phillips, 
star of last season's National Theatre 
stock company, endeavored to commit 
suicide by swallowing poison in the midst 
of a shopping crowd at State and Wash- 
ington streets. Chicago, last week. It Is 
believed trouble witb ber husband led to 
the attempt. Dr. Max Tborek. after .ad- 
ministering antidotes, declared the patient 
would soon recover. 

A peculiar thing about the Chaplin fea- 
ture films is that most of the theatres 
showing them appear to be playing to 
capacity audiences, though, unlike most 
feature films, there do not appear to be 
first run restrictions and many theatres 
in one neighborhood — especially the loop — 
are showing tbe same picture simultan- 
eously. This is a mighty fine testimonial 
to Chaplin's popularity and one that no 
other star of the film world can show, at 
least no film star that has been seen In 
this city. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 




SONGS THAT ST 

Funny, isn't it? to hear people say, 'Teist has the big hits because he's lucky." That's nonsense. 
Everybody knows ifs dangerous to speculate "on hick." Once in a great while we hear of someone 
who "made a Lucky Strike" and "cleaned up." It's so rare, that's why everybody talks about it— but as* 
a general proposition — it's all Rot! Bosh! — Phool Stuff! 

All 'Teist" songs are not successful, but you don't know the "Flivers" as we "can 'em" quickly- 
All you have to do, is to pick the one— two or more that fit YOUR ac 



»•»• j 



P?Sp 



Any old song won't do; that's the spiel we handed our writers and they came across 'with a pipj 

and take notice. - The title, 'wonderful as it is, is but a mere 

'IRELAND MUST BE HEAVEN FOR 

If ever there was a lync that can stand the focus of the spot light, it is this new one by Joe ! Ic< 



YOU CANT 
GO WRONG 

WITH A 
FEIST SONG' 



D, "d you ever hear tmma Cams rave? She doewit d 
Lost week Miss C*rus and her new partner, Larry Comer, opened up at the Palace Theatr;. N'« 

The one supreme hit of their act was them 

'THE SWEETEST I 

by Grant Clarke and Jimnne V. Monaco, who have in this son R written another ballai tl 



• ''MM Its •■* e#J.|. 



Lyric by GRANT CLARKE 



tf 



Talk About Your Talk Abouts, the MostTai 

YOU'RE A DOG-GOM 

This is the song that all the big newspapers in the country are raving about The song that is being sjng 
song that even the hot weather couldn't hold down. A song that the audience remeab 






''mm 




illllt 1 




She's the Right Kind— Tie 



■( 



THERE'S 1 LITTLE BIT OF BUD 

The greatest novelty "Girl" song since "Any Little Girl Is the Right Little Girl," and by the same compo 

gone Dangerous Girl!" and "Get Out and Get Under." 



fr^ 




SAN FRANCISCO 

5s— PANTAGES BUILDING 



CHICAGO U 

G.O.H. BUILDING. 



LEO F 

135 W. 44-th STR 



ST. LOUIS 7TH 



3 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



OD THE ACID TEST 

you see, we take the trouble to find out before we "band 'em to you" — Putting it differently — a 
"Feist" song has got to "stand the add test" and if ifs a "realer" we let you in— if it's a 'lemon" 
we -Atoll" II 

So you see it's not exactly luck — is it? No! certainly not ! So then, when we tell you that every song 
mentioned below is a Hit, you know it is a Hit, because it's been "tried out" before we hand it to you. 

m it's "easy sailing" to the "Road of Sure Success"— GET ABOARD ! 



, so new and novel that even we, accustomed as we are to having quick hits, were compelled to sit up 
uggestion of the new sup-eme ballad hit of the new season* 

MY MOTHER CAME FROMITHERE" 

IcCarthy and Howard Johnson, while the melody by Fred Fischer is emphatically infectious. 



do;it often, but when rhe does, it means something. 
New York.: Naturally, they were a riot. Everybody expccted.it, and no one was disappointed. 
new and novel song with "a punch, entitled 

MELODY OF ALL 

that will appeal to every ballad singer in America, a song positively in a class by itself. 



Talked About Song in the U. S. A. to-day Is 



IE DANGEROUS GIRL 



99 



Music by JIMMIE V. MONACO 



,ig by more head liners than any other song in the country. A song that is the biggest prevailing hit. A 
Ibers and identifies the act after the show is over. You know the kind we mean. 



» Up to Her— She's a Hit! 

Ill HOI GOOD 

Dppser, FRED FISCHER, while the sure-fire lyric is by GRANT CLARKE, he who wrote "You're a Dog- 
»•" Wonderful for singles! Knock-out for doubles! 




El ST inc 

Jet, new york 

^ OLIVE STREET 3 



mm 



SING A 

FOST'SONG 

BE A 
STAGE HIT" 







M BOSTON ^ 

I8ITREMONT STREET *. 




PHILADELPHIA 

BROAD k CHERRY 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 




F@ir Mezrt W®(Blk 



U. B. O. CIRCUIT 

Hew York City. 

PALACE— Claude GIlllnirwateT— Fritzl SchcnT— 
Chick Sale — Morgan Dancers. (Five to Ml.) 

COLONIAL — World Dancers — Husscv and Lee — 
T*a Misses CamuteU— Uncart anil Bradford — 
Oscar Torralne. (Two to nit.) 

ROYAL— Alexander Brothers— Bnrna ft Klasen — 
Nsndain it Frledland — Tal ft Ernie Stanton — John- 
son ft Hardy — De Blare. 

imlDB i — Abbott * White — Clslrmont 
Brothers— "Breath of Old Virginia"— Halllgan ft 
flrtoa flitimanl Trio — Ward ft Tan — Watson Sla- 
ters — Vinton ft Boater — Sboen ft Ma Ciua ' Arthnr 
Deagon — Nellie Nichols — Morton ft Moore. 

Brooklyn. 

r BB* r HWICR— Lewi* Hardt— Frank Le Dent- 
Tare* Stelndel Brothers— Dogan ft Raymond — 
Lorenocrg Sisters — Geo. Kelly ft Co.— Cole. Rus- 
sell ft Darts — Cook ft Lores*. 

OJtPUKlTM— Nan Halperln — Al Herman — Kits 
orarm Japs — "Proaperlty" — Mnllen ft Rogers — 
"Four Hatbands" — Tempest ft Sunshine. 

Atlanta. 

FORSYTE— Mcalcal Johnstons — Chas. Kellozg— 
Dainty afarle — Bsrstxjn ft Grbha — Laurie ft Bron- 
aon— Harry Green ft Co. 

• Boston. 

_ -"Fit* of Crohn" — Clsndlns ft Scarlet 
■u Abeam ft Co.— King ft Harvey— Cecil 
Cdsntnchun — Act Beautiful — McCormaek ft Wal- 
lace— PonaeBo Slaters. 

Birmingham. 

LYRIC- (First Half)— Elsie Winism* ft Co. 
(Last HiHt- Geo. N. Bosenrr— "The Oetopna" — - 
Walt*. Dream. 

"•" ' Buffalo. , 

SHEA'S — Goelet. Harris ft Morey — Ellnore ft 
Carltoo— Keno. Keys ft Melrose-^Joeente Donedln 
—Hugh Herbert ft Co.— "At the Party"— Barry 
Ellis. 

Baltimore. 

■jtftBYLAKD— Mack* Walker— Moore ft Easier 
—Boy Harrah TroBpe— Geo. Lyons— Ethel Hop- 
klilx— Joe Fanton* Co.— Arettng ft Lloyd— 3*ek 
Wilson Trio. 

Cleveland. 

kBBTt- Hsrry GUfott— The DaMacos— HaUen 
ft Fuller. Valerie Bergere ft Co.— Boshanara— Ben 
Daeley ft Co.— Adelaide ft Hughes— Clark ft Verdi. 

Chattanooga. 
■gXSTK'% (First Half)— Stone ft Hayes— Walters 
& Walter*. tLaat Half)— Lorraine ft Cameron- 
Three Bseardoa-rVIollnsky. 

Cincinnati. 
KZTTK'B— Minnie Allen— Kerr ft Weston— 
American Cosnedy Foot— -.yaconm Cleaner* — 
Torn l^arasftCo.-EIea Ryan ft Co.-Wlo.ton'. 

- Columbus. 

KEITH'*— Bob Albright— Edwin George— Dooley 
ft Bogel. Heager ft -.Goodwin— Tboss Fire Girls— 
K««ne ft Mortimer. 

Dayton. 

KVEITH'8— Mrs. Thos. WhlfTen— Tennessee Ten— 
vslmont ft Reyn.n-B.ker ft Janls-Cbnek Haaa 
— Stoart Barnes — Clara Morton — McCarthy ft Faye. 

Detroit. 

TEMPLE— Harris ft Manlon— Nat C. Goodwin— 
Wbeuf D'Armond ft Co.-HopkIn* Aatell Trio- 
Three Bobs. 

Ene. 

COLONIAL— Samaross ft Sonla— B. Morrall Sex- 
tette Valand ft Gamble— Leon ft Adeline Slaters. 

Grand Kapids. 

jrtoREBS— McWatter* ft Tyson— Una Clayton ft 
Co!-Hoey ft Lee— las. J. Corbett-Three Ro- 
salre*- _ _. 

Hamilton. 

TEMPLE— Mirano Brothers— Douglas Flint ft 
Co.— Hunting ft FraneU— Dunn & Beaumont Sla- 
ters— Lexey ft O'Connor. 

Indianapolis. 

OBAJTD— Harry B. Lester— Adams 'ft Murray— 
liunedln Duo— Tatea ft Wheeler— Comfort ft King 
— Eadie ft Rameden. 



Jacksonville. 



KEITH*- (First Half)— Chaa. Mack ft Co.— 
Violet McMillan. (Last Half)— Marie Stoddard— 
The Norrellea. 

Knoxnlle. 
BLJOTJ (Flrat Half '—Lorraine ft Cameron- 
Three Escardos— YioUosky. (Last Half)— Stone ft 
Have* — Walter* ft Walter*. 

Louisville. 

KUTH'B— "Forty Wlnka"— Yrette— Jaa. Car- 
•oift Co.-Togan ft Qenera— nicer ft Douglas. 

Montreal. 
OEPHXTTht— J. C. Nugent ft Co.— Fr»nk Cromltt 
- Qulgler ft Fltagerald. Conley ft Webb. 
Norfolk. 

COLONIAL (Flr»t Hair)— Emerson ft Baldwin— 
SvTveiter ft Vance. (Last HalO-Apdale'. Ani- 
mals— HsUen ft Hunter. 

Naahvme. 
ruicns (First Hall)— Geo. N. Bjaener— 
TbToctopne"— Walt* Dream. (Last Half)— mate 
Williams ft Co. 



Providence. 

KEITH'S— Whitfield ft Ireland— Dorothy Begal 
ft Co. — "Age of Reason"— Loner HaikeU — Leonla 
Lamar — Sbattock ft Golden — Jim ft Marlon Bar- 
kins — Merle's Cockatoos. 

Pittsburgh. 

■MS-. Harm Haake, Phyllis Nelltoo Terry- 
Leigh ft Jones. .- - - - 

Philadelphia. 

KEITH'S— Chas. L. Fletcher— Pariah ft Peru— 
Santley ft Norton— Adelaide Boothby ft Co.— Ed- 
win Arden ft Co. — Capt. Anson ft Daughter — Gar- 
' aid 'ft Clark — Belle Storey— Tbe Kramers. 
Richmond. - 

COLONIAL (First Half)— Apdale'a Animals— 
Hallen ft Hunter. -(Last Half)— Emerson ft Bald- 
win — Sylvester ft Vance. 

Rochester. 

TEMPLE — La Argentina — Herbert'* Dogs— 
Schooler ft Dickinson — wmie Solit — Smith ft Aus- 
tin—Gene Adair ft Co.— Merle ft Delmar— Wlnaor 
McKay. 

Savannah. ■ 

SAVANNAH (Flrat Half)— Marie Stoddard— The 
Norrelles. (Last Half) — Chas. Mack ft Co. — Vio- 
let McMillan. 

Toledo. 

KEITHS — Carl Boelnl ft Co. — Harry Fern ft 
Co.— Three Jordan Girls— Blossom Beeley ft CO. — 
Wills H. Wakefield — Nordstrom ft Potter— Haihn- 
ton ft Barnes. . . . 

Toronto. 

SHEA'S Bae B. Ball — B. Lament's Cowboys — 

:Cbaa. ft Addle Wllklns— Era Taylor ft Co.— Hou- 
■ '-dinl Dyer ft Faye — Peggy .Bremen" ft Bro.^-Sek- 

bory ft Price. 

Washington. 

ii Fi T H -g — j»ck Norworth-^lteynard ft Blanca— : 
Merlsn's Dogs— Bradley ft Ardtne-^Maud alnDer — 
TIghe ft Jason — Three Leightons. ■ • 

Yonngstown. 
KEITH'B— Bert Hanloo, BeWltt' Toung ft sister 

The XT • h er a — Four ' Bhtertalnera-^Mlniature 

Beroe — Countess Nardlnl. ■ .._ =-. , • 

ORPHEUM CIRGUrr 
Chicago. 'Jf . 

MAJESTIC— EUls ft Boraonl—Chessy _ft. Payne— 
Mack ft Walker— Harry Cooper>-Fay(.Two Ooleya 
ft Fay— Odlra— Grace De Mar— CMford Walker— 
The Seehacka. 

PALACE— Bessie Clayton ft Co.— Franklyn Ar- 
deU ft Co. — Clair* Rochester — Jasper— Hufford ft 
Chain — noward's Ponies— Moore, Gardner ft Boae 
— Lamb's Manikins. 

Calgary. 

ORPHEUM — Sophie Tucker ft Co.— Blche ft 
Burt— CantweU ft Walker— Beeman ft Anderson— 
Both Bodd— "Cranberrlea." 
Denver. 

OHPHETJM — Mrs. Langtry — ^Lydell ft Hlggtna — 
The -Sharroeka — Dancing Kennedy* — Partes ft 
Conwaj — Joe Newman. 

Dulnth. 

ORPHET/M — Imperial Chinese Trio— Bert Le*y — 
Geo. HoweU ft Co.— Moon ft Morris— Anna Chan- 
dler— Mullen ft Coogan. 

Des Moines. 

ORPHEXTM— "Petticoat*"— Lew Madden ft Co.' 

— Mme. 8umlko ft Glrto— Spencer ft Williams— 
Boudlnl Brothers— Lohse ft Sterling. 
g-.Tma* City. 
ORPHEUM — Stone ft Kallss — Booney ft Bent — 
DufTy ft Lorenxe— Bockwell ft Wood— Princesa 
Kalama Duo— Sylrla Loyal. 

Los Angeles. 

ORPHEUM— "Nursery Land" — Delro — Allan 
Dlnehart ft Co. — Dore ft Halperln — Violet Dale — 
J. C. Lewi* ft Co.— WUIard. 

Lincoln. 

ORPHEUM— Arco Brothers— Dan P. Casey — 
Fred ft Et* Moaart — Cooper ft Smith— Btiee ft 
King— Cartmell ft Harris — Olirer ft Olp. 

Minneapolis. .-••";' 

OEPHXUM — Clark ft Hamilton — Harry Botman 
ft Co. — Werner Amorce Troupe-M3. Aldo Randeg- 
cer— Marie Fltagibbon— MartlnetH ft Sylvester — 
Savoy ft Brenaan. 

Milwaukee. 

ORPHEUM— Robert T. Haines ft Co. — Stanley 
Trio — l«ah Her* ft Co.— Albright ft Rodolfl — TTo- 
earo — Consul the Great — Lloyd & Brltt — Weston 
ft Claire. 

Memphis. 

ORPHEUM — Louise Dresser — Lew Dockatader — . 
The White Hussars— "Lore In the Suborba"— Th* 
Meyskos — Primrose Four — Lore ft Wilbur. 

Hew Orleans. 

ORPHEUM— Kddle Leonard ft Co. — Bonlta ft 
Lew Hearn — Russell & Wsrd — Ames ft Wlnthrop — 
Bert Melrose — The Gladiators — Vlnie Daly. 

Omaha. ». . 

ORPHEUM— Bankoff ft GIrtte Ballet— McConoell 

ft Slmpwo — Mary MeWlSe — Six Water LltDea — 

Suva Bnfor Boys— I*o Kartell Trio— McKsy ft 
Aniine. 



Oakland. 
ORPHEUM — Bran-Bnrrowa Fontaine — Lunette 
Bisters— Walter Brower— Claire Vincent ft Co. — 
Mortn Sisters— Plelert ft Schofleld— Kajlyam*. 

Portland. 

ORPHEUM — Morton ft Glass — Scotch Lad* ft 
Lassies— William* ft Woltus — Marshall Montgom- 
ery— Brltt Wood — Lanra Nelson Han ft Co. — 
Francis ft Kennedy. 

St. Louis. 

ORPHEUM— Maybew ft Tsylor— woolf ft Stew- 
art — Mary Gray — Mayo ft Tally — Conlln ft Parks 
Trio — Bobbie Gordone — Howard, Klbel ft Herbert 
— Two Blondye. 

. San Francisco. 
ORPHEUM— Chip . ft Marble — Nederreld'* Ba- 
boons — Alexander MacFayden — Allen ft Howard — 
Fred V. Bowers ft To. — Orth ft Dooley — Sherman 
ft Dttry. 

Stockton, Fresno and Bakersfield. 

ORPHEUM — "Honor Thy Children" — Demareat 
ft Collette— Helen DaTta— Jacques Plntel— Webb ft 
Bums — Balser Sister*. 

St PanL 

ORPHEUM — Carroll ft Wbeaton — Kenny ft Hol- 
11a— Jim ft Betty Morgan— Wilfred Clarke ft Co. — 

■STengall-^Gomes Trio— Maryland Singers. 

Seattle. 

ORPHEUM — "Bride Shop" — De Witt, Bnma ft 
Torrence — Maud Lambert — Ernest Ball — Raymond 
Bond ft Co. — Bernard ft Searth — Musical Geralds. 

Salt Lake City. 

ORPHEUM— Alan Brooks ft Co.— Hans Llmie's 
Act — Old Time Dsrkles — Al ft Fannie Stedman — 
Gordon ft Biea. 

Vancouver. 
ORPHEr/M — "Forest Fire"— Ward Brothers — 
McDeTitt, Kelly ft Lucy— Miller ft Vincent— 
Friaeoe — Kltaro Brothers— Josle Heather ft Co. 

Winnipeg. 

ORPHEUM — Sarah Padden ft Co. — Raymond ft 
Carerly — Four Headings — Craig Campbell — Lelpxtg 
— The Brighton* — "Dancing Girl of Delhi." 

LOEW CIRCUaTv - 

New York City. 
AMERICAN <Flrst Hair) — Alrares ft. Martell — 
Eeans, Smith ft Dunne — Harry ft August* Torpln— 
Bis Stylish Steppers— Marrii,'* Mlnstels— Bertie 
Fowler — "Her Honor, the. Mayor" — Scuploff— ^Ker- 
rsssaa. (Last Half) — Scaalon ft Pressr-Hawthorne 
ft Leslie — Josle Flynn ft Minstrels — Ware ft Bafr — 
Mercedes, Clark ft Co, — Harry Breen — Kelso Bros. 

BOULEVARD (First Half) — Hearn ft Batter — 
Daniels ft Walters— Lew Welsh ft Co. — Marie Fea- 
too. (Last Half) — Murphy ft Barry — Snyder ft 
May — Archer ft Bel ford— Lew Well* — "Boy* ft 
Girl*." • . _ . 

OREELET SQUARE (First Half)— Snyder ft 
May— Musical Hunters — "Fireside Bererle" — Alice 
Hanson — Stelner Trln. (Last Half) — Pnilnpl Four 
—Tracy ft McBride— Mr. ft Mrs. Norman Phillips 
— Billy McDermott — Booth ft Leander. 

DELANCET STREET (First Half)— Keene A 
Williams— Dolce Sisters — Wilson Bras. — Mr. ft 
Mrs. Norman Phillips — Lillian Watson — Kelso Bros. 
(Last Half) — Hearn ft Rotter — Norton ft Noble — 
Arnold White — Folsom ft Brown — Franda Renault 
— E- E. Cllr* ft Co.— Etta LaveJe. 
- LINCOLN SOUABE (First Half) — Mstt. Bros, ft 
Girlie— Walton ft Delberg— Frank Gaby ft Co.— 
Capt. Sorcho — Folsom ft Brown — Chinese Mns. Bn- 
tertsiners. (Last Half) — Johnson ft Wells — Grsy 
ft Klunker — Morstti Opera Co. — Adams ft Gnhl — 
Capt. Sorcho. 

NATIONAL (First Half)— Etta LayeBe— Kauf- 
man ft Lnnan — Harvey De Vora Trlo^E. E. dire 
ft Co. — Thos. Potter Dunne — Phinipi Four. (Last 
Half) — Reed St. John Trio — Tabor ft Green — Brown 
ft Jackson — "Cheater*" — Wilson Bros. — Dunbar, 
Banrard ft Dunbar. 

ORPHEUM (First Half)— Martyn ft Florence — 
Scaoloo ft Press — Adams ft Gobi — -Brown ft Jack- 
son — "Cheater*" — Lew Wells — Leander ft Booth. 
(Last Half)— Alrary ft Marbel — Margaret Calvert 
— Harry ft Augusta Turplo — Boras ft Klssen — Marie ' 
Fenton — Sully Family — Stelner Trio. 

SEVENTH AVENUE (First Half )— Margaret Cal- 
▼ert— Hawthorne ft Leslie^ — Morstti Opera Co. — 
Dunbar, Banrard ft Dunbar. (Last Half) — loleen 
Sisters — Eddie Cox ft Co.— Walton ft Delbert — 
Owen ft McGlrney — Alice Hanson — "School Days." 

BIJOU (BXXTH.) (First Half)— Barkings — 
Francis Renault — Gray ft Klunker — Chiaholm ft 
Breen — Harry Breed — Josle Flynn's Minstrels. 
(Last. Half )— Daniels ft Walters— Frankle Fay— 
"Fireside Bererle" — Str Stylish Steppers — Chinese 
Mns. Entertainer*!'" 

. DE KALB (BBXTH,)- (Flrat Half)— Arnold ft 
Whlte-^Tracy ft McBride — Owen ft McGlrney — 
Marie Russell. (Last Half)— Martyn ft Florence — 
Dolce Sisters— Fennel I ft Tysoo — Lew. Welch ft Co. 
— Three Lyres. 

FULTON (BKLYN.) (First Half)— Gardner's 
Maniacs — Forrester ft Lloyd — Archer ft Ballard — 
Et Cleve — "Boys ft Glrla." (Last Half) — Halktngs 
— Evans. Smith ft Dunne — Harvey De Vara Trio— 
CbishoTm ft. Breen.— Old Soldier Fiddlers. 

PALACE (BKXYN.) (First Half)— Tabor ft 
Green — Brooghton ft Turner— Billy McDermott. 
(Last Half)— Lillian Watson — Frank Gaby ft Co. — 
Thos. Potter Dunne — Cunningham i ft Marlon. 

Baltimore. 

HIPPODROME— Holden ft Graham— Curry, ft 
Graham — Australian Woodcboppers — Herbert ft ' 
Dennis— Tessie Farrell ft Co.— John O'Mtller— 
Three Kundles. 

. -. ■?- ,.• Boston. 

ORPHEUM (First Half)— Aerial Belmont* — Seed 
ft Wright— Ethel Mae Ban ft Co.— Tom Mahotxr 
— Cronlo's Merry Men. (Last Half) — BVana ft 



Wilson— Mabel McKlnley — McGowan ft Gordon— 
"Ofllce Girls"— Patsy Doyle. 

ST. JAMES (First Half)— Erana ft Wflsos— 
Sully Family— Edah Dellrldge Trio. (Last Half)— 
Reed ft Wright — Tom Mahoney — Aerial Belmonss. 

Fall River. 

BLIOTJ (nrst Half)— Patsy Doyle— Conroy's 
Models. (Last Half) — Mr. and Mr*. A. Capias — 
Harry Sydell — Conroy's Model*. 

Hoboken. 

LYRIC (First Half)— MaroC* Manikins— "Bel- 
low Peril" (Last Half)— Hoot. O'Connor ft Co.— 
Merle Russell. 

Newark. 

MAJESTIC (First Half)— Raymond— Nortoa ft 
Noble— Friukie F*j^— James ft Bonnie Thornton — 
Three Lyres. (Last Half) — Matt Bros, ft Glrll* — . 
Forrester- ft Lloyd — Musical Hunter* — James ft 
Bonnie Thornton — Tracey ft Vincent — Kerraasaa. 

New Bochelle, 

LOEWS (First Half)— Mercedes. Clark ft Co.— 
Corcoran ft Mack. (Last Half)— El Clere — "B*» 
Honor, the Mayor" — SeaploftT. 

Providence. 

EMERY (First Half) — Born* ft Kesson — Mr. ft 
Mrs. A. Caplan — Harry Sydell — Hall's Mnalesl 
Minstrels. (Last Half)— Ethel Mae Hall ft Oft — 
Edah Dellrldge Trio — Craig-Campbell Glrla. 

Toronto, Can. 

YONOE STREET— Dunlap ft Vlrden— Eckhofl ft 
Gordon— Chas. B. Lawlor ft Daughter — Klnkaln 
Kilties — Msck. Albright ft Mack -BeU Thaser Bras. 

POU CIRCUIT 

Bridgeport. 

POLI'S (First Half)— Assakl ft Co.— Alain ft 

Williams— Jnlls Ring' ft Co.— Sid Lewis— Deal 
Girls. (Last Half) — Three BTelos — Lewis Rat- 
rlngtoo ft Co. — Arthur Llpson — William Prnet** 
ft Co. (To fill) 

PLAZA (First Half) — Samsya — Sidney ft Town- 
ley — Carson ft WUIard— Dor* Dean Player*. (Last 
Half) — Gsllsudo — Savannah ft Georgia — Kennedy 
& Burt — Staines Comedy Circus. 

Hartford. 

PALACE (First Half)— Bernard " 4 Bennett— ' 
Leonard ft WUIard. (Two to fill.) -(Last Half) — 
Albert Banget ft Co.— Brown ft Mccormick — des* 
BeVao. ft Co. — Florrie Mfllerabip— "Going Dp." 

POETS (Flrat HsJf)— Delmore ft Moore — Hil- 
ton ft Sheldon -Pintle — Valyda ft BraiUlsn Nuts 
— Staines Comedy Cirrus. (Last Hair) — Watte 
Bros. — -Hooper ft Borkholder — Lewis Harrlngfoa 
ft Co. — Sid Lewis — Emmett Welsh Minstrels. 

'I _ . New Haven. , , 

POETS (First Half)— Three Kelos— Fisher ' ft 
fiockaway — "Memories" — Florrie MHlenhlp — Ray 
ft G-ordln Dooley — Dora Dean Players. (Last 
Half) — Assakl ft Co. — Alvln ft Williams— Leonard 
ft wniard— Deal Glrbj. 

BIJOU. (Flrat Half)— Barnons Midget Horses 
— Hooper ft -Burfcholdec — Lewis -.Harriagton ft-Oav — ■ - 
— Arthur Ltpaon— Katharine Dana's Fisher Folk. ■ 
(Last Half) — Bamaya — Armstrong ft . Strom a 
"Mr. Flynn From Lynn" — Andy Rice — Pinkie. 

Springfield. 

PALACE (First Half) — Qoeenle Dnnedln — Shorty 
Dewitt — Robinson ft MeSbaym — Spencer Charter 
ft Co. — Kennedy ft Burt — "Heart of a Thief." 
(Last Half)— Mardo ft Hunter — Wm. Ebba — Del 
more ft Moore — Hannonle Girls — Carson ft Wil- 
lard — "Going Up." 

Scranton. 

POLI'8 (First Half)— Daly ft Berlow— Dorothy 
Muether- : -"Vlca Versa" — Banders ft Min>» — 
"Hello Honolulu." (Last Half) — Wilson ft Lana* 
— Zeno ft Mandel — Barry McCormlck ft Co.— Rd 5 
DcwUng— Lew Winch ft Co. 

Waterbury. 

POLTB (First Half)— The raynes— McAeoy ft 
Brooks — Brown ft McCormlck — Lewis Harrington 
ft Co. — Carson ft Willard— "Going Dp." Ls-«t 
Half)— The Yaltos — Winchester 4 Claire — Will. 
Oakland ft Co. — Valyda & Brazilian Nn(- — 
"Whirl of Song and Dance." (To fill.) 

Wflkes-Barre. 

POLI'S (First Half)— Wilson ft Larson — Zeno 
ft Mandel — Barry McCormlck ft. Co. — Ed DowUng — 
Lew Winch ft Co. (Last Half)— Daly ft Berlow— 
Dorothy Moether — visa Versa" — Handera ft Mil- 
lag — "Hello Honolulu." 

Worcester. 

POLTS (First Half)— Merles Cockatoos— Sa- 
rannsh ft Georgia — Julia Ring ft Co. — GoMing ft 
Keating — "Going Dp." (Lost Half) — Tbe Faynes 
— Gold Lawrence ft Howard — Spencer Charter 'A 
Co. — Arthur Llpson — Katherlne Dana's Fi-ber 
Folk. 

PLAZA (First Half)— Mardo ft Hunter- 
Arthur Barrett — Cole BosseU ft Daels — Fisber ft 
Rockaway — Espe ft Dutton. (Last Half) — As 
sskl ft Co. — Sidney ft Townley— Valyda ft Braail- 
laa Nut* — "Boarding School Glrla." 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

Fran Liberty St., 7 A. M. to it P. M. 

aad at Midnight with Sl sa ai a r * 

It M INUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. EU St. 

... YOUR WATCH ■ YOUR TIKE TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E. P. At-at 
14st BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



S. & C CIRCUIT 



Atlanta. 

PIEDMONT (First Half)— Thompson A Oriffen 

— Knapp A Murray — Chria- Gruher A Co Haley A 

Haley— Sanset Six. (Last Half)— SmUetta Sls- 
ttn — Walrod ft Zell— Unalcal Three— Variety 
Trie. (One to Ml.) 

Cincinnati. 

EXPRESS — Cheyenne Days— DeArmo * Mar- 
guerite — Clifford A Wins — Fltzslmmoua A Groves 
— Nichols Slaters — Marsh A DeFoggle. 

Columbus. 

GRAND (Last Half)— Eastman at Moore — 
Jean McElroy— Sorority Glrla— Van Der Koors. 
(Cue to fill.) 

Detroit. 

KELES— Clipper Trio— Qnlgg . * Ntckerson— 
Wilbur ft Doll — Wsllle ft Irene Brooks — Gafl- 
Bery Jk Pale — roar Casting Kaya. 

Fargo. 

GRAND (First Half)— Aerial Macks— Fergn< 

aon A Sunderland — Elliott at McGrecTy — McAuiiffe 

A Pearson. (Last Half)— The Zlraa — Mitchell A 

Lore — La Petite Mercedes — Franceses A Jackie. 

Janesville. 

APOLLO (Last Half)— Ban rard Slaters— White. 
Mollaly & White — Olson ft Johnson. (One to 

ML) — -v, 

KnorvJle. 

GRAND (First Half)— Chief Little Elk A Co. 
Potts Broa. A Co.— Milton A Herbert — Walter 
Baker A Co. (One' to All.) (Last Half) — BosaeU 
Sisters— Lee ft- Bennett— Balph Bayle A Co. 
(Two to Ml.) 

Minneapolis. 

TTNIQITE (First Half) — Wilson A Snyder — 
Challla A Lambert— La Petite Mercedes. (Two 
to Ml.) (Last. Half) — Bamooa . Ortto— Geo. Hua- 
aey— Mneller A Meyers— Draper ' A Clayton. (On* 
to ML) j 

Mason City. 

CECIL (First Half)— 20tb Century Minstrels— 
Wolf A Brady. (One to nil.) 
. Macon. 

MACON (First Half) — Russell Slaters— La 
Zler— Lee A Bennett — Ralph Bayle A Co. (One 
to ML) (Last Halo— St. Jollans — Van Atta A 
Gersboo. (Three to fill.) 

Marsnantown. 

CASINO (Last Half)— Wolf A Brady— Will- 
lams A Calrer. (One to. ML) 

St. Cloud. 
HZKO (One day) — The Zlraa— Aerial Macks— 

Ferguson A Sunderland— 20th Century Minstrels. 
(One to all.) 

St PauL 

HIPPODROME (First Half)— Bamooa Ortis— 
Geo. Hossey — Mr. A Mrs. Harry Eldon— Mneller 
A Meyers — "AD Aboard." . (Last Half)— Wm. 
Schilling ft Co. — ChaDls ft Lambert— ElUot ft 
McGreeTy— La Malre ft Dawson— "All Aboard." 

INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT 

Austin. 

ATXBTLbT (First Half)— Tuaeano Broa. — Elklns, 

Faje ft Elklns— rive Antwerp Girls— Benaee ft 

Balrd— Bonur Miles A Co. — Whiting A Bart — 

Bice. Sully ft Scott. 

Atchison. 

ORPHXUM— Georgalla Trio— Harris A Bond — 
Fred Zobedle— The Tamer. 

Dallas. 

MAJESTIC — Lemur Trio— Joyce. West A Seen 
— James Thompson— Helen Lackaye-^Janet Adair 
A Adelphl — Ruby Cavelle. 

Ft- Worth. 

BTERS (First Half) — Howard Sisters — Sol- 
Unos — Bay L. Boyce — Adroit Bros. (Laat Half)— 
Harris A Negle — Evans Lloyd A Co. — Stein. 
Home A TBomas — Belle Monte Slaters. 

MAJESTIC .(Last Half)— Irwin ft Henry— 
Caltea Bros.— Sadie Fondeller— Maurice Bnrk- 
hart — Be Ho, Gray A Sommerrule. 

Galveston. 

G. 0. H. (First Half)— Swan ft Swan-^Jan 
Bublnl — H e 1 e n Bereaford — Dlaoe D* Aubrey — 
Perkins Pantomime — Seven Honey Boys — Rita, 
Mario A Co. 

Houston. 

MAJESTIC — Hcraa ft Preston — Fred ft Adele 
As talre— Eddie Carr ft Co.— Lillian HerUen— Vic- 
tor Morley ft Co. — Willing. Bentley ft Willing— 
Three' Stewart Sisters. 

Muskogee. 

BROADWAY (First Halfr^Sadle EondeUer — 
Caltea Bros.— Irwin ft Henry— New Producer— 
Maurice Burkhart— B« Ho, Gray ft Sommervtlle. 

Oklahoma City. 

LYRIC (First 'Half)— Bio ft Normen— Harris 
ft Nagle— Evans Lloyd ft Co.— Stein, Hume * 
Thomas— Belle Monte Sisters. (Laat Half) — 
Dancing Mara — Permalne — Leila Shaw — Roth ft 
Roberts — Prelles Circus. 

St. Joseph. 

. CRYSTAL (First Half)— Jack ft Kitty Lee— 
Klein Bros. — Edmunds. Dart* ft Co.— Henry A 
Usell— Anita Diss Monks. (Last Half) — Pup- 
peta — Mimic Four — Marconi Brothers. 

San Antonio. 

MAJESTIC (Laat Half)— Swan ft Swan— Jane 

Bublnle — Helen Beresford — Diane D'Aubrey — 

Perkins Pantomime — Seven Honey Boys— Rita 
Marlon Band. 



Topeka. 

NOVELTT (First Half)— Georgalla Trio— Har- 
ris ft Bond— Fred Zobedle — The Tamer. (Laat 
Half)— Jack ft Kitty Lee — Vlctorlo Trio— Ed- 
monds. Darts ft Co.— Klein Bros. — Anita Diss 
Monks. 

Tulsa. 

EMPRESS (First Half)— Dancing Mars— Fer- 
mslne. Both A Roberta — Prelles Circus. (Last 
Half) — EmIIle Willie Bros. — Flo ft Ollle Walters 
— Hal Stephens — Lorraine ft Dunn. 

Wichita. 

PRINCESS (First Half)— Flo ft Ollie Walters 
— Emllle Willie Broa. — Hal Stephens — Lorraine A 
Dunn. (last Half) — McConnell ft Austin— Tub 
McFarlaods— Majestic Four— Wright A Darts— 
Gordon Bros. 

Wichita Falls. 

WICHITA (One Day) — Sadie Fondeller — Caltea 
Bros.— Irwin ft Henry — "New Producer" — Mau- 
rice Burkhart— Be Ho, Gray ft Sommervllle. 



W. V. M. A. 



Alton. 

HIPPODROME (First Half)— Wm. O'Clsre ft 
Shamrock: Glrla. (Laat Half) — Shirley Sisters — 
Gorman Bros. 

Champaign. 

ORPHETJM (First Half) — "All Girl Berne" — 
Kate Watson. (laat Half) — Boo Hall— "What 
Happened to Huth" — Benny ft Woods — Diving 
Nymphs. (One to Fill.) 

Camp Hughes. 

CAMP HUGHES — La Vlra— Fields. Keene ft 
Wslab — McGee ft Kerry— Frank Stafford ft Co. 

Chicago. . 

wwrnrrg (First Half)— Erabe ft Alton— The 
Funny Sheet— Bita Gould— Alice Teddy. (Last 
Half) — Jack Larter — Imhoff. Conn ft Corene — 
Frank Bush. 

LINCOLN (First Half) — Darto ft Blalto — 
Agnes Kayne— Treats Seals— Joa. Browning— "Tha 
Femall Clerks." (Last Half)— Manning ft' Lee- 
Four 81lckers — Grace Cameron — Saroy'a Bull 
Doss. (One to F1U.) ' 

AMERICAN (First Half)— Anderson A Golues 

The Family— Bobbe ft Nelson — Imperial Troupe 

— Roser Dogs. (Last Half) — Darto A Rlalto— 

Kaufman Broa "The Femall Clerka" — Knapp ft 

Cornelia— John R. Gordon ft Co. 

WINDSOR -(First Half)— Morlarity 8Isters— Lew 
ft Mollle Hunting — Imhoff. Conn ft Corene — Fatri- 
eola— Jack Larter. (Last Half)— Fraternity Boys 
ft Girls. 

AVENUE (Ftrst Hslf) — Mcllyar A Hamilton — 
Vine A Temple — John R. Gordon ft Co. — O'Neal ft 
Gallagher — Kerslake's Pigs. (Last Half) — Frsncla 
A Holland— Baby 8ylrte— Ralph Counore— Beran ft 
Flint — "The Funny Sheet.'; 

WILSON (Flrrt Hslf)— Argo A Virglnls— Bslph 
Connors— Kan If man Bros. — Helsen Revue. (Last 
Hslf)— Lew FitrglbbODS— Lew A Mollle Hunting— 
Nell McKInley — Helsen Berne. 

' Cedar Rapids. 

MAJESTIC (First Hslf) — Wanda — Johnny Small 
A Small Slaters — Laverne A Dagmar — LeBoy ft Har- 
Tey — Fiddler A Shelton — ''Fashion Shop." (Laat 
Half)— Billy Swede Hall ft Co.— Misses Llgbtner 
A Alexander — Mile. Luzanne A Dancers. 

Decatur. 

EMPRESS (First Half) — Bell A Fredo— WUllng 
ft Jordan— Burke ft Burke— Knapp A Ourneua — 
The Dog Watch. (Last Halt) — "AU 'Olrl Berne" 
— Kate Watson. 

Davenport, 

COLUMBIA (Ftrst Half) — "The Vanity Fair." 
(Laat Half) — Nora & 81dney Kellogg— Gorton, 
Dvlraar A Pracer — "The Family" — Merlan'a Swiss 
Canines — Pat Barrett. 

Dnlnth. 

(First Half) — Transfleld Sisters — Spiegel ft Dunn 

Arthur Angel A Co. — Three Melrln Bros. (Last 

Hslf) — Sperry A Bae — Norton A Earl — Bert A 
Harry Gordon^Flre Florlmonds. 
- Dubuqne. 

MAJESTIC (First Hslf)— Princess Whltecloud — 
Tyler ft Crollner— Merisn's Dogs. (Last Half)— 
Johnny Small ft Small Sisters— Leroy ft Harrey— 
Rlggs A Ryan. 

East St. Louis. 

ERBEB'B (First Half)— Lillian Sisters — Gorman 
Bros.— Adler A Arllne — Hubert Dyer A Co. (Laat 
Half) — Tilford A Co. — Monarch Comedy Four — De 
Reno A Flores. 

Evansville. 
NEW GRAND (First Half)— Polxln Bros.— Ernie 
A Ernie — The Freshman — Parillo A Frablto — Law- 
rence Crane ft Co. (Last Half)— Faber ft Waters 

Maiie King A Co. — Patrlcola A Myers — Bennett 

Sisters— Wsrd A Curran. 

Ft, Dodge. 

PRINCESS (First Half) — Geo. A Lilly Garten — 
Bobt. Henry Hodge A Co.— Ash A Shaw — La Veen 
A Cross. (Last Half)— Bayle A Patsay— O'Neal 
A Gallagher— "The Edge ot the World." (One to 

FW> _.-. 

Ft William. 

(Laat Half)— Transfleld Slaters — Spiegel ft Dunn 
— Arthur Angel A Co.— Three Melrln Broa. 

Green Bay. 

ORPHEUM (Last Half) — Ray Snow — Bae. ft 
Wynn — Eight Black Dots. (One to Fill.) 

Hammond. 



.(Taftt Half) — La Vine A Inman — 
Fire Melrdr Maids — Godfrey A Henderson — 
Kerslake's Pigs. 

International Palls. 
TrmnsSelil Sisters — Snlexei A Dunn— Arthur Angel 
A Co.— three Melrtn Bros. 



Janesville 

MEW METERS (Laat Half)— Frank Colby ft Co. 
— Bowman A Vernon — Green A Pugb. (Two to 
Fill.) 

La Crosse, 

MAJESTIC (first Halt) — Parker A Butler — 
Bernertd Bros- — Cook * Stereos — Three Hlckey 
Broa. (Last Half)— Richard Wally A Co.— Cogh- 
lan. Avery A Otto — "A Musical Matinee." (Two 
to FI1L) 

Lincoln. 

LINCOLN (First Half)— Mimic Four. (One to 
FID.) (Laat Half)— Ash ft Shsw— Roysl Italian 
Sextette. 

Madison, 

ORPHEUM (First Half) — "The Blow Out." 
(Last Half)— Chaa. Howard A Co.— Olga Mlahka 
Trio— Kervllle Famnj— Wood'a Anlmala. (One to 
Fill.) 

Milwaukee. 

PALACE (First Hslf)— Darts ft Kitty— Bay 

Snow — Eight Black Dot* — Kervllle Family — Olga 
Mlahka Trio— Santos ft Hares. (Laat Half)— Font 
Roses — Petticoat Minstrels — Rita Gould— Joa. 
Browning— Treat's Seals. (One to Fill.) 

Michigan City. 

ORPHEUM— Darto A Rlalto — Hutchinson ft Sad- 
lier— Morlsrlty BIstera — "The Freshman." (One to 
Fni.) . 

Mason City. 
REOENT (First Half)— Bayle ft Patsay— Three 
Marconi Bros. (Last Half) — Lefflngwall A Gale — 
Darling Saxaphone Four. 

Minneapolis. 

NEW PALACE— Kremka Bros. — Parlalan Dan- 
cers — Clark A McCullough — Boss Bros. 

GRAND — WUllson A Sherwood — Mystic Hanson 
Trio — Kelly A G lav In — Stlckney'a Circus. 

Omaha. 

EXPRESS (First Heltt^-George Hamilton Green 
— Lefflngwell ft Gale — Royal Italian Sextette — 
Three Lordona. (Last Half)— Poabay ft White — 
Bobt. Henry Hodge ft Co. — Adele Jason. (One to 
FIU.) 

Oak Park. 

OAK PARK— Glass A Walmas— La Seals Sex- 
tette. 

Oskaloosa. 

ORIENT (First Half) — Smith A McGarry — Edna 
Dreon. (One to Fin.) (Last Half)— Fred A Al- 

lcco Vance — The Storys. (One to Fttl.> 

(Laat Half)— Great Westln— Chase ft La Tour— 
"Darn Good ft Funny" — Roberta. Stuart A Roberts. 

Sockford. 

SEW' PALACE (First Half)— Nora ft Sidney 
Kellogg — Bevan A Flint— Caas. Howard A Co. — 
Lou Hoots — Mile. Luxane A Dancers. (Last Hslf) 
— "The Blow Out." 

Rochester, Minn. - 

METROPOLITAN (laat Half) — Parker 'A. Butler 
— Bernevicl Bros. — Cook A Stevens — Three Hlckey 
Broa. (One to Fill.) 

Superior. 

PEOPLES (First Hslf)— Turner ft Grace — 
Draper ft Clayton— Cogblan. Aver; ft Otto. (Last 

Half)— Gedmln ft Co.— Cortose Trio. (One to Fill.) 

Sioux Falls. 

ORPHEUM, (First Half) — Adele Jason — Powder 
A Capman — "The Edge of the World." (One to 
Fill.) (Lsst Half)— Stanley A La Brack— Mile. 
CorUta ft Howland— Jaa. F. McDonald. (One to 
FH1.) 

Saskatoon. 

(First Hslf) — Gnat Westln — Cbaee A La Tour — 
"Dam Good A Funny" — Stnart. Roberts A Stuart. 
South Chicago. 

(First Half)— Frank Palmer— Messer Slaters- 
La Vine A Inman — Earl A Edwards — Five Melody 
Maids. (Last Half) — Morlatry Sletera — Harry Gil- 
bert — Five Armentos. 

St. PauL 

(First Half) — Sperry A Rae — Norton A Itae — 
Bert' A Harry Gordon — Five Florlmonds. (Last 
Half) — Carls A Kitty — La Verne A Dagmer— Tyler 
A. Crollus — Gordon Highlanders. 

St Louis. 

EMPRESS (First Hslf) — De Beno A Flore* — 
Mse Curtis — Tilford A Co. — Monarch Comedy Four 
— Five Muslkale Girls. (Last Hslf] — Wartenborg 
Bros.— Lillian Sisters — "The Bight Msu"— Ed. 
Morton— "The Dog Wstch." 

St. Louis. 

GRAND Msbony A Rogers — Green. McIIenry ft 

Dcsn — Geo. Fisher A Co. — "Earl A The Glrla" — 
Paul Pedrinl — Grace Gibson — Rambler Slaters A 

rinaud. 

South Bend. 

ORPHEUM (First Half)— "The Naughty Prin- 
cess." (Last Hslf) — Anderson A Golnea— Grspe- 
wln A Chance— Bison City Four— Alice Teddy. 
(One to FIU.) 

Springfield. 

MAJESTIC (First Half) — Wartenbure Bro*. — 
Shirley Sisters — "Wbst Usppeoed to Bnth" — Fay. 
Two Coleya A Fay — Grsot Gartner — Vera Sabloa 
A Co. (Last Hslf)— Cook A Botbert— Willing A 
Jordan — Burke A Burke — Sliver A Duvall— La 
Gracloaa — Al Sharer. 

Sioux City. 

ORPHEUM (First Half) — Edna Brotbera A Co. 
— Plsano A Bingham— Nerlns A Erwood — Carletta 
A Howland — "Edge of the World." tl.a«t Half) 
— Dawne Jnn«> — Wlltoo SIsterr— Bowman Broa.— 
Ameta — Rawron A Claire. 

Terre Haute. 

NEW HIPPODROME (First Half)— Ward A Cm- 
ran— Faber A Waters— Marie King A Co. — Frlen.1 

A Downing — Tfcre^ Bennett Blateva. <La*t Half) — 

I'olrle Bros.— Ernie A Ernie— "The Freshman"- - 
Grant Gardner — lawience Crane A Co. 



Virginia. 

BOTAL (First Half)— Gedmln ft Co.— Cortoas 
Trio. (Last Hslf) — Turner A Grace. (One to 
Fill.) 

Waterloo. 

MAJESTIC (First Half) — Dawne Jam- — Wlltoo 
Sisters — Ravrsoo A CIsire — Bowman Broa. — Ameta. 
(Last Hslf)— Geo. ft Lily Gsrden— Lou Holts— 
Thos. P. Jscksc.n A Co.— Fiddler A Shelton — "The 
fashion Shop." 



PANTAGES CIRCUIT 

Calgary. 

PANTAOES— "Mr. Inquisitive"— Three Keatuua 
— Isetta— Burke A Broderlck— Bucket A Winifred. 

Denver. 

PANTAOES— "Midnight FolUes"— Four Haley 
Slaters — Wm. DeBollU ft Co.— Sllber ft North- 
George N. Brown A Co. 

Edmonton. 

PANTAOES— "Hell Blngera"— Betting Bettys— 
Smith A Kaufman — Slgabrv'e Doga^ — Olive Ilrlnr»e. 

Great Falls. 

PANTAOES (Oct. 17-18)— Resists ft Co.— George 
Primrose Minstrels — Gllroy, Uaynra ft Mont — Leo 
A Mae Jackson — Weber A Elliott. 

Kansas City. 

EMPRESS— "The Elopers"— laaat A Dads— WW 
Morris — Dickinson A Deagon — Flo Bayfield— Bob 
Albright. 

Los Angeles. 

PANTAOES— Plrnlkorf Rose Troupe— Clark's 
Royal Hawallsns — Lucler Trio — Carclnettl Bros. — 
Holmes A WeUs— Beanmonte A Arnold. 

Ogden. 

PANTAOES— "Brides of (be Desert"— Ed Bin n- 
dell & Co. — Cameron A O'Connor — Greene A Parker 
— Models De Lose. 

Oakland. 

PANTAOES— Society Buds— Welch, Nealey A 
Mont — Creole Bagtlme Band— Kartelll— Clamlla 

Coleman. 

Portland. 

PANTAOES — Long Tark Sam— Eva Slilrb-j — 
Keuo A Green — Gaylort A Lam-ton— Wills. Gill ert 
A Co. 

San Diego. 

PANTAOES— "That's My Uorse"— 1.. Audrrsou 
Players — Vun Cello— Matey A Woods— lleorac Mor- 
ton — Alice Hamilton. 

Salt Lake City. 

PANTAOES — Six Klrksmltb Slstrrs — Parla (irreu 
— Brooks A Bowen — '.'Dlvprce question"— Krvi-msu 
A Dunham — Black A White. 

Seattle. 

PANTAOES— "Oh. the Women" — Warren A 
Tenipleton — Jl:e Quong Tal— Ollle A Johnnie Vsuls 
— James Gratly A Co. 

Spokane. 

PANTAOES— tlorllck Bsllet— Sastuecl— llo.vanl 
A Fields Minstrels — Uerry A Wolfnrd— Frear. Ku- 
get» A Freer — Elsie White. 

Sad Fran:irco. 

PANTAOES — Junior vsaEan — "The Heart «' a 
Man"— Iti-ruaril A Trace)— Will A Kemp— lln.iu- 
lug A |fc-i,n. 

Tacoma. 

PANTAOES— RIgotfttn r.rus.— Nestcr A Uw.-rt- 

hearls — Gn-nt l-ester — Tlires- llarto* — Crawford A 
Broderlck — James Gorton. 

Vancouver. 

PANTAGES — "A Nut Sundae"— Valentine Vox 
Mmm Van A Hymau— Clifford A Slack— Three 

Mori Bmw. 

Victoria. 

PANTAOES — Hertiert Lloyil A Co. -Four Renee* 
— Cbloko — Minnie Ksufmsn— Wsrd A Faye— Neal 
Abel— Raggalnl A Vegllettl. 

Winnipeg. 

rpANTAOEal — Harrteen— John T. Ihiyle * Cu. — 
Howard A Rose — Joe Whitehead— Osakl Jap" — 
Wood. Melville A P. 



<w t%m& 




Week Oct 16, Return Engigement 

At KEITH'S, Philadelphia 

Booked till June. 1917 

Quality Is Apfsraciataal 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 



DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

Routs* Mint Roach This Office Not Later 
Thus Saturday 

AngUn, Margaret (Chaa. Frohman. Inc., 

mgrs.) — Empire, New York, lndef. 
Abarbaoell, Una (John Cort, mgr.) — Casino, 

New York, Indef. 
Arllsa, Geo. (Klaw 4c Erlanger A Geo. C. 

Trier, mgr*,) — Criterion, New York, lndef. 
Adams, Maude (Chaa. Frobman, Inc., mgrs.) 

New Cattle. PL. 11 : Canton. O, 12 : Zanes- 

ville, 18 ; Psrkersburg, W. Vs.. 14. 
Allan, Maud — Forty-fourth Street; New York. 

16-20 (mats.) 
"Anna and the Girl" (Win. Harris, Jr.. mgr.) 

—Fulton, New York, tadef. 
"An Old Sweetheart of Mine" — Indianapolis, 

9-14; Logansport, 16. 

-JJiJIiiJ at Last" (The Shnberts, nigra, ) — 

Illinois, Chicago, 13, lndef. 
Bernhardt, Sarah — Montreal. Can.. 9-14. 
Boston National Opera Co. — Indianapolis, 13- 

"Boomerang. The" (David Belasco, mgr.)— 

Belaaco, New York. __ 

"Big Show, The" (Chaa. B. D ill ingha m , mgr.) 
-Hipp.. New York, lndef. 
ck Ffie" 





. ngr. 
Thirty-ninth Street, New York, lndef. 



"Back 



Lawrence, mgr.) — 



(Walter N. 
1 Ne.. 

(The Shnberts. mgra.) 



"Bine Paradise, The" 
— Chicago, lndef. 

"Blue Paradise, The"— Majestic Brooklyn, 
9-14. 

"Bringing Up Father In Politics" (Griff Will- 
iams, mgr. ) — Fottstown, Fa., 11 ; Lebanon, 
12 ; Lancaster, 18. 

"Black Feather" — Gnerph. Can.. 11: Bt 
Marys. 12; Chatham. 18. . 

Collier, Wm. (H. H. Frasee, mgr.) — Long- 
acre. New York, lndef. 

Clifford. Billy "Single" — Charleston. S. C, 
1B; Savannah, Ga.. 14; Aiken. S. C, IS; 
Abbeville. IT ; Anderson, 19 ; Piedmont, 20 ; 
Greenville. St. . . . _ _ _ __. 

"Cheating Cbeaters" (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — 
Bltlnge, New York, lndef. - 

"Cohan Revue of 1916" (Cohan A Harris, 
mgra.) — G. O. H-, Cincinnati. 6-14. 

"Common Clay," with John Mason (A. H. 
Woods, mgr.) — Olympic. Chicago, lndef. 

"Common Clay," with Jane Cowl (A. H. 
Woods, mgr.) — Sbubert, BUya, 9-14 ; Gar- 
rick, Pblla.. 16-Nor. 4. 

"Cinderella Man, The" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) 
—Buffalo. N. Y, 0-14; Sbubert, Bklyn., 
19-21. 

Dlcrlchateln, Leo (Cohan A Harris, nigra.) — 
Grand, Chicago, lndef. . 

DUgblletTs Ballet Basse — Manhattan O. H., 
New York, 16. lndef. ,„ 

Drew, John (John D. Williams, mgr.) — 
Hartford, Conn., IM». , 

Elnnge, jnllan (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — Mil- 
waukee, 8-14; St. Louis. Mo., 15-21. 

"Everywoman" (Henry W. Savage, mgr.)— 
London. Can.. 11 : St Thomas, 12 : Strat- 
ford, 13; Branford, 14; Gait, 16; Hamil- 
ton. 17-18: Barrie. 10; North Bay. 20: 
Sudbury, 21. _ . 

"Experience" (Elliott. Comatnek -A- Gest 
mgrs.)— Adelpbis, Phils., lndef. 

"Experience" (Elliott Com stock A Gest 
mgrs.) — Grand Rapids, Mich.. 16-28. 

Fields, Lew — Hartford, Conn., 19. _ _ 

Flake, Mrs. (Corey A Biter, mgrs.)— Buffalo, 
N. Y, 9-14 ; Hartford, Conn., 20-21. 

Ferguson, Elsie (Klaw A Erlanger. mgrs.) — 
Atlantic City. 9-11. _ 

"Fair and Warmer" (Selwyn A Co., mgrs.)— 
Ford's, Baltimore, 9-14 ; Washington, D. C, 

16-23. 

"Fair and Warmer" (Selwyn A Co, mgra.)— 

Cort, Chicago, lndef. 
"Flame, The" (Richard Walton. Tully. mgr.) 

— Forty-fourth 8treet New York, 9, lndef. 
"Fear Market The"— Bronx O. H., New 

York, 9-14; Majestic, Bklyn, 16-21. 
"Famous Bostonlana" (B. Lang, mgr.) — 

Fernle, B. C, Can., 9-14. 
Graham. Oscar — Strawn, Tex.. 11 : Whitney. 

12 ; HiUiboro, 13 ; CooUdge, 14 ; McGregor, 

16: Goldthwaite, IT; Lometa, 18; Burnett, 
19 : Marble Falls, 20 : Llano, 21. 

"Girl From Brazil, The" (The 8huberts, 
mgrs.)— Shubert, New York, radef. . 

"Good Gracious Annabelle" (Arthur Hopkins, 
mgr.) — Park Sq„ Boston, 9, indef. 

"Go To It" (Bay F. Comstock, mgr.) — Al- 
bany. N. Y., 12-14. 

"Girl Without a Chance," Eastern Co. (Rob- 
ert Sherman, mgr.) — Ashland. O.. 11; 
Wadawortb. 12; Chicago Jet. 14: Paine* 

■ville, 16 ; Sharon. 18 : Greenville, 19 ; Mer- 
cer. 20; Beaver Falls, Pa., 21. 

"Girl Without a Chance," Western Co. (Rob- 
ert Sherman, mgr.) — Blair. Neb., 11: 
Waboo, 12; Lincoln, 18-14; Grand Island. 
IS ; Kearney, 16 ; North Platte, IT ; Lex- 
ington. 18; Casad, 19; McCook, 20; Nor- 
ton, 21. 

Hodge, Wm. (The Shnberts, mgrs.) — Marine 
Elliott, New York, lndef. __ . -. 

Holmes, Taylor— Aitor. New York, lndef. 

Hitchcock. Raymond — Globe, New York, lndel. 
"His Bridal Night" (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — 

Republic. New York, 9-21. 
"Hush" (Wlnthrop Ames, mgr.) — Little. New 

York, lndef. ._ . . _ _. 

"HIt-the-Trail HoUlday" (Cohan A Harris, 

mgrs.) — Springfield, Mass., 12-14. 
"House of Glass" (Cohan A Harris, mgrs.) — 

Garrick, Phlla., 9-14; Ford's, Baltimore, 

1A-21 
"Hobson's Choice"— Standard. New York, 9- 

"Her Soldier Boy" (The Shttberta, mgra.)— 
Lyric, Phlla, 9-14. _ _ 

"Hip. Hip Hooray" — Metropolitan O. H.. 
Phlla, 14-Not. lL 

"Intruders, The" (Cohan A Harris, mgrs,)— 
Cohan A Harris, New York, lndef. 

"Ikey and Abey" (Geo. H. Bnbb. mgr.) — 



Spring Valley, Minn, 11; Preston, 12; 
Lanesboro, 13; Grand Meadow, 14: Dexter, 
15; Rushford, 16: VIroo.ua, 17; Necedah. 
18; NelUsrUle, 19; Whitehall, 20; Fair- 
child, 21. 

"Justice" (Corey A Biter, mgra.) — Montana, 
Bklyn., 9-14; Powers', Chicago, 16-Nor. 11. 

"Just a Woman" — Newark, N. J, 9-14; 
Standard, New York. 16-21. 

"Katinka" (Arthur Hammersteln, mgr.) — 
Springfield, Mass, 20-21. 

"King-Pin''— Hartford, Conn., 11-12. 

Lou-Tellegen — Academy, Baltimore, 9-14. 

Le Roy, Talma, Bosco— Rochester, N. Y, 12- 

"Le Polln"— New Garrick, New York, 9-14. 
Maude, Cyril— Montreal, Can, 16-21. 
Murdock, Ann (Chaa. Frobman, Inc., mgra.) 

— Powers', Chicago, 9-14. 
Mltal (Henry W. Savage, mgr.) — Illinois, 

Chicago. 9-14 ; Milwaukee. Wis, 15-21. 
Montgomery A stone (Cbas. Dillingham, 

mgr.) — Nixon, Pittsburgh, 9-14. 
"Man Who Came Back' 7 (Wm. A. Brady, 

mgr.) — Playhouse. New York, indef. ■ 
"Miss Springtime" (Klaw A. Erlanger. mgra.) 

— New Amsterdam, New York, lndef. 
"Montana" (Bants ton A Morris, mgra.) — 

Beaver City, Neb., 11: Wllsonville, 12; 

Orleans, 13 : Woodruff, Kan, 14; Norcatnr. 

16; Oberiln, 17; Norton, 18; Seldon, 1»: 

Jennings, 20; Kensington, 21. 
"Merry Wives of Windsor" (Sylvio Heln, 

mgr.) — Hamilton, Kan., 16-18. 
"Mary Broome" — Little, Chicago, 17, indef. 
"My Home Town Girl" — Auditorium, Chicago, 

9, lndef. 
"Natural Lew, The," Western Co, United 

Prod. Co.'s (Merle H, Norton, gen, mgr.) — 
Waupnn. wis., 11 ; Princeton, 12 ; Rlpon, 13 ; 

Oehkosb, 14; Appleton, IB; Green Bay, 

16 ; Shawano, IT ; CUntonvllIe, 18 ; Neenab, 

19: Anttgo, 20: New London, 21. 
Olcott, Cbauncey, mgr. — Academy, Baltimore, 

16-21. 
"Only Girl, The" (Joe Weber, mgr.)— Alrln, 

Pittsburgh, 9-14. 
"Other- Man's Wife, The," Eastern, Lambert 

Prod. Co.'s (Lem Edwards, mgr.) — Coshoc- 
ton, O, 11; E. Liverpool, 12; Greenville, 

Pa, 18; PalnesvOle, O, 14; Salem, 16; 
New Castle, Pa, 17: New Castle. 17: Mer- 
cer. 18; OU City, 19; Salamanca, N. Y, 
20; Ashtabula, 0„ 21. 

Patten, W. B. (Frank B. Smith, mgr.) — Bel- 
mond. la.. 11 ; ClarkavUle, 12 ; Eldora, IS ; 
Iowa Falls, 14; Newton, 18; Story City, 
IT; Webster City. 18; Humboldt 19; Eagle 
Grove, 20; Fonda, 21. 

"Passing Show of 1916'— Winter Garden. 
NewYora, Indef. 

"Pierrot the Prodigal" (Wlnthrop Ames and 
Walter Knight, mgra.) — Booth, New York, 
lndef. 

"Pollysnna" (Klaw A Erlanger A Geo. C. 
Tyler, mgra.) — Hudson, New York, lndef. 

"Potash A Perlmntter In Society" (A. H. 
Woods, mgr.)— Tremont Boston, 9-21. 

"Princess Pat The" — Garack, Chicago, lndef. 

"Pair of 811k Stockings"— Lyric, Cincinnati, 
O, 8-14; Indianapolis, Ind., 16-18. 

"Peck's Bad Boy"— Brodbead, 111., 11; Mon- 
roe, wis.. 12; Argyle, 18; Darlington, 14; 
Plattvllle, 16; Lancaster, 17; Fennlmore, 
18; Prairie dn Chlen, 19; Claremont, la, 
20: McGregor. 21. 

"Prince of Pilsen" — Hartford, Conn, 13-14. 

"Pair of Queens" — Hamilton, Can., 13-14. 

Ross, Thos. W. A Maclyn Arbuckle — Black- 
stone, Chicago, lndef. 

Robson. May — Auburn. N. Y, 11; Glovera- 
vllle. 13; Schenectady, 14. 

"Rich Man, Poor Man" (George Broadhurst 
mgr.) — Forty -eighth Street lndef. 

"Bio Grande" (Cbaa. Frobman. Inc.. mgrs.) — 
Hollls, Boston, 19-14; Montauk, Bklyn, 16- 
21. 

"Robinsoa Crusoe Jr." — Belaaco, Washing- 
ton, 9-14. 

Sanderaon-Brlan-Cawtbora Co. (Cbaa. Frob- 
man, Inc., mgra.) — Forrest, Phlla., 9-28. 

Skinner, Otis (Cbas. Frobman, Inc., mgrs.) — 
Lyceum, New York, lndet 

"Seven Chances" (David Belasco, mgr.) — 
Cohan's, New York, 9-21 : Belasco, New 
York, 23. lndef. 

"So Long Letty" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) — 
Shubert. Boston, 9, lndef. . 

"Silent Witness. The" (H. H. Frasee, mgr.) 
— Plymouth, Boston. 8-S0. 

"Silas Green from New Orleans" (Prof. E. 
Williams, mgr.) — Fry lea Point Miss, 11; 
Sumner, 12; Philllpp, 13; Moorehead, 14; 
Greenville, 16; Itta Bens, IT; Indlanola, 
18. 

"Bunny South" (J. C. Rockwell, mgr.) — Can- 
ton. Pa, 11 ; Jersey Shore, 12 ; Milton, 13 ; 
Sunbnry, 14: Mt Carmcl, 16; Shamoktn, 
IT; Shenandoah, 18; Tower City, 19; 
Tremont 21. 

"Serenade. The" (Walker A Stevens, mgra.) — 

Lexington, Ky, 11-12: Huntington, W. 

Va, 18; Charleston, 14; Bluefleld, 16; 

Roanoke, 17; Raleigh, 18-19: Goldaboro. 

N. C, 20; Durham, 21. 
"Step Lively"— Clearfield. Pa, 11: St 

Marys, 12 ; Emporium, 13 ; Corev. 14. 
Tempest Maine — Broad, Phlla, 9-14. 
"Turn to the Right" (Smith A Golden, mgrs.) 

—Gaiety. New York, lndef. 
"Twin Beds" (A. 8. Stern A Co, mgra.) — 

Lindsay. Out, Can, 11; Barrie. 12; North 

Bay. 13; Sudbury, 14: Ft William. 16- 

18; International Falls, Minn, 19; Vir- 
ginia. 20; Superior. Wis. 21. 
"Upstairs and Down" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) 

— Cort, New York, Indef. 
"Under Sentence" (Selwyn A Co, mgrs.) — 

Harris. New York, lndef. 
TJnchaatened Woman, The" (Oliver Morosco, 

mgr.) — Princess. Chicago, indef. 



"Uncle Tom's Cabin," Kibble's — Columbus, 
Ind, 11; Seymore, 12; Washington, 13; 
Vlncennea, 14; West Baden, 16:' Bedford, 
16; Bloomlngton, 17; Terre Haute, 18; 
Brazil, 19 ; Paris, 111, 20 ; Msttoon, 21. 

"Very Good, Eddie'' (Marbury, Comstock Co, 
mgra.) — Princess, New York, 9-14. 

"Very Good, Eddie" (Marbury, Comstock Co, 
mgrs.) — Wilbur, Boston, lndef. 

Washington Sq. Players — Comedy, New York, 
indef. 

Warfleld, David (David Belasco, mgr.) — 
Knickerbocker, New York, 10, lndef. 

Wilson, Al H. (Sidney R. Ellis, mgr.) — Mar- 
shall, Tex., 11 ; • Sulphur Springs, 12 ; 
Greenville, 13: Sherman, 14; Wichita 
Falls, 16 ; Ft Worth. 17-18 ; Dallas, 19-21. 

"Where the Booster Crows" (Rush A An- 
drews, mgrs.) — Fine Arts, Chicago, 9, lndet 

"World of Pleasure" — Cort, San Francisco, 
8-14. 

"When Dreams Come True" (Courts A Tenuis, 
mgra.) — Campbellton, Can., 11; Quebec, 12- 
14; Sherbrooke, 16; Brockvllle, 17; Ot- 
tawa, 18; Pembroke, 19; Renfrew, 20; 
Kingston, 21. 

"Zlegfeld's Follies"— Colonial, Boston, lndef. 

INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT. 

Blaney, Harry Clay — Bronx, New York, 9-14; 
Lyric, Bridgeport, Conn., 16-21. 

Bover, Nancy (Will J. Donnelly, mgr.) — 
G. O. H, Atlanta, Ga, 9-14; Bijou, Rich- 
mond. Va, 16-21. 

"Bringing Dp Father In Politics" (Chaa. H. 
Yale, mgr. ) — Auditorium, Baltimore, 9-14 ; 
Walnut Phlla, 16-21. 

"Broadway After Dark" (Halton Powell, 
mgr.) — Crescent, New Orleans, 9-14 : Bijou, 

Birmingham, Ala., 16-21. 
"Daughter of Mother Machree" — G. O. H, 

Bklyn, 9-14; Bronx, New York, 16-21. 
Bllnore, Kate (Williams A Hill, mgrs.) — 

National, Chicago, 9-14; American, St. 

Louis, 16-21. 
Emmett Oracle — Majestic. Jersey City, N. J, 

16-21. 

"Eternal Magdalene, The" (Lee Harrison, 
mgr.) — Orpneum, Phlla., 9-14; Knicker- 
bocker. Phlla, 16-21. 

Fox A Stewart (J. Goldenberg, mgr.) — BIJou, 
Birmingham, Ala, 9-14 ; G. O. H, Atlanta, 
Ga, 16-21. 

"For the Man She Loved" (Wm. Woods, mgr.) 
— Broadway, Camden, N. J, 9-14 ; Orpneum, 
Phlla, 16-21. 

"Girl Without a Chance, The" (Robt Sher- 
man, mgr.) — Poll's Washington, 9-14 ; 
Auditorium, Baltimore, 16-21. 

"Girl He Couldn't Buy, The" (Arthur C. 
Alston, mgr.) — Lyceum. Peterson, N. J, 9- 
14; Orpheum, Newark, 16-21. 

"Heart of Dixie" (Robert Campbell, mgr.) — 
Majestic, Bofalo, N. Y, 9-14; Lycenm, 
Pittsburgh, 16-21. 

"How Heart and Homes Are Broken" — Grand, 
Worcester, Mass- 9-14; wilting O. H, 
Syracuse. N. Y, 16-18; Colonial, TJtlce, 

"His Other Wife" (Vaughan Glaser, mgr.)— 

Boyd's O. H, Omaha, 9-14; Imperial, 

Chicago, 16-21. 
"Hour of Temptation" (Schiller A Wets, 

mgrs.) — Castle Sq, Boston, 9-14: Grand, 

Worcester, 16-21. 
"Little Girl in a Big City" (Arthur Alston. 

mgr.) — Lyceum. Detroit 9-14; National. 

Chicago, 16-21. 
"Little Lost Sister"— Gaiety, Louisville, B- 

14; BIJou, Nashville, Term, 16-21. 
"Little Peggy O'Hoore" (Halton Powell. 

mgr.) — Nixon, Atlantic City, 9-11; Trent 

Trenton, 12-14 ; Broadway, Camden. 16-21. 
"Little Girl God Forgot The" (J. Bernero, 

mgr.) — BIJou. Nashville, Tenn, 9-14 : Lyric 

Memphis, 16-21. 
"My Mother's Rosary" (Ed. Rowland, mgr.) — 

Lyric, Memphis, Tenn, 9-14; Crescent 
New Orleans, La, 16-21. 

"Madame Spy" — G. O. H, WHkea-Barre, Pa, 
9-11; Academy, Scranton, 12-14. 

"Mutt and Jeff's Wedding 7 ' (Joe Pettengill, 
mgr.) — Lycenm, Pittsburgh, 9-14; G. O. H, 
Youngstown, 16-21. 

"Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl, The" — 
Park, Indianapolis, 9-14; Gaiety, Louis- 
ville, 16-21. 

"Major Peg" — Prospect, Cleveland, O, 9-14 ; 
Palace. Toledo, 16-21. 

"Natural Law, The" (Geo. Goett mgr.) — 
Walnut Phlla, 9-14 : Nixon, Atlantic City, 
N. J, 16-18; Trent Trenton, 19-21. 

"Old Homestead, The" (8. Z. Poll, mgr.) — 
Garden, Kansas City, 9-14; Boyd's O. H, 
Omaha. 16-21. 

"Other Woman, The" — Orpheum, Newark, 
N. J, 9-14 ; G. O. H, Bklyn., 16-21. 

"Peg o' My Heart" — Majestic. Jersey City, 
9-14: Lyceum, Peterson. 16-21. 

"Penalty of Sin" — G. O. H„ Youngstown, O, 

9-14 ; Prospect, Cleveland, 16-21. 

"Rolling Stones" (Clark Ross, mgr.) — Modern. 

Providence, 9-14 ; Castle 8q„ Boston, 16-21. 
Thurston, Howard (Geo. H. Nlcolal, mgr.) — 

Palace, Toledo, O, 9-14; Lyceum, Detroit 

16-21. 
"Texas" (Jake Lieberman, mgr.) — Lyric. 

Bridgeport Conn, 9-14; Modern, Provi- 
dence, 16-21. 
Joe Welch (M. Jacobs, mgr.) — Colonial. 

Dtiea, N. Y, 12-14; Majestic, Buffalo, 16- 

21. 
"While the City Sleeps" (Edwin Clifford, 

mgr.) — Bijou, Richmond. Vs., 9-14; Poll's, 

Washington, 16-21. 
"Woman He Married, The" (Max Spiegel, 

mgr.) — Imperial. Chicago, 9-14; Park, In- 
dianapolis, 16-21. 
"Which One Shall I Marry 1" (J. J. Howard. 

mgr.) — American, St Loula, 9-14: Garden, 

Kansas City, 16-21. 



BURLESQUE 

Columbia Whewl 

AL Reeves' Big Beauty Show — Palace, Balti- 
more, Oct 9-14 ; Gaiety, Washington, 16-21. 

Behman Show— Jacques, Waterbury, Conn., 
Oct 9-14 ; Cohen's, Newburgh, N. Y, 10-18 ; 
Cohen's Ponghkeepsie, 19-21. 

Ben Welch's — Empire, Toledo, O, 9-14 ; Lyric, 
Dayton, O, 16-21. 

Bon Tons — Lyric. Dayton, O, 9-14: Olympic, 
Cincinnati, 16-21. 

Bostonlans — Open 9-14; Gaiety, T»n.«. city, 
Mo„ 16-21. 

Bowery Burleaquera — Casino, Philadelphia, 
Pa, 9-14; Hnrtlg A Seaman, New York. 

Burlesque Review — Bronx, New York, 9-14; 
Empire, Brooklyn, 16-21. 

Follies of the Day— Bas table, Syracuse, N. Y, 
9-11 ; Lumbers, TJtica, 12-14 ; Gaiety. Mon- 
treal. Can, 16-21. 

Globe Trotters — Newburgh, N. Y„ and Pough- 
keepsle, N. Y, 9-14; Bronx, New York, 

Golden Crooks — Columbia. Chicago, 9-14 ; Ber- 

chel, Des Moines, la, 16-18. 
Hastings' Show — Empire, Albany, 9-14; Boa- 
ton, 10-21. 
Hello, New York — Empire, Hoboken, N. J., 

9-14; Peoples, Philadelphia, 16-21. 
Hlp-Hln-Hoorsy Girls — Gaiety. Kansas City. 

9-14 ; Gaiety, St Louis, 16-21. 
Howe's Kissing Girls — Gaiety, Buffalo, N. Y, 

9-14 ; Corinthian, Rochester. N. Y, 16-21. 
Irwin's Big Shaw — Casino, Brooklyn, 9-14; 

Empire, Newark, N, J, 16-21. 
Liberty Girls — Berchel, Des Moines, . la, 8- 

11 : Gaiety. Omaha, Neb, 16-21. 
Maids of America — Colonial, Providence, 9- 

14; Boston, 16-21. 
Majesties— Columbia, New York, 9-14 ; Casino. 

Brooklyn, 16-21. 
Marion's Big Show — Gaiety, Detroit Mich.. 

9-14 ; Gaiety, Toronto, 16-21. 
Merry Rounders — Grand, Hartford, 9-14; 

Jacques, Waterbury, Conn, 16-21. 
Midnight Maidens — Gaiety, Washington, 9-14 ; 

Gaiety, Pittsburgh, 16-21. 
Million Dollar Dolls— H. A 8, New York, 9- 

14; Orpheum, Peterson, 16-21. 
MoUle Williams' Show — Gaiety, Boston, 9-14 ; 

Columbia. New York. 16-21. 
New York Girls — Gaiety, 8t Louis, 9-14; 

Chicago, 16-21. 
Puss Puss— star, Cleveland, 9-14; Empire. 

Toledo, O, 16-2L 

Rag Doll in Bagland — Casino. Boston, 9-14; 
Grand, Hartford, Conn., 16-21. 

Rowland Girls — Gaiety, Montreal, Can., 9-14 ; 
Empire, Albany, N. Y, 16-21, 

Rose Sydell London Belles— Olympic. Cincin- 
nati, O, 9-14 ; Chicago, 16-21. 

Biuman'8 Show — Peoples, Philadelphia, Pa, 9- 
14 ; Palace, Baltimore, 16-21. 

Sightseers— Gaiety, Pittsburgh, Pa, 9-14; 
Star, Cleveland, O, 16-21. 

Some Show— Gaiety, Toronto, Out, 9-14; 
Gaiety, Buffalo, N. Y, 16-21. 

Spiegel's Revue— Park, Bridgeport, Conn., 12- 
14; Colonial, Providence, R. I, 16-21, 

Sporting Widows— Empire, Newark, N. J, 9- 
14 ; Casino, Philadelphia, 16-21. 

Star and Garter— Corinthian, Rochester, N. Y„ 
9-14 ; Bistable, Syracuse, N. Y, 16-18 ; Lorn- 
berg, TJtica, 19-21 

Step Lively Glrlg^CWcago, ID., 9-14; Gaiety, 

Twentieth Century Maids — Orpheum, Pater- 
son, N. : J., 0.J.4 ; Empire, Hoboken, N. J, 

Watson's Beet Trust — Gaiety, Omaha, Neb, 
.9-14: open, 16-21; Gaiety, Kansas City, 
23-28. 

Watson A Wrotbe — Empire, Brooklyn, 9-14; 
Park, Bridgeport Conn, 19-21. 



Bal's Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 

» Inch. .J17JS I 34 inch. 

31 men. 1AM 3* huh. 

i« huh. is.ee m loch. 

42 inch 



WILLIAM B AL COMPANY 

145 W. 4Stfa St, N. Y. 4 W. 22d St, N. Y. 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

Mall Ordsra FOUd Sams Day Wsceiiad 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



American Circuit 

Americana — Gaiety, Philadelphia, Pa., 9-14: 

Camden, N. J., 16-18; Trenton, N. J., 19-21. 
Auto Olrla— Standard, St. Louis, Mo.. 9-14; 

Terre Hants, Ind., 16-18; Lafayette, 19; 

South Bend, 20 ; Gary, 21. 
Beauty, Youth and Folly — Buckingham, Louis- 
ville, Ky., 9-14; Lyceum, Columbus, O., 

16-21. 
Bis Beriew of 1917 — Century, Kansas City, 

Mo., 9-14 ; Standard, St. Lonla, 16-21. 
Broadway Belles — Erie, Pa., 9-10: Ashtabula. 

O., 11; Park, Yonngstown, 12-14; Penn 

Circuit. 16-21. 
Cabaret GlrlB — Canton, o., 11: Akron, O.. 12- 

14; Empire, Cleveland, 0., 16-21. 
Charming Widows — Gaiety, Chicago, in., 9- 

14 ; Majestic Indianapolis, 16-21. 
Cherry Blossoms— Gaiety, Bt Paul, Minn., 9- 

14; Duluth, IS; St. Cloud, 10; Maukato, 

17: Waterloo. 'la., 18; Marshalltown, 19; 

Cedar Rapids, 20; Ottumwa, 21.. 
Darlings- of Paris— Howard, Boston, 9-14; 

New Bedford, Mass., 16-18; Worcester, 

19-21. . 

Follies of Pleasure— -Lyceum, Columbus, O., 

?"i 4: ?»°esrille, O., 17; Canton, 18; 

Akron, 19-21. 
French Frolics — Empire, Cleveland, O., 9-14; 

Erie, Pa., 16-17 : Ashtabula, O., 18 ; Park, 

Yonngstown, 19-21. 
Frolics of 1916 — New Bedford, Mass., 9-11; 

Worcester, Mass., 12-14 ; Garden, Mass.. 16 ; 

Greenfield. 17 ; Amsterdam, N. Y., 18 ; Hud- 
son, Schenectady. 19-21. 
Ginger Girls — Englewood, Chicago, 9-14; 

Gaiety, Milwaukee, 16-21. 
Girls from Joyland — Academy, Jersey City, 

V. J.. 9:14 ; Gaiety, Philadelphia. 16-21. 
Girls from the Follies — South Bethlehem, 9 ; 

EJastpn, 10; layoff, 11-14; Star. Brooklyn. 

lv-21. 
Grown TJp Babies — Norwich, 11 ; International, 

Niagara Falls, N. Y., 12-14 ; Star, Toronto, 

Ont., 16-21. 
Hello Girls — Majestic, Indianapolis, Ind.. 9- 

14; Buckingham. Louisville, Ky., 16-21. 
Hello. Paris — Cadillac. Detroit, 9-14; open, 

16-21 ; Englewood. Chicago, 28-28. 
High Life Girls — Waterloo, 11; Marshall- 
town, 12 ; Cedar Rapids, 18 ; Ottumwa, 14 ; 

Century, Kansas City, 16-21. 
Lady Buccaneers— Open, 9-14; Englewood. 

Chicago, 16-21. 
Ltd Lifters — Amsterdam, 11 ; Hudson, Sche- 
nectady, 12-14; Blnghamton, N. Y., 16-17; 

Norwich, 18: Oneida. 19: International. 

Niagara Falls, 20-21. 
MUttary Maids— Savoy, Hamilton, Ont.. 9- 

14: Cadillac, Detroit, 16-21. 
Mischief Makers — Gaiety, Baltimore, 0-14; 

Trocadero, Philadelphia, 16-21. 
Monte Carlo Girls — Penn Circuit. 9-14: 

Gaiety, Baltimore, 16-21. 
Pace Makers — Terre Hante, Ind., 9-11 : La- 

JWS?' Ja '• 8o ' ItD Pi 18; Gary, 14; 

Gaiety, Chicago. 16-21. ■ 
Parisian Flirts— Galetr. Minneapolis. Minn., 

9-14 ; Gaiety, St. PatU, Minn., 16-21. 
Pat White Show — Star, Toronto, Ont, 9-14; 

8avoy. Hamilton. Can., 16-21. 
Record Breakers — Majestic. Scranton, Pa.. 9- 
„ 14; Gaiety. Brooklyn, 16-21. 
September Morning Glories — Camden, N. J„ 

9-11: Trenton. 32-14; South Bethlehem, 

16 ; Easton, 17 : Wllkes-Barre, 18-21. 
Social Follies — Olympic, New York, 9-14; 

Majestic, Scrsnton, Pa.. 16-21. 
Tango Queens — Gaiety, Brooklyn, 9-14 ; Acad- 
emy, Jersey City, N. J., 16-21. 
Tempters — Holyoke. Mass., 9-11 ; Springfield, 

Mass., 12-14; Howard, Boston, 16-21. 
Thoroughbreds — Trocadero. Philadelphia, Pa.. 

9-14; Olympic, New York, 16-21. 
Tourists — Gaiety,- Milwaukee, Wis., 9-14; 

Gaiety, Minneapolis, Minn.. 16-21. 
TJ. 8. Beauties— Star, Brooklyn, 8-14 ; Holyoke 

and Springfield. 16-21. 

Penn Circuit 

OPERA HOUSE. Newcastle, Pa., Monday. 
Cambria, Johnstown, "Tuesday. 
MIBHLFR. Altoona. Wednesday. 
ORPHBDM. Harrisbnrg, Thursday. 
ORPHETTM. York. Friday. 
ACADEMY, Reading, Saturday. 



STOCK AND REPERTOIRE ROUTES. 

Permanent and Traveling. 

Academy Players — Haverhill. Mass., lndef. 
Alcazar Players— San Francisco, lndef. 
Alcine Players — Wichita, Kan., lndef. 
American Players — Spokane, Wash., lndef. 
Academy Players — Halifax. N. S., Can., lndef. 
Angell Stock (Joe Angell. mgr.) — Park, Pitts- 
burgh, lndef. 
Angell's ~ Comedians. Southern Co. '<BUl!e O. 

Angelo, mgr.) — Rldgeway,, Mo.; 9-14.' 
Balnbridge Players- — Minneapolis, lndef. 
Burbank Players — Los Angeles, lndef. 
Brownie Blye. Rep. Co. — Canal, Dover, O., 9- 

14 ; Johnstown, 15-21.- • 
Goburn-Pearson Players — St. Cloud, Minn., 

Indef. ■ 

Chicago Stock (C. H. Bosskam, mgr.) — 

Washington. Pa.. 9-14~ 
Callahan Dram. Co.— Virginia, 111., 9-14. 
Denbam Stock — Denver, lndef. 
Doblnsky Stock (Ed. Dublnsky, mgr.)— St 

Joseph. Mo., lndef. 
Dougherty, Jim, Stock — Eau Claire, Wis,, 

lndef. 
Davis. Walter, Stock (Adam W. Friend, mgr.) 
„ — Cooperstown, N. Y., 9-14 ; Newark, 16-21. 
Desmond, Ethel, M. C. Co. — Lafayette. La., 

Elsmere Stock— Elsmore, Bronx, lndef. 
Eckhardt Oliver, Players — Reglna, Sask., 

Can., lndef. 
Emerson Players— Lowell. Mass.. indef. 
Empire Players — Salem, Mass., lndef. • 
Fields, Margaret, Stock — Warren, Pa., 9-14. 
Qlaser. Vauchan, Stock — Cleveland, lndef. 
;;.' Hyperion Players— New -Haven. Coon., indef. 



Hlmmelein Associate Players — EvanaviUe, 
Ind., lndef. 

Harrison A White's Ideal Players (Allen O. 
White, mgr.) — Sooth Haven, Mich.. 9-14. 

Hillman Ideal Stock, No. 1 (Harry Sonne, 
mgr.) — Cambridge, Neb., 9-11: Danbury, 
12-14; Wilsonvllle, 16-18. 

Imperial Stock — Imperial. St Lonla, lndef. 

Jewett Henry, Players — Copley, Boston, 
Indef. 

Keith's Hudson Theatre Stock — Union Hill, 
N. J., lndef. 

Lawrence, Del, Stock — Wigwam, San Fran- 
cisco, lndef. 

Lorch, Tbeo., Stock — Topeka, Kan., indef. 

Lewis, Wm. F.. Stock— Oak, Neb.. 9-14; 
closes season. 

Murosco Stock — Los Angeles, lndef. 

Mozart Players (Jay Packard, mgr.) — Elmlra, 
N. Y„ lndef. 

Northampton Players — Northampton, Mass., 
indef. 

New Yorker Musical Stock— Little Falls. N. 
Y„ 9-14; Illon, 16-21. 

National Stock (F. B. Cole, mgr.) — Minne- 
apolis, lndef. 

Nestell Players — Freeport, 111., indef. 

Orpheum Players Stock (Ed. Williams, mgr.) 
— Omaha, Neb., indef. 

Orpheum Players — Reading. Pa., indef. 

Oliver, Otis, Players (Harry J. Wallace, 
mgr.) — Oak Park, I1L, lndef. 

Poll Stock — Worcester, Mass., lndef. 

Payton. Corse, Stock — Spooner. Bronx, N. Y„ 
lndef. 

Park Opera Co. — Park, 8t Louis, lndef. 

Flayers Stock — Players, So. Louis, lndef. 

Pickert Stock — Galeton, Fa., 9-14: Batavla, 
N. Y„ 16-21. 

Purklas Stock — Colome, S. Dak., 9-14. 

Bae, John G„ Co. — Portis, Kan., 9-14 ; Os- 
borne. 16-21. 

Sherman Stock (Robert Sherman, mgr.) — Dal- 
las, Tex., indef. 

Spooner, Cecil, Stock — Lawrence, Mass., 
lndef. 

Shubert Stock — Milwaukee, indef. . 

Shubert Stock — St Paul, indef. 

Somerville Theatre Players — Somerrllle, 
Mass., lndef. 

Selby Mas. Stock (Art L. Selby, mgr.) — Terre 
Haute. Ind., Indef. 

Turner-Hammond Players (Jim Hammond, 
mgr.) — New London, Conn., lndef. 

Trumbull Players (L. , R. Trumbull, mgr.) — 
Colebrook, N. H„ 9-14. 

Van Dyke * Eaton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.) — 
Tulsa. Okla., indef. 

Wilkes Players — Seattle, Wash., lndef. 

Wilkes Players — Salt Lake City. D.. lndef. 

Wallace, Chester, Players— Sharon, Pa., 9, 

lndef. 

Wallace, Morgan, Players — Slonx City., la., 
lndef. 

Minstrels 

Big City Minstrels— West Chester. Pa.. 11; 

Allen town. 12; Easton, 13; Scranton, 14. 

De Rae Bros. — Toms River. N. J.. 11; Lake- 
wood, 12: Barnegat 12: Egg Harbor, 14. 

Fields, Al. G.— Vicksbunr, Miss.. 11 : Natchez. 
12; Jackson, IS; Meridian, 14: Betas, 
Ala., 16 ; Montgomery. 17, 18 ; Columbus, 
Ga., 19; Macon, 20; Savannah, 21. 

O'Brien's — St Louis. 8-14; Alton, 111., 15; 
Springfield. 16; Streator, 17: Galesburg, 
18: Davenport. la., 19; Marshallrowo. 20: 
Omaha, Neb., 21. 

-RANDS AND ORCHESTRAS. 

Conway, Patrick, & Band— Ithaca, N. Y.. »- 

Foreman's Band — Oakland. Cal.. indef.' 
Kyrl's Bohemian. Orchestra (H. J. Leake, 
mgr.) — Alden. la., 12 : Southland. 13 : In- 
wood. 14.: Canton, 8. Dak.. 16: Sheldon, 
la., 17 : Hustings, Minn.. 18 : Hutchinson, 
19: Saylord, 20: Springfield, 21. 

COMPANIES IN TABLOID PLAYS. 

Bernard's.- Al & Gertrude. Girls and Boys 

from Dixie (Al. Bernard, mgr.) — Birming- 
ham, Ala., lndef. 
Broadway Girls M. C. Co. (Hal Wattlers. 

mgr.) — Commerce, Okla., 7-14: Drum- 

wright. 15-21. 
Enterprise Stock (Norman Hilysrd, mgr.)— 

Chicago, lndef. 
Enterprise Stock. No. 2 Co. (Norman nil 

yard, mgr.) — Chicago, lndef. 
Hoyt's Musical Revue (M. J. Meaney, mgr.) 

—Portland. Me., 9-21. 
Hutchinson, Jack, M. C. Co. — Latrobe, Pa., 

8-14. 
'Knit Kouinlr Kiddles — Manulngton. W. Va.. 

9-14: Grafton. 16-21. 
Kileare's Comedians — Cincinnati. O.. lndef. 
Little Bluebird, Zarrow's— Columbia. 8. C 

9-14. 
Lee. James P., M. C. Co. — E. Liverpool, O., 

indef. 
Lord A Vernon M. C. Co. — Clarksburg. W. Va., 

9-14. 
McAnltffe, Jere, Revue (Fred Bowman, mgr.) 

— Herkimer, N. Y., 9-14 ; Gloversvtlle. 

16-21. 
Sub-Marine Girls (Mersereau Bros., mgr.) — 

Tulsa, Okla.. 8-14; RoMen-rtlle. 1S-21" 
Stewart. Wslter J.. Stock (Stewart * Good- 
win, mgrs.) — Chicago. Indef. 
Thomas M. C. Co. — Bowdoln Sq., Boston, 9- 

21. 
Variety Review. Zarrow's (D. J. Lvnch, mgr.) 

— Newport News, Va., 9-14 ; Wilmington, 

N. C. 9-14. 
Walker. Musical & Lady Minstrels— New 

Castle. Ind.. 9-14. 



CIRCUSES. 

Barnes, AL G. — Abbeyvllle. La., 11 ; Jen- 
nings, 12; Lake Charles, 13; Beaumont 
Tex., 14; Eagle Lake, 16: Wharton, 17; 
Bay City, 18; Victoria, 19; Beevllle, 20; 
Cuero. 21. 

Buffalo Bill & 101 Ranch— AbosUe, N. C, 11 : 
Rocky Mount 12; Goldsboro, 13 ; Klnston, 
14; Wilmington, 16; Lomberton, IT; Ham- 
let, 18 ; Darlington. S. C, 19 ; Camden, 20 ; 
Sumter. 21. 

Barnum As Bailey — Wrco, Tex., 11 ; Temple, 
12; Austin, 18; San Antonio. 14; Galves- 
ton, 18 ; Houston, 17 ; Beaumont, 18 ; 
Lake Charles, La„ 19; Alexandria, 20; 
Shreveport, 21. 

Carlisle's Frontier Wild West ShoW-^-Grats. 
Pa.. 9-14. 

Hagenbeck-Wallace— Rogers, Ark., 11 ; Spring- 
field, Mo., 12; West Plains, 13; Jonesborp, 
Ark., 14; Memphis, Tenn., 18; Dyersbutg. 
17; Jackson, 18; Corinth, Miss., 19; 
Trenton, Tenn., 20; Dnlon City, 21. 

Honest Bill Shows — Mutual. Okla., 11; 
Cestos. 12 ; Selling, 13 ; Tacoga, 14. 

Singling Bros. — Athens, Ga., 11; Anderson. 
S. C, 12; Greenville, 13; Spartanburg* 14. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Bragg A Bragg Show (Geo. M. Bragg, mgr.) — 

Toronto, Can., indef. 
Frtmlni (Harry J. Freeman, mgr.) — Mattoon, 

111., 9-14; Atlanta. Ga., 16-21. 
I.ucey, Tbos. Elmore — Plevna, Mont, 11 ; 

Baker, 12; Hettinger. IS: Raleigh, 14: 

Lelth, 16; New England, 17; Mott, 18; 

Carson, 19 ; Flasher, 20. 
Ncwmann. the Great — Kenmare, N. Dak., 11- 

12; White tall, Mont, 18-14: Outlook, 16- 

Smltij. Mysterious — Douglas, Wyo., 11-12; 
Wheatland. 13-14; Sidney, Neb.. 16-17: 
Bridgeport, 18-19; Harrison, 20-21. 

Swain, W. I., Show — Waverly, Tenn., 9-14. 

PALMER RELICS TO 

BE AUCTIONED OFF 



WEST LIKES THE 

INTERNA CIRCUIT 



Collection Includes Many Curious Old 

Portraits, Among; Which Is > Rare 

One of the Bard of Avon. 

According; to the announcement made 
by the Anderson Galleries, at Madison 
Avenue and Fortieth street, there will be 
sold at that place the collection of stage 
relics owned by the late A. M. Palmer. 

In the collection is a Shakespeare 
portrait which Mr. Palmer purchased 
thirty-five years ago from George Fawcett 
Rowe, and which is a carious old painting. 
There are thirty-seven other stage portraits 
consisting of colored lithographs, engrav- 
ings and chalk drawings. There are many 
autograph letters -from persons of the 
stage. There is a- collection of playbills 
and portraits from the Playhouse, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Saturday, October 21, is the date for the 
opening of the exhibition of the Palmer 
collection. The sale takes place the after- 
noon of November 9. 



SCHENCK TO BECOME BENEDICT 

Joseph M. Schenck, the general booking 
manager for the Marcus Loew enterprises 
is, according to current reports, about to 
give up the joys of bachelorhood and join 
the newlywed class. Norma Talmadge, 
the picture star, is the lady whose. name 
ib linked with Mr. Schenck in his proposed 
matrimonial venture. It appears, also, 
that this couple will be business as well 
as life partners for Mr. Cchenck has 
formed the Norma Talmadge Film Cor- 
poration for the exploitation, exclusively, 
of that daily screen beauty. 



White Slave Plays Seam to Have Call 

and Open to Record Business 

in Chicago. 

Special to The Clipper. 

Chicago, III, Oct. 10. — The Internationa] 
Circuit is profitable in the West in spit* 
of the condition said to exist in the East. 
There 'are ten weeks of time west of 
Pittsburgh which is profitable for mana- 
gers. The shows - going out of Chicago- 
may be better than the ones leaving New 
York; at any event, there is no alarm re- 
garding the conditions west of Pittsburgh 
for either the producer or the house 
manager. 

One Western show, "Truxton King" was- 
called off because the attraction failed to 
draw. There was talk of cancelling ' 
Nancy Boyer in "The Little Lady from 
Lonesome Town," but when "The Cry of 
His Children" proved a failure, the Nancy 
Boyer show was given its route, with a. 
change of title to "The Woman Who 
Paid." "Somewhere in France" filled in 
one week at the Imperial at Chicago, and 
wm discarded to the workshop. It was 
not a regular attraction on the circuit, and 
took a "Truxton King" date. 

As far as the Western territory Is con- 
cerned It is plain that white slave plays 
have the call. "The Little Lost Sister" 
opened recently at Indianapolis to take up. 
a route that was open, and started up 
with big business in spite of the fact that 
the show has played the same houses on 
frequent occasions in the past. "The Mill- 
ionaire's Son" and "The Shop Girl" 
opened in Chicago as though they meant 
to prove a record breaker. "The Little Girl 
That God Forgot" is doing big business 
everywhere. "The Girl Without a 
Chance" did a big business South, and 
promises to duplicate its success of last 
year when it starts on its return date. 

THEATRE COMPLAINTS FILED 

Fobt Worth, Tex. — Eleven additional 
complaints against proprietors of motion 
picture shows for keeping their doors 
open last Sunday have been filed in the 
County Court, bringing the total now on- 
the docket to almost one hundred. Three 
of the cases have been tried, resulting in 
convictions in two instances. 



: .v£ 



CARNIVALS. 

Big Four Amuse. Co. — Chester, 8. C, 9-14. 
Campbell, W. H.. United Shows — Poplar Bluff, 

Mo, 9-13: Little Rock. Ark.. 14-20. 
Frisco Expo. Shows (Thus. Martin, mgr.) — 

Flatonla, Tex., 0-14 ; Shiner. 16-21.* - 
Great American Shows (J. F. Murphy, mgr.) 

— Monroe, Ga., 9-14; Washington, 16-21. 
Gray, Boy, Amnse. Co. — Fayette. Ala.. 18-21. 



AUTHOR ATTACHES OWN SHOW 

"Funny Mr. Dooley" was written for 
William Ishom by Paul Quinn, with the 
understanding that Qninn was also to pro- 
duce the show and have a good role in it. 
For this he was to receive a salary of $75 
per week; with an extra $25 royalty for 
the use of the book, music and lyrics. 
Qninn this week, through his attorney, 
James A. Timony attached the scenery, 
costumes and wardrobe of the show, claim- 
ing a debt of $711.82, including money 
loaned to Ishom.' - 



BARNSTEAD WITH MARKS CO. 

Ed. Hugh Barnstead is with the R. W. 
Marks Famous Stock Company as business 
manager in advance. This is his second 
season with this attraction. 



JOLSON SUES DAVE MARION 

Harry Jolson, brother of Al, has brought 
suit against Dave Marion for $4,590. 
Through his attorney. James A. Timony. 
Jolson alleges breach of contract made on 
May 20, 1915, for the season of 1915-1916 
at a weekly salary of $135. 

The black-face comic claims he was dis- 
charged on Oct. 9, 1915, and demands 
judgment against Marion for the sum men- 
tioned, together with costs. 



"HIP, HIP, HOORAY" CO. LEAVES 

The "Hip, Hip, Hooray" Co., last year's 
Hippodrome spectacle, wiU leave today 
for Philadelphia to inaugurate their road 
tour Saturday night of next week. There 
are 500 persons, including Sousa'e Band', 
in the production. 



m 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 



NEW VIOLINIST. HEARD 

Bernard Bogonslawsky, French concert 
violin virtuoso, who is. the only, one in this 
country, outside of Kreisler and Thibaut, 
having the distinction, of receiving the 
Grand Prix dn. Conservatoire de Paris, 
made his debnt Oct, 9 at the Lexington 
Opera House, assisted at the piano by 
Maurice Eisner. He Is under the 
ajement of Maxim P. Lowe, Inc. 



MANAGER HURT IN SUBWAY 

While alighting from a subway train 
one night last week, Harry D. Harrigan 
was caught in the aide door and. received 
a fractured nose and left arm. Harrigan 
is manager for Pauline Hall, a moving 
picture actress. He was taken to his 
home, and the attending physician said 
it would be several days before he could 
leave, his bed. 



OPERA STAR SEEKS DIVORCE 

Mme. Margaxette Matzenauer, of the 
Metropolitan Opera Co., 'has taken the pre- 
liminary steps toward divorcing her hus- 
band, Edouardo Ferrari-Fontana, tbe tenor, 
who is now fighting with the Italian army. 



CHILD ACTOR. BITTEN 

Fqur-j ear-old Jane Lee, one of the young- 
est movie stars was* attacked and bitten 
on the nose by tbe Russian wolfhound of 
Theda Bara at the Fort Lee, N. J., studio 
of William Fox last week. 



. . .' -r 




. ; ■...---. -ns£$£a 









'-'*j> *W--*'>i 









<»■*>&$? 



-V.-"- ' r ' / ,; .;i--.— : .- ?4£&toBSU: 



MARGUERITE VON KEXSZ 

Marguerite Von Reese, who is playing Anita Gardner, a society reporter, and 
a light comedy role, with "Tbe Hour of Temptation" company touring the Inter- 
national Circuit with great success, has been in dramatic plays but a short time, but 
has proven herself as clever in these parts as -when she was with musical comedies 
and in vaudeville. Miss Von Keese is an artistic performer as well as a clever dancer. 
She has received an offer which she is considering to tour South America next season. 
—Ado. 



WANJTED 

good singing and dancing 

IRISH COMEDIAN 

chorus girls, other useful Musical Tab peopla. 
Wil! bar plush drop and wardrobe Address 
M. J. MEANE Y, S*fem " 



I'll Show You 



PffiFORMER 



Easiest Way 
For You 

TO IKOIIF A V4UDEVIHE 

ValataW tats— SUM Fm 

10ND0N. 732 CriBy BU&, CHICKO, HUMUS 
Wanted— Sister Team 

and cbaros girls for Tauderille act. salary the 

limit, act booked. Height 5 ft. 2 In., not ore* 5 
ft. 4 lo. Only good * looking, yoonc. experienced 
and reliable people need anewer. Musical comedy 
people write. Girls with vaudeville experience pre- 
ferred. Wire or write TOE wax.T c /o K. H. 
Croat. 4CS-4 Parkway Baildias. Philadelphia. Pa. 

AT LIBERTY ?SK c SolS5 c 

JACK ALEXANDER 

A No. 1 hoary character or can. bos. man. 
H.lsht 5 ft. 11 tn. Weight 170 lb*. Age 29 yrs. 
Wardrobe, abil ity, and exp erien ce. loin on wire. 
Aawavt to MHasWatT HOTEL, Salisbury, aid. 



AT LIBERTY 

PIANO LEADER 

Al, Experienced. No Rep*. 
ALLEN, 2S45 German town Av« n Philadelphia 



LEADING LADY OR SOUBRETTE 

to feature. Pianist, comedian, actors, vaude- 
ville people write; State age. height and 
weight. Sure salaries — long season. Advance 
agent— Can use clever amateur ..woman (small 
parts). Enclose photo. HOYTE, COOK COM- 
PANY, Genl Del, Utica, N. Y. 



THE BOOM IS ON 

Good comedy material Is cheap at any 
price. If you want to get tbe cream of 

sure-fire, original laughs written by a 
successful author of many years* experi- 
ence, get 

Madison's Budget No. 16. 

PRICE ONE DOLLAR 

Coctenta Include 12 original monologues, 8 
great acta for 2 male* and T for male and 
female: a blight lrtah comedy. 16 woDder- 
ml parodies. 4 crackerjack minstrel flrat- 
porta, a screaming tabloid comedr. besides 
hundreds of new gags, sidewalk bits and 
useful flu- In jokes. Price SI. Back Isaacs 
an gone except No. IS. Combination pries 
of No. 15 snd No. 18 is n.50. J AMES 
104S THIHT) AVE* OK. SXW 



JtAUISOH, 
TORS. 





H Vs i ) and Juvenila Woman. Height 5-7: weight I4S; age 35. Quick study, and ca- 
pable specialties and piano. A I appearance on and off. Iona Jacobs, Portsmouth, O. 

WANTED TO SUPPORT 

JANE TOWNE and JOHN ADAIR 

Lars* character and heavy man; scenic artists for parts. Others wire and mail 
photos. Only the best stock people wanted. 

TRAVIS A. KIMMEL, Mgr. Kunmel's Theatre, Cairo, DL 

AX LIBERTY 

LAWRENCE SULLIVAN 1DABELLE ARNOLD 



Comedian, Specialties 
One piece rep. or stock. 



Ingenues 
Both young, experienced. All requirements. 
LAWRENCE SULLIVAN, Portsmouth, Ohio. 



Wanted— For Permanent Stock 

Leading man, leading woman, man for heavies and general business; character 
woman, who can play heavies, scenic artist to double stage. Two bills a week. 
Make your salary right, aa it is sure. Send photos. Will also buy good script*. 
Address F. J. OBER, Manager, Miles Theatre, Miles City, Mont. 



AT 
LIBERTY 



The GORDINIERS 



OTIS 



VERDAH 



Leads and Hearlcs. Age 31 Tears. Height S ft. Ingenue* and Sosb. Age 28 Tears. Height B ft. 

10% In. Weight 160 lbs. Weight 107 lbs. 

Neat dressers oa and off. We are willing to earn oar salary and let the man who pays them ran the 
t roupe. Single and Doable Specialties It desired. Single or Joint Engagement. Address 8. 0. OOaV 

DISIEE, Montrose , lows. aaSaSf 



AT LIBERTY 



WALTER DE LUNA 

Comedy, Character or General Business 
Weight 130. Height 5 ft. eK.ina. Age 3a 



ON ACCOUNT OF 
SHOW CLOSING 



LOUISE AD DEL 



Ingenue or Soubrette 
Weight 124. Height 5 ft. 2 ins. 



Age 25. 



HIGH CLASS REP. OR STOCK 

Have good references. Absolutely professional and do not misrepresent. 
Cars of Lunar, sat Academy St, New York City 



WANTED PIANIST 



BEN TOY 



(A. F. ot M.) for TABLOID MUSICAL COMEDY. AH week 
stands; steady work; salary absolutely sure. Lowest sal- 
ary first letter; join on wire; must be sober. 
MAJESTIC THEATRE BUTLER. PA, 



AT LIBERTY 

FOR DRAMATIC OR MUSICAL -COMEDY STOCK OR ONE PIECE 
WILL ST. JOHN FINCH I BERYL JEAN 

5 feet eleren Inches — 159 lbs age 36. Eccentric I 5 ft. seven inches — 142 lbs.— Age 29. Characters 

Comedy — Char. Heavies — Gen. Bos. A-l Stage I Gen. Boa. Prlma-donna. Strong, High Soprano 

Director. I Voice. 

Strictly sober and reliable. Lon g ex perience. Ability. Wardrobe snd Appearance, the very best. 
Address ■■KTT.LcaEBT FASH," Hew Franklin, sto. 



AT 
LIBERTY 



PERCY KILBRIDE « 



Stock or Production. Address General Delivery, Detroit, Michigan. 



Wanted to Join on. Wire 

WOMAN for Hcavie* and General Bmineu. 
State if you do specialties and lowest salary. 
October 12, East on; 13, Robinsons; 14, Masar- 
dis; all in Maine. CLAUDE REiD. 

REASER BROS. WANT QUICK 

Young Attractive Woman for Emotional Jtrrentle. 
Totmr, clever man for Jnranilo lead. Toons-, 
fins looldna- woman for sympathetic heary. Clever 
light comedian. Large heavy, man — police Inspec- 
tor type.- Save your time and oars If yon want 
higb salary, it's sore. Send pbotos — prepay wires 
— most bare modern dress suits and gowns. One 
night stands. We are all right: how are yon? 
Would like to hear from a regular agent. 

Delsware, Ohio. 

WANTED, AT ONCE 

TUBA and CORNET PLAYERS 

Double bass. Also man for "Tom Logan" and 
"Most," double in. band. State alL Address 
by letter only, C. R. RENO, Knickerbocker 
Theatre Bid,.. I«t2 Bro.dw.y, Mew York. 



AT LIBERTY 

AFTER OCT. If th 

Stock, Road Burlesque or Musical 
Comedy 

COMEDIAN AND PRODUCER 

Geo.(Irish)Adams 

Victoria Theatre, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WANTED QUICK 

Jnvaaue statu Character Ola Ran. State It roe 
do specialty. One nlarnter. sta te al l arst letter. 
Most join on wire. CHAS. E. WHAFLE8. 13 — 
Colchester. 13 — Eastnampton. 14 — Moodns, an 
Conn. Can place good aonnrettc with speeisltr. 



ACTS 



PLAYS, SKETCHES, WRITTEN, 
SCENARIOS and MSS. REWRIT- 
TEN. 

E. I- GAMBLE, Playwright, 
East LhrerpooL Oaaa. 



WANT MALE VIOLIN PLATER 

Married or single, for rood town of 1,500. Play 
In orcbeatra and teach rlolln lessons; opportasltr 
for right ma n. O nly reliable and steady nssa 
apply. JOE PEFPXE DSI9A, Athena, Wis. 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



"VERY GOOD EDDIE" TOR 
ROAD ; 

"Very Good Eddie" deserves the dis- 
tinction of being New York's most recent 
champion "moving" play. It opened at the 
Princess, then to the Casino, then to the 
Ttiirty-oLath Street and finally sought 
rotate in the house of its birth. And now 
it is forced to again leave that theatre. 

This last move is being made solely be- 
cause of another previous booking at the 
Princess and the inability to secure an- 
other theatre for "Very Good Eddie" to 
move into. It will take the road on Oct. 23. 



"FOLLOW ME" CAST COMPLETED 

The cast of "Follow Me," the new musical 
play, in which Anna Held will appear 
under the direction of the Messrs. Shubert, 
has "been completed. It includes, in addi- 
tion to Miss Held, Roy Atwell, Letty 
Yorke, William P. Carleton, Georgia. Drew 
Mendum, Wilmer Bentley, Edith Day, 
George Eagan, Mabel Weeks Claflin. the 
Sykes Sisters, P. Paul Porcasi, Frank Mc- 
Cormack and Norman Charles Brace. 
Frank E. Tours has been engaged to direct 
the orchestra. 



YIDDISH MUSICAL PLAYS 

A novelty of the current week is the 
production in Yiddish of "The Broken 
Melody," a musical play. Standing sponsor 
for the enterprise is Boris Thomaschefsky, 
and the premier occurs Wednesday at his 
theatre. More than seventy players and 
singers participate in the performance. 

On the same night at David Kessler's 
Theatre, "On Trial" will receive its pre- 
arier in Yiddish, with Frances Adler, Jacob 
Adler*s daughter, in the leading role. 



MEGRUE PLAYS MINE HOST 

Roi Cooper Megrue, co-author of "Under 
Sentence," entertained members of the cast 
and a few friends last week after a per- 
formance of the play. The playwright's 
msther was the guest of honor. 



"SILENT WITNESS" IN YIDDISH 
Otto Hanerbach's claim that "The Silent 
Witness" would return to New York in 
October was substantiated last week when 
H. H. Frazee disposed of the Yiddish 
rights of the play to David Kessler, who 
will present it at Kessler's Theatre, New 
York, within the next few weeks. Later 
tie play will tour the Yiddish theatres 
throughout the country. 



SHOW GIRL SUES STOCKBROKER 

Margaret G. Sullivan, a show girl, has 
brought Salt in the Supreme Court against 
Oscar H. Alexander, a stockbroker, for $30,- 
000 damages for breach of promise. In 
her complaint Miss Sullivan alleges that 
Alexander is worth more than $50,000 and 
that he has an income of $3,000 a year and 
upwards. She says he promised to wed her 
» May, June, July and August, 1913, at 
various times in 1914, and on Jan. 2 and 
20, and Nov. 28, 1915, but that instead 
he married another. 



LYRIC DARK THIS WEEK 

The Lyric Theatre will be dark this week 
owing to preparations for the showing there 
beginning October 16 of the William Fox 
film spectacle, "A Daughter of the Gods." 



VENTRILOQUIST IN JAIL 

Tom Edwards, the ventriloquist, was 
arrested last week while playing the Colo- 
nial Theatre for non-payment of alimony. 
Bail for the player was fixed at $2,000, but 
being unable to obtain it, he was taken to 
Ludlow Street Jail, the home of the Ali- 
mony Clnb. 

Edwards was divorced five years ago by 
his ■ wife, Flora K.. being ordered to pay 
her $15 per week. Bnt he only paid it 
for five weeks. 

The ventriloquisfs former wife now 
wants $4,080. If it is not forthcoming 
Edwards win remain a member of the club. 



TODY HAMILTON'S CURIOS SOLD 

A few of the friends of the late "Tody" 
Hamilton attended the sale of his effects 
Oct 5. There were forty-four lots all 
told and they only, brought $312. 



AID MANAGER'S MOTHER 

A number of contributions have come 
in to Sam H. Harrison toward the fund 
that is being raised for the blind and des- 
titute mother of the late Arthur Evans, 
formerly stage manager of the Ziegfeld 
"Follies." Among them was a check for 
$50, sent by Henry W. Savage, who was 
the first to employ Evans as stage manager. 



DANCER AWARDED $20,000 
Teehton, N. J., Oct 6. — Mrs. Daisy 
James, of Newark, a former Winter Gar- 
den dancer, received a $20,000 verdict 
against the Lackawanna Railroad here. 
She sued in the Federal District Court for 
$100,000 damages. Mrs. James said she 
was struck by a train in East Orange, in 
June, 1915. Both legs were cut off below 
the knees. 



NEW THEATRE FOR BETHLEHEM 

Bithijhkm, Pa,, Oct 8.— Bethlehem is 
to have a new up-to-date opera house, ac- 
cording to the announcement made by the 
Kurtz Bros., the enterprising west side 
manufacturers. They have purchased the 
Otto Bruaner property for the site, and the 
bnllding will take up the entire lot which 
has a frontage of sixty feet and a depth of 
one hundred and ninety feet extending back 
to Raspberry street and win have a seating 
capacity of between 1,500 and 2,000. 



MRS. MINNIE DUNBAR DIES 

'Mrs. Minnie Dnnbar, for fifteen years 
on the variety stage in this country with 
the Flying Dnnbars, died Oct. 4. Her 
husband, George W. Dunbar, also one of 
the company, is seriously ill in Bellevue 
Hospital. Due to the long illness of her 
husband and herself, Mrs. Dunbar died 
practically destitute. 



GENEVIEVE ROLLO DIES 

Genevieve Hollo, formerly a well-known 
actress and the wife of Walter Clarke 
Bellowes, for many years stage manager 
for the late Charles Frohman and other 
prominent American producers, died in 
this city during the past week. 



ROSENQUEST MARRIES ACTRESS 

Baltimore, Md., Oct 4. — J. Wesley 
Rosenquest, Jr., son of the owner of the 
Fourteenth Street Theatre in New York, 
and a prominent theatrical manager, mar- 
ried Florence X. Fallon, whose stage name 
is Florence Darling, with the "Robinson 
Crusoe, Jr." company, now playing at the 
Academy of Music here, at 2 o'clock yes- 
terday morning. 




26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 




ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 



BY DR. MAX THOREK, Chicago 

Surgeon-in- Chief American Hospital; Consulting Surgeon Cook 
County Hospital; Consulting Surgeon Sheridan Park Hospital, 
Chicago; Surgeon White Rats and Actors Fund, etc., etc. 

Tb«« .rtlcles are written exclusively for tie NEW YORK CUPPER. 
Questions pertaining; to health, disease, hyriene, sell-preservation, pre- 
vention ef disease* and matters of general Interest to health will be 

answered in this column. ADDRESS ALL INQUIRIES TO DR. MAX 

THOREK, AMERICAN HOSPITAL, CHICAGO, ILLS. Where space will 
not permit or the subject is not suitable for an open answer, letters 
will be sent to the applicant personally. Dr. Thorek should not be ex- 
pected to diagnose or prescribe in theee rtrlirmnf for fndividaul diseases. 

THE PASSING OF AN "OLD TIMER" 




"Mr. Warren, of the Actors* Fond, has 
called and wishes to speak with 70a," I 
was informed by my secretary upon arriv- 
ing at the hospital several days ago. I 
proceeded to get into telephonic communi- 
cation with Mr. Warren. 

"Doctor, I wish you would please see 
Charley Hawkins at your earliest conven- 
ience. I only just heard that he is very 
111 In some rooming house ever on North 
Clark street, and I'd like to have your 
opinion on his case as soon as 70a can 
conveniently give it to me." So spoke Mr. 
Warren, and I promised him I would call 
upon Mr. Hawkins within the next hour. 

I was prompt. 

My chauffeur opened the door of the car 
and permitted me to alight in front of a 
large rooming house on North Clark street. 
There was a small place at the staircase, 
which boasted a dilapidated chair and a 
■mall table over which hung a cardboard 
displaying conspicuously the word "Office." 
I inquired here and was told that Mr. 
Hawkins was occupying a room at the top 
of the house. I had to climb a number of 
Sights of stairs and then found my way 
. into a veritable cage which harbored the 
prostrate form of a man well advanced in 
yean. 

The air was stuffy in the compartment, 
and on a chair near the bed was a tray 
which held the remnants of a meager 
luncheon. 

"Who are you?" inquired the poor old 
fellow. After I explained to him who I 
was, he allowed me to examine him. The 
examination disclosed a severely advanced 
case of leaking and decompensated heart, 
a marked insufficiency of the kidneys 
(Brighfe disease) and arterio tclerotii 
(hardening of the arteries). 

"This is no place for you, Mr. Haw- 
kins," I urged. 

"But." retorted the emaciated patient, 
"kind air, these people here are so good to 
me. They charge me nothing for my lodg- 
ing. I don't like to leave the place and go 
to the County Hospital. I — I — ," and 
here his "sentence was interrupted hy a se- 
vere attack of coughing and shortness of 
breath. He wanted to resume his remarks, 
but he was too. exhausted to continue. 

The atmosphere that permeated the 
dingy sick-room cannot be adequately de- 
picted. The picture would move a Javert, 
I believe. I assured poor Mr. Hawkins 
that Mr. Warren and I would make imme- 
diate arrangements to take him to a 
private institution and not to the County 
Hospital. 

When I descended the stairs. I wondered 
if there were many in the profession who 
ever devoted a thought to the great num- 
ber of actors and actresses who were fa- 
mous in their days and are now scattered 
all over the country in alms houses, in 
asylums and often in the gutter. Outside 
of the Actors' Fund and one or two other 
charitable organizations, I venture to say 
there are few, shamefully few, who are 
bothering about these poor creatures. 
"Let them fight it out for themselves** 
seems to be the slogan. It is too cruel to 
even think of. 

I was unnerved when I looked upon the 
cheerfully illuminated mansions on my 
way home and compared them with what I 
saw at the Clark street rooming house. 

Mr. Hawkins waa taken to the Amer- 
ican Hospital and placid under proper 
care. The problems connected with his 
case were serious. He arrived there in a 
hopeless condition. I abhor the word 



"hopeless." I believe in making one com- 
f 01 table at least, though his condition may 
be hopeless. And, sure enough, under the 
influence of proper care, conscientious 
medical attention and words of encourage- 
ment, Hawkins began to improve. He be- 
came more rational and he even smiled at 
me one day when I came in and insisted 
that he must tell me all about his suc- 
cesses in the years gone by and how he 
"made good," even in his last role in the 
cast of "Alias Jimmy Valentine.'' His 
sweet manner of .reciting his experiences 
soon gathered my assistants, nurses and 
other convalescents around his bedside, 
and Charley Hawkins was, to aU appear- 
ances, happy once more. 

I inquired every day about the visitors 
who called on Mr. Hawkins, but I was in- 
variably informed that outside of a tele- 
phone call from good George C. Warren 
and an occasional call from BUI Clifton 
and perhaps one or two others, he seemed 
deserted by former associations and friends 
of bygone days. 

His improvement continued with remis- 
sions and exacerbations for over two 
weeks or so until the irreparably damaged 

parts of the human machine began to 
"give" and dropsy, with periods of uncon- 
sciousness, added to the picture of existing 
misery a sepulchral atmosphere. 

The weary days and nerve-wrecking 
nights crawled on and digitalis and theo- 
bromine (two standby a in the doctors* ar- 
mamentarium) refused to act. When BUI 
Clifton called the following day, he waited 
for me to receive direct confirmation of 
the ominous condition of poor Charley 
Hawkins. 

Three days later he was dead. 



The following Item struck my eyes when 
I picked np the Chicago Herald this 
morning: 



"ONCE FAMOUS COMEDIAN FRIEND- 
LESS IN DEATH" 

"Charles B. Hawkins, Noted Star of Fifty 
Year* Ago, Diet in BotpUaV 

These two headings told the story. Half 
a century ago, they tell us, Charley Haw- 
kins was one of America's best known 
comedians. Thousands have forgotten 
life's sordid trials while being entertained 
by his droll wit and humor. His life was 
devoted to making mankind happier, but 
with the passing years both fame and for- 
tune vanished. 

There are many Charley Hawkins' scat- 
tered .throughout the country. We see 
them every day. The men and women 
with red blood coursing in their veins — as 
the common expression will have it — 
should make it their business to know 
what is going on in the ranks of those of 
their profession who have been "shelved" 
when Father Time enfolds them in his 
grim cloak. 

The result of a knowledge of existing 
conditions would undoubtedly be the estab- 
lishment of institutions that will care for 
the poor actor when he is in need and de- 
serted. It is only too sad, but true,. that 
one finds people ready to do the Samaritan 
net, without the oil and twopence! I meet 
such individuals every day. Xou meet 
them. But as soon as you have given them 
an opportunity to express their sym- 
pathies, nine out of ten forget. 

We all can do something to aid 



ULCER OF THE STOMACH 

MB. T. I. Mel., Philadelphia, Pa., writes : 
Deak Sib: I am an actor. I am 49 
years of age; married, and have two 
daughters. The older one, 19 years old, 
has been told that she has an ulcer of the 
stomach. We, my wife and I, are constant 
readers of The New York Clipper, and 
would like you to tell us, through that 
paper, what the outlook is in cases of 
ulcer. Is it curable? Thank yon for an 
early reply. - . ' •* • ' 

- REPLY. 
Not long ago I wrote an article on Ulcer 
of the Stouu.cn, for The Clipper. By 
writing the main office in New York you 
may obtain a copy. of the issue that con- 
tains that article. However, I wish to say 
that in a general way the outlook for re- 
covery in cases of nicer of the stomach is 
good. Complete cure can only be claimed 
when the patient has been free from stom- 
ach symptoms for a number of months at 
least. Relapses of ulcer attacks are fre- 
quent.. Medical treatment of the proper 
kind (persisted in for months, if need be) 
is often followed by brilliant results. In 
bad cases and those with threatening ■ per- 
foration, surgery offers the only means of ' 
relief. 



EXCESSIVE FLOW OF MILK 

TKOUPERS, Kansas City, Mo., writes : 

Deak Doctor: My husband and I are 
on the road with a show. Our baby boy 
is eleven months old. I have an excessive 
supply of milk and have weaned the baby 
two months ago. Please suggest some- 
thing, in The Cupper, that would stop 
the excessive supply. Many thanks for an 
early reply. 

REPLY. 
Tight bandaging of the breasts. Restric- 
tion of liquids. More solid food. Have a 
druggist make up the following prepara- 
tion, from which you may use a teaspoon- 
f til three or four times a- day : 

Potassium iodide ..'! drachms 

Syr. of sarsaparilla comp 1 VL- ounces 

Water sufficient to make. . . .3 ounces 



INFLAMMATION OF THE GALL- 
BLADDER 

MR. D. Z. McW., Sheboygan, Wis., writes: 
Mi Dear Doctob: I was just about to 
decide on an operation when I thought of 
writing and asking your opinion in The 
Clipper. I am 33 years of age and a 
juggler by profession. My whole body 
turned yellow some weeks ago and I did 
not feel bad in any way. My doctor told 
me that if the yellow tinge does not dis- 
appear within a week that I must be 
operated upon. What would you advise. 
.Snail I or shall I not undergo the opera- 
tion? 

REPLY. 
For simple catarrhal jaundice such as 
you undoubtedly have NO OPERATION 
is necessary. However, if there is pus in ' 
the gall-bladder as shown by repeated 
chills, fever, pains and loss of weight 
coupled with other, constitutional symp- 
toms, the story is different. Drainage of 
the gall-bladder is then called for. Wait 
a while. I believe your Bkin will clear up 
without any trouble whatever. 



EFFEMINACY 

INQUIRER, Cincinnati, writes: 

Dear Doctor : Can anything be done 
for effeminacy? 

REPLY. . 

That depends upon a number of factors. 
In some cases a great deal may be accom- 
plished." 

FLOW AT MENOPAUSE 

MISS D. B. N., Detroit, Mich., writes: 

Dear Sir: My mother and I are trav- 
eling together. I am in vaudeville. She 
has been with me since I went upon the 
stage. I love her dearly. She is now 48 
yean; of age and is. suffering from peculiar 
hemorrhages. I am alarmed. We are con- 
stant readers of The Clipper, and would 
like to kii.>-v. through the health depart- 



ment of that paper, what it may mean and 
what you would suggest doing. Thank's 
for an early reply. 

reply: 

Get busy and take mother to a first-class ' 
physician and have her examined thor- 
oughly. Hemorrhages at this . particular 
period of life may be forerunners of can- 
cer. Timely action is the only thing worth 
while and procrastination invariably leads 
to serious consequences. It will not hurt 
to have a first-class opinion. It may be . 
only an ordinary bleeding, and I hope this . 
is the -ease. If not — "a stitch _ in time 
will save nine." 



CLEFT-PALATE 

MR. E. N., New York, N. Y., writes: 

Dear Doctob : Our baby was born 
with a cleft ° palate and hare-lip. Of 
course, it is understood that this can only 
be repaired by an operation. I would like 
to inquire when the operation should be 
performed. Will look for a reply in The 
New York Clipper. Many thanks, etc. 

REPLY. 

Some surgeons operate on these cases 
while the child is still very young; others 
wait for a while. I am in favor of waiting 
for a time, when the child is stronger and 
the operative risk Is dim ini shed. The 
operation should be performed in two 
stages. At .the first sitting, the hare-lip : 
at the second sitting the cleft palate should 
be repaired. 



DOUBLE PUS-TUBES .. . • 

CHORUS GIRL, Minneapolis, Minn., 
writes: 
Dear Dr. Thobek:. I.am with a bur- 
lesque show. For the last three seasons I 
have been bothered with pus-tubes. I am 
laid up very often with much pain in the 
sides. ■ Whenever I get to a town . and . I . 
feel ill I seek a local doctor who usually 
fixes me up for the time being: I had a 
severe attack of pain last week and had to 
quit working. The doctor said I must. be. 
operated upon. I have decided to have 
myself cared for.. Please advise me, 
through The Cxxppeb, whether the oper- 
ation is" dangerous. How long will I have 
to remain in the hospital and what chances 
are there for a cure. Thanks for an early 
reply. 

REPLY. 

The disease is more dangerous than the 
operation. If you let matters run on you 
are standing an excellent chance, to de- , 
velop peritonitis. If skillfully performed, 
you need not worry. You will make a 
good' recovery. Count on being in the hos- 
pital for at least two or three weeks. It 
Is better to do that than to get seriously 
ill in some tank town and take your HfV 
into your hands. 



CURE. FOR LEAKING HEART 

MR. L. H. A., Seattle, Wash., writes: 

Dear Dr. Thobek : I am a singer, 29 
years of age. r feel -splendid physically, 
and never dreamt there was anything the 
matter with my heart until the other day 
when I had myself- examined for life insur- 
ance. They told me that I have a leaking 
heart. What I would like, to know is 
whether such defect can be cured, and how 
it is that I have no symptoms whatsoever. 
I am not a bit worried or nervous and I 
want your opinion on my case. I- shall be 
very grateful, indeed, for a reply in The 
Clipper. 

REPLY. 

There are thousands of people who have 
leaking valves and do- not know anything 
about it. Nature compensates such de- 
fects, and persons live their natural' lives 
without even suspecting that they have a 
leaking valve. Of course, in a measure, it 
may be a good thing for you to know that 
you have a physical defect, which means, 
nothing serious if you will take care of 
yourself. I hope you will do this. The 
actual repair of a leaking heart valve, by 
medical or other means, is at present im- 
possible. Forget your heart — just lead a 
normal life «ud T<"> will he all right. 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



"UNDER SENTENCE" 

IS MELODRAMA AND 
FARCE COMBINED 



"UNDER SENTENCE"— A play In 
three acts by Irrin S. Cobb and Roy ' 
Cooper Mesne, presented at the Har- 
ris Theatre, by Mm an<J Co., Oct. 
::- 3, 1918. .-'-'' 

IV, '. . CAST. . 

Katborli.c... ....;... .Janet Bercher 

Copier.-. -•• .v.-. i Fetbc '■ Kromcs 

/•watt George MacQuorrle 

Bhanoaessy Stephen Denbetgb 

Mike T. P. Ounn 

P«Kan. B. G. Boblnsoo 

™ay Thomas -. Mitchell 

P Prank Morgan 

Btrond & B. Dresser 

***5 Joseph .Us j tor 

Jennings George Wright, Jr. 

■2, I,k * ...George Nash 

25P* Harry Crosby 

£*** * Lawrence Bddlnger 

f«ranis Joon A. Boon 

Jonea^. . . .Gerald Ollrer Smith 

An Official H. W. Peroberton 



When Irvin S. Cobb and Roy Cooper 
Megrue began writing "Under Sentence" 
tbejr - should, have had a disagreement and 
each gone bis own way, for it is probable 
that each would then have written a play, 
one a farce and the other a melodrama, 
both much better tban the fruit of their 
collaboration. "Under Sentence," pre- 
sented at the Harris Theatre by Selwyn 
4 Co. during the past week, hi neither fish 
nor fowl. 

Starting off with an act in which the 
horrors and cruelties of Sing Slug Prison 
are displayed, it works into a second act 
of real peppery melodrama such as people 
like to pay two dollars to see. Then 
though, It slips backward and in a third 
act reveals itself as very poor farce. 
There is not enough of either, however, to 
deeply impress one. 

;.I;im Copley. Is one of those cashiers we 
read about who is sent to Sing Sing for 
the "copping" that somebody has done, 
the latter, in this case, being John W. 
Tlako, it powerful banker who rides about 
the world in automobiles purchased with 
the profit*) received from wrecKing a big 
.securities;, company. ' . 

.lie. ban a faithful wife, however, 'wfoo, in 
the second act, confronts Blake in his own 
borne, anS, after fusing' him to make dam- 
aging admissions, signals to "a detective 
who is in the banker's employ as a servant 
and the highly polished handcuffs snap 
over his wrists as the curtain rises and 
Miss Janet Beecher cries: "I've got yon 
now, John W. Blake." 

The second act is good. It would in- 
terest both a Fifth Avenue society' man 
and a Tenth Avenue truck driver. George 
Nash played the part of Blake, which is 
the same as saying, that it could have 
liardly been improved upon.' 

With Blake in prison and Copley out, 
the third act develops .into a nice tea 
party. The former convict, who wore a 
Times Square hairdressing, all oily and 
shiny, throughout his years in Sing Sing, 

b now the main spirit of a home for re- 
formed thugs and murderers, and, by some 
means never revealed, secured a pardon 
for Blake, who, during his stay "up the 
river" has elected a governor from his cell. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY 
Son— A thriller. 
World— Old-time melodrama. 
Tribune Preposterous. 
Herald— A iicceis. 
American — Melodrama. 
Tim*a~Beainnino it melodrama. 



CAROLINE GRAVES DEAD 

Caroline Hentes Graves, in private life 

Mrs. Sheppard S. Friedman, died last 

■ week at Mount Sinai Hospital. • Death 

resulted from an operation performed for 

appendicitis. 

Mrs. Friedman was well .known for hei 
musical comedy work and was the. wife 
of Sheppard S. Friedman, ' a writer for 
the Evening Wodd. Interment took place 
at- Mt. Kisco, N. *Y 7 on Friday Jas$. --•• 



"LE POILU,'' WAR-TIME 
OPERETTA, RECEIVED 
WITH ENTHUSIASM 

"he Poilu,'^ a musical operatic comedy, 
fresh from Parisian triumphs, made its 
bow to a New York audience at the re- 
juvenated Gaixick Theatre last Monday 
night. . If you had not just stepped off 
Broadway, you could scarcely have 'be- 
lieved that you were in a New York the- 
atre, for the ' atmosphere was 'entirely 
French. Dainty French ushers, garbed at- 
tractively in costumes of the tri-color, a 
typical French audience, and a play spoken 
almost entirely in French,- gave an' -un- 
mistakable continental flavor.' At the 
close of the first act enthusiasm rah riot 
The audience rose to join the actors in 
singing the "Marseillaise," as French flags 
waved triumphantly. 

But this does not tell you what "Le 
Poilu" is about. "PoUu" is the French 
word for "bearded" or "hairy." "I* Poilu" 
is the unkempt French soldier in the 
trenches, to whom every loyal French girl 
sends gifts and love letters. She appoints 
herself his godmother. The "Poilu" in 
this story is Robert Vnldler, who comes 
to visit bis godmother, Suzanne Le Tilloy, 
whom be had never seen. Suzanne's 
grandmother receives him, pretending that 
she is the object of his affections. Su- 
zanne enters disguised as a maid, and wins 
the admiring glances of Robert. The kind 
old lady (really she is very young and 
charming) consents to their marriage, after 
the ruse Is revealed;;'' 

So. much for the bare plot There were 
some dozen or more. interpolated numbers, 
the best of which were'Tor You and' Me" 
sung by Marguerite Deschamps. a talented 
young lady ; "Saint* Snranne." by Made 
line D'Eepinoy, wtio was not happily cast 
for the role of the seductive Suzanne, al- 
though she gang wellj Chanson "Patri- 
otique" sung by Jeanne Maubourg, late 
of the Metropolitan Opera Co., who sang 
and acted magnificently and carried the 
first act to a successful climax ; and "Cou- 
plets a Cupidon" a duet by Mile. D.'Es- 
pinoy. and. Andre Bellon, who was the 
"Poilu," characteristically French in ges- 
ture and manner. Others deserving of 
mention are Alice Marin. as a. maul; Pierre 
Mindaist as the Colonel ; Gerard Viterbo 
as Fetfuzee. the funny orderly, and Bmile 
Detramontas as Justin. The music was pleas- 
ing in parts, but not characterized by a 
great degree of originality : ranch of it was 
decidedly cheap. 



"BETTY" AUSPICIOUSLY 
OPENED AT GLOBE 
HITCHCOCK THE STAR 



WHAT THE DAILIES SAY 

Sun— A fine patriotic production. 
American— "Le Poilu" French operetta, 
charming. 

Times — Stirring and melodiout entertain- 
ment. 
Tribune— Witty farce. 
Herald — Hutic it charming. 



"Betty" — A musical comedy In three acta. 

presented at the Globe Theatre. 

Oct. 2, 1916. 

Oast 

Duke of Crowbrldge Joseph Herbert 

Cersrd. The Earl of Bererly J. Santley 

Lord D'Arcy Pliyne.. Raymond Hitchcock: 

Dartd Playne Master Lowrle 

The Hon. Victor Halifax. . .Henry Vincent 
AcbiUe Jotte. a dressmaker. . .Peter Page 

miller, a bntlrr Sam Burbsnk 

A if. a pace Master Cramptoo 

Cedrlc AUn [•,-,„ 

Lathers, a «let Eocene Berera 

Dors. Countess of Playne. Kather'e Stewart 

•aUquette Justine Johnstone 

Estell. EHeeo xman 

Mrs. Bswlln. Verda Shelberg 

Jane Marlon Darlcs 

Betty Iry Sawyer 



"Betty," the new musical play in which 
Raymond Hitchcock is starring this sea- 
son, opened at the Globe Theatre on Tues- 
day evening of last week, and scored a 
big success. Mr. Hitchcock is to be con- 
gratulated on his new vehicle, which fur- 
nishes him the best part in which he has 
been seen for some time. The piece is 
beautifully staged, the story is unusually 
well brought out, the music good, and the 
production altogether is most pleasing. 

The story deals with the adventures of 
the twenty-one year old cousin of Mr. 
Hitchcock, who prefers a life of pleasure 
surrounded by beautiful young women to 
the marrisge upon which his stern old 
father has set his heart. In the attempt 
to force his son into matrimony, the father 
threatens to disinherit him unless he mar- 
ries immediately. Angered by this threat, 
the son proposes to "Betty," a maid in the 
house, who accepts. The father does not 
feel the displeasure he pretends, realising 
that "Betty" Is a good and virtuous as well 
ns a very lovely girl. The marriage takes 
place, and the bridegroom sends bis bride 
into the country alone. Some time later, 
when she has become the reigning success 
of the London' season in her new position, 
they meet again and discover that they love 
one another. 

Joseph Santley plsyed the role of the 
yonng adventurer in bis own graceful and 
pleasing way. His dancing was a delight, 
as always. Seldom has he given a more 
finished performance. Ivy Sawyer, In the 
role of "Betty," was altogether rharming. 

Raymond nitchcock. as Lord D'Arcy 
Playne, a sort of "bachelor cousin," was n 
joy. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY 

Sun — A typical English comedy. 
World— Tatteful entertainment. 
Tribune — ifixture of good and bad. 
Herald — Full of melodiet. 
American — "Betty" tcore* success. 
Times — Humor, sentiment and music thin. 



HIPPODROME 

MANAGEMENT CHARLES DILLINGHAM 
Nl«bt» st &15: Just, everr dar. S.IJ 
"THE BIG SHOW 

STAGED BY R. B. BURNSIDB 

With the Incomparable PAVLOWA 

NEW ICE I MAMMOTH I 100 NOVELTIES 

BALLET I Ml.NSTREIS I 10MPBWLE 

World's biggest snow at lowest prices; 



klaw A erlanoer-h New Musical Comedy 

MISS SPRINGTIME 

By EMMERICH KALMAN, Composer of "SARI." 



HlfflCArU THEATRE, Wsst«thSt 
nWOUll Brea. 8.20. Mats. Wed. * Bat. 
"The Gladdest Play In All ths Glad 

World."— Tsl.gram. 

POLLYANNA 

COHAN & HARRIS ( ^£S T 

Bros. 8.15. Mats. W«d. ft Bat. at S.1S. 

^^f 8 "llEINTRlJDER 

A Drama by CTBIL HAHCODBT, Author of "A 
Pair of 811k Stocklass." -A Lady-. Name." Etc. 



FI II .TQN W - ««" ■«• Era. at 8.30 

WILLIAM H A BBH A. insists 

"ARMS AND THE GIRL" 

A Comedy brOBANT STB WART and 
BOBEBT HAKKK. 



EMPIRE n-WAT A SOU, ST. Srrs. 8.15 

™ . ■■■*>*=• Mats. Wed. ft Rat. st 3.1J> 

CHAS. PBOBMAN CO Manaier 

CBARLE8 FROHMAN CO. Prrnntl ^^ 

MARGARET ANGLIN 

to con&" CAROLIN E "'"iS&ST" 
LYCEUM 



CHAS. PBOBMAN CO. 

P relents 



«th St. * inesy. Bra. (.11 
Mats. Tbora. * Bat. a.n 

OTIS SKINNER 

IN THE AMERICAN' COMEDY 

MISTER AHTONIO BugTH t & llimoit 

Rl A I Til BWAV ft 42d STREET 

■* * a 1 * Ma M ^M Contlnuoos from noon dally 

BESSIE LOVE In 

"SISTER OF SIX" 

T r?i.SiV-JfS DCAT,0NAI " wwa ab» iw- 

OOMPA B S BT i E R1ALT0 ORCHESTRA. 



ELTINGE THJATEB. W. «d gt. Ers. at 8.S0 
asaiaanwai Mats. Wed. and Sat. st 2.80 

A. H. WOODS present! 

CHEATING CHEATERS 



tfVlf I ST ""J" 10 - "■'»- "«<• * Sit I JO 

m * OUw Uorr.ro'. ml IsiadilM 



By MAX MABCIN. 
-,5EA M ' THZATXZ. B'WAT * <Jd 

COHAN'S K. ..'^ "■" w - * 

KLAW A EBlanoek Managata 

"'pra^g- 4800 SEVEN CHANCES 

A comedy, by HOI COOPER Mr.QRL'E 
"Eseeptlooslly Ponny"— World 

REPI)Bllr THEA ' rHE V W - <M. Ht. Era. at 8.50 

smaja tout MlU . WeJ) _ Md „., „ 1io 

A. H. WOODS presents 

HIS BRIDAL NIGHT 

Willi the DOLLY SISTERS 

By Lawrenee Blslng. Re»lsed by Margaret Mayo. 

BEOAJJWAY * «ath BT. 
Era. at f.l.*>. Mats. 
Wed. A Mat. at 2. 13 



GAIETY 



Ort-Qti-r Morjtan 
Panrprw. Aron Come<Jy 4. 



-. «— ru, ,TTir. uLanin* rurcp*< \jr*>l £ 1 .7 . ' ' * ■ *'■*■• 

^TA^SDOWN TURN TO THE RIGHT 

BfaarrfaW aad ^aahWi at "tht Gnat lsnf." By W1NCHEXL SMITH and JOHN B. HAZEabd 

COLUMBIA THEATRE 

bway, 47ta STREET, N. Y. 

FRED IRWIN'S MAJESTIES 

CIVILIZATION 

"Sttrpewlm aad Wonderful --Tribnna 

PARK THEATRE "^S^^r 



B. T. KEITH'S JACK HORWORTH. MA- 
PA IiACE T * LtZ AM ' Bmm « Cor- 
Broadwv * «Ttb St. Tlfna - 
Mat. Dally at 2 P. M. 

25, SO and 75c. Al Herman. Mike Donlln 

Ersry Bight "O' 1 Marty McBale. Tbr 

2S-SO-75-tl-SlJ0 Reals' Alaska Trio. 

RlTf AtZATTB w '" Mth *'■ E '«- 8;l " 

n ' F'M i r mJB^fcP Mats. Thnrs. A BsL st 2.20 
3d TBAB DAVID BBLASCO prssesU 

THE BOOMERANG 



market."— ETB. mail 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14. 1916 



ACTORS PROMISED 

AID TO GET VOTES 



Chairman (Hear Straus, of the Public 

Sarrica Commiuion, Gxraa Actor 

Hop* of Exercia* of Franrrir— 



The cause of the actors of this State 
who are anxious to obtain the passage of 
a eonatitutional amendment permitting 
them to vote wherever they mar chance to 
he in the State on Election Day, regard- 
less of registration restrictions, was given 
an impetus last week at a meeting of the 
Actors' Equity Association in the Hotel 
Astor. 

Chairman Oscar Straus of the Public 
Service Commission, one of the speakers' 
of the occasion, said that the absent voters 
measure which had been defeated some 
time ago in the Legislator*;, deserved an- 
other hearing, and if the Equity Associa- 
tion would lend ita efforts toward interest- 
ing the stage In general in the movement, 
be would personally sea to it such a hear- 
ing was obtained, even if he had to go' 
to Albany himself to do it. 

The meeting was held for the purpose 
of formulating plans to institute action 
toward obtaining such a hearing, and 
Chairman Straus* remarks were greeted 
with prolonged cheers. Mr. Straus told 
the actors their profession was always the 
first to recognize need and to answer the 
call for assistance from any way in life, 
and, therefore, deserved consideration at 
the hands of other citisens. 

Other speakers were Dudley Field 
Malone and Mrs. James Lees Laidlaw. 



ELTINCE BUYS HOTEL 

Julian Eltinge has purchased a hotel on 
Brandt Lake In the Adirondack*, which will 
be conducted by bis father, Joseph Dalton. 
It will be known aa Brandt Lake Inn, and 
will be run as an all-year resort. Mr. Dal- 
ton is an experienced boniface. 



POONTON RETURNING EAST 

James Poonton, the well known advance 
agent, who has been in Arizona for his 
health since last December, sends word that 
he will leave Tucson for New Xork on 

Oct. IS. 



UKULELE MAKERS PROSPER 

Honolulu, Oct. 5. — The ukulele craze 
in the United States is making Hawaiian 
manufacturers rich. At the end of August, 
1915, manufacturers of ukuleles in the Ha- 
waiian Islands were turning out about 500 
or 600 instruments per month. At the end 
of August, 1916, the output was extended 
to 1,600 per month, with demands from 
mainland music dealers which could not 
be met. 

There are eight principal manufacturers 
of ukuleles in Honolulu, with a scattering 
of instruments coming from small makers 
in the other islands. Each manufacturer 
has turned his small work shop into a fac- 
tory, adding new workers and increasing 
the plant as rapidly as possible. 



"BEN HUR" IN REHEARSAL 
"Ben Hut," as announced in these col- 
umns several weeks ago, la to be revived 
this season by Klaw ft Erlanger and Joseph 
Brooks. Rehearsals are now on and the 
ajaagajy will be ready for the road about 
the first of November. A tour of the Middle 
West will be made. 



"NOTO" PASSES AWAY 
"Noto," a Japanese comic opera, by Mary 
Lee T^ertheimer, which was given a trial 
performance la Hartford, Conn., has Joined 
the storuge warehouse brigade. After the 
first performance ita promoters decided it 
would be futile to continue it All book- 
ings were canceled and the members of the 
company returned to New York. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

M. B. Curtis was accused of shooting 
Policeman Grant in San Francisco. 

Agnes Herndon toured in "La Belle 
Marie." 

Peck and Fursman sent but ''All in the 
Family." ■ 

Tile New York Phonograph Company 
phoned a long distance record to Saratoga, 
N. Y. 

"Down on the Farm" was the song. 

Mme. Zazel did the leap for life with the 
Forepaugh Show. 

Nettie Huffman was with the Night 
Owls. 

Maggie Mitchell' appeared with "Little 
Maverick." 

New Plays: "Dolly Varden" with 
"Patti Rosa": "Qoack, M. D."; "Little 
Lord Fauntleroy"; "Paradise Flats"; 
"Thermidor"; "New York Day by Day"; 
"Irish Honor"; "Judith, a Daughter of 
Israel'; "Nero"; "The Waif of the Sea"; 
"Jack Royal of the 82nd": "Lord 
Booney"; "The Marquis' Wife"; "A Jollj 
Surprise"; "Another Man's Shoes"; 
"Down on the Farm'; "Gabrielle" ; "The 
Devil's Editor"; "The Dwarfs Wedding." 

M. Witmark secured an injunction re- 
straining Frank Tousey from- publishing 
an Infringement on "The Picture that is 
Turned Towards the Wall." 

Charles Cowles played the Stranger in 
"A Hole in the Ground." 



LONG ISLAND HOME FOR CRAVEN 

Frank Craven has bought a waterfront 
plot in the Great Neck estates section at a 
reported price of $7,500. Mr. Craven has 
had plans drawn for a New England 
Colonial house for the plot. Ernest Truex 
also bought a plot on Vista Drive, Great 
Neck estates,' adjoining bis hoose. 



"TWIN BEDS" TOURING 

Chatham. Ont. Oct 6.— The Western 
company of "Twin Beds" has. opened its 
season under the direction of A. S. Stern 
and company. The cast included J. M. 
Morrison, Luis AlbernI, William Weston, 
Marguerite Blsser, Antoinette Bochte, 
Bess Stafford, Martha McGraw, John 
Coughlin, carpenter; Fred Black, proper- 
ties ; F. Shelling, electrician ; Louis Miller, 
advance representative, and Felix Rlsser, 
manager. 

FIELD SUIT OFF CALENDAR 

The $10,000 suit of Al. G. Field against 
the Trenton Theatre Building Co. on the 
ground of breach of contract has been 
removed from the calendar in the United 
States District Court This action fol- 
lowed a conference of counsel at which it. 
was announced that Mr. Field was in the 
West and could not attend a trial for some 
time. A new date will be set. 



STERN SEEKS SEPARATION 

Harold Stern, an orchestra leader, is 
suing his wife, Estelle, for separation, alleg- 
ing cruelty. Mrs. - Stern filed - a counter . 
claim for separation, asking $75 a week 
alimony and counsel fees of $750. 



DON'T BE A RIP VAN WINKLE. 



E UP! 

Shake the rafters with these half-dozen high-voltage Musical Hits 



iensalion From the West 



PRAY SLIGHTS;*. OUT 

The Mosl Talked-of Coon Shout in Decades 
I Eclipses Its Great Forerunner "Ballin' the Jack"- 



MY OWN IONA 

The Hawaiian Hit that Swept America Like a Cyclone. 

Gilbert, Priedland and Morgan, at Their Best 

Sung by Vaudeville'* Foremost Headliners 



SHADES OF NIGHT 

Songdom's Peerless Favorite 

Superb Companion to "The Glow Worm" 

By L. WOLFE GILBERT and ANATOL FRIEDLAND, the 

Writers of "'My Little Dream Girl'' and "My Sweet Adair." 



TENNESSEE BLUES 

The "Blues" Which Is In Every Live Singer's Repertoire! 
A Sad Sweet Melody of Intoxicating Charm. 



OUT:, CRADLE:; MY HEART 

Gilbert & Friedland's Fascinating Ballad Success. 



Unforgettable Kind 



THE WORLD IS HUNGRY 
A LITTLE BIT OF LOVE 

The Western Novelty Gem 
Lassoed After Keen Competition. 



WE ALSO PUBLISH 
ARMY BLUES and ROSE OF HONOLULU 



Prof/Copies 

Sent on receipt of 

late program and 

5 cents (or 

mailing 



Jos. W. Stern & Co. 

102 West 38th St. NewYort 



L WOLFE 6IINRT, 

Mgr. Prof. Dept. 

1556 BROADWAY, *. Y. 

A few steps from 
Palace Theatre Bids;. 

CHICAGO 
14S N. dark Stmt 



ictober 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



Dr. Max Thorek wishes to announce 
st he will be at the Hotel Knicker- 
cker. New York, on Oct. 21 and 22 and 
the Bel lcvue- Stratford, Philadelphia, - 
:t 23 to 28, where his friends and pa- 
nts may see him. 



■OT BUS BY 

EVERY TOM, D^CK and HARRY 

It Cafe S1.50— Tkat'i Why 

Emj Skttel. Mmtai*. rarefy. SUt-W«lk in. 

Gai. Eb., MtaisW H 

LONDON'S 

VAUDEVILLE BUDGET 

IS SUIE FIIE STUFF 
lOHDOI'S VAUDEVILLE BUDGET Ft! 
Sumo 1916-17 ttotjlti 
C SKETCHES F01 2 BALES. Irlih, Dittk. Man. 
las, ENMrtrit. Silly KM art Biaa. 8 ■•«»- 
UK8ES. MS Mill. D.M.. Tn«». Jew. Black art 
Eiaatrx. 7 SKETCHES FOB Bali AID FE- 
MALE, pfbs, miriinudi. Mil. lafinsisort, 
■IsO, Hakraw, Irlih. Eanatrfc. TABLSIO, CABS, 
■ITS. 12 Wartarfal PARODIES. PUCE $1.50. 
art saswjr laak It sat ntMrt. THE BEST BUDB- 
ET IB SNOW BBSIBESS. BBOEB 0U1CK. 
LSHBBB'S VAUDEVILLE SUBSET, 
CSILLV BLOB.. CHICAGO 



DOLLY CONNOLLY 




Theatrical 
Outfitter 



WANTED 

Tuba-String Bass 

CcUs and 2nd Violin with Favorable double In 
braaa. Also vocaliata and daoceri who can 
double harmony horn. 

Comedy Musical Act 

Male or female — 4 to 6 people. Address John 
W. Voir.I. Mar. Vofd'i Bis Mlnatrala. Allen- 
town. Fa., Oct. 12; Easton, 13; Scranton, 14; 
Oneonta, N. Y., 16; Norwich, 17; Bingbamton, 
18; Jort JervU, 19; Middletown, 30; Newbnrs. 21. 



B.F. Keith's Circuit of Theatres 

A. PAUL KEITH, PrasUaat. . B. F. ALBEE, Vka-Pras. * Can. liar. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Booking Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 



W. S. CLEVELAND 

WANTS THE BEST IN VAUDEVILLE 

Salt* 2BI. Ordway B1J., m Market St, NEW AUK. NEW JERSEY. PHONE Be MARKET 



BACK: OIV BROADWAY 



ED: VINTON \ BUSTER 



Colonial Theatre This Week 



- With the Same Success and Same Wonderful Dog — Alhambra Theatre Next Week 
Direction MORRIS & FEIL 





CHARLES VAN OSTEN 



Vaudeville's Classiest Singing, 
Talking, Acrobatic, Dancing Act. 

Booked Solid until 1918 on U. B. O. TIME 



A 

afl 
"aft? 


il^^S 


BBBBV 

' IHa ' 


^BBB 

i; ,m 




IPjk. 


BHr5kLT*'J 


1 PJ hj"2 


?W^bb1 ''«JV.ilS 



SAM J. PARK 



Direction KAUFMAN & HYDE, Inc. 



FORMERLY MAXIM P. LOWE, with H. B. MAR1NELLI, LTD., 




AXI 



FITZGERALD BLDG., 



NOW ASSOCIATED WITH 




P. LOWE (inc.) 



TEL. BRYANT 4499 




1482 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Artists Desiring First Class Business Management and 
Personal Representation in Securing Bookings for Vaude- 
ville Productions — Circus — To Communicate at Once 

FOR FAIR BOOKINGS— BIG ACTS WANTED 

For Our Forthcoming Productions Need More Talented Principals 

Address Maxim F*. 



30 



THE NEW YOR K CL I P P E R 



October 14, 1916 



"WILL UND WIEBKE," 
NEW GERMAN PLAY 
SEEN AT BANDBOX 

In accordance with its policy of chang- 
ing the programme weekly, a new play 
"Will ur.d Wiebke," a four-act comedy by 
Fidur von Zobeltitz, was presented at the 
liimUboz the past week by Managers Ru- 
dolph Christians and Hans Baruch. 

While somewhat old-fashioned, the plot 
is evolved cleverly and contains many 
humorous complications and situations, 
though, naturally, it is hardly brilliant 
enough to vouchsafe the desire to bear it 
twice, i. c. once from the prompter's box 
and once from the actors, an ordeal forced 
upon the audience. - - ' 

' In fact, in a honse of such diminutive 
dimensions as the Bandbox, the prompter 
ought to be done away with altogether, 
which, however, would necessitate the cast's 
being letter perfect. In this case almost 
everyone was- far from it 

The two principal parts, those of. Count 
Will von Preysingk and the orphan girl 
W'ebke, were played by Heinricb Marlow, 
one of the old favorites of our German 
theatre, goers, and Margarete Christians. 
Herr Marlow played as well as ever, 
though his makeup was somewhat too 
young, and at times, especially in the third 
act. he exaggerated just a little. FrL 
Christians presented herself for the first 
time- in- a. really big, part and while she 
might have displayed a little more tem- 
I'er.tment and fire, her youth and beauty, 
two powerful allies, and her splendid cos- 
tumes, were effective in making the audi- 
ence overtook this lack. In time, this 
novice may develop into a valuable member 
of the ensemble. 

Clairette Clair, who is taking care of the 
old ladies' parts, played well, and her 
pleasing and dignified appearance are 
valuable assets. Anni Uub-Foerster did 
well in her ' part and looked exceedingly 
pretty and well-dressed. Wilhelm Muelhan 
showed the necessary reserve and discre- 
tion in the portrayal of tbe overripe, and 
finally discarded, lover. Hnnns -Unterkir- 
rher. Emil He's, Ernst Holznagel, Bruno 
Schlegel. Margarete Tarau, Otto Meyer and 
Curt Manthey took good care of their re- 
spective smaller parts. 

WANTED QUICK 

Good General Business Man 

One rv>inp Specialties G(t«o Preference. State all 
y«>u An In first letter with lowest salary anil be 
rraily to Join on wire. 

Address — EBERT EDWARDS 

Mar. Edwards-Wilion Co.. Lynn. Ind. 



ALICE BUTLER WITH TREE 

Alice Butler, late of stock, will appear 
in Shakespeare this season, having been 
engaged to support Sir Herbert Tree, 
whose ' company will open at the Hollis 
Street Theatre, Boston, two weeks hence. 



WALLACE PLAYERS MOVE 

Peoria, HI., Sept. 30.— Morgan Wallace 
Players, whose season at the Majestic here 
was brought to a close, owing to tbe burn- 
ing of the theatre, opened Sunday, Oct 1, 
i't the New Grand, Sioux City, la. 



WIKOFF ON ROAD TO RECOVERY 

SpanroraxD, O., Oct 9. — Will J. Wikoff, 
character actor and stock director, who has 
been confined at his home here since August 
19 with a severe spell of sickness,, is well 
on the .way. to recovery and expects to be 
back in harness in the near future. 



NORTHS ANNOUNCE NEW ARRIVAL 
Topeka, Kan., Oct 7. — Mr. and Mrs. 
"Ted" North, with the Theodore Lorch 
Stock Co., announce the arrival of Edward 
Ernest Oct. 3. The company is playing 
mi indefinite engagement at the 'Hip" 
Theatre. 




" UBS 



Satin ,sbppe?s tn stock m 
an colors. Entire compan- 
ies,, fitted in 24 hours. 

hmyStafraadStnttdne 
majanaMntia satisfied here 



155^1 B LUfly 



AT LIBERTY 

THE BIXLERS « 



THEO M 



Comedy. Charac'era ,or Omni Brcajm ss. Stoci. 
1>I». »r One Here. E.m erieuccd. *>Git and rell- 
,tl»"c. **Mnrar ••.-* flint «li;n't ptt>\ keep off." 

BOX 61. PETEBJ3BUBG, JDCH. 



F=? S GUARANTEED 
AKE-UP BEST MADE 



WANTED] 

FOR PERMANENT STOCK 

GENERAL BUSINESS MAN 

General business woman; leading; man; scenic 
artist, to play pirts. Send photos; one and ; 
t*-o a week. Tickets, if I know you. Address 
FRANCIS V. BOYCE, 17 W«at Locuat St, I 

SHRINE THEATRE! 

ETJTLiND. VT. 
()iu n Time tor 1 night stands or for week's en- | 
rai-'fiwnt. beginning Oct. 30. 5->atfn*r capacity I 
1.100. 
Aadrcti H. B. PISE. Mrr, 

WANTED 

Musical Comedy People 



Show opena Cleveland 
altlt Bern*, 
id othfl 



Ohio. 



Ore n'trht Mand. 

ahent Oct. 30tb 

Primi Scans Chor»» Gir'i a nd oth er useful 

If "iica! ComeJy oeonlo, IH/nn JOKH w. BOW, 

i:c« West T9th Flat*. CIe*a'a?d. Ohio. 



FOR RENT 

Broadway Theatre 

Logansport, Ind. 

Second Floor and Gallery 
Seating Capacity 1200 
Will Rent Reasonably 

Write W. H. PORTER, Logaiuport, Ind. 

CLAUDE BLOUNT 

Juvenile and Light Comedy. Height 8* 8*. 
Weight 134. Age 25. 

JUNE BLOUNT 

Ingenne and Soenretta. ITclcht 5' 1*. Weight 90. 
Age 23. Join on wtre. Bellahle managers only. 
Salary. Address OS Fry St., lamed, *—■■* 



WATNTE D 

PERMANENT STOCK LOCATION 

For the Greatest Money Getter in the Show Business Today 

E,D. WILLIAMS STOCK CO- 

Presenting all the latest and best royalty plays. The best popular price attraction in 
the business, consisting of people that can act, and giving productions worthy of ' 
any $2.00 show. If you want to make money-with your theatre here is your chance. 
Can present two plays a week and make each a production. Address at once 

ED. WILLIAMS. Krug Theatre, Omaha, Neb. " 

AT LIBERTY FOR BURLESQUE 





THE JOLLY GBaUklAAf-tr 

Anything from a "German Baron" to a "ChiDpiece.** Comedian, producer with book, lyrics 
and music Season 1J14-15, Prmcip-d Comedian with Max Spiegel's "Winning Widows." Season - 
ltlS-lt, Principal Comedian with Churchill's "Around- die Town."* Open for Immediate engage- 
ment for balance of aeataon; can Join on wire. Write or wire 
■ BEN HOLMES, Box US*, Richmond, Vs. 

AT LIBERTY 

PRODUCER AND PRINCIPAL COMEDIAN 

or Company intact. After twenty weeks stock Tabloid, -Musical Comedy, at the Academy -The- - 
atre, Buffalo, N. Y. Only first class houses or reliable managers write or wire. 

' FRED GEDD1NG, 119 Johnson Park. Buffalo, W. Y. 

W/\NTED-l2E THE EMERS0N-MAYL0N PLAYERS 

Young: Ingenue Leading Woman, strong enough to feature. Must he Good Looking 
with Plenty of Wardrobe. Man for Second Business — Good Musical Act or Novelty 
Act— Tenor and Bass Singers for Quartet — AH must play parts. State exact age, 
height and weight; also send photos and programs; same will be returned. This is 
a First Class Repertoire Company playing Royalty Bills, so you must make good. 
Address- BRO WNSVILLE. PA. 

WANTED— BUSINESS MANAGER 

Who understands stock. Must be young. „,. 

FRANCIS V. BOYCE, 17 W. Locust St., Newark, Ohio. 

AT LIBERTY : 

FRANK L. MADDOCKS LAURA MAE PARK 

Heavies, Juveniles, Light Comedy, Ingenues, Boys, Kid Parts, Eccentric 

Utility. Age 32 years, height 5 feet Characters." Age 22 years, height 5 

9 inches, weight 145 pounds. feet 5 inches, weight 125 pounds. 

Experience, Wardrobe, Versatility and Accurate Study. 

" FRANK L. MADDOCKS, care Saratoga Hotel, Chicago, I1L 
WANTED-MUSICIANS 

A Leader Who Can Arrange. How many times have you read an "ad" like this? Can YOU 
arrange?. If ao» this will not interest yob; but if not, send 2c. stamp for trial lesson. Three 
trial fcmsKina free. If not then convinced you'll succeed, you owe us nothing*. TAUGHT BY 
MAIL SUCCESSFULLY, PRACTICALLY, RAPIDLY. You must know the rudiments of music 

and mean business, otherwise -don't write. 

WIIC0X SCHOOL OF COMPOSITION 



■ C W. WILCOX, Director " 

Boa C, 2ZS FiTlh Avenue, New York City 



AT LIBERTY, OCTOBER 21st 

DICK ELLIOTT 

Versatile Comedian For permanent stock or high-class repe rtoir e. Age 30. Height 

5 feet 7 inches. Weight 1 60 pounds. Address DICK ELLIOTT, Wayne, Nebraska. 



Ir.ii't i\\ StOtfag Members .1 !br Theatric*! ProJtitliM !f> Eu' 



GREAT NEW UNPUBLISHED SONG NUMBERS 



:ker h|a 



KNICKERBOCKER HlARMOiNYSTUDIOS 1 ^".:;;: 



MUSICAL COMEDY 

people ia all lines' to join on wire, including 
S. ft D. Soubrette with lots of pep. Chorus 

Girls that can sing. To ininre reply all roust . 

stste age, height and weight. De LOSS MAS- 
QUERADERS. New Kensington, Pa. 



Qoiclf Sadie Belgarde^i^.nt 

Dramatic People 

With Experience — Ability — Wardrobe and Appear- 
ance. Specialties preferred. Don't m isrepres ent 

— all particular* flr»t Ipttpr. Addrror BICHAKD 

ST. vaanr. C.tarill. H. Y.— Oct- • sad Weak. 
Little rail.— Oct. 18 and Week. 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



J&Jp$@iP 




In order to avoid mutalifi and to inaure the 
prompt deivery of the latter* advertised in this 
Hat. a POSTAL CARD moat be sent requesting 
ua to fon»«rd your letter. It muat ba signed) 
with your full nam* and the address to which 



the latter ia to be seat, and the line el business 
followed by the 'aender should be mentioned. 

Please mention th* date (er number) of the 
CUPPER fat which the latter* east for were 



AuUoo, Delia 



Van Bran. Viol* 
Bertha, nUs* 
Bennett. Victoria 
Bartotetu. - ima 
Coleeun, Claudia 
rheUUt. Cberra 
Deponal. Eds* 
DotkeU, Irene 
Dm. Ann 
De Van, Lillian 
Donnelly. AmyW. 

Darts, £dna 

Denton. Nellie 
Esmeralda. Edna 
Katal, Or* 

ytorcaes. Mildred 

Oar*. Son 

Out. kin. c. 

Glbaoo. Nelda 
Gray. Maud 
Glblno, Mra. 
Prank 



LADIES' LIST 

Garrett, Margie 

Glrndon. Time 
DiDhard, Adelaide 
Harcotirt, Daisy 
Hyde, Frances 
Hoostoo, Bulb 
Hayes, Marie 
lndita, rttricesa 
Kerne, Agnes 
Klngsl?y, Tbelma 
Lyons, Jessie 
Lord. Lillian 
La Bergtre, Elsie 

Marlon. Marie 

Hoeateulek, Elsie 
May, Jessie 
Manrl. Irene 
Meara. Irene 
MtGratil, Anna 
Manden, Violet 
HeCoy. Patty 
Oakley. May 
Osmond. Marie 
Owl. Mrs. B. 



Pringlo. Jolly 

Delia 
Phillips. Ulnna 
Bulh, Baby 
Russell. Georgle 
Boss. Tina 
BuS3?U. Mae 

Lindsay * 
Bannond, Utile 

B. 
Starr, Margarita 
Starr. Mis* D. 
Snyder, .una 
Teela. PeiaT 
Taylor, Edna 
Vlarda, Max. 
Varden, Erelyn 
Vaiajbarj, Ger- 
trude 
Woods. Nellie 
Wmn. Bessie 
WilleU. Mist 
Zimmerman, 
Martha 



GENTLEMEN'S LIST 



Allwyn, Maeklyn 
Asbley. Herbert 
Armstrong. H. G. 
Allen. Billy 
Adler. Chas. J. 
Abbey, Edmund 
Ayen, Dudley 
Aosiet, Jack 
American Amuse- 
ment Go. 
Arthebold. F. 
Actor. H. H. 



Brown. Howard E. 

Bariove, Fred 

Bracken. Tedd 
Nick 
. Win. 
Bltrble 
. Prtd 

Baker, John 

Blair, Jas. 

Bowers. 0. Matt 

Biemlsb. Frank 

Beverir, Bey 

Brown. Geo. U . 

Brown, J. VT. 



Boyd, Larry 
Brawn, Jas. J; 
Blcknell * Glbney 
Burke, John 
Bed!ll. N. J. 
Beasley, Al 
Beaudonl. Fred 
Baker. Sherman 

A RrtnljiD 
Brazel. J. C. 

1 
Colar. Jack 
Coggshall. J. B. 
Cob*n. Manny 
Ctartstys Hippo 
snows 
Crosby, Scott a 

Puglla 
CoIUns A Hawley 
Cunningham. 

Billy 
Carl-ton. Frank 
Callahan. Frank 

H. 
Carlln. Bobert 
Cutle. Harry B. 

Cain, Artllur 



Clifford A Wllmot 

( photo) 
Chureb. L. H. 
Du Fayne. Frank 
Dickens A Floyd 
Duisll. Harry 
Dunning, Bodle 
Denting. Arthur 
De Lais. John 
Derelde. Ed. 
Darldson, W. J. 
Drake. F. a 
D'Lelr, Joe 
Dampler, Frank 
Desmond. L. L. 
Delnna, Walter 
De Grant. Oliver 
Delmar. Bomey 

Douglass. Bale 

Dunbar. Erroll 

De Forrrst. J. 8. 
Dermotti, Tbos. 
Elk* Trio 
Ecunomoa. Therm 
Elliott. M. C. 

Farrell, Billy 

Flarstrop. NVal J. 



Flynn, J. J. 

Flak. Chas. L. 
r'on-paugb. Geo. 

A. 
Finney, a W. 
Frit.. Bam 
Foley. Eddie 
Fi. Ids a Allen 
Flncb, Leon ' 
Feldman A Chris- 
tie 
Frank. J. E. 
Gllmore A Castle 
Glilen. Chas. J. 
Goetz, Coleman 
GUlin. Frank C. 
Gorver, Henry 
Gordon, Paul 
Gerard. Ralph 
Geyer Stock Co. 
Calvin. Jaa. 
C*lbraith, Ted 
Grabaoe, Ferd 
Goodrldge. Geo. 
Geer. Johnny 
Glggerfleid. Mr. 
Crw. Bobert 
Crlfflth. Jack 
Gagnoo, Claude 
Gould, Frank 
Harvey, Jack 
HlUert, Con 
Hulcnlnsoo Chas 
Harford. Jack 
Healy. Tim 
Hunt. Jack 
Haftle, John W. 
Hardman, Joe 
Hougbtoo. A. P. 
Hadgjns. T. 0. 
Hreay, J. T. 
HUlla. Paul 
narrit. Meyer 
Halloway. Fred J. 
Hammond. Chas. 
Jolsoo. Harry 
Jackson. Gay M. 
Jam's. Jiinmy 
Jeavons. Tbos. J. 
Klnksde. Larry 
Kub.-ler. Chas. 
Kearney. John T. 
Klrkham. J. Ellis 
Kane. John E. 
Kemptnn. On. K. 



Le Paige, Barrow 
L* Trade, N. A. 
Lurch. Ibeo. 
Ugstroot, Antlrew 
tux. Grant 
U Boy. W. D. 
Lambe. Le* 
La Mam, Flying 
1 a**n American 
Producing Go. 
Lutcr. II. A. 
Laaler, Frank 

alutphy, H. Fran- 
cis 

Morgan, Jack 
Mechan, John 
Marshall. Walter 
Meyer, Cbas. E. 
Meakin, Hardle 
MenetU A Sldelll 
Mae Associate 

Player* 
Mack. Tony 
Mayo, Earl C. 
Melntyre, Bob 
McAvoy, Arthur 
llcDenrjoii, £ J. 
Miller, Seymour 

Marshall. O. 0. 

Mauley, Fred 

McAllister, Jack 

Michael, J. H. 

Maekay. Frank 

Murphy, J. Turn. 

Newmao, Al C. 

Nye, B. H. 

Norcross. D. F. 

O'Neill. Bobby 

Oliver. 0. T. 

Owens. J. N. 

"Prince A Pau- 
per" Co. Mgr. 

Pollock. E. E. 

Paul. W. 

Proudlore. Jas. 
D. 

Price. John 

Pearl. Jim 

Paul Bros. 

Pelhams. 'The 

Paltovman. 
Frank 

Parrlsh, Earl 

Russell. Edw. 

Burn, cirl C. 



I Bleb A Bay 
I Remley. Ralph M. 
I Beegc, Darid 
Bogevs, v. B. 
Benals Comedy 

Co. 
Salter, Harold E. 
spencer, W. A. 
A B. W. Ben 

NaT 

Seeman Jarru 

Show* 
Stebblns. 81 
Sanger, Mare 
Stanley. Arthur 
Steele, Frederick 
Selby. Arthur L. 
Sanford. Buster 
Sherwood, W. 
SUiplln. B. M. 
Scblulnger, B. 
Short. Joe 
Sealer. Geo. 
8tickrad, Jack 
Sbelley. John 
Stevens, Gerald 
Taylor, Albert 
Todd. Prank 
Travelers Address 

A Information 

CO. 
Turner, Jack 
Thomas. Jack 
VarUe Players 
Varo, Frank 
Von Smith, Chas. 

E. 
Wilson. Tbos. M. 
Wilson. BlUle 
Wright. A. A H. 

Lane 
WUsoo, Cbas. C. 
Wood. Cully 
Wright. Mr. A 

Mrs. John D., 

Jr. 
Weaver. Edwin 
Waldron, J. L. 
Way. K*rt 
Whitney. Cbas. 

E. 
Williams. Harold 
Wire. Sidney 
Yankee Robinson 

areas 




ANTHONY REIFF, one of the founders 
of the Philharmonic Society and the oldest 
surviving member of the Society, died Oct. 
S at his home In this city. The deceased 
was one of the leading musicians here for 
many years and became an operatic leader 
at the age of eighteen. He introduced 
srrand opera In Australia. -and was with the 
original Gilbert and Sullivan opera com- 
panies. Mr. Relet* wrote the music for the 
original "Hurapty Dumpty," and the in- 
cidental music for the Forrest and Booth 
S reductions. As a boy he was a member of 
enny Llnd'a Orchestra at Castle Garden. 
Mr. ReltC was a former president of the 
Musical Mutual Protective Union and was 
the oldest living member of the Arrrriean 
Institute. 



In the llfa long; memory of my Slater 

BERTHA BERNARD 

How Lonesome I Am 

CASSIE B. SYDELL 



HENRY woodruff, a well known 
actor, died Oct. 6, at the Hotel Algonquin, 
this city. ' The -deceased was born in Jersey 
City, N. J., In 1870 and made his first stage 
appearance in "Pinafore" at the age of 
nine. In 18s? he Joined A. M. Palmer's 
company In "Jim. the Penman." Later he 
gained stellar honors In "Brown of 
Harvard" * In which he appeared for several 
seasons. 

HARRY KENNEDY, of Kennedy & 
Quatrelli. died Sunday morning, Oct. 1, in 
Jersey City and was burled Tuesday, Oct. 
S. In the Bay View cemetery, Jersey City. 

ROWLAND HILL. MAYLAND, manu- 
facturer of musical instruments in Brook- 
lyn, died last week at his home in Freeport, 
U. L. aged sixty-eight years. 
_ COL. W. B. STODDARD, father of Burt 
Stoddard, and himself well known in the 
profession, died September 25 at New 
Britain, Conn , aged seventy-seven years. 

CHARLES W. ALLISON, former super- 
intendent of. the Actors' .Fund Home, on 
staten Island, died October 6 at the Edwin 
"Forrest Home, Holmesburg, Pa„ from 
cancer of the throat. 

WHY DON'T , YOU 

"- Get my price* if yon need new material? 
Interview by appointment. Write today. 
WILL GILL1CK. 105 E.- 89th Street, Now York 




BUILD UP YOUR ACT 

And Double Your Income 

WITH 

DEAGAN 

AlumlDum Chimes 
Pizzicato Nabimbas 

Marimba.phor.es 
Electric Una-Fons 

AND OTHER MUSICAL 
NOVELTIES 

"Write for List of Show-Hoom Bargain*. 

J. C. DEAGAN 

Deagan Building- CO Hjvniiwood At*. 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

NOW READY 

THE I CLIPPER 
RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

For Ssaion 1916-1917 

It contains the names and addresses of Man- 
ager*, Vaudeville and Dramatic Agent* in New 
York, Chicago, Boston. Philadelphia, Pitts- 
burgh. San Francisco, Canada; Music Pub- 
lishers; Theatrical Clnbs and Societies; Mov- 
ing Picture Firms, and other information. 

Sent only on receipt of 2c st amp, accom- 

?anied by a coupon cut from THE NEW 
ORK CLIPPER. 



COT OUT AND 
Send this Coupon and 2c. stamp for a 
copy of 

THE CUPPER RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

a (For l»la-l»17) 

To THE HEW YORK CLIPPER 
UN Broadway, New York 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

HAWAIIAN MUSIC 

"On the Beach at Waikiki" 

The sensational Hawaiian sons success. 
Just the song to give the "Punch" to 
your Act. The wonder song of the year. 
Your audiences will crave it. Now ready 
for professional distribution. Send for Or* 
chestrattons. No charge to bona fide 
artist*. 

NOTE— We publish fully 90 per cent, of 
the best Hawaiian Songs and Hulas. We 
advise you to investigate while -the craze 
for Hawaiian Music is on. 

Agents for Bergstrom Music Co.'* 
Publications 



SheirmanrBiay 

SAN FRANCISCO 



YES, NEW 

EVERY LINE IN 

THE NEW No. 2 

McNALLY'S 
BULLETIN 

PRICE $1.00 

Gigantic book of 132 page* of solid com. 
edy. It contains material that will give 
you an entire new Act or else build np 
your present one 

McNALLVS BULLETIN No. 2 contain* 
17 SCREAMING MONOLOGUES. For 
Hebrew, Irish, Black and White Face, 
Dutch, etc. 

U GREAT ACTS FOR TWO MALES. 
Each act an applause winner. 

• ROARING ACTS FOR MALE AND 
FEMALE. They'll make good on any 
bill. 

22 SURE-FIRE PARODIES. On all of 
Broadway's latest Song Hits. 

A COMEDY SKETCH. Entitled "AN- 
XIOUS TO GET RICH." Ifl the FUN- 
NIEST SKETCH in Vaudeville. 

■McNALLVS MERRY MISTRELS. Con- 
sisting of six corking FIRST PARTS, 
ending with a screaming Finale. "NOT 
GUILTY." 

A TABLOID COMEDY AND BURLESQUE 
entitled, "ITS YOUR WIFE"; also hun- 
dreda of Cross- Fire Gags and jokes and 
additional Comedy Surprise*. Remem- 
ber the price of McNALLY'S BULLE- 
TIN No. 2 is only ONE DOLLAR prr 
copy, with money-back guarantee. 

WM. MeNALLY, 
(1 E 125th St., New York 




Quackery 
and Corns 

Hundreds of treatments have been 

Offered for corns- 
Some were sedatives to quiet pain. 
Some were adds, harsh and risky. 
Some mere quackery. 

Bat one man — a famous chemist- 
studied corns for 23 Tears. And 
finally discovered Blue-jay. 

That Is now the standard treat- 
ment, gentle, certain, scientific. It is 
used on a million corns monthly. 

It baa stopped the corn pain in- 
stantly, 70 million times. It has 
ended the corns completely within 
48 hoars, in 91 per cent of the cases. 
The others take a little longer. 

Stop paring corns. Stop treating 
them in wrong ways. Use Blue-jay, 
and that ends them in a gentle, easy 
way. Prove that tonight. 

Blue-jay 

Ends Corns 

15 and 25 cents— at Druggists 

Also Blue-jay Bunion Plaster* 

BAUER C& BLACK, Chicago and New York 

atakar* ef gargieal Dressings, eta. 



Bid Time Acts 



PAB0D1ES. etc. G-UIOg for 
■La Dp. Rxrtatin work (too*. 
v i Trrms for ittKp. 

MARY THAYER, 21» Broad St. Prov- gt I. 



LISTERINE 

The Safe Antiseptic 

Is a beneficial loiion to prevent 
skin ircitatfon<3^ 
the makeup. ; 



SHOW PftlNHRS, 

LiTHOGRAPHERS, 

ENGRAVERS 



National 



PRIHTfNC 
.ENGRAVING. 



SPECIAL DESIGNS 
FOR EVERY LINE 



hew YORrf^**s^fcri.tcAGQ OF; AMUSEMENT 
re ,- st. iouis . . : 



WHICH OF THESE CATAt-OCUES SHALL WE SEND YOU T 



tWEJStSICAL CMaUK.ilE. No. 14 pf. Dramiti . Rejje'!! 
i s'.H CarALOtlLkcl Rsl«--.. anjlion. Autu Hacvs. ' Mol< 
VATIC CMALOf.oEot Hjpnofic.. Hind Heading ' 
MINSTREL CAYAlOGUE.it Wh:ui and Ctiloreii K, 
MUVCAL.COWEDlf ..C*Ta'lQGUC ; oTO<>fras jn.l.Mus>ta 
ViESIEPH PIAVS CATAlOf.UE olPapsf Mr *. astern ui 
CARH1VAL CAIAtOGUEot Printing for FraUrir,, Carnii 
ClRC-US and WILD WEST CATAl OCUE <.! Cc-npltte !:>..; 
CAttLOr.OE OFOAJES. rVo- B-'Is. SKicl LMters Ban 



:l:fr. Mo,. ,. Vr,uce,'lle. ComrOj, el'.x- 
vrcromi, -Mdc.V ..Aato, Hora* Shows, elc 

"ar'.-.HaridCutf.elr. , 
land Coforr/i Miisrc*! Cnm>dT ota'i'Vmi 
il ShtV^tl -ilh. an4 »*lhdtit tilie 

fiT.s\. tor Opera Hoi)<»;er Te^i* $hoet \ 
vaN Srfret.Fa-rs an«l Use rveflti _; 

el r a* -.'.'. r*~? up-i^-dale'-fai^r . 
ir.ru Uee ap« Hin.^Worl; elf. 



F0". OERS OF NON-ROvALIT CHYS »"n Cdrspirle LineV ot 'aarr *irt>e old latortte 

COMVFflt-'IAL CATALOGUE or rosters a-d c,tt Ow.j if Com ret? 'a: L>e»,rir.t 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 14, 1916 





LAEMMLE TO START NEW 

FILM C OMPAN Y, IS REPORT 

President of Universal Will Shortly Branch Out As Head 
of Own Concern, Trade Circles Hear — Is Now 
in Chicago, Officers State 



Oarl Laemmle, president of the Univer- 
sal Film Co., will soon bead a new mov- 
ing picture organization, if reports among 
;>eopIe in the business turn out to be true. 
a a attempt to verify the story at the Uni- 
versal offices was unsuccessful, it being 
minted that Mr. Laemmle was the only 
niiin who could discuss the matter and 
that he was in Chicago. 

♦ Jonaiderable color was extended the re- 
port by film men who profess to onder- 
stnnd conditions past and present in the 
picture field, because of the numerous 
changes that have occurred in the nun- 
u Ferial policy of the Universal since the 
Spreckels' Sugar interests became strong 
it: the organization. 

H. O. Davis is the representative of the 
Spreckels' Universal stock holdings. Bated 
ns an efficiency engineer, with headquarters 
nt Universal City, Cal., Davis receives 
N100.000 a year for his services as the U's 
general manager. 

One of the first reforms inaugurated by 
Mr. Davis after accepting the manager- 
ship was the issuance of an order calling 
for the entire roster of camera men, play- 
ers and directors on the salary roll to re- 
port for duty at the hitherto unheard of 
hour of eight A. m. Naturally, the drastic 
ruling caused the actor folk much uneasi- 
ness and not a little inconvenience. 

Some of the big stars even went so far 
as to kick over the traces. Later some 
of them ceased to be connected with the 
Universal 



Whether the aforementioned artists quit 
in a huff or were discharged has been a 
topic of conversation for those curiously 
inclined even since the order went into ef- 
fect. 

The erection of the Universal's Fort 
Lee studio, now rented to another picture 
concern, it is said, caused considerable dis- 
cussion between conflicting factions in the 
company. When the Universal decided to 
transfer its producing activities to the 
Coast last spring, Matt Moore went along 
with what remained of the New York 
stock organization. 

Moore's trip to the Coast was made for 
the purpose of finishing several scenes of 
"Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the 
Sea," a multiple reeler the Universal has 
been working on for several months. 

The cost of transporting the people, 
with considerable added for sets, eta, it 
is claimed ran up to $48,000. But two 
scenes were made on the Coast for the 
submarine picture and later these were 
eliminated. 

Outwardly, while everything is calm, 
there seems to be an under current work- 
ing vigorously in the neighborhood of 
Forty-eighth Street and Broadway. . 

Laemmle, Fat Powers and R. H. Coch- 
rane started the Universal four years ago. 
Should Laemmle change his base of pic- 
ture making operations it would not be 
surprising if Cochrane and one' other film 
man not connected with Universal but 
much in the public eye of late, were asso- 
ciated with him. 



JOE SCHENCK A MAGNATE 

Jos. Schenck, general manager of the 
Marcus Loew enterprises, was added to the 
ever growing list of film magnates last 
week through the launching of Norma 
Talmadge as an independent screen attrac- 
tion. He is the president of the newly 
organized Talmadge Film Corp., whose 
maiden entry will be a multiple reel adapta- 
tion of David Graham Phillips' successful 
novel "The Price She Paid." 

Edgar S eld en negotiated • the deal. The 
concern will maintain offices with and dis- 
tribute its product through Selznick Enter- 
prises, Inc. i 



TWO ROMEOS 

A double assortment of Romeos will 
make ardent love to a like number of 
Juliets in picture theatres this week. Fox 
lias one in five reels, featuring Theda 
Bara, while Metro will release the other, 
a ten part production, said to have cost 
$200,000 to make. 

Bushman and Bayne play the title roles 
in the Metro picture, the cast of which also 
contains the descendants of some of the 
world's greatest histrionic geniuses. The 
list includes the names of Booth, Sothern, 
Kemble and Mantell. 



MORE MOVIE MILLIONS 

Standard Film Industries, Inc., was 
awarded a charter by the Secretary of the 
State of Virginia Oct. 7. The latest pic- 
ture organization is -capitalized at $10,000,- 
000. Louis B. Jennings is president and 
the directors include the following well 
known financiers: Anthony J. Drexel. 
Philip O. Mills, Eliot Norton and Geo. R. 
Hurry. 

The corporation is the result of a merger 
of the American Film Laboratories, Inc., 
and the American Motion Pictures Corp. 
There is a possibility that the new Stand- 
ard company win acquire two. large produc- 
ing concerns now actively engaged in turn- 
ing out film. , . :■' 



GENERAL LOSES ANOTHER 

Beginning Oct. 29 the Hughie Mack 
comedies hitherto released on the General 
Film Program will be distributed through 
the Titagraph's own exchanges, formerly 
known as the V. L. S. E. organization. 
This latest move on the part of the Vita 
in removing the Mack pictures from the 
General list would apparently indicate 
that the concern will ultimately withdraw 
all of its releases, following the example 
of Geo. Kleine and Pa the. :-'■ : 



NO MACHINE COMBINE 

The report of a combination of the 
Nicholas Power Co. and Precision Machine 
Co., said to be the forerunner of a general 
amalgamation of the principal makers and 
jobber* of picture theatre equipment in the 
United States,. is all wrong, according to a 
denial issued by a representative of the 
Power Co. 

A theatrical paper printed the rumor, 
declaring that the Morgan money interests 
were behind the proposed combination of 
Power and Simplex. 



FORD NOMINATES INCE 

Henry Ford, auto maker for the masses 
and ardent pacifist, has signified -his inten- 
tion of nominating Tom luce as a can- 
didate for the Nobel Peace Prize. ' Ford 
believes that Ince should be accorded the 
honor because of having produced "Civiliza- 
tion." 

The week after the spectacle was put on 
in New York Ince received a call to show 
the film in Detroit and Ford paid $1,000 
for the privilege of giving it the onceover. 
Whether or not Ford's interest in Tom 
Ince' s achievment will result in a business 
relationship is still a matter of conjecture. 



SUCCESS MAY START 

The presence in New York last week of 
two men interested in the Success Film 
Corp., a concern that started out to do big 
things, at least on paper, several months 
ago, but which abruptly stopped making 
further announcements of its plans, gave 
the gossips of filmdom a chance to indulge 
in a little guessing.. 

It was definitely ascertained after the 
numerous rumors had been discounted that 
the Success Corp. will start producing 
within a fortnight. The reorganization of 
the company is nearing completion and 
when accomplished the original plans will 
be carried out. 



JERSEY CONVENTION 

The M. P. Exhibitors' League of New 
Jersey held its . first convention Oct. 8. 
Achtellstetter's Frail in Newark was the 
place chosen for . the initial session of the 
recently formed league and over 000 picture 
showmen were in attendance. 

Addresses were made by Lee Ochs, na- 
tional president ; Rev. Dr. Howard, of the 
Halsey Methodist Church, and Dr. Die- 
fendorf, who spoke against Sunday shows. 
The Jersey league appointed a committee 
to see the Governor and local officials 
throughout the State on the questions of 
censorship and Sabbath observance. 



UNICORN CHANGES HANDS 

A thorough process of reorganization 
finds the Unicorn Film Service Corp. 
with a new set of officers and a radical 
change .of policy. With the transfer of 
stock control.. Bee Schlank became presi- 
dent ; Fred B. Murphy, vice-president ; P. 
A. Chase, treasurer, and Harry A. Palmer, 
secretary. In addition to the two and 
three-reel subjects handled by the old 
regime a five-reeler will be made a feature, 
of the monthly output. In line with the 

. progressive plans of Unicorn John Henry 
Goldfrap has been appointed director of 

! publicity.- 



CHURCHMEN OBJECT 

TO FILM CHARITY" 



Catholic Prelate. May Soak AM of 

License Commissioner. Picture 

Recalls Recent Controversy. 

Frank Powell's film production of 
"Charity" has stirred up strong opposition 
on the part of Catholic Church authorities, 
who it is claimed see in the picture a rather 
striking resemblance to conditions alleged 
to exist in New York charitable institu- 
tions. While the truth of these allegations 
remained somewhat obscured in the testi- 
mony brought out at the recent investiga- 
tion, the churchmen feel that the film, sets 
matters forth in a manner hardly in ac- 
cordance with the facts. 

When the "Charity" film was shown at 
the New York Theatre a couple of weeks 
ago, Monsignor Dunn, head of the N. Y. 
Diocese and Father Wm. Farrell were 
invited to witness the exhibition. After 
the showing the priests voiced their dis- 
approval in no uncertain terms. 

License Commissioner Bell according to 
a representative of the Frank Powell Pro- 
ductions Co. declared he would Btop "Char- 
ity" in the form it appeared at the N. Y. 
Theatre if it was announced for exhibition 
at any house within his jurisdiction. 

As a result of Bell's edict the film was 
re-cut and edited last Friday. Whether 
"Charity" in its revised form will over- 
come the objections of the Catholic prelates 
and the License Commissioner remains to 
be seen. 



SOUNDING CANDIDATES 

The National Association of the Motion 
Picture Industry made two. distinct at- 
tempts to pin the presidential candidates 
down to something approaching a definite 
stand on the question of Federal censor- 
ship last week. A delegation consisting of 
Carl Laemmle, Wm. A. Brady, W. W. 
Irwin, Pat Powers; Wm. L. Sherrill and 
several other factors in the film world 
journeyed to Washington and presented 
their side of the case to President Wilson, 

The chief executive listened attentively 
to the arguments offered against censorship, 
but skillfully managed to refrain from 
committing himself. Candidate Hughes 
was likewise waited upon by a committee 
of film men, but outside of asking a few 
questions evidenced no real indication of 
bis attitude. ■' '■■"... 



PETERS WITH MOROSCO ','. 
House Peters signed np with Oliver 
Morosco for a term of years, Oct. 9. . Peters 
who is rated as one of the best drawing 
male stars now engaged in screen work 
will receive a salary for his services that 
should make -the English income tax col- 
lectors grin, when they start fixing np the 
rolls for 1017. 



JAMES KIRK WOOD MARRIED 

James Kirk-wood, presently directing for 
Mutual, was married Oct. 9 to Gertrude 
Robinson. . The ceremony was performed 
in Los Angeles, where the couple will make 
their home- for the time being. The bride 
is a well known screen actress. 



October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



'THE REVOLT" 

t Peerless. Five Seels. 

Released Oct. 2 by World. 
Cast. 

Anna Steven* France* Nelson 

John Steven* Arthur Ashley 

Xannie Steven* Madge Evan* 

Lena Schmidt Clara Whipple 

Mr*. Schmidt .'. . . .Mi** BurneUter 

Tame* Turner Frank Beamith 

Jir. a node (i'eorge MacQuarrie 

Eva E**ex Ada Price 

Story — Adaptation of Edward Locke's 
novel. Scenario by Frances Marion. 
-Modern problem play with some sex in- 
terest and considerable melodrama. 
Barry 0*Neil, director. 
Action — Interesting. Good situations. 
Continuity— Smooth. 
Suspense — Well sustained. 
Detail— Sight. 
Atmosphere — Convincing. 
Photography — Up to standard. 

Remarks. 

"The Revolt" presents on the whole a 
good, substantial dramatic entertainment 
relating a story of every day life in a 
manner that holds all the way. 

Frances Nelson as a young shop girl 
whose material view of worldly affairs 
leads her into serious difficulties, registers 
satisfactorily. Arthur Ashley gives a con- 
vincing portrayal of a well -meaning but 
excessively temperamental husband, Clara 
Whipple stands ont as a woman whose 
wickedness is due to environment 

Box Office Valne. 
One duy large cities. Fair advertising. 
Feature Ashley, Nelson and Whipple. 
Locke's magazine reputation might also 
pull some business in the better houses. 



"HER FATHER'S SON" 

Morosco. Five Beds. 
Released Oct. 9 by Paramount. 

Cast 

France* Fletcher Vivian Martin 

Lieut. Richard II arkness. .Alfred Yotburgh 

Wm. Fletcher Herbert Standing 

Betty Fletcher....... Helen Jerome Eddy 

Mammy Chloe Lucille Ward 

Story — Written for screen by L. V. Jef- 
ferson. Romantic comedy drama. Civil 
war period. Very light story lacking in 
dramatic interest. Wm. Taylor, di- 
rector. 
Action — Rather slow. . 
Con tinuity— Even . 
Suspense — Never enter*. 
Detail — Fair. 

Atmosphere— Good and fair. 
Photography — Very good. 

Remarks. 

"Her Father's Son" seems to have been 
written with a well defined object in view. 
Said objective being Vivian Martin's abil- 
ity to wear boys clothes and appear cnte 
in same. 

The picture is absolutely devoid of any- 
thing approaching real drama, and the 
director fell down heavily once or twice 
on detail. For example, a scene depicting 
a general's tent in Civil war time looked 
exceedingly like the model camping out- 
fits which can be purchased ready to use 
in any sporting goods store. 

The soldiers and other characters, too, 
had a decidedly modern appearance, and 
did not suggest people of Civil war days. 

A man and horse fall from a bridge 
into a stream was very well executed. 
Box Office Value. 

One day. Advertise fair. Any class of 
house. 



Don't b 



misled 

Ihereis ONE, and 01 



(ME 



Special Pzoduciu 

Shake speaxe's Lo 

Borneo 



FBANCI; 

ZheCroi 

AND B 



fueen 



de Liixe of 
ttory of ihe Ages 

SKfeF 

. BUSHMAN 

Kins' of Moiion. Piciuree 

ERXY BAYISTE 

of ihe Screen. 



ITH 



'X. 



andl 



_ -R was <li*eczed by John W. Noble 

X. Bushman wifL a cotnpany of 
en. players, — axict ii cost 

.5OOOO (Real Moneyl io 

.rorluce ii -BOOKING WOW 

/ATAixMEXROtxcHMrGES 

'BONTB£ MISLED by itdGcrie** 
imiiaiionS of a. iVfiuszerjuec« 

METRO 

PICTURES CORPORATION 

1476 Broadway • New York. 



MUNRO SUES TRIANGLE 

Cincinnati, Oct. 7. — Wallace Monro, 
who was here in advance of the "Cohen's 
Revue lOlti." filed affidavits and petitions 
preparatory to entering suit, against the 
Triangle Film Company in New York. 

Munro charges the company violated 
the copyright law in presenting "Flirting 
With Fate." which he claims was taken 
from his play. "The Last Straw." 



TAUBER SUES BERNARD 

Sam Tauber brought an action against 
Barney Bernard in the Supreme Court of 
New Tork Oct 8 alleging that the 
comedian owed him $2,000. Said sum Is 
supposed to represent the balance of a 
commission fee which Tauber claims 
Bernard agreed to pay him for negotiating 
a picture engagement for the latter several 
months ago, it is said. 



the Power sf Evil 



BY 



GEORGE BRONSON HOWARD 



FEATURING 



Margaret Nichols and an All-Star Cast 

"Touches Every/ Phase of a Terrible Vice" 

NOW READY FOR BOOKING 



729 SEVENTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK CITY 




34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



N* 



October 14, 1916 



"THE FIRM OF GIRDLE- 
STONE" 

VITAGRAPH. FIVE KEELS. 

Released Oct. 9 by V. L. 8. E. 
Cast. 

John Girdles tone Charles Rock 

Ezra Qirdlestone, his son Fred Groves 

Tom Dimsdale Hayford Bobbs 

Major Tobias Clutterbuck.Wyndham Cruise 

Kate Hartton Edna Flugrath 

Rebecca Molly Terraine 

Story — Adaptation of novel by A. Conan 

Doyle. Melodrama. 
Action— Rapid. 
Continuity — Even . 
Suspense — Keen. 
Atmosphere— Good. 
Detail — Nothing lacking. 
Photography — Will do. 

Remarks. 

Made in England, this picture hat the 
atmosphere necessary to the locale and is 
convincing at all times. The book by 
the author of Sherlock Holmes lends 
itself admirably to screening. It is full 
of tense situations and the thrilling kind 
of melodrama. Well played by a cast 
that is not known to American picture 
patrons, this picture compares favorably 
with the home-made product of the Vita- 
graph. 

The machinations of the Girdlestones in 
their efforts to satisfy their greed for 
money rive ample scope for melodrama 
of the entertaining kind. 

The production detatila of the picture 
are weu looked after, and all in .all, it is 
one of the best which has come from the 
other side. 

Box Office Value. 
Three days. Advertise strong. Bring 
out fact that this is a Conan Doyle Story. 



"LOVE NEVER DIES" 

BLUEBIRD. FIVE REELS. 

RtUased Oct. 23 by Bluebird. 
Cat. 

CecUe {The Woman) Ruth Stonehouse 

FeUm (The Man) Frankly* Farnum 

M. Lccoq Kingsley Benedict 

M. Jarnier Arthur Hoyt 

Madame Jarnier Ifrt. Witting 

M. Laseot Wadstoorth Harris 

Story— Human interest drama. Written 

for screen by Harvey Gates. 
Action — Tedious. 
Continuity — Poor. 
Suspense — None. 
Detail— Fair. 
Atmosphere — Good. 
Photography— O. K. 

Remarks. 

One of the poorest examples ot the 
modern motion picture art shown in gome 
time is "Love Never Dies." The story is 
inane and alow moving, and the acting at 
times stops just short of being amateurish. 

A girl loves a boy. They are parted. 
She meets success as a dancer. He fol- 
lows to Paris and accuses her of helping 
to steal his opera. 

She becomes sick. To save her life 
they send for the boy. He comes. She 
lives. Curtain. 

Not enough substance for a good one 
reel of the old days. 

Thia picture is tiresome and will not 
help the Bluebird people much in attain- 
ing a standard of excellence necessary to 
the success of the present day feature. 

Box Office Value. 
One day. No advertising. May get by 
in the jitney house. 



C. William Kolb and Max Din, the fam- 
ous Mutual comedy team, went riding on 
a whale's back the other day. They did 
it for their funny picture. "A Peck 
O'Picklea." 



"THE WHEEL OF THE LAW" 

ROLFE. FIVE REELS. 
Released Oct. 2 by Metro. 

Cast. 

Afona Mainard Emily Stevens 

John Norton Frank Hills 

Tom Mainard Raymond McKce 

Big Bill Ryan Edwin Bolt 

Pearl he Claire Roma Raymond 

John Daniels h arry Davenport 

Jimmy M cC lane Jerome if. Wilson 

Frank Willis Charles Eldridge 

Story — Written for screen "by Katherine 
Kavanaugh. Melodrama. Good human 
interest story with familiar but well 
constructed situations. G. D. Baker 
directed and turned out a fine produc- 
tion. 

Action — Holding. 

Continuity — Even. 

Suspense — Gripping. 

Detail— O. K. 

Atmosphere — Realistic. 

Photography — Up to standard. 



Remarks. 

nils is a '"circumstantial evidence" 
melodrama with a rather obvious plot. 
The piece is nicely put together, however, 
and the acting is of an especially high 
order. 

Emily Stevens, an actress who has won 
considerable fame in several Broadway 
shows, plays the principal role and proves 
that she is equally competent as a screen 
or legitimate artiste. Frank Mills gives 
a corking performance in the leading male 
role and fine characterizations are dis- 
closed by Charles Eldredge, Jerome Wil- 
son and Raymond' McKee. 

As a dramatic entertainment "The 
Wheel of the Law" will do. Geo. Baker, 
the director, showed unusual ability in 
maintaining a high quality of suspensive 
interest. 

Box Office Value. 
Two days. Fair advertising. Suitable 
for any type of house. 



WILLIAM A. BRADY 




WORLD 
PICTURES 



presents 

ETHEL CLAYTON 

and 

HOLBROOK BLJNN 

in 

'THE HIDDEN SCAR" 

Directed by BARRY O'NEIL 



Ford Sterling has not worked in a Key- 
atone for ten weeks. He should worry 
when he t«ts $500 a week for "watchful 
waiting." 




October 14, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



New Victoria Hotel 

IN NVW YORK" AT BROADWAY AND 
1W PtCt W I VrTvaY LONG ACRE SQUARE 

145 to 155 West 47th Street 



350 



Th. Very Heart of New York" 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 
ROOMS 250 PRIVATE BATHS 

European Plan Exclusively 



ABE MIERS, Manager of Cafe Drop in at any time 

Single roams, hot and cold water. (1 

Stagl* room., private bath (1-5* and up 

Suite, parlor, bedroom and bath U and up 

Suite, parlor, 2 bedrooms and bath (5 and up 

The Best 50c. Dinner in New York 

C. A. HOLLINGSWORTH New York City 




CLIPPER 
BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisements not exceeding one line in 
length will be published, properly classified, in 
this index, at the rate of $10 (or one year (52 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while the 
advertisement is running. 

ASBESTOS CURTAINS AND PICTURE 
BOOTHS. 

C W. Trainer Mfg. Co., 75 Pearl St., Boston, 

Mass. 
CARNIVAL FRONTS AND SHOW BANNERS. 

D. C Humphry. Co., 913 Arch St., Phils.. Pa. 

MUSICAL BELLS AND NOVELTIES 
Edwin R. Street, 28 Brook St., Hartford, Conn. 
B. H. Mayland & Son, 54 Willoughby St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MUSICAL SPECIALTIES. 
J. C Deacon, 3800 N. Clark St.. Chicago, HI. 

MUSICAL CLASSES. 
A Brauneisi, 1012 Napier Ave., Richmond Hill, 

PRINTING OF ALL KINDS. 

"Planet" Show Print ft Eng. House, Chatham, 

Ont. 

SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 
Howard Tuttle, 141 Burleigh St., Milwaukee, 
, Wis. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

581-583-585 South High St., Columbus, O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Grain, 319 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
THE SINGING AND SPEAKING VOICE. 
Theo. Van Yorx, 21 W. 38th St., New York. 
Tel., Greeley 3701. 

SONG BOOKS. 
Win. W. Delaney, 117 Park Row, New York. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Botton Regalia Co., 387 Washington St, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Graves Hardware Co., 47 Eliot St., Botton, 
Mas.. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 

E. Walker, 309 W. 39th St.. New York. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobson, 910 Prospect Ave.. N. Y. C 

■ WIGS, BEARDS AND MUSTACHES. 
Perey Ewing Supply House. Decatur, 111. 

CHANGE IN PRICES 

We beg to notify our customers and friends 
that owing to the conditions iurrounding the 
paper- market, which amounts almost to a 
famine, we have been compelled to advance 
our prices. Notice is hereby given that all 
quotations and price lists bearing date prior 
to Sept. IS, 1916. are null and void, and are not 
the prices prevailing at this time. Send for 
our new price list giving prices current now. 
Watch this paper for quotations from week to 
week. When paper market conditions return 
to normal our prices will be reduced in propor- 
tion. Please write us for quotations or any. 
thing you may need in theatrical type work. 

Gazette Show Printing Co. 

MATTOON, ILLINOIS, U. S. A. 



TIGHTS 

Silk Opera Hose and Stockings 

ABB OUR SPECIALTIES 

QUALITY PKICES th^lVOWEST 

Gold and BUver Brocade*, Silks, Satins, 

Theatrical Jewelry, 8p*ngles, Etc 

Gold and Silver Trinuclaxs. 

wlffs. Beards and aU Goods Theatrical. 

Catalogues and Samples upon request. 

When asking for Catalogue, please mention 
what goods are wanted. 

StEGil AN & WEIL 

B. W. Cor. 27th St. ul Madison Ave. 
THE) THEATRICAL SUPPLY EMPORIUM 



MUSIC COMPOSED AND ARRANGED 

Chas. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati, O. 



IMPORTANT.-EVERETT J. EVANS, Com- 
poser-Arranger, makes a specialty of writing 
music for new authors, and assists publication. 
Send your poems or complete songs. Estab. 
1900. Suite 505. Astor Theatre Bldg., 45th and 
Broadway, N. Y. 

STAGE SHOES 

WOOD SOLE CLOGS 




This 
Style 
(5.00 



Plain Kid . . $3.50 

Patent Leather, S4.50 
All Color. • - $5.00 

Extra neat, will not rip. 
Stage Last in Oxfords, 
Slippers and Shoes. 
Send (or Catalog 
Sent C. O. D. if $1.00 
per pair is advanced. 
FINE MAPLE DANC- 
ING MATS, made to 
order at 30 eta. per 
square foot. 



NEELY BROS. 

Opp. Haymarket Theatre, 



72* W. MADISON ST. 



CHICAGO 



A VAUDEVILLE ACT FOR ONE DOLLAR 

Snappy Tallin. Act for 2 Halts (tall of "pep."). 4 

Parodies, 3 Hooolocs, 3 rtmoj MMH all for $1. 

iikrb M0NABAN. Vaadnlllt Author. Brocktoo. Man. 

UoccPfl High Grade 
flGboyU. Make-Up 
Uniform in Color and 
Quality Guaranteed 

Hav. You Used Our 
mt. Ar Film Grease Paint 
aQ,C9 and Powder 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



TIGHTS 

Cotton Tight*, my mod im- 
pair. Toe.: 





ity. 

Tlsbts, nudism eelaht. a 
pair. 13.00; Wonted TUnta, 
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$2.73; sua flatted Ibeata. 
pair, II B0; 



(Imported) 

II-,. r 75 



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anu Bid only, noaeM 
$8.00 pair to (4.00. 
811k TIctite In Cmaa 
only, reduced from (8.50 a 
pur to se.00. gttrt. to 



THE BAUOT3 



Ordeit Pilled Promptly. C 
Catalog Free on appucsili- 

BKB-NAKD MAKDL. 110-113 

W. Madison Street, 
CHICAGO. ILL. 



Others Bunted, Why Can't Toot 

STAGE TRAINING 

Draaa. Cetasay, VaadreMs, Sua. Dea*. 
1=1 aal Phot. Play lariat, ix-hnlol 
and Practical C uuisea , Celebrities who 

itadlfd under Mr. Airiest: Aurora Kti- 

lernuLui. Nora Barw. Havel Dtn. 

Joseph Baotley. Hany Pllerr. Hue. Dans. 
Mary Fuller, Dolly Staters, Taylor Ifolaira. 
Vivian Prescott. Eleanor Painter and 

oU»n. Write for caialociaj mmtlnnln. 
study desired. 

AItok) Theatre School of Acting 

57th St.. at Broadway, 
Entrance 223 w. 57th BL, Ne* York. 

SECOND-HAND 

GO WNS 




ANDREWS, 506 S. Stat* St., CHICAGO 



CENTRAL TRUNKS 

26 In.. $11.50: 2S In.. (12.30: 32 In.. (13.30: 38 la.. (14.00: 40 In., (10.00. Circus Trunks. 24xlSzlV 
(10. Bill Trunks. 3ta2Sxl3, Inside, (13. Litbo Trunks, 42Vjx2S>-xl2. In»ldr. (1U.30. Shipped on receipt 
uf (5. balance C. 0. D., except orer 300 miles, then remit whole amount. 
CENTRAL TRUNK FACTORY. Eat. 1S84. SIMONS & CO., S. \T. Oar. Tin and Arch Street.. l-Llladi-lpbla 

QUICK Deliveries of costumesjights aid wigs 




We Are Manufacturers te|^c2&H 

assssssassa Our R.i.tal D»partjn.iit Contain. Ov.r i,ta» CMMa 

NOW READY! Jack Weber*. Minstrel Joke Book 
No. 1. A Big Hit. 25c Postpaid 

of Make Up 



We carry four complete lines 



CHICAGO COSTUME WORKS „,"&•«, ££&»?? CHICAGO. U. S. A. 



PLAYS 



FOR STOCK, REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Book, (or home 
amusement, Negro Play., Paper, Scenery, Mrs. Jarley'i Wax 
Works, Catalogue Free I Free! Free! 

SAMUEL FRENCH, a Waat Jlth St.. Ntw York. 



WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS, $5.00 

Big Bargain. Have been used. Also a few 
Second Hand Innovation and Fibre Wardrobe 
Trunks, (10 and (IS. A few extra large Prop- 
erty Trunks. Also old Taylor Trunks and Bal 
Trunk.. 
Parlor Floor. U W. ll.t St., N.w York City 

SHOW PRINTING 

Type Fosters at the Right Price 
LETTER HEADS 

Contracts, Tickets. Envelopea, etc. Free Sam- 
ples. STAGE HONEY, lie Book of Herald 
Cats, 25c 

CROSS ft BANTA „.£&„ CHICAGO 



■END FOR CATALOG 




Gar i Punted 
Pto:e?.$ior.2l 

UU?!. leads 



la ee. ar saw* Orion: spas, 
esaesoa. tkla asuke win «... 

tiDiniriiarSBiaka* 
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MOUQUIN'S 

6th At*., bet. 27th and 28th St.., N. Y. 
MOST POPULAR FRENCH RESTAURANT 
PARISIAN CAFE. MUSIC «J* P. M. to 1 A. M. 



ARRANGING BUREAU 

ORCHESTRATIONS OF CLASS 

Transposing, Copying and Revising of Song Mae. 

COLUMBIA THEATRE BLDG. 
Phone «MZ Bryant NEW YORK 

B B & B Special 

Wardrobe Trunk 

S Ply Fibre Ceverea • 
N. T.I Cbaa. E. Mack. 1578 B'way €AI\ (Mt 
Chicago: Marshall Field ft Co. ?*K*.UV 

Send for Catalogue 
B B ft B TRUNK CO, Pittaberg. Pa. 

TOUPEES, GREASE 
PAINTS, ETC. 

A. M. BUCH & CO. 

lis N. Ninth St, Phftadelphla 

NEARLY NEW 

Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Foil Drei », Tuxedo »•* Prince Albert SniU 

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INGENUE 

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MUSIC ARRANGED 

PIANO, ORCHESTRA. Melodiea written to 
•ong poem.. "W. H. NELSON, Astor' Theatre 
Bldg., 1581 Broadway, N. Y. 



WIGS 




TAYLOR'S No. 2 
CIRCUS REGU- 
LATION TRUNK 



$ 



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Strongeat and Lightest on th. Market 

Six*. 24 a is a II. 

Send for 1916 Catalogue 

C. A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 

Chicago, III., a E. Randolph St. 
N»w York, N. Y., Ill W. 44th St, J 



WANTED 

2 female Cat<arct singers (78 a week, must t>e 
full of pep. first etas. hoo... Addree. 
'"IT DEAM, star.. HoUl 
Olsvaland, Ohio. 



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free, T.8.D«nlsondt Co., UerjU 17 .Chicago 



CIRCUS and JUGGLING 

Apparatus, Rolling Globes, Clubs, Batons. 
Guns. Wire Walkera' Apparatus and V 
Sump for catalog. EDW. VAN 
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Ipparatui and Novelties. 
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N. V. PLAY BUREAl 
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Stamp for catalog. 



ACTS. ETC. 

JHF.AU, Trc- 



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NEW DROPS, $10.00 

Painted to Order. Any aiae up to 15*20 feet, 
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WIGS 



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aoatntta or Mm ■ Drew Wig. (l.M. 
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Facer Bats, 14aS>. Noeattla, Pieaa. 

KUITEST MT0..48 Coonsf «a..N.T. 



ALICE DE GARM0 

IN VAUDl^rTLLE 



jfl AAA Accident Insurance Policy, with 
lal f If 111 Oere-min Silver Identification LabeL 
J)I.UUU Tot »> co »'' ila > ■ i ,cir - Frotects 
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ATLAimC UraSTIT CO.. Hem Hag.. RkaaatW, Va. 



PLAYS 



CATALOG of mf essknal and Anatata- nan. 
Skcteon. Hooolocs. Minstrel Joan, lactta- 
tlan.. Make-l'p Oooea. Etc.. sent FgKX. 

dick a rirzcESAU). 20 aos gt. it t. 



the TtcitMCAL raaas, niw yobk 



aaana 



tmiaaaaWim 



i'-JtiiAif* 



THAT HAPPY COMBINATION 

of the right kind of SONGS and me right kind of SINGERS is what wra 

' :■ whom a music publishing concern j:brries in contact] The (Jays of "kidduig yourself along" are "dead 

J&s^sSSfe* aS ^ >ot ' 0> ' in ■•*v*l mu ? Jc business. -a You MUST have the- songs^and they must be ;used by HEAD- 

LINERS who know how to interpret them. We frequently called your attention to the num- : 
be rs we were i featuring, but purposely refrained from mentioning singers' names/because we be- 
lieved "the SONG'S ^^ 
made our songs of past seasons'; VVANTED in the HGME1S) and to the dealers (w^ 
■'"<%&•*: our music TO the homes) we feel that the time has come to acquaint you with some "inside in- 

;.,.;., ArJ Mfc^ .j : J .. . formation." ' ■'■ - .•'■''V'">:^fe':'-' : ' :".'-■''.;- 

>* ' ': 'We: told* you repeatedly : that we . had a song especially; designed for ; singers withi" 

' ..Opera" .-'voices.'; >, The best -\ example- {of:- a; "Grand; Op^ 

^gS . jDpera singer. You all know that ELAINE DE SELLEM, of the Boston English Grand Opera 

■"'■rfjjjfifc--- '■' Company, would not put her stamp of approval upon a number, unless it registered lyrical and 

v musical perfection in eyeiy respecL ' W 

toire,- she had room for a single interpolation— and examined some, two hundred manuscripts in an 
endeavor to locate the right song^v She found bhlyj one that conformed precisely with her ideals— and 
she liked it so well that she declared she -would use it in Vaudeville at the end of the Opera season. 
: The song that proved suitable for HER "Grand Opera" voice and that will satisfy YOURS (if you 
elajne.de selxjem have one) is ".',, \"u~&i , '; : -:'-a':' i'.::.-' ■ "• , ' •:£ : ":." ; 



miiavsKu 



Poem by JACK: FROST Melody by E; CLINTON KEITHLEY 




ONCE IN AWHILE a song is written; that makes us believe 
this old world, Isn't entirely devoid of . .sentiment, after alL 

5uch song* touch, "the Universal soul" by lhej{;sweeti>ess ancl : 
simplicity. ' They," '..carry ; their message so : faithfully • that the? 
words and music are usually written by one person. JACtC 
FROST has this;. kind of a song to his credit in- I 



Lh^p ^"^ I ^L Imhh I I ^B 



IF A SNAPPYAnQVelfc^- song, with a lively darice-stbry iet 
to a melody that makes you want to be up and;<lomg,; means 
anything at -all' to you— you're 'going-', to -write or call for.::- 

THE PUSSYFOOT PRANCE 

By JACK. FROST & "SLAP" WHITE 
It's the niftiest Novelty number you ever heard — watch it 

start a new dance craze. ''■■ ':■;?■■ ■ 



WHENYOU GO NEAR a sheet-music counter and hear 
somebody! demonstrate; a light ballad vy:ith;a. penetrating,; un- 
forgettable: chorus strain, chances are you're listening to-^- 
WHEN {THE MOON SHINES DOWN IN OLD 

ALASKA 

THEN? I'LL ASK HER TO BE M I NE 

By FROST & KEITHLEY ' ., 

It isn't a Summer song, it isn't a Winter sontj, just a ballad 

-that- your ^act needs. ■ '. 



II MAY BE FOOLISH for us to say much about this song, 
becaiiaetiie.vay you. performers have'. helped .us . to popularize ':- 
: r ii-T-T- as 'v demonstrated: by the: flood of orders that 1 reach .us by 
each '':rh^t^~^makei5v'aH.^ornjj^e.nt^ sound superfluous. ^ ■ But, just 
bv .'way of reminder;- we ; again call attention -to 

I AIN'T GOT NOBODY 



A, IM D I NO O O D >T 

■ * f The; bluest song on '.reci 



;;-;f"OF*' : ,ivi ; e;; 

d"— by Young & Warfield 



"MOTHEft-DAY^r comes in May-4-and then a few hours are^devoted by a careless world to one who spent, countless 
hours thinking, planning, working for-^-you know whom. : But you and; your audiences, will make a "MOTHER-PAY" of 
EVERY day, If you; appeal to the easily-flamed family spirit that awaits a; tender reference to bring tears to every eye. SING 

YOU ARE THE IMAGE OF MOTHER 



. - (TH^T' S-;- ' AAA M x. 

Marvin-Lee- and May, Hill: 



LOVE YOU) : 

To-day, to-morrow , and : ,e 



day, till May. 



McKINLEY MUSIC CO. 



CHICAGO OFFICE : Grand Opera House Bldg. 1 NEW YORK OFFICE 
E. GUNTOK KEITHLEY, Mgr.' Professional Dept 80 FIFTH AVE, 



II H— W 



n^um^w w ..^,.mu».m«i»in,. M a;Aiiw». 



1111111111. IIIIMIl' 



I f HHMitt i 




m "' ««» "» ™> "» < 
EWYORK 




THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBUCATIQN IN AMERICA 

in m Ji» in' ii) in iu in m 'tin- mi m hi lit m ' 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



Octobei 




ttLM>UNEBS EVONWKRE 
REGARD THIS AS • THEl I 
D1GGEST- f EATUKI 



THE • SONG • KIT • OF • THE 

FOLLIES • OF 1916 




L V R. I C • BY 

GENE. BUCK 

/A U 3 I C • BY 

JEROME- KERN 



% 



AN • EXC E PT I ON AL • N LFM D ER 
AND-A- GREAT- KELP ■ TO -YOUR-ACT 



^^g£5 S! ™^3' 



Q& 



I 



TBHARHS & FRANCIS, DAY & HUNTER 

62 WEST 45th STREET, NEW YORK 




Copyright, 1916, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN. 1SS3 



NEW YORK, OCTOBER 18, 1916. 



VOLUME LXIV— No. J7 
Price. Ten Centi 



BIG BOOKING 
AGENT IS 
ACCUSED 

WHITE RAT MAKES CHARGES 



Harry Fitzgerald, a booking agent, with 
offices in the Palace Theatre Building, and 
operating through the United Booking 
Offices, was summoned to the West Side 
Court last Monday to answer a complaint 
charging him with operating as a booking 
agent without a license and demanding 
more than the 5 per cent, commission al- 
lowed by law for the booking of theatrical 
acta. 

The complainant is James Oliver, man- 
ager of the Six Tumbling Demons, and 
the action is admittedly a blow by the 
White Rats Actors' Union against the 
Vaudeville Managers' Protective Associa- 
tion in the war which has been going on 
between the two organizations for some 
rime. 

After a short hearing, the case was ad- 
journed until next Monday morning, when 
the entire charge will be gone over. 

The action is said to be only one of a 
number that will be brought shortly 
against booking agents, in retaliation for 
the alleged blacklisting of White Rat acts. 

That much was admitted by Harry 
Monntford, Executive Officer of the White 
Rats' organization, who haa been the 
leader of the opposition which the Rats 
hare exercised toward the managers for 
nearly a year. 

In his affidavits, submitted to the court 
by Lawyer James Timony, Oliver states 
that he first went to Fitzgerald in August, 
1915, and entered into an agreement where- 
by the latter was to handle his bookings. 
No special agreement was entered into, 
he says. 

Shortly afterward Fitzgerald secured an 
engagement for him at the Les Jardin de 
Zoologique, Montreal Oliver says, the sal- 
ary being agreed upon as $350 per week, 
of which 5 per cent, would be $17.50. 

Fitzgerald informed him, though, Oliver 
declares, that he would have to pay him 
$25.00, or $7.50 in excess of the 5 per 
cent, allowed by law for the securing of 
the bookings. 

Desirous of filling the engagement, 
Oliver, who is a White Rat, went to Mont- 
real, worked during the week of August 
22 of last year, and then, after the en- 
gagement was concluded, paid the $7.50 
to Fitzgerald, in addition to the 5 per cent, 
which the manager of the Montreal theatre 
deducted from his salary. 



CLAUDIUS & SCARLET FOR 
"FROLIC" 

Claudius & Scarlet, whose novelty banjo 
act has been seen in all the big-time 
houses, will open on Monday night in 
Ziegf eld's "Midnight Frolic." 

In addition to this engagement there is 
a possibility that the aet will also be 
used in the coming "Century Girl" produc- 
tion. 



"YVETTE" SPONSORS SUED 

Michael Ring, through his attorney, 
James A. Timony, is suing Paul Benedeck, 
Inc., sponsors for the ill-fated show 
"Yvette," for payment on a note which 
be claims was given him in lieu of part 
salary during the time he was engaged 
in producing numbers for the play in 
question. The sum involved is $80. 



L0EW BREAKS 

FILM PRICE 

RECORD 

OFFERS $65,000 FOR STATE RIGHTS 



With the closing of Tbos. H. I rice's mo- 
tion picture spectacle, "Civilization," at 
the Park Theatre on Sunday night, the big- 
gest State right deal ever concluded was 
practically closed by the disposal of the 
New York State territory for that picture 
to Marcus Loew for $65,000. Ten prints 
are to be turned over to the theatre man- 
ager. 

"Civilization" has been running at the 
Criterion, and later at the Park Theatre, 
since June 1, and during that period a 
gross of approximately $100,000 was done 
at the two houses. At the start an aver- 
age of $7,600 business a week waa done, 
and never have the box-office receipts 
fallen below $3,000 a week. Consequently, 
with the overhead expenses, including ad- 
vertising, a profit was shown each week. 

Marcus Loew runs theatres that are ad- 
jacent to both houses and carefully ob- 
served the business that was being done. 
He made several overtures to the Ince 
representatives for the picture, but was 
always informed that they were not ready 
for the "family" type of theatres. 

Last week, after several conferences, 
Loew made them a formal proposition to 
take over the entire New York State 
rights for the film, upon condition that 
they abandon the showing of the picture 
at the Park Theatre. Word was con- 
veyed to Ince, who is in California, and 
he wired his acceptance of the proposition, 
and the deal was provisionally closed with 
the understanding that the picture would 
be withdrawn from the Park . 



NO SHUBERT 

HOUSE FOR 

BRADY 

PUTS SHOW INK.4E. THEATRE 

A cause for much speculation and the 
circulation of many rumors, was the ac- 
tion this week of William A. Brady In 
making arrangements with Cohan and Har- 
ris to place in their theatre of the same 
name his new piece, "Object Matrimony," 
on Tuesday evening, October 25. 

This move on the part of the theatrical 
producer lent considerable color to a story 
which stated that all was not as happy and 
tranquil as it should be between "Wm. A." 
and bis business associates, the Shuberta. 

The story related that when "Object 
Matrimony" was first produced, the cast- 
ing of certain parts in the play gave rise 
to a slight squabble between the parries 
interested, which difficulty was afterward 
straightened out to the satisfaction of all 
concerned. The piece went through the 
customary "ironing out" process, and to 
the eyes of Mr. Brady was strong enough 
for a long stay on Broadway. 

A discussion then arose between Brady 
and the Shubert office as to what theatre 
should house the new play, and the result 
appears to have been a strong difference 
of opinion. The Shuberta wanted him to 
take the Garrick, it is said. The argu- 
ment, it is understood, drifted into acri- 
monious channels, and after an interchange 
of hot words, Mr. Brady decided to take 
matters into his own bands. 

After looking the field over carefully, 
he selected the latest addition to the Klaw 
& Erlanger string, and it would appear 
that last minute arrangements were made 
between the rival producers and managers 
to open "Object Matrimony' in the Forty- 
second Street Theatre on October 25. 

The friction which has evidently mani- 
fested itself in the usually smooth re- 
lations between the Shubert interests and 
Mr. Brady, haa made necessary a change 
in the plans of George Cohan to present 
his new play, starring Chauncey Olcott, 
named "Honest John OBrien." He in- 
tended to present that vehicle at the Cohan 
& Harris house on October 24. But be- 
cause of Mr. Brady's move, this premiere 
will be deferred. 

Rumors are rife concerning the outcome 
of the disagreement. Efforts to learn how 
serious the trouble really is met with little 
or no success at either office, representa- 
tives of both managements refusing to 
make any comment on the situation. 



FAY TEMPLETON RETURNING 

Chicago, Oct. 16. — Memories of Weber 
& Fields will be revived at the Majestic 
Theatre, on Oct. 23, when Fay Templeton 
returns to the stage in a vaudeville act 
provided for her by Junie McCree. Among 
her new songs are "The Expert Bride," T 
Love You, Bill," "The Scandalmonger" 
and "Some Girl, Some Boy." 



ORDJNSKY FOR COAST 

Richard Ordjnaky, producer of Flora 
Bella, the recent Shakesperean revival of 
Macbeth with James K. Hackett, and th* 
Stadium production of Caliban, haa left 
for the coast to engage in a stock com- 
pany venture. It is believed Mr. Ordjn- 
sky intends settling in California even- 
tually under a permanent contract with 
one of the large picture firms. 



WALTER TO SUE 

TRIANGLE 

FILM 

WILL CHARGE PLAY THEFT 



Eugene Walter, the playwright, wfll 
begin suit against the Triangle Film Cor- 
poration, claiming that the big scene In 
the motion picture "Fifty Fifty" haa been 
taken from his play, "Just a Woman," 
which was produced recently at the Forty- 
eighth Street Theatre, with Josephine Vic- 
tor in the role of the wife. 

Not only did the Triangle Company 
copy the* court room scene, says Mr. Wal- 
ter, bnt even tbe lines of his play are 
used on the screen. 

Those who have seen "Just a Woman" 
and the picture "Fifty Fifty" have noticed 
the similarity of the court room scene. 

In both play and motion picture taa 
"big scene," which is intensely dramatic 
shows a frame op on a good and loyal life. 
The husband wants a divorce in order to 
marry "the other woman." The wife at 
the trial refuses to answer the trumped 
up charges and tbe Judge tells her that 
if she does not answer he will be com- 
pelled by law to give the husband a di- 
vorce, and also the custody of the child. 
Tbe wife feeling that her case Is lost tells 
a deliberate lie. "He can't have my boy, 
because be Is not bis father," Is her dra- 
matic reply. 

"Fifty Fifty," with Norma Talmadge as 
tbe wife is the feature picture at tha 
Rialto Theatre this week. "Just a 
Woman" is the attraction at tbe Standard 
Theatre next week. The play waa pro- 
duced by the 8huberta, who it is said, wfll 
also bring soil against tbe Triangle Fibs 
Company. . . 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 



MARCUS LOEW 

» EXPANDS pi 

SOUTH 

ATLANTA. FIRST HOUSE OPENED 



CHANGE GARDEN DATE 
The Means. Shubert hare changed the 
date for the opening of "The Show of 
Wonders," at the Winter Garden, from 
Oct 23 to Oct 26. "So Long Letty" win 
(tart at the Shnbert on Oct. 23. On that 
date "The Girl From BrazU" will be given 
in Philadelphia and on Oct. 30 Anna Held 
wOl open in "Follow Me" in Boston. 



ROBERT EDESON SEEN 

IN ORIGINAL DRAMA 



Karens Loew is a great believer in ex- 
pansion, for having covered a good manr 
parts of the East and Middle West he is 
■ow casting covetous eyes npon the Sooth. 
The States lying South of the Mason & 
Dixoa Line have long been considered by 
Mr. Loew as being fertile ground on which 
to plant Loew vaudeville, and many tub 
rmtm trips have been taken by this mag- 
nate with this in view. 

That these trips have borne fruit came 
to light on Friday of last week when Mr. 
Leew, accompanied by one or two of his 
raised assistants, left for Atlanta, Ga., 
to formally open on Monday of this week 
Lasw s Atlanta Theatre. 

With the opening of this house, the first 
of a chain of houses contemplated to be 
under the Loew banner, in all of the big 
H —ta un cities, this astute manager feels 
that as has accomplished something worth 
while, 

Heretofore, those of the South who 
wasted vaudeville, have had to be satisfied 
with the brand dished ont by the concert 
■alls, which are there by the hundreds, 
fact that so many concert halls 
was proof that vaudeville, their 
amusement offering, was wanted by 
of the South as well as the North, 
the entertainment as given oat at the 
halls did not appeal to women and 
children. In other words, it was not 
Mita vaudeville, as we of the North know 
it 

It was this weakness in the armor of 
rtosjthera amusements that caused Marcus 
Coaw to decide to attack It. Attack it 
wfth the same high-class equipment, with 
tfcs same amy of seasoned performers and 
tie same experienced generals that had 
so successfully carried es the Loew Cam 
nsfara la the North. 

The Loew Atlanta Theatre, which has 
g statist; capacity of 2,000, Is one of the 
asset beautiful, aa well as moat modem, 
nausea in the South. la fact, there are 
Caw to equal it in Dixieland outside of 
Now Orleans. 

The) opening has proved fully up to the 
Loew expectations aid everyone associated 
wfth that manager are in high feather. 

Several other sites for Loew theatres 
fa. that territory have already been se- 
eaxed and the sue c e s s of the Atlanta house 
Km caused a fresh isapetus for many 
others, and building operations will soon 
ha under way in many of the larger cities 
and. If p re s en t plans are carried out It 
wGl not be long before the Loew banner la 
Bssjfjsj over houses in every large dty In 
(he "Land O* Cotton." 



GRACE LA RUE TO BE CO-STAR 

Grace La Rue is planning to be a co-star 
in a production of a musical play entitled 
"A Castle in Poland," which is an adap- 
tation of a German romantic operetta en- 
titled "Sturnidyll" that was produced at 
the Irving Place Theatre last year. She 
hopes to have it ready for production 
about the end of this year. 



WANDA LUDLOW IN COLLISION 

Cincinnati, Oct. 14. — Wanda Ludlow, 
who is playing across the river, escaped 
injury when her automobile collided with 
a machine driven by Paul Hesser, president 
of the Kentucky Motor Car Co. Both ma- 
chines were damaged. 



MBS MARBURY RETURNS 
Elizabeth Marbury returned from abroad 
last Monday on the La/oyetts from a trip 
fssting several months, all of which time 
was spent in France and devoted to her 
private hospital for the wounded soldiers 
there. 

Miss Maxbmry brought with her seven 
*ww plays by French, Belgian and Italian 
sarthors. 



NEW MOVIE FOR WASHINGTON 

Wahhinoton, D. O, Oct 16. — Ground 
has been broken for a new movie theatre 
to be known as Crandall's Knickerbocker. 
The owners and builders are known as the 
Knickerbocker Theatre Co., composed of 
Harry Crandall, George T. Smailwood, 
Barry Bulkley and Fred S. Swindell. The 
estimated cost of the new house is 
$150,000. 



"Hi. Brother'. Keeper," Produced by 
Rash eh Andrews, Make. Im- 
pression at Premier. 
[snau to tiii curras.] 

Loiro Bbabch, Oct. 16. — "His Brother's 
Keeper," a play by Robert Porter and, of 
which Robert Edeson is the star, was pro- 
duced here Saturday night at the Broad- 
way Theatre 'by Bush and Andrews and 
made a pronounced impression. 

Though this is the first play to be pro- 
duced, the author has Mt upon a stirring 
theme, summed up in the following cryptic 
sentence: "To what extent is a man re- 
sponsible for his brother's actions." In the 
play Mr. Edeson has the part of the man 
who believes that he is responsible for his 
brother's action and became of this belief 
pays the price and meets his responsibility 
in the way that manliness and honor dic- 
tate. 

Mr. Edeson was supported by a strong 
company including Stella Archer, Ann Mac 
Donald, Ada O. Nevil, Mabel Carruthers, 
Alice Fleming, Mary De Wolf Newcomb, 
Clara Greenwood, P. Jerome Lawler, Wil- 
fred Lytell, Arthur S. Byron, and Hallet 
Boswortb. "His Brother's Keeper," will 
make a short preliminary tour before go- 
ing into New York for a run. 



TOM MOORE ERECTING THEATRE 

Washinoton, D. C, Oct 16. — Tom 
Moore, of the Strand and Garden, will 
erect a large new house on Ninth Street 
between D and E. The house will have 
a aeating capacity of 3,000, and will be 
modeled after the Strand of New York 
City. 



"MERRY WIVES" PLEASES ALBANY 

Albany, Oct. 16.— Silvio Heln's sump- 
tuous revival of "The Merry Wives of 
Windsor" was given here tonight at Bar- 
manus Bteeckw Hall before an audience 
that filled the house. Tom Wise as Fal- 
staff repeated his success made in New 
York. Constance Collier aa Mistress Ford 
and Isabel Irving as Mistress Page, were 
capital. Others in the cast were: W. 
Lawson Butt aa Ford, Aurial Lee as Dame 
Quickly, Alexander Onslow as Fenton, 
Vera Fuller Mellish as Anne Page, Robert 
Mantell, Jr., as Nym. and Gordon Burby as 
Page. 



FRIARS CLUB EVENTS 

On Saturday eevning, Oct 21, the Friars 
will hold a "Get-Together-Night" in the 
monastery in West Forty-eighth Street. 
The affair will begin at 11 o'clock, and an 
appropriate and attractive entertainment 
win be offered. 

On Monday, Oct 23, a 100- point straight 
pool tournament "will commence. 



ROY ATWELL HURT BY FALL 

Roy Atwell, leading comedian of the 
Anna Held play, last week slipped and fell 
at rehearsal, severely hurting his head. 
Mr. Atwell, after a rest, was able to go 
on with the rehearsal. 



FRAZEE PLANNING 

"RIVALS" REVIVAL 



Will Assemble an All-Star Cast for 

Sheridan Classic, with William Col- 

lias* in Rol* of Boh Acres. 

It has been annoonnced by H. EL Frasee 
that he contemplates assembling aa all- 
star cast of players for a special produc- 
tion of "The Rivals," with William Col- 
lier in the role of "Bob Acres." 

Mr. Frazee is planning to produce the 
Sheridan comedy in the Longacre Theatre 
next Spring, for one or two weeks oaly, 
with engagements of only a week each to 
follow in Boston, Philadelphia and Chi- 
cago, and one or two nights each in other 
dties. 

While no attempt will be made to play 
"The Rivals" before next Spring, prepara- 
tions for its production will begin as soon 
as Mr. Collier hss completed his work Of 
directing the rehearsals of "Business Be- 
fore Pleasure," the new farce by Mr. and 
Mrs. George Randolph Chester. 

Ever since he was a call-boy with tb« 
famous Augustin Daly Stock Co., Mr. Col- 
lier has cherished an ambition to play "Bob 
Acres." Once after he became a star, he 
played it— legitimately — in an all-star bene- 
fit performance in which Marie Dressier 
played "Lydla Languish" and Andrew 
Mack was the "Sir Lucius OTrigger. 
"The Rivals" has not played in New York 
since 1912 when Annie Rnssell Included it 
in her season or repertoire at the Thirty- 
ninth Street Theatre. 



WOMAN BUYS M. P. THEATRE 

PmrinTfPmi, Oct. 14. — The moving 
picture theatre at 508 South Street was 
sold last week to Fannie Feldman for a 
nominal consideration subject to a $33,000 
mortgage. The theatre occupies a lot 25 
by 170 feet 



NEW HAWAIIAN ACT 

Chas Bomhaupt is responsible for the 
placing of the Moanaluo Sextette of Ha- 
waiian singers and dancers with the new 
Rector Revue. The act carries special 
scenery and features "Pan-o-ka," a so- 
called sensational Hula-Hula wriggle. 



SHUBERTS GET MI.1.E. LUBOWSKA 

Desiree Lubowska, the classic dancer, 
has signed contracts to appear at Castles- 
in-the-Air for the Messrs. Shubert. 



ABORN SEASON OPENS 

The Aborn Opera Company began an 
engagement Monday, evening at. the Brook- 
lyn Academy of MurJc. The repertoire for 
the first three days of the week is as fol- 
lows: Monday evening, "The Jewels of the 
Madonna"; Tuesday evening, "Lohen- 
grin"; Wednesday matinee*. "The Jewels 
of the Madonna"; Wednesday evening, 
"Madam Butterfly." 



CHARLES BLAKE, ACTOR, 
KILLED BY TAXICAB 



Run Down, Ho Died Later in Hospital 

from Serious Injuries Received 

Saturday. 

Charles Blake, who for years has been 
known to Broadway and theatregoers as 
an actor and booking agent was run down 
by a taiicab at Forty-fourth Street and 
Ninth Avenue and died later in the Poly- 
clinic Hospital. He suffered a frac- 
tured skull, a fracture of tbe right hip and 
internal injuries. 

The actor was prominent some years 
ago as a comedian with tbe A. H. Woods 
melodrama attractions. He created several 
Hebrew parts in such productions as "The 
Queen of Chinatown," "The Gambler's 
Wife" and "Since Nellie Went Away." 
Later he went into vaudeville with his wife, 
where they were known as Blake A Har- 
vard. 

Recently Blake bad been connected with 
the cabaret department of the Morgenstein 
Booking Offices in the Gaiety Theatre 
Building. 



PLAY ACTED FOR MANAGER 

A special performance of the German 
musical play, "One Time in May" was 
given at the Irving Place Theatre last week 
for Charles B. Dillingham, who intends to 
star Joseph Santley in an English adap- 
tation. 

Tbe play is in four acts, the action cov- 
ering a period from 1838 to 1914. The first 
act is described as comedy, the second aa 
farce, the third melodrama and the last 
as musical comedy. The authors are Ru- 
dolf Barman and Rudolph Schanser, while 
the music Is by Walter Kallo and Willy 
Bredschneider. 



HART HAS DOZEN PLAYS 

Joseph Hart will have on tour this sea- 
son nearly a dozen playlets, including "Peg- 
for- Short," with Elsa Ryan;' "Who Owns 
the Flat," with Wilfred Clarke and on* 
in which Harry Beresford will appear. 



LOPOKOVA GUEST OF PLAYERS 

Lydla Lopokova was the guest of honor 
of the Washington Square Players at a 
supper given after the performance Friday 
evening, Oct IS. 



"NONETTE" IN ELIZABETH 

Nonette, the violiniste, opened her 
son on Monday at Proctor's Theatre, Elis- 
abeth, N. J. 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



CORSE PAYTON 

IN CONTRACT 

ROW 

TROUBLE MAY REACH COURTS 



Corse Payton furnished op-town the- 
atre devotees with more than their usual 
quota of gossip and excitement this week 
by engaging in a heated disagreement with 
The P. and B. Amusement Company, 
operators of the Spooner Theatre, relative 
to the validity of a contract which the 
Brooklyn stock actor holds, calling for 
use of the house in question. 

Through his attorney, James A. Timony, 
the impresBario and performer claims that 
he holds a- contract for the Spooner house 
until May 20, 1017, and that because of a 
change in the plans of the P. and B. 
Amusement Company they are endeavor- 
ing to break the written agreement by 
forcing him out. To this end, he states, 
they advertised as a current attraction 
for the present week, a production of 
the Cohan and Harris success "It Pays to 
Advertise," whereas he had already made 
arrangements to play "Paid in Full" dur- 
ing the same time. 

Payton further alleges that there is the 
sum of $1,600 coming to him, his share of 
past receipts. 

In a characteristic speech made from 
the stage of the theatre on Saturday eve- 
ning, the actor stated he would secure an 
injunction restraining the theatre people 
from interfering with his production ac- 
tivities, and meanwhile, if necessary, he 
would uu one-half of the stage on Mon- 
day afternoon to give his play "Paid in 
Poll" while the Spooner company occupied 
the other half with "It Fays to Advertise." 

The theatre people carried out their 
original intention, however, and gave a 
showing of "It Pays to Advertise," thus, 
Payton claims, breaking the contract which 
be holds for the exclusive use of the 
theatre. 

It is presumed the producer-actor will 
secure an injunction this week seeking to 
restrain the present occupants of the the- 
atre from further interfering with him 
until the matter ia settled. 



SEIZE LAST ISSUE 

OF JIM JAM JEMS 



Fall. Under Ban of Anti-Vice Society, 

Who** Activity Causa* Authorities to 

Confiscate All Copies in Sight. 

Aa a result of action taken by the Anti- 
Vice Society, the latest issue of the publi- 
cation known as Jim Jam Jem* has been 
barred from sale on the news stands of 
tius city, and all copies found on sale have 
been consficated by the authorities. 

The periodical was barred from the mails 
more than a year ago but it was shipped 
to the newsdealers here by express. 

The article which caused the Anti-Vice 
Society to take action against the publica- 
tion was called "Where Are the TJnbom7' 
and dealt with the exhibition of motion 
pictures at the Strand, Nashville, Tenn. 



NEW MANAGER AT ELMIRA 
Thane Haute, Ind., Oct. 14. — Chaa. 
Smith, former manager of Grand, here, is 
now located in Elmira, N. Y., in charge of 
the Motart Theatre. 



CENTURY GETS LIZZIE KELLY 

Miss Lizzie Kelly was yesterday en- 
gaged by Charles Dillingham and Florenz 
Ziegfeld, Jr., for a prominent role in "The 
Century Girl," thereby augmenting by 
one more name the long list of stars who 
will appear in that forthcoming produc- 
tion at the Century Theatre. Miss Kelly 
is one of the most popular canines on 
the American stage, and has been the 
feature, with her owner, Harry Kelly, in 
previous productions of Charles Dilling- 
ham. Mr. Kelly is likewise in the cast of 
"The Century Girl." 



MUSICIAN FRACTURES SKULL 
Bbattlebobo, Vt, Oct. 13. — Clarence 
Miller, one of the first violinists of the 
New York Symphony orchestra, is in a 
critical condition in the Memorial Hospital 
here, with a depressed fracture of the skull, 
the result of being thrown c at of a carriage 
in which he and his wife were riding. Mrs. 
Miller sustained a badly Bp rained wrist 
Miller's condition is regarded by his phy- 
sician as critical. 



BECOMES FITCHBURG MANAGER 

FrrcBBUBO, Mass., Oct. 14. — Samuel 
Kaufman, formerly treasurer of the Em- 
pire and Westminster Theatres, Provi- 
dence, R. I., has been appointed manager 
of the Lyric Theatre, this city. 



HOPKINS SECURES SEYMOUR 

William Seymour, the well-known stage 
director, has been engaged by Charles Hop- 
kins as producer for the Punch and Judy 
Theatre productions. Mr. Seymour has 
for many years ranked among the best play 
producers in the country. He had been 
general stage director for Charles Froh- 
man for upwards of twenty yean, prior to 
the death of the late manager. 



RETURNS FROM SOUTH AMERICA 

Gay Cromwell Smith, who has been in 
Sooth America for the last eight months 
supervising the engagements of "The Birth 
of a Nation" in Argentine Republic, Uru- 
guay and Bolivia, returned last week on 
the steamer Seaola. 



PHOTO-PLAY THEATRE SUED , 
Fitxhugh L. Sparks haa brought suit 
against the Photo-Play Theatres Co. for 
$4,436 for rent alleged to be due for the- 
atres in Richmond, Va. The defendant 
company ia lessee of a chain of Sim theatres 
in the South. 



READINGS BY MISS HAYNES 
Minna Gale Haynes will inaugurate a 
series of readings in New York this 
winter. Six dates have been assigned, and 
her program will embrace a wide range 
of subjects and authors, including Euro- 
pean and American. 



B. L PAYNE BUSY MAN 

B. Iden Payne, returning to New York 
after the successful premiere of "Major 
Pendennis," which he staged, has turned 
his attention to "Zack," by Harold Brig- 
house, which will have Richard Bennett 
as the featured member. 



"CENTURY GIRL" OPENING DATE 

The premiere of "The Century Girl" at 
the Century Theatre will take place Thurs- 
day evening, Nov. 2. 



MUSIC PUBLISHERS 

HOLD MEETING 

Representatives of Loading House* Dis- 

cbh Plan* for the Elimination of 

Bu si ne ss Evil. 

A meeting of sheet music publishers was 
held on Monday afternoon in the offices 
of the National Vaudeville Managers' As- 
sociation, in the Columbia Theatre Build- 
ing. The object of the meeting, which was 
attended by representatives from prac- 
tically all of the popular music publishing 
houses, was to consider some means by 
which many of the evils of the business 
could be eliminated. 

The enormous increase in the cost of 
doing business during the past few 
months, due to the advance in price of 
paper, printing, inks, etc., has made such 
inroads into the music publishers' profits, 
that many unhesitatingly declared that 
unless means to remove the most glaring 
of the evils were immediately adopted, 
the entire industry would be wrecked. 
One of the principal matters discussed and 
which is without doubt the biggest item 
of expense in connection with the pub- 
lishing of popular music is the paying of 
singers. 

This item, always a large one, has dur- 
ing the past few years grown to enormous 
proportions and publishers have come to 
believe that the only way it can be elim- 
inated is by concerted action. 

A number of plans to eliminate this 
expense were discussed, several of which 
were pronounced feasible, although the 
fact was rather freely commented upon 
that all of those which the majority of 
those present believed practicable had been 
suggested to publishers by the head of 
one of the large retail syndicates several 

weeks ago. 

A second meeting of the publishers will 
be held on Monday, Oct. 30. 



MOROSCO PLANNING 

ANOTHER N. Y. HOUSE 



Inability to Secure Theatre, for New Pro- 
duction. Load, to Decision to 
Build New Playhona*. 

Oliver Morosco has decided to build an- 
other New York theatre in the immediate 
future. He recently announced the tak- 
ing over of a new playhouse on West 
Forty-fifth street, just across from the 
Astor Hotel, which is now nearing com- 
pletion, and which will open about Christ- 
mas with the musical farce, "Canary 
Cottage." 

Mr. Moroaco'a decision to build a second 
New York theatre ia the result of hie 
being unable to secure the theatres he 
desires for his many new attractions, a 
condition that has confronted him on 
many occasions when he haa been desirous 
of bringing new plays into New York. 

At present there appears to be a dearth 
of playhouses to an over-abundance of 
productions now waiting to be given a 
Broadway hearing. 



OPENS NEW HOUSE 

Fbawkxiw, n. H., Charles Waldron 
opened his new house here, the Auditorium, 
with "Some Baby," to capacity business. 
Mr. Waldron now has three houses in New 
England playing first class production*. 
Besides Franklin, he has the Colonial at 
Laconia and the Auditorium at Concord, 
all doing fine business. 



REHEARSING NEW DRAMA 

"The Ingrate," a three-act comedy 
drama by M. W. Kallesser, now in re- 
hearsal, will open October 26 at Manhelm, 
Pa. George M. DeVere, the well-known 
blackface comedian and manager, la pro- 
ducing the play In conjunction with the au- 
thor. The cast Includes Francis Keeley, 
who ia being featured, as well as Saatford 
Anderson, Richard Carbart, Geo. M. 
DeVere, M. Kallesser, Jessie Lansing and 
Mabel Inalee. 



THE "LADY IN BLUE" 

HAS ITS PREMIER 

Franca* Starr and Company Seen in Naw 
Belasco Play, Destined for Broad- 
way Showing. 

Special to Tire ClJPFEB- 
WASniNOTON, Oct. 10. — France. Starr 
and her company began an engagement 
here tonight at the Belasco Theatre in 
"Little Lady in Blue," a comedy, by 
Horace Hodges and T. Wigney Pereyval, 
the authors of "Grumpy." David Belasco, 
of course, was among those present. 

Miss Starr's role is one of comedy. She 
has in her company Jerome Patrick, 
George Giddens, Horace Braham, Charles 
Garry, Carl Sauerman, Albert J. Andrews, 
Frederick Graham, Adrian H. Rosley, Ro- 
land Rushton, Lucy Beaumont and Eleanor 
Pendleton. 

"Little Lady in Blue" will be sent on 
a tour of the principal cities or the East 
and Middle West and then move into the 
Belasco Theatre, New York, during the 
holiday period. 



POLIS. NEW HAVEN. ALTERED 

New iiavxti, Conn., Oct. 18. — Exten- 
sive alterations are to be made by 8. Z. 
Poli at his theatre here, which will result 
in making the house capacity fully 8,000 
and Incidentally transform It Into the 
most modern of theatre*. The work plan- 
ned will involve $186,000. 



VETERAN MANAGER TOASTED 

GiNciitHATi. O., Oct. 16. — James Doug- 
las, an old-time theatrical manager, was 
the guest of honor here today of a dinner 
given by a number of actor friend*. Mr. 

Douglas was tie subject of several 



NEW PRODUCER Of FIELD 

A new personality, C. G. Blehl, is enter- 
ing the field of theatrical production. Mr. 
Riebl ia negotiating with Leon Errol, and 
he may present the comedian in a mustsal 
farce. 



NEW PITTSBURGH OFFICES 

The Clara Kimball Young Film Corpo- 
ration has leased office, from the Seltzer 
Music Co. at No. 1201 Liberty Avenue, 
Pittsburgh, Pa., for the distribution of its 
product. 



ANNIE HUGHES' SON WOUNDED 

Annie Hughes haa received a cablegram 
announcing that her son, who has been at 
the front, is severely wounded. She haa 
retired from, the east of "The Marry 
Wives of Windsor." 



«LE POlLU" ACT CHANGED 
"La Polio," which is appearing at tha 
Garrick, has had the cabaret climax of Us 
second act replaced by one more in spirit 
with the rest of the piece. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 




BLACKLIST WORKING AGAINST 
WHITE R AT ACTS , IS REPORT 

Lock-out, Scheduled for October 31, Already in Effect, Against 
Union Performers, Is Statement by Actors 
During Past Week 



The declaration of the Vaudeville Man- 
ager's Protective Association in their 
trouble with the White Rats, to the effect 
that a lock-out of all union acts will be 
declared on and after Oct. 31, found 
definite expression this week, it was said, 
in the blacklisting of several acts of more 
or less prominence. 

It was declared that orders have gone 
out to all agents to begin a campaign that 
ia intended to eventually eliminate an 
union turns from variety bills. The first 
gun was sounded in the cancellation of 
the bookings of three or four well known 
players, it was said, who decided to throw 
in their lot with the Rats in the bitter 
fight which is Blowly but surely reaching 
a climax 

The managers claim that the blacklist 
has resulted, already, in the resignations 
of hundreds of well known acts from the 
artist's organization and they are reported 
as saying that before Oct. 31, the date of 
the lockout order, many of the variety 
bills will be devoid of union turns. 

Harry Mountford, in a recently pub- 
lished statement, said that the applica- 
tions for membership in the order are in- 
creasing weekly, giving the number as 
eighty-nine in seven days. He says it wOl 
be impossible to give complete vaudeville 
bills without the assistance of union 
artists. 



The throwing out of White Rats acta, 
however, is in full swing, it is said, and, 
according to well authenticated reports, a 
strict watch in the shape of an accurate 
blacklist given to all managers in the 
vaudeville field, together with a majority 
of theatrical stage producers is being kept 
on the situation by the big and small time 
magnates. Any agent caught doing busi- 
ness with acts in the list will find himself 
suddenly bereft of his connections. 

The open meeting of the White Rats, 
the date of which is definitely set for the 
latter part of this month, will be the final 
muster or roll preparatory to deciding 
whether or not it shall be war to the death 
between artist and manager. At that 
time will be determined the advisability 
of ordering a general strike to combat the 
blacklist and other tactics said to have 
been adopted by the vaudeville managers. 

A strong movement is on foot by Mount- 
ford and others active in White Rat 
affairs to arouse the sympathy and solid 
alignment of non-theatrical unions in their 
favor in the event of a strike. The suc- 
cess of this is questioned by many 
prominent labor leaders. The sharp draw- 
ing up of the lines on either side, how- 
ever, is being watched with the keenest of 
interest by the theatrical world in gen- 
eral and the first of November will sound 
a dominant note in future plans. 



COLONIAL TO GIVE TWO SHOWS 

The Colonial is the first of the New 
York houses to announce two shows for 
Election night. Manager Darling has ar- 
ranged a splendid bill for that week. 



"Just Sandy." His collaborator is L K. 
Friedman, a Chicago dramatist. 



MARION WEEKS' LONG ROUTE 
Marion Weeks, the young coloratura, 
soprano, has been booked for a tour of 
72 weeks in the United Booking Offices' 

theatres. 

DOROTHY JARDON'S NEW ACT 
Dorothy Jardon will show her new act 
at the Greenpoint Theatre, Brooklyn, this 
week. She will be seen at the Palace The- 
atre the last week in Octoebr. 



WHITE RATS TO HOLD SMOKER 

A smoker will be held at the White Rats 
Clnb on Oct. 31. A new set of house rules 
is now being printed. 



TURNS FILM ACTRESS 

Rosamond Carpentier, petite and tal- 
ented picture and dramatic actress, has 
silenced her voice for the time being, and 
is playing with the Fox Film Co. 



ROSE SYDELL CANCELS DATE 

Chicago, Oct. 16.— For the first time in 
many years the Star and Garter Burlesque 
Theatre has no show for the full week of 
regular season. Rose Sydell's "London 
Belles" were scheduled to come in from 
Cincinnati, opening Sunday matinee, but 
owing to a disagreement over the terms 
of percentage, W. S. Campbell refused to 
play the date and the house remains dark 
this week. 

ALICE JANSEN, SINGER, WEDS 

ClNcrKWATr, Oct 16. — Alice Jansen, 
headliner of the Bostonian Opera Co., play- 
ing at the People's Theatre here, eloped to 
Covington on Saturday night and became 
the bride of John J. O'Connell of Phila- 
delphia, the mechanician of the troupe. 



VIVA REN AUD IN NEW ACT 

Viva Renaud has joined the Gordon 
Boys in a new act, and will be seen in 
vaudeville shortly. 



RESUMES HER OWN NAME 

Jean Good has resumed her own name 
Josephine Leroy. 



RAYMOND KENNY IN VAUDEVILLE 

Raymond Kenny, who was engaged for 
the role of Pistol in the revival of "The 
Merry Wives of Windsor," has given up 
the part and is appearing instead in vaude- 
ville. He is with Emmett Corrigan in the 
melodramatic sketch "The Van Lowe Dia- 
mond." 

MUSICAL NOSSES FOR "LETTY" 

The six musical Nosses, who for years 
have been a vaudeville feature, are a 
recent addition to the cast of "So Long, 
Letty," the musical farce which Oliver 
Morosco will preBent at the Shubert The- 
atre next Monday night. 



FLORENCE ROBERTS FOR VAUDE. 

Florence Roberts is returning to vaude- 
ville, opening October 30. Miss Roberts 
will revive her successful sketch, "The 
Woman Intervenes." 



WHITFORD KANE. PLAYWRIGHT 
Whitford Kane, Borne time actor and 
producer, has written a three-act comedy, 



NEW PLAYLET FOR THOMPSON 

William H. Thompson has selected "The 
Interview," playlet by Tom Gallon and 
Leon M. Lion, for his forthcoming vaude- 
ville tour. 



SOLDIER BOYS, WHO 
ARE SHOW BOYS 




The man on the right (smiling) is 
Billy Moran, of the vaudeville team 
of Hyde and Moran. The one on the 
left is F. J. Craven, Charlestown, 
Mass., formerly with Ringlings' circus.- 
The one in the center is F. J. O'Brien, 
Decatur, HI., late of the 179th U. S. 
Coast Artillery. 

All three are now enlisted for serv- 
ice overseas, in the Irish Canadian 
Rangers, the 199th Battalion Cana- 
dian Expeditionary Forces, the bat- 
talion that coined the famous recruit- 
ing slogan "If you have a wish bone 
wish for peace; if you have a back 
bone, fight for peace." Moran, who 
was doing an English dialect act be- 
fore, the war on the Keith circuit, is 
the star recruiter of the battalion. 



SCHEFF QUITS PALACE 

The bill at the Palace Monday after- 
noon was minus its headline feature in the 
person of Fritzi Scheff. Investigation 
brought out the fact that the tempera- 
mental prima donna felt the advertising 
given her name on the bills outside the 
theatre did not stand out sufficiently from 
the rest of the acts. She apprised the 
management of this fact at 12 o'clock 
Monday, with the result that her name was 
taken from the bills and those of Rock 
and White move to the top of the show. 

It was stated by the Palace manage- 
ment that due to Miss Scheffs lack of 
consideration for the theatre's patrons, 
further engagements would be denied the 
singer at the big time house. A sign to 
this effect was hastily painted and placed 
in the lobby later in the afternoon. 



ANOTHER VAUDEVILLE REVUE 

Fepplc & Greenwald are at work on 
Btill another vaudeville production, which 
will be -called The Revue de Vogue." It 
will have eight acting people and a car- 
penter. Henry Catalano will be featured. 
Rehearsals began Monday of this week. 



RETURNS TO TWO-A-DAY 

Jack Gorman, playwright and producer, 
is about to re-enter the two-a-day field 
with several productions, among which are 
"The Crook," with four people; "The 
Long Shot," with two people, and "The 
Days of 61," with five people. 

Gorman's play, "The Undercurrent," 
will shortly be seen on one of the popu- 
lar priced circuits, and to add to his ac- 
tivities, he is organizing a film company 
for the purpose of featuring the well known 
bachelor. Nat C. Goodwin. 



VAUDEVILLE AT DALY'S 
Billy Thompson and Joe Shea will put 
vaudeville bills into Daly's, New York, on 
a percentage arrangement with Jerome 
Rosenberg, the lessee. Bob Fitzslmmons 
will be the opening headliner on the In- 
dependent bill. 



ICE BALLET FOR VAUDEVILLE 

A company of fifteen American skaters 
are rehearsing a spectacular Ice Ballet to 
be given its first New York showing at the 
Palace early in November. Under the di- 
rection of G. W. Watters, champion Ameri- 
can skatorial artist, the turn will carry 
three principals and a chorus of twelve 
'skating beauties. 



DORIS PREDO FOR "FOLLOW ME" 

Doris Predo, who is Mrs. St. Clair Hitch- 
cock, a young society woman of Green- 
wich, will appear in the Anna Held piece, 
"Follow Me," to be given early next 
month. Miss Predo is the wife of Dr. St. 
Clair Hitchcock, owner of Crest View 
Sanitarium, Greenwich. She is the orig- 
inator of the Dore Quartette, composed of 
Greenwich society women. 



"BEAU BRUMMEL" FOR VAUDE. 

After many years of legitimate play- 
ing, "Beau Brummel" is being rewritten 
for the two-a-day. A company of eight 
people, headed by France Bendtsen, wiB 
commence rehearsals of the famous stage 
offering next week. 



HOTEL MAN RESIGNS 

Boston, Oct. 16. — B. W. Hill for many 
years assistant manager of the Common- 
wealth Hotel, this city, known to alt show 
people visiting the "Hub" has resigned tak- 
ing effect Nov. L He leaves at once for 
Detroit, where he goes into business for 
himself with prospects that he believes 
are much greater. 



PREPARING NEW ACT 
Cora Beekwith will shortly appear in 
vaudeville in a dancing act. 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




"BOARDING SCHOOL GIRLS" 

Theatre— City 

Style — Sketch. 

Time — Fifteen minute*. 

Setting — House, full stage, boxed. 

Value — Only good for smaller houses. 

"The Boarding School Girls" has some 
bright spots, but on the whole is 
mediocre. The story tells of a little 
"cut up" party in a girls boarding 
school, which is given "pep" by the un- 
expected appearance of a young, man. 
The affair is broken up by the woman 
who conducts the school. 

While the idea is old, if properly 
handled, it might have turned out a 
snappy skit. 

There are six women and one man 
employed. One of the women, playing 
one of the girl students, is a very 
clever performer. She portrayed a girl 
who, to use her own phrase, "You 
couldn't make a lady of her" and re- 
ceived full recognition for her work. 
But one swallow doesn't make a sum- 
mer. The others read their lines, but 
showed little individuality. 



"THE MASTER MOVE" 

Theatre — Jefferson. 

Style— Dramatic Sketch. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — House, full stage, boxed. 

Value — A. good skit for most any bill. 

"The Master Move" is away from the 
beaten track. It tells of a bear of a 
husband who treats his wife harshly. 
He is a commission merchant and sends 
goods abroad and pockets the money 
given him to insure them. His wife en- 
gages some news boys to call out that 
the Baltic has gone down. When he 
hears it he thinks he's ruined and of- 
fers anything to save himself. He 
draws up a paper giving everything he 
owns to his wife and she then tells him 
of her deception. 

The woman is a rather clever actress 
and plays with good repression. The 
man should tone down a little; he is 
too boisterous. The sketch was well 
liked. 



WILLIAM SISTO 

Theatre— Proctor' » Fifth Avenue. 
Styles — Monologist. 

Time— Twelve minutes. 

Setting— House drop-in-onc. 

Value— Good number three or four. 

William Sisto has a good line of talk, 
bordering on the war question, political 
situation and women, and has an orig- 
inal way in sending over his material. 
He makes a mistake doing a trick har- 
monica stunt for an encore as it takes 
the class away from his work. He 
needs a better' finish. He classes with 
the beat in the present line of mono- 
logists, and from his showing at this 
house is entitled to the best bookings. 
He call his act "The Italian Statesman" 
and dresses accordingly. 




FASHION PLATE MIN- 
STRELS 

Theatre — Jefferson. 

Style — Singing, dancing and talking. 

Time — Seventeen minutes. 

Setting — Special, interior. 

Value — A good showv act for any bill in 

third or fourth position. 

"The Fashion Plate Minstrels" is an all- 
girl act. There are seven employed in it, 
the end "men" are in black-face, and 
dressed in blue knickerbockers, blue 
jacket, white vest and blue stockings. 
One plays bones, the other is tambo. The 
remaining five are in white face. Their 
"show" is like a minstrel first part. One 
of the girls in white face is a capital ec- 
centric dancer. Two of the girls do a 
sister act and the other two sing, each in 
good voice. The two in black face sing 
and dance. All of the numbers used are 
Southern songs. 

The act has real merit. The set is ap- 
propriate, and the costumes are attract- 
ive. It is an applause getter from start 
to finish. 



SCARPIOFF & VARVARA 

Theatre — American. 
Style — Singing and piano. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting — House in one. 
Value— A feature. 

Scarpioff and Ivan Varvara appear in 
their native Russian dress costumes. 
Scarpioff is billed as "the wonderful Rus- 
sian boy tenor" and the billing is true to 
the mark, as he offered several classic and 
popular selections with a rich tenor voice 
which was really enjoyable. He is as- 
sisted by Varvara at the piano. This 
young fellow sure can play. He has a 
touch of an artist. 



"A FIRESIDE REVERIE" 

Theatre — .American. 
Style -Musical sketch. 
Time — Eighteen minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

Value— Very aood. 

A young man seated in his apartment, 
thinking of his former sweethearts, whose 
photos are on easels, four of them, in the 
room. He falls asleep and dreams. The 
girls come in, all of a different type, sing- 
ing. An old friend also arrives, he has 
to impersonate an old lady, so as to chap- 
eron the girls. In this character he get's 
much comedy. 

The act is well staged and costumed. 
The two men portray their parts in an 
excellent manner, so do the girls. It is 
highly entertaining and amusing. 



GALLAGHER and MARTIN 

Thea tr e Colonial. 

Style— Comedy, singing and dancing. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting — H ouse drop in one. 

Value— A good second feature. 

The new act shown by Skeets Galla- 
gher and Irene Martin at the Colonial 
last week is a winner. Here is a couple 
that is perfectly mated. They open with 
a little patter, then to song and finish 
with some excellent dancing. 

Their performance consists mostly of 
dancing and comedy, the latter being sup- 
plied in both by Gallagher, a young man 
with a bright future before him. 

Miss Martin is dainty and has a splen- 
did stage presence, and while not posses- 
sing a wonderful singing voice, knows 
how to pnt over a song with telling re- 
sults. 



"ANKLES" 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Comedy sketch. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting— Parlor set. 

Value — Good on any hill 

It's the old story of two men getting 
in wrong with the other fellow's wife, 
but told in a different way. This time 
the wives meet with an accident, sprain- 
ing their ankles, and were carried in 
the house by the men at different times. 
Hiding the women in the rooms, they 
come face to face in the finish. There 
are many witty lines throughout the 
sketch, with one laugh following after 
the other. The four people are clever 
performers, each handling his or her 
part in an excellent manner. 



ROCK AND WHITE 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style— Singing, dancing and comedy. 

Time— ■Twenty-fire minutes. 

Value — Feature act. 

William Bock and Frances White are 
putting over about the best routine of 
character songs and comedy they have 
used since they became a team. Besides 
being a two-footed dancer, Billy Rock is 
distinctly there when it comes to placing 
comedy points for the best laughing 
results and Frances White possesses 
that rarity among female humorists, a 
real sense of comedy values. 

The team has nifty material and they 
know how to use it. Miss White's cos- 
tumes are particularly becoming, her 
, headgear being worthy of special men- 
tion. The turn has plenty of "class" 
and on the whole can be safely described 
as a real feature act. 



MACARD AND BRADFORD 

Theatre — Colonial. 

Style— Comedy sketch. 

Time— Eighteen minutes. 

Setting — Dining room. 

Value— Good for comedy results. 

If Bill Macard wrote hia latest sketch 
for laughs he has succeeded; it's the 
beat laugh producer that he has shown 
so far. The skit has no plot, juet 
eighteen minutes of "hooken," giving 
Bill mostly all the opportunity, with 
Miss Bradford a good assistant. 

Women suffrage gets a big boost, and 
what little story there is tells about the 
women running the house. 

Several scenes are rather drawn ont 
and tiresome, and should be cut down. 



HERZ RETURNS TO VAUDEVILLE 

Ralph Herz will return to vaudeville in 
a new act, written by Edgar Allan Wolf; 
Carrie Clark will appear in support of 
Mr. Herz, who has given up the idea of 
reviving "A Regular Girl" for this season. 



ALLEN AND COOLS DOUBLED 

George W. Allen has doubled up with 
Dick Cook. 



MISS GAYLOR OUT OF HOSPITAL 

Chicago. Oct 14. — Flossie Gaylor was 
discharged from a local hospital last week. 



ATLANTIC CITY SEES "THE SIMP" 
Atlantic Crrr, N. J., Oct. 16.— "The 
Simp," a rural play with a mixture of New 
York City life, was presented here tonight. 
Zella Covington is the author and Clarence 
W. Willeta the producer. The east in- 
cludes: William Carey, H. I. Wills, Robert 
Blaylock, Charles Mussett, Lillian Van 
Arsdale, Rose Wilber and Daisy Stampe. 



CLAUDE GILLINGWATER 

Theatre — Palace. 
Style— Comedy playlet. 
Time— Twenty-eight minute*. 
Setting— Full stage. Special. 
Value— Good for spot on any bill. 

Claude Gillingwater and company, in- 
cluding Julie Heme, put plenty of 
dramatic meaning into Reginald Bar- 
low's comedy playlet "The Frame-Up" 
at the Palace this week. The sketch 
starts like a melodrama, and leads up 
quickly to a climax, which once passed 
leaves the audience in no further doubt 
regarding the author's intent. 

After the heavy dramatics have been 
satisfactorily disposed of the playlet 
resolves into a light comedy affair of 
rather familiar construction. 

The piece is entertaining and very 
well acted. Gillingwater plays with the 
ease and precision of the veteran, and 
Julie Heme, who has little to do for an 
actress of her attainments adds some- 
thing at least to the stage picture. "The 
Frame-Up" should And no trouble in 
filling a "spot" on any first class bill. 



DRAMA FOR SCHENCK 

Earl Sehenck, who is the latest addition 
to the re-organized forces of the World 
Film Co., will divide his time this season 
between the silent and the spoken drama. 



CLARK RETURNS TO "JUSTICE" 

Wallis Clark, who created the role of 
the judge in "Justice," has returned to 
the role at Chicago, where the play is 
booked at Powers' Theatre for an ex- 
tended run. 



DANCING PAIR HAVE NEW ACT 

Oartmell and Harris are rehearsing a 
new act, the dialogue and songs of which 
deal with the subject of golf. They are 
using an abandoned golf course in Free- 
port, L. L, probably with the idea of 
getting the proper atmosphere. 



"END OF PERFECT DAY" SECURED 
Chicago, Oct 17.— Gaakell & MaeVltty 
are to put out —The End of a Perfect Day," 
an English play by Howard MeKent 
Barnes, which will open late in November. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 




PALACE 

FrlW Soheff did not appear at either 
matinee or night performance Monday. A 
card in the lobby explained her absence. 
Daring intermission the audience was far- 
ther apprised of the reason for Miss 
8cbeS"s non-appearance, by means of a 
slide which carried a managerial post- 
script, declaring that the Viennese artiste 
would not receive another booking at the 
Palace. No one was delegated to depu- 
tise for the temperamental ginger, the bill 
remaining an act short. 

Charles (Chic) Sale ran away with the 
show next to closing. He waa an un- 
qualified hit, and deserved to be. Always 
easy in action and repressed in speech. 
Sale quite amply fulfilled every require- 
ment of the real artist. His characters. 
are genuine studies from life, with just 
enough caricature to make them delidonaly 
humorous. The rapidity of Sale's costume 
changes also helped in no small measure 
to land him at the top of the hit column. 

Another turn that found the going much 
to their liking Monday night waa the sing- 
ing and dancing offering of William Bock 
and Frances White. Their special num- 
bers are all exceedingly well written, and 
what is more important, beautifully de- 
livered. The act is reviewed under new 



The Morgan Dancers in their fourth 
successful week at this house went even 
better than they did during the first period 
of the present Palace engagement. This 
act is a high class production in every sense 
of the word, a peculiar thing about it be- 
ing that while there Is considerable bare- 
ness, not to mention a bit of nudity dis- 
closed now and again, there la never for 
a moment the slightest breach of good taste, 
the general effect being one of extreme 
modesty. 

Haydn and Haydn closed strong with 
the concertina and dancing finish. The 
baseball talk at the. beginning of the act 
la weak and should be brightened up with 
a real gag or two. The boys are versatile, 
but at present are doing juat a bit too 
much. 

Moeconi Bros, are dancers who can pat 
over a straight as well as a comedy num- 
ber. The miap iin eccentric dance at the 
fini.h seemingly hit the Palace bnnch ex- 
actly in the right spot 

Prince Charlie, a monk, as well trained 
as the beat of the Simian comedians seen 
hereabouts for some time, performed the 
usual routine of eating, drinking and bi- 
cycling riding without mishap until he es- 
sayed the taming of a wild motorcycle. 
This stunt nearly proved his undoing, as 
some ten exploded incandescent bulbs that 
formerly held forth In the foot-pan mutely 
testify. Charlie was a hit, even If he did 
almost smother the flute player with 
broken glass. 

The Belleclaire Bros, held them in very 
well closing the long bill. The strong men 
looked handsomer than ever in their Roman 
costumes. The act is an asset to any high 
class bill. 

Claude Gillingwater, assisted by Julie 
Heme and Company, offered a comedy in 
one act that pleased immeasurably. It win 
be reviewed under New Acts. 



COLONIAL 

Manager Darling had a turn-away busi- 
ness at the Monday night show. If for 
nothing elte, the excellence of the hill war- 
ranted it- And strange as' it may seem, 
Maurice Brierre and Grace King, in num- 
ber two spot, almost walked away with the 
show. Here is an act that stands upon 
its merit. Both are finished singers and 
dancers. The act is finely arranged and 
presented. 

The Misses Campbells, switched to the 
first half of the show, had it all their own 
way during their twelve minutes. The girls 
are big favorites here and the large audi- 
ence gave them a grand reception. They 
rendered several new songs, retaining only 
one of their old ones. For class and grace 
these girls are there. The costumes, one 
of pale blue and the other a light pink, 
were creations. 

Ssm Veno, with a repertoire of exclusive 
songs, went over big, with the exception 
of one song that could easily be eliminated. 
If a a number about "Yonkers" and has 
a line in it that goes something on this 
order, "How could you expect to get a 
boy and a girl when 111 stay only one 
day." The audience took exception to it, 
and Manager Darling will most likely pro- 
hibit its use. Otherwise Leno was a 
solid hit. His songs are all comic and got 
the desired results. 

Joe Cook had no trouble in convincing 
that his act is a novelty above the average, 
and for ten minutes had them laughing 
over his "hookum." 

The World Dancers, featuring Emllie 
Lea and Tom Dingle, with a company of 
nine, held down headline honors well. 

There's a young fellow in the act do- 
ing "The Conaque Dance" that should 
have his name in electric lights.' He's a 
wonder in his line. Miss Leo and Dingle 
executed their high kick dancing specialty 
in great shape, getting several bows for 
their endeavors. The act is a classic and 
a credit to vaudeville. 

Jlmmie Hussey and Al Lee, reunited 
after two years, gave their humorous "Fox 
Hunter" sketch and had a hard time get- 
ting them. Hussey had a bad cold which 
handicaped him somewhat in rendering his 
songs. Lee hasn't made a good selection 
of songs, and in the spot where he usu- 
ally lands them fell down badly. He has 
only one good number — an Irish-Jewish 
song. 

If bicycle acts were in vogue today, 
Valentine and Bell would be a feature on 
any bill. In opening position, they took 
three bows. The man is a crackerjack 
rider and has a young woman as an as- 
sistant that is full of pep. They make it 
a novelty by riding the different objects 
about the room. 

Mario Lo and company presenting 
"Porcelain," the act beautiful held them 
in unto the finish. 

X.- H. Macard and Ethlynne Bradford 
presented a new act called, "Dove, Honor 
and Obey." Full review in our new act 
column. 

The patronage at the Colonial has been 
making big strides recently, but the hills 
justify it. 



FIFTH AVENUE 

Shortly after the show started every 
seat in the house was occupied with the 
exception of a few box seats, and an au- 
dience that was ready to applaud when 
ever anything appeared that waa worth 
the old band clap.' 

Shock and D'Arville opened the bill, a 
man and a woman. The man was a fairly 
good head and hand balancer, but his part- 
ner hardly fitted In. 

Viva Ethelia offered several classic se- 
lections in an artistic manner. Miss 
Ethelia has an excellent voice and easily 
reached high "C." 

Ben Smith, doing blackface, told sev- 
eral stories and offered three Irish songs 
in an excellent manner. Smith has a rich 
tenor voice and went over very good. 

Keller Mack and Anna Oakey offered a 
comedy singing and talking act. Went 
over big. 

Tbe Crisps offered a variety of dancing 
that was a real treat. Acrobatic toe and 
modern. Both the man and woman are 
very artistic dancers. Their Apache dance 
was clever. The changes made by the 
young lady were remarkably quick. The 
act was a big hit. 

Canfield and Barnes, two men in a talk- 
ing and singing act, had to take several 
bows before they could get away. The 
straight man is aa good as any "feeder" 
seen around here in some time. The come- 
dian put over a fine eccentric dance, as well 
as taking care of hla comedy in an easy 
fashion. 

The Nsvasser Girls, a sixteen piece or- 
chestra, closed the show. The girls looked 
pretty and handled their instruments as 
artists. The cornet solo, aa rendered by 
one of the girls, assisted by the entire or- 
chestra, went over big. The anvil chorus 
was effectively presented, and received 
several encores. 

"Ankles," a comedy act See new acts. 



JEFFERSON 

The old. Monday afternoon cry of "full 
house" was heard here on Oct. 16 as usual. 
The bill waa arranged to the best ad- 
vantage and pleased those present. 

Dufty and Daisy, man and woman, did 
their clever bicycle act and scored aa they 
usually do. 

Karamerer and Howland, man and 
woman, presented their singing act to good 
results. The man's imitation of Bert Wil- 
liams' talking a song waa capital. 

O'Brien and Buckley, man and woman, 
in their Irish musical comedy act, were 
the big laughing hit of the bill. 

Kirby and Borne, two men, presented a 
very clever soft shoe dancing act with 
some singing. The boys are experts with 
the Tricks." 

The Fashion . Plate Minstrels, seven 
women, was a good offering. (See New 
Acta.). 

Arthur Whitelaw's monologue was as 
well liked aa ever. His comedy patter and 
songs got the laughs and his sentimental 
recitation, "The Top o* the Morain'," held 
the interest of his audience. 

The Grudschmidts, two men, a woman 
and two dogs, offered their well-known 
acrobatic act in the closing position.,. ■ ■ 



AMERICAN 

A well balanced bill is offered on the 
Hoof the first part of the week, and a 
fairly good size house was on hand Mon- 
day night. 

Alvarez and Martell opened the show 
with a neat dancing and. singing act. 

Arnold and White, two men, one doing 
black face, did well on second, with a 
singing, dancing and musical act Tbe boys 
dressed nicely. 

Harry and Augusta Turpin offered a 
comedy skit, "The Girl and the Bank," 
which finished well with the girl on a lad- 
der resting against her partner, both sing- 
ing, he dragging the ladder around in sort 
of a dance, going big. 

To see ten minutes of solid dancing, 
everything in the line of wooden and soft 
shoe hoofing is going some. That's what 
the Six Stylish Steppers did; it's one of 
the best acts of its kind on the stage, and 
one of the big hits of the bill. It is well 
costumed. It would be a great act for 
a show. 

Maud Tiffany came on right after inter- 
mission, looking the picture of health. 
She put over her four numbers in real 
Tiffany style, with a change of costume 
for each number. 

"Her Honor, the Mayor," a comedy 
sketch with four people, went over. 

The Karesaas, a comedy bar act closed 
the bill. 

"A Fireside Reverie.'* (See New Acts.) 

Scarp i off, Russian boy tenor. (See New 
Acts.) 



CITY 

An entertaining and well arranged bill 
for the first half of the week drew a 
packed house at the opening performance 
Monday afternoon. 

Herbert Clifton was first on after tbe 
pictures, and with his female impersona- 
tion act he scored a good-sized hit and 
waa forced to respond to an encore. 

Juliet Wood and company, man and 
woman and two extra men, gave their 
Shakespearean travesty act and won their 
full share of approval. The act has been 
greatly improved since we last saw it at 
another city house. 

The Imperial Russian Revue, five men 
and three women, open in three, with sing- 
ing and go to full stage with the regula- 
tion Russian dances. One of the women 
and two of the men are particularly ex- 
pert dancers. 

Cummings and Seaham, two men, in 
Number 4 position, scored in their; acro- 
batic act. They are excellent performers 
and the taller of the two does some very 
clever stunts with a derby hat 

Sroughton and Turner, man and woman, 
do a singing and talking act in one with 
special drop.. - They sing Irish songs ex- 
clusively, and each has a good voice. 

Lowey and the Lacy Sisters, man and 
two women, open with a trio, but aa 
singers proved only fair. As soft shoe 
dancers, however, they came into their 
own and finished strong. 

Duke Rogers- did not appear, and Jerge 
and Hamilton, with their singing and 
dancing substituted for him in a 
that was pleasing and clever. 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




LINGERIE, DRAMA 

AND FUN BLEND IN 
WILLIAMS SHOW 

Mollie Williams and her own company, 
under her own management, were cordially 
greeted Monday, Oct. 10, at the Columbia, 
New York. Miss Williams makes her 
initial appearance as the girl in "The 
Dance I/Enticement," which she has fea- 
tured for several seasons. As the dancing 
girl who outwits and kills the bandit, 
played effectively by Frank Fanning, she 
scored the usual hit. 

After that she appeared in various cos- 
tames built after the latest patterns and 
of the showiest material and workman- 
ship, playing the style of characters most' 
suitable to her talent. 

The comedy element was well looked 
after by Teddy Burns as the bogus baron, 
as the night clerk in a hotel, and in the 
Sanitarium Burlesque as Offus Noodle, 
and the complacent way in which he dis- 
pensed the fun was well liked. There was 
also Boscoe Aills, a grotesque character 
whose contortion antics and funny grim- 
aces easily touched the laugh strings and 
pulled them with ready response. He has 
some genuinely funny movements, and 
showed unlimited possibilities. 

Simon Myers was another comedy fac- 
tor in the specialty with Mr. Aills, and as 
the blackface nut in the sanitarium. 

Jack Duffy was a comedy straight, and 
also dipped into the fun department. 

Eva Malvin, a shapely burlesquer, led 
the feminine contingent in the first part. 
Frankie Burns played the maid, also a 

prohibition expounder who falls for the 
. booze tablets. 

Florence Kelly completed the cast. 

The Driesdall Sisters organized to lead 
the Quakertown numbers. 

The show is well equipped in the chorus 
way, each girl bearing a number, but the 
key was missing on the program. 

Ted Burns had an effective line of old 
Irish melodies, sung in clever style. 

A comedy marriage ceremony between 
Mollie Williams and her "Sidney," after 
she had secured a bridal veil during her 
letter carrier song, was done in ragtime 
for a big encore. 

Some of Miss Williams' most effective 
costumes were the blue letter carrier out- 
fit, the black and silver Chin Chin crea- 
tion, and the cloth of gold pantalettes. 

"The Meaning of U. S. A.," led by Miss 
Malvin with the flag finish, was encored. 

The changing of her clothes by Miss 
Williams upon the stage, surrounded by 
the show girls, while the ponies worked 
up the chorus of her last number, is being 
adhered to. 

The transformation tablets did their 
work with good comedy effect, and the 
antics of Burns and Aills as girls was a 
big scream. 

The entire show was well liked. 



NOVEL BOARD FOR LOBBY 

Pittsbubgh, Oct. 10. — Henry Krutx- 
man, manager of the Gayety, this city, is 
giving the patrons something new, in the 
line of a bulletin board, which he has 
named a "Watagoinon," and placed in the 
lobby of this house. Any live burlesque 
news concerning the different shows, stars, 
or anything of interest, he places on the 
board each week. 

He would be glad to hear from the va- 
rious manegers and agents, about the 
members of their companies. This is a 
very good idea for agents to keep the 
names of their principals in the public 
mind for weeks before the arrival of their 
show. 



OPENED FINE 
A wire to Blutch Cooper says that Bert 
Weston opened with the "Beauty, Youth 
and Folly*' in Louisville, Saturday night, 
and was a big hit. The show la doing fine 
business in Columbus, this week. •' 



DUFFY WORKING SINGLY 
Jack Duffy, formerly of Duffy, Geisler 
and Lewis, of the well-known vaudeville 
team, is doing a dandy "single" and work- 
ing "straight" with the MolUe Williams 
Own Show this season. His specialty in 
the show wins applause, and his advance- 
ment in the profession s*nce starting out 
alone is noticeable. 



BEN KAHN SPECIALIZING 

Ben Kahn will hereafter give his undi- 
vided attention to the Union Square Stock, 
all his other deals having been declared off. 
The Union Square company includes Nor- 
ma Brown, Adele Benson, May Leavltt, 
Leo Stevens, George Walsh, Brad Sutton 
and James X. Francis. 



BURLESQUERS IN .TRAGEDY 

Frank Kearns shot Stephen Clifford, 
Monday afternoon at 231 Welt Forty-thin! 
street, New York, and then shot and killed 
himself. Clifford was removed to the 
Polyclinic, where he died shortly after- 
wards. 



BARCLAY PREPARING ACT 

Don Barclay with the "Follies" this sea- 
son, is preparing an act which be will pre- 
sent at the Palace, New York, at the close 
of his present season. 



BABE DUFFY ILL 

Babe Duffy with Charlie Taylor's "Darl- 
ings of Paris" company, was taken sud- 
denly ill with pneumonia, while playing 
at the Howard in Boston, Oct. 11, and re- 
moved to the hospital, where it is said she 
is improving and would rejoin the show 
shortly. 



SHAPES ARE THE 
PRINCIPAL ASSET 
OF SOCIAL FOLLIES 

The "Social Follies" at the ' Olympic, 
New York, offered a choice exhibition of 
female charms in the forms of Minna 
Schall and Ruby Lusby. and both ware 
liberal in the display. 

The singing portion of the entertain- 
ment suffered by comparison, even the 
choruses being spoiled by several raspy 
voices. 

"A spicy salad with very little dressing" 
aptly describes the proceedings as many 
suggestive lines and movements were 
permitted. 

Fred Beebe as the German was tolera- 
bly funny, and Bobby Stone as the 
was passable. The theme of Peter 
played by Fred Beese, wearing clot! 
loaned him by the Hebrew who is always 
on his trail, was well worked up. 

Miss Schall as the widow looked and 
acted well, and several musical numl 
were entrusted to her. 

Miss Lusby was right in line wit. a 
ravishing form, and her costumes, includ- 
ing one showing a short umbrella skirt 
with ribbons running to the ankles over 
tights, were all built for • purpose. The 
black, pink, blue or any other color cas- 
ings were equally effective. 

More shapes were displayed by the girls 
in the muff number led by Miss Schall. 

The "Simp Club" was another success- 
ful comedy subject, and the drinking 
scene also scored. 

"Some Girls Do" was worked to the 
limit by Misa Luby. The jail teens, also 
the seminary burlesque with "May and 
Daisy." played by Fred Beebe and Harry 
Kay as the fake scholars, were funny. 

Joseph Cunningham impersonated a 
"cop." Jeannette Mohra' bit as the dope 
fiend looking for a murderer in the Jail 
was applauded. It is a clever imperson- 
ation. 

The chorus included Daily Hoffman, 
Chick Bussell, Mazle Hunt, Bena Moeller, 
Florence Messier, Edith Flenner, Del 
Wagner, Mae Wagner, Edith Boyle, Trizie 
McNally, Jo Harrington, Min Lawrence, 
Virginia. Johnston, Nellie Bruce,. Helen 
Carmody, Ruth Sheppard, Peggy Paul and 
Marion Webber. 

The staff: Sol Myers, manager; Big. 
Wachter, business manager; Sam T. 
Compton, musical director; Joseph Cun- 
ningham, carpenter; Fred Thomas, props; 
Gus Stiehle, electrician. 



VINE AND TEMPLE CLOSE 

Dave Vine and LueUa Temple closed 
with "Beauty, Youth and Folly" Oct. 14, 
at Louisville, Ky. 



DANNY SIMMONS IN HILL SHOW 

Danny Simmons is playing Father, and 
Polly Holmes Mother, with "Bringing Up 
Father in Politics." 

BURLESQUE SUITS 

Virginia Kelsy bss put in her notice 
with the "United States Beauties" com- 
pany. She will go into vaudeville. 



DONUN AND McHALE 

From baseball to vaudeville has been a 
pleasant change for Mike Donlin and 
Marty MeHale, and they are winning favor 
at every performance. 

In their new act, "Play Ball," Janes* 
Madison has given them parts which It 
them like • glove. 

Irrespective of their box-office value as 
b aseball players they are doing an act 
that would succeed if they were unknown. 



BIG DAY FOR IRWIN 
Columbus Day wa» well celebrated by 
burlesque patrons. Fred Irwin's take was 
over $3,000 for his two shows at the 
Columbia, New York, and the 





PATRICK KENNEY DEAD 

Patrick Kenney, who wes connected for 
many years with Waldron's old Palace In 
Boston, dropped dead in the Parker House 
that city, Friday, Oct 6. Hii body was 
buried at Calvary Cemetery Oct. 9. He 
was well known to the profession for the 
last twenty years. 



CLOSES SHORT ENGAGEMENT 

Margarette Shannon, who joined the 
Stone A Pillard Show in Bridgeport, 
closes with' the company in Hartford this 
week. 



Hastings' show, featuring Dam 
will W at the Columbia, New 



Frances Meehan, daughter of Win. C 
Meehan and Violet Pearl, was the first 
pupil accepted at the new Hippodrome 
ballet school. 

"The Cabaret Girls" broke all records for 
burlesque st the Grand Opera House, 
Akron, Ohio, 6-8-7. The house was packed 
at every performance, and Saturday eve- 
ning they had to stop selling tickets. 
One hundred were seated on the stag*. 

Fred Irwin refused to allow seats for 
spectators on the stage to be sold last 
week at the Casino, Brooklyn, as it would 
have interfered with the performance 
given by his big show. 



Ed Keller is the new leader with Fred 
Irwin's Big Show. 

George Barrett, musicsl director, in 
playing' the Gotham, Brooklyn, this week. 



Ernest Otto baa been succeeded by 
Earl Gates with the "Hello, New York" 
company. Marie Gates is doing her dance 
with Earl. Nettie Nelson is doubling 
two parts. Kitty and Al Garnsr have 
joined. 

Joe Harris, formerly at the Murray HOI, 
New York, is interested in the 1916 
Minstrels featuring the Langweed Sisters. 



The Burlesque Travelers' Club baa en- 
rolled Charles H. Wsldron and Jan. H. 
Rhodes. 

Tbos. A. Brooks, the black face come- 
dian, is with the "Heart of Dixie" Corn- 
pay. 

Bob Simons has been appointed man- 
ager of the "Rowland Girls." 



Ben Grinnell has replaced Harry Craw- 
ford with the Spiegel Revue. ' ' 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 



t _. 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




SINGER READY 

TO FIGHT 

RATS 



WESTERN MGRS. BACK EASTERN 



That the "No Whits Rats booked after 
October 31" dictum of the Vaudeville 
Managers' Association in the East will be 
strictly upheld by the Western Vaude- 
Tille Managers' Association in Chicago, 
was emphatically affirmed by General 
Manager Mort H. Singer, upon his return 
to Chicago from New York a few days 
■go- 
Singer has spent several days in a con- 
lcieura, cauea oy ine managus iu<w», 
and stated he was in a position to say 
that there would be no "ifs n or "buts" 
about the contemplated action. 

ToW? wtil 1 iftf UTT vWrfe" jSft^uVfjnbyW 
by the U. B. 0. after that date," he said, 
and added significantly: "And the same 
thing is true of the W. V. M. A." 

Singer declared that there is no basis 
for mediation with the union officials, be- 
cause the latter distort facts in their en- 
deavor to put vaudeville managers in a 
wrong light with performers. 

"No level-headed person can hear them 
refer to theatre owners who are barely 
making both ends meet, as millionaires," 
he continued, "like the story spread about 
that a certain owner, who lives in a board- 
ing house, resides in a millionaire's man- 
sion." 

Singer said that while the White Rats 
referred to the many acta employed at the 
Great Northern Hippodrome, Chicago, to 
make up a bill, they refrained from stat- 
ing that the bill was so arranged that 
acts working the night shift were free 
all day, while acta working the day shift 
were free all night, a condition which com- 
pares favorably with the workings of all 
first-class houses. 

Vaudeville bills were fairly good in the 
theatres this week. At the Palace The- 
atre dancing, aa usual, held the stellar 
place on the bill, with Bessie Clayton and 
her "Jazz" band the canter of attraction. 
Lambs' Manikins opened with their 
well-liked offering. Moore, Gardner and 
Rose, song writers, entertained with 
snappy singing novelties, then John and 
Winnie Hennings sang and danced with 
plenty of good comedy sandwiched be- 
tween. Henry De Vries held the audience 
enthralled with his realistic protean pre- 
sentation, in which he portrayed seven 
characters. Claire Rochester revealed a 
voice of great range and received much 
applause. Franklin Ardell, assisted by 
Marjerie Sheldon, brought back hi* laugh 
getting real estate sketch The Wife 
Saver." Hnfford and Chain followed Bes- 
sie Clayton for ten minutes of repartee. 
Howard's animal spectacle closed the bill. 
The Majestic bill had a "solid talk" 
sspset because four «*"g'»g acts are 
hunched near the end. 

Melville Ellis and Irene Bordoni in the 
hit spot have a far better act than last 
ssssen's offering. 
After the Seebocka, followed pictures. 



with their gymnastic novelty. Clifford 
Walker pianologued for ten minutes, in- 
troducing recitations with music which 
pleased. Creasy and Dayne, assisted by 
Marion Hodges, revealed the well-played 
sketch, "A City Case," in which Creasy 
got many laughs as the cautious country 
lawyer with a big heart. 

Grace De Mar delivered good comedy 
chatter taken from life for fifteen minutes. 

Much light comedy, some clever espe- 
cially written songs and pert dialogue 
were embraced in Wilbur Mack and Nella 
Walker's "A Pair of Tickets." 

Albert Hockey playing minor role and 
piano. Harry Cooper is the same old 
Harry with same old Hebrew comedy, but 
new songs, assisted by a Ross Robertson, 
who has a splendid voice. Fay, Two 
Coleys and Fay finished the singing end 
of the bill with slapstick blackface work 
than won applause. 

Odiva, mermaid-like swimmer, and her 
wonderfully trained seals constituted a 
closing act of absorbing interest. No bet- 
ter water act could be conceived. 

At McVickers there was the "Suffragette 
Court." a musical comedy with ten peo- 
ple. Lipinski and her dogs, Hicks and 
Hunt, boomerang throwers and jugglers; 
Chas. Riley, Daniels and Conrad, offering 
a musical act; Dale and Archer, Mabel 
Harper, Charles Gibbs, and Charles B. 
Ijiwlor and daughters are also on the bill. 



Harmony Notes 



Ever since Leon Flatow stroked the keys 
for Wolfie Gilbert he has had an ambition 
to write popular songs. Now, while work- 
ing in Feist's Chicago office, he has com- 
pleted a couple of numbers that look good 
enough to be released through the "big 
house." 

Upon joining the Shapiro-Bernstein Chi- 
cago staff, Gus Winkler made his first con- 
nection with a local office since leaving 
F. J. A. Forester's employ four seasons 
ago. 



Tom Quigley says one reason for Wit- 
mark success in the West lies in the fact 
that he has many people around him who 
have been around him for a long while. 



Will Rossiter makes it a point never to 
get after a song he feels most like going 
after. If he likes a song, he gets jubilant 
over it, talks about it constantly to his 
staff and, when they think he's going after 
it, presto! he shifts his line of attack to 
some song that somebody brought in the 
day before. That's how he gets hits like 
"Walkin' the Dog." 



The McKinley Music Co. has just issued 
a new eatalog which, is a marvel in con- 
struction. Though the booklet contains 
thousands of thematica, a light, India pa- 
per has been chosen which makes it very 
easy to handle. By virtue of their many 
listed dealers, the firm estimates that half 
of the million edition already printed will 
be in the homes of music users before No- 
vember 1. The numbers included range 
from new issues to the "old standbys" of 
the concern. 



LOOP THEATRE 

PLAYS ARE 

CHANGING 

MANY NEW ATTRACTIONS DUE 



That part of the season when Loop the- 
atre Bbowj change with clock-like regu- 
larity, after current attractions have had 
more or less healthy runs, has been 
reached in Chicago. 

John Barrymore and a splendid cast, in- 
cluding O. P. Heggie, Whitford Kane and 
Bertha Mann, have brought "Justice," 'a 
strong play dealing with English prison 
conditions and the limitations of divorce 
laws, to Powers', replacing "Please Help 
Emily." 

"Alone at Last," a Lehar operetta, has 
come to the Illinois with a "singing" cast 
headed by Harry Conor, Forrest Huff, 
Stella Norelle and Fritzie von Busing. 
Chicago always welcomes plays from the 
pen of the composer of "The Merry 
Widow." 

The Little Theatre has opened featuring 
Marguerite Hertz in the first local per- 
formance of "Mary Broom," a comedy with 
touches of pathos. Other attractions that 
are coming include Margaret Anglin in 
"Caroline" at the Blaekstone, Oct. 30; 
French celebrities, in repertoires, at the ' 
Playhouse, Nov. 6; Arthur Byron and 
Wallace Eddinger, in "The Boomerang" at 
Powers', Nov. 13, and Sir Herbert Tree, 
in "Henry VHT' at the Illinois, on Nov. 27. 

A roster of (be theatres shows the fol- 
lowing attractions at the various houses: 

Illinois (Rollo Timponi, mgr.) — "Alone 
at Last," first week. 

Powers' (Harry Powers, mgr.) — John 
Barrymore, in "Justice," first week. 

Chicago (Shubert management) — "The 
Blue Paradise," fifth week. 

Playhouse (A. L. Perry, mgr.)— "Where 
the Rooster Crows," second week. 

Cohan's Grand (Harry Hidings, mgr.) — 
"The Great Lover," third week. 

Garrick (John J. Garrity, mgr.) — "The 
Princess Pat," third week. 

Olympic (George C. Warren, mgr.) — 
"Common Clay," seventh week. 

Princess (S. P. Gerson, mgr.) — 'The Un- 
chastened Woman," third week. 

Cort (U. J. Hermann, mgr.) — 'Tair and 
Wanner," eleventh week. 

La Salle (Harry Earl, mgr.) — "Where 
Are My Children f u pictures, twelfth week. 

Columbia (E. H. Woods, mgr.)— Week 
15, "The New York Girls." 

Haymarket (A. H. Moeller, mgr.) — 
Week 16, "Beauty Review." 

Star & Garter (C. L. Walters, mgr.) — 
Week 16, Rose Sydell Co. 

Gayety (R. S. Schoenecker, mgr.)— 
Week 15, "The Pacemakers." 

Englewood (J. W. Whitehead, mgr.)— 
Week 15, "The Lady Buccaneers.'' 

Orchestra Hall— Oct 11 to Nov. 11, 
"Burton Holmes' Travelogues.'" 

Colonial (Norman Field, mgr.) — "The 
Birth of a Nation," pictures, fourth week. 

Studebaker (Jones, Linick & Schaefer 
management) — "20,000 Leagues Under the 
Sea," pictures, second week. 



FOR ADVERTISING 

RATES, PHONE 

RANDOLPH 5423 

Imperial (Will Spink, mgr.)— Week 16, 
"The Other Wife." 

National (J. P. Barrett, mgr.)— Week 
16, "A Little Girl in a Big City." 



DORIS SHOWS WINTERING 

PrrrsBUBGH, Pa., Oct 14. — "Honest" 
John Brunen, manager of the Mighty Doris 
Shows, has had the show property shipped 
from Lewistown, where it closed recently, 
to its winter quarters on the North Side. 
Dr. Enob, who was special agent for 
Mr. Brunen this season, is assisting in the 
work. 

Mr. Brunen is already planning for the 
season of 1917, and expects to make big im- 
provements over his show of this season. 



HAMILTON WRITING ANOTHER 

Cosmo Hamilton, the English dramatist 
and author of "The Blindness of Virtue," 
and co-writer of "Flora Bella," now on 
view at the Casino, New York, has just 
completed a new musical comedy for the 
Messrs. Shubert, and is at work on the 
dramatization of his latest novel, "The 
Sins of the Children." 



News Briefs 



Morrie Stern tried his best to forget the 
music business and enter the real estate 
game, but an offer from Tell Taylor 
brought him back to the game last week. 



The ten cent stores on State Street call 
many songs hits that even the publishers 
hesitate to classify in that manner. 



Katm & Van Alstyne hastened to write 
their own ringer around their "Pretty 
Baby" for Remick, before some other firm 
would release one. 



Charles W. Racey, an important cog in 
the great Chicago studio of the Essanay 
concern, is back at work again, after 
thirteen weeks' illness. 



Carl Laemmle, Universal film king, came 
to Chicago last week to witness the initial 
performance of "Twenty Thousand Leagues 
Under the Sea" at the Studebaker. 



The Showmen's League of America 
stepped into local politics last week by 
endorsing Edward It. Litzinger, Republican 
candidate for member of the Board of 
Review. This was done because of Lit- 
zinger'a splendid record as secretary of the 
United States Tent & Awning Co., the 
largest outdoor enterprise outfitters in the 
West. 



Chicago Vaudeville is complacent and 
calm, while the East reeks with vivid 
stories of vaudeville strike crises in the 
West. 



Ernie Young is trying out some ideas 
for the Strand Theatre that will soon 
place it in the list of Chicago's legitimate 
houses. 



The Schallman Brothers will share space 
with Sam Bristow. in the Consumers 
Building. 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




Founded is IKS by Frank Quean 

Published by the 

CUPPER CORPORATION 

Orlind W. Vaugban. .President and Secretary 

£55 J ,, w K 5 w V? ta .: Vlce President 

Frederick C. Mailer Treasurer 

1604 Broadway, New York. 

Telephone Bryant 9462. 

ORLAND W. VAUGHAN, EDITOR, 

Kwt&rasss } a™*"* ■«■■* 



NEW YORK, OCTOBER 18, 1916. 



Entered Jane 24, 1879, at the Poet Office 
at New York, N. Y., as second class matter, 
onder the act of March 8, 1870. 
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ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON 
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Address All Communications to 

THE NEW YORK CLIPPER. 

MM Broadway. New York 

KeifUterod Cable Addrctt, "Adthobitt." 



FRANCIS POWELL will direct a new 
art company in the East this aeaeon. 



EDITH RANDOLPH has joined Helen 
Freeman at the Nine O'clock Theatre. 



ROSAMOND OARPENTTER hsa joined 
the acting staff of the Fox Film Com- 
pany. 



K I It ATI M ARKHAM opened her season 
with the Little Theatre, Los Angeles, last 
week. 



"CALIBAN," the Shakespearean Mosque, 
will, it is said, be sent on the road next 
season. 



WHITFORD KANE has finished his 
Brat long play, which will be produced in 
New York next year. 



ANNIE HUGHES, having recovered 
from a painful injury sustained several 
weeks ago, has returned to Broadway. 



"WHO IS HEt" the new detective 
comedy by Horace Vachell, will be 
brought to New York late this month. 



HELLEN EVTLY was in the original 
American production of "Chitra," by Ta- 
gore, which has just . had an European 
premiere. 



CHARLES COMPTON has closed his 
season at the Princess Theatre, Sioux 
City, and returned to New York for a 
Broadway production. 



PAUL GORDON is playing a limited 
engagement in pictures under the banner 
of the Rolfe company. "Margery Daw," 
in which he appeared, has closed. 



BERTHA MANN will play a Summer 
season when "Justice" closes. She and 
Howard Kyle will be the featured mem- 
bers of the University Players next year. 



YVETTE GUHBERT is off for a Cana- 
dian tour. 



EARLE 
Press Club. 



WILLIAMS has joined the 



HARRY TIGHE is to forsake vaudeville 
for musical comedy. 



PATRICOLA is playing Western Asso- 
ciation time. 



THE Greater Morgau Dancers remain 
for another week at the Palace. 



MAE MURRAY has begun her new pic- 
ture for Jesse Laaky. 



LAST Sunday's Hippodrome advertise- MILDRED GILMORB is singing at a 

ment was printed In eight languages. cabaret, in New Orleans. 



LOHSEE AND STERLING will be on 
the bill of the New Pantages, Milwaukee. 



EDITH MONTROSE is returning to the 
stage after a year's absence. 



LINA CAVALIERI arrived last week 
from Bordeaux, on the French liner Et- 
pagne. 



MAVERICK TERRELL is writing 
comedies for Charlie Chaplin. 



LILLIAN GREUZE, of the Theatre 
Frnncais, this city, arrived last week on 
the Etpagne. 



FRANK LOSEE has renewed bis con- 
tract with the Famous Players. 



THE Canadian company of "Alma 
Where Do You Lire?" has closed. 



JOHN G. RAE, who closes bis tent show 
Oct. 21, will take his repertoire company 
out about Christmss. 



THE Ellis Grand Opern Co. starts a 
three weeks' tour this week at Toledo. 



A SOLEMN high mass was held October 
13 for the late Josephine Cohan Niblo at 
St. Malachy's Church, New York. 



EDDIE SHAYNE is now booking acts 
for the Oak Park Theatre, Oak Park, 111. 



WILLIAM HODGE has moved his fam- 
ily from his country place at Great Neck, 
L I., to New York for the winter. 



VICTOR CRANE is planning a new 
road show, starting around Thanksgiving. 

T. O. TUTTLE is the new manager of 
the General Film Office in New Orleans. 



CHARLES DALMORES, tenor singer, CHARLES OSGOOD, JR. is assistant 

arrived in this city Oct. 11 from abroad, treasurer of the Tunlane Theatre, New 
He joins the Chicago Opera Co. Orleans. 

ninuwiDDUuiii 



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GEORGE ARLISS has begun rehearsals JACK HOWARD, of Howard and Boyle, 
of "The Professor's Love Story," which is slowly recovering from an attack of 
he will produce at an early date. paralysis. 



A. H. WOODS and EUGENE WALTER IT IS reported from San Francisco that 

announce that they are unable to find a Nat Magner is forming a company to play 
suitable leading lady for "The Knife." the Orient. 



EUGENE WALTER appeared as an ex- THE Theatre St Francis, a new pic- 

tra at the Thanhouser studios last week tore house in San Francisco, opened early 
in a film featuring Charlotte Walker. thia month. 



THAT the late Max He Inrich left $5,000 
was disclosed last week by an application 
for letters of administration in the estate. 



THE MCINTYRES sail for Australia 
early in November to play the Harry 
Rickard's Tonr. 



"THE GIRL FROM BRAZIL" closes 
Saturday, Oct. 21, at the Shubert Theatre 
and opens in Philadelphia the Monday fol- 
lowing. 

THE Yorkville German Theatre will put 
on "Die Polly Dolly," a musical farce in 
three acta, on Oct 21. Andre Sherri is 
staging the production. 



HENRY LEWIS, of vaudeville fame, 
is about to do some two-reel comedi •« be- 
fore the camera. 



"THE STRIKERS" made such a hit at 
Pantages, San Francisco, that J. J. Clux- 
toh will send it East 



ON Ladies' Day at the Friars', more 
than eight hundred women visited the 
Monastery. Louis Mann delivered an ad- 
dress of welcome and Raymond Hitchcock, 
William Collier and others entertained. 



GEORGE MORTON, formerly on the 
Orpheum Circuit opened as a single at 
Pantages, Los Angeles. 



GEORGE BOWLES, who has been in 
Australia since last April, expects to re- 
turn to New York In six weeks. 



JAMES MORRISON is about to start 
work on a new Ivan ten-reek r. 



NAT GRISWOLD is playing with Leff- 
ler & Bratton's "A Devil's Harvest." 

KARL F. KELSEY la musical director 

of one of the "'Ramon a" road companies. 



MYRTLE STEDMAN is a new fact 
at the Lasky-Famoos Studios, Hollywood. 
Cal. 

MARIE VAN VORST announces her 
engagement to Gaetano Gagiati. of Roma, 
Italy. 



"WAR AS IT REALLY IS," will be 
shown in series form exclusively at the 
Mattel 



EDITH STERLING will appear in the 
film of "The Planters," supporting Tyrone 
Power. 



WALLY VAN has resigned from the 
Vitagraph Co., with which he has been 
for six years. 



THE new Marie Dressier film produced 
by the World Film Corp.. will be called 
"Tlllle's Day Off." 



WALTER SCHEUER, of the Dispatch 
Film Corp., has bought the Audrey Mun- 
son picture, "Purity." 



EMILY STEVENS returns to pictures 
at the close of her winter season In "Tut 
Unchastened Woman." 



GLADYS ALEXANDRIA baa algned 
for an important role in "The Sunbeam," 
a Metro-Rolfe production. 



THOMAS CONKBY will temporarily 
desert the light opera stage and will be 
heard in concerts this season. 



SUE MACMANAMEY bas been engaged 
by Frederic McKay to play the role of the 
sister in Irene Franklin's new production 

GILBERT HAMILTON will return to 
Los Angeles shortly to begin the produc- 
tion of the Ella Wheeler Wilcox aeriea. 



"THE SHIELDING SHADOW b 
popular in Philadelphia. Nearly every 
vaudeville house in that city baa booked 
it 

HAMILTON CHRISTD3 baa been en- 
gaged by Oliver Morosco to play the role 
of Aleric in "Peg o' My Heart" for the 
coming season. 



"THE HEART OF THE HILLS," wBl 
be released Oct 30. It la the first Edison 
release through the Kleine-Ediaon-Sellg 
Esssnsy Combination. 



ACCORDING to the management of the 
La Salle Theatre, Chicago, "Where Are 
My Children" drew 412,000 persons in the 
first nine weeks of its stay. 



"WITCHCRAFT," which is released 
this week, on the Paramount Program, la 
the photo-drama which won the prise con- 
test at the Colomb'a University. 



KENNETH HARLAN baa been held 
over for a second week at the Orphecia 
Theatre, San Francisco, owing to the 
great success which his act has met with 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 





HIGH-CLASS NUMBERS 

IN GREAT FAVOR 

Vaudeville Audience* Enthuse Over 

Better-Grade Song* An Evidence 

of Musical Development. 
The growing tendency on the part of 
the public to welcome songs of the bet- 
ter grade is sufficient evidence of the 
change and improvement in musical taste 
of the American people. Songs that not 
long ago would hare been suitable only 
for concert engagements are now great 
favorites with vaudeville audiences. Sing- 
ers have been quick to realize this, and 
have lost no time in encouraging the 
taste for good songs by featuring them 
far and wide. They have discovered that 
these numbers are always dependable, and 
are enthusiastically received in the 
smaller cities aa well as in the great 
metropolis. 

So strong has the demand for good 
songs become during the past few months 
that nearly every publishing house has in 
its catalogue several high-class numbers. 
M. Witmark A Sons, always leadera in 
this style publication, have a particularly 
large collection, among them being stand- 
ard favorites as "Resignation," "Evening 
Brings Rest and You," "On the Road to 
Paradise," "Carissima," "Mother Machree," 
"Can't Yo* Eeah Me Callin', Caroline!" 
and "A little Bit of Heaven." 



MORRIS IN TOWN 

Joe Morris was in town last week, and 
mentioned the fact that "There's a 
Quaker Down in Quaker Town" is the 
best seller he has ever published. 

Another number that Joe is pushing 
bard ia "Just One Day," the song with 
a elever punch line. 



FEIST MEN GOOD PROPHETS 

Early last summer the Leo Feist pro- 
fessional men, in convention, went on 
record with the statement that the two 
songs, "Ireland Must Be Heaven" and 
"There's a Little Bit of Bad in Every 
Good Little Girl," would become national 
successes before fall. The enormous pop- 
ularity of these two numbers and their 
great sales stamp the Feist men as real 
prophets even in their own country. 



STILL THEY COME 
Another Hawaiian song has made its 

appearance. This time it's Wolfe Gilbert 

that has been found guilty. 
He calls it "The Hawaiian Sunshine," 

and aaya "if a a novelty because the word 

ukulele ia not used in the lyrics." 
Joa. W. Stern A Co. are the publishers. 



COMER FEATURES FEIST SONG 

At the Colonial Theatre last week, 
Larry Comer, Emma Cams' new partner! 
score* the singing hit of the bill with the 
Leo Feist song, "There's a Little Bit of 
Bad ia Every Good Little Girl." 



STARTS TRIP 

Walter Douglas, nUmm f or the 
Broadway Music Corp., started on a trip 
last week that will consume about six 
weeks. 



REMICK BUSINESS BOOMING 

"War rimes, scarce paper, milk famine, 
car strikes and all those sorts of things 
cut no inroad into our business," said Mose 
Gumble, reclining complacently in his arm 
chair at Jerome H. R»Tni/.fc Co., recently. 
"You see, it's this way," continued Mose, 

"we have jnst so many hits a year, any- 
how. But this year we have exceeded the 
speed limit Here are a few of the many: 
"Jnst a Word of Sympathy," "Mammy's 
Little Coal Black Rose," "Underneath the 
Stars," "And They Called It Dixie Land." 
Bnt there are also others which still con- 
tinue to sell in five-figure lots, such as, say 
"Pretty Baby," "Memories" and the like. 
"I'll tell you this," concluded Mr. Gumble, 
"It's the way you look at things in life. 
Be contented and keep on hustlin'. The 
hits will take care of themselves!" 



WORKING ON NEW SONG 

After being satisfied that,. "I'm at Your 
8ervice Girls," "He's Got a Bungalow," 
and "Sometimes the Dream Gomes True," 
have been properly exploited in the South 
and West, the Bernard Granville staff are 
concentrating their efforts on "Any Old 
Name Is A Wonderful Name." 

"Hula Lou," the Grossmith & Ward 
Hawaiian Ballad was featured at Loew's 
Seventh Avenue last week 

This is a Hawaiian song, the melody of 
which has not been taken from any native 
strains but is highly original and melo- 
dious. 



MURRAY BLOOM IN CHICAGO 

Murray Bloom, of the Harry Yon Til- 
zer Company, is in Chicago, where be has 
opened temporary professional offices in 
the Randolph Building. He is demon- 
strating the new Von Tilzer songs to scores 
of the Western acts. 



STERNS SIGN STEWART 

Leslie Stewart has signed to write ex- 
clusively for the Joa. W. Stern Co. 

Mr. Stewart is at present playing in vau- 
deville with May De Soosa as a partner. 



ELLIS & BORDONI IN THE WEST 

Ellis & Bordoni, who have been appear- 
ing on the Orpheum Circuit, are now on 
their way East This week at the Ma- 
jestic, Chicago, they are scoring a big suc- 
cess with the new Harry Von Tilzer song, 
"On the South Sea Isle." 



NEW EDWARDS BALLAD 

"If I Only Knew Just How I Stood 
With You," is a new Gua Edwards bal- 
lad just released by the Jos. W. Stern Co. 

Gns will make it a feature with his new 
vaudeville act 



NEW STASNY PHIL. OFFICES 

The A. J. Stasny Music Co. has opened 
new and finely equipped offices in the Park- 
way Building, Broad Street Philadelphia. 
Earl Burtnett, the manager, is doing a 
fine business in that dry. 



BROCKMAN SONG FEATURED 

Mae Marvin, at the American last week, 
made a feature of James Brockman's latest 
ballad, "Don't Forget Me." 



THE SERENADE OF SERENADERS 

If ever the historian starts out to com- 
pile a list of "the best songs ever writ- 
ten" he will fail in his duty if he should 
omit "Can't Yo' Heah Me Callin' Caro- 
line!" written by Wm. H. Gardner and 
Caro Roma. Here is a Southern darkey 
serenade that combines with extraordi- 
nary success and effect all the best qual- 
ities in lyrical music that make it thor- 
oughly and essentially popular, and at 
the same time possesses that sterling 
merit and sound workmanship that en- 
titles it to a place in the standard bal- 
lads of all time. There must be few 
singers, professional and non-professional, 
who have not sung this fascinating song 
of the South. It has an enviable record, 
and, though it has built that record up 
over a number of years, judging from the 
insistence of the demand for it, both 
musically and commercial, it is as new 
today as ever it was. M. Witmark & 
Sons number it among their many suc- 
cessful publications. 



A BIG STASNY WEEK 

Earl Burtnett, manager of the Phila- 
delphia office of the A. J. Stasny Music 
Co., recently arranged a "RoBes" Week, 
featuring "I Found You Among the 
Roses." Every music store in Philadel- 
phia devoted a window to the display of 
the Bong, and over 5,000 copieB were sold 
in a single week. 



MILLS AGAIN PUBLISHING 
F. A. ("Kerry") Mills, formerly one of 
the prominent popular music publishers, 
has again entered the publishing field. 
This time he is confining himself exclu- 
sively to the standard, or high class, num- 
bers, which he is issuing from his head- 
quarters in Montclair, N. J. 



H A VILAND GETS RIGHTS 
F. B. Haviland has just secured the 
American Puplisbing rights from the Star 
Publishing Co. of London for "I'll Make 
You Want Me." 



HAROLD DILLON IN BOSTON 

Harold Dillon, professional manager of 
the T. B. Harms & Francis, Day & Hunter 
Co., is in Boston for a few days, intro- 
ducing the new Harms songs. After a 
short stay there Mr. Dillon will go to 
Philadelphia. 



A NEW WESTERN WRITER 

John P. Medbury, a talented California, 
lyric writer, who recently came to New 
York, has joined the staff of the Harry 
Von Tilzer Music Co. 



MORRIS INCREASES STAFF 

Joe Gallagher, last season connected with 
the 20th Century Maids Burlesque™, is now 
connected with the Philadelphia office of the 
Joe Morris Co. 



NOW A RECORD 

The Victor and Columbia companies have 
made a record of Billy McKenna's song, 
"Everybody Loves an Irish Song," pub- 
lished by Haviland. 



Sharps and Flats 

By TEDDY MORSE 



Talk about your place called "Harmony," 
I've found one that beats the band; 
It's down in Pennsylvania, 
Is it a dream? — Ifs " Happy land !" 



Jim Thornton was basking in the warm 
sunlight in front of the ' Palace Cafe re- 
cently, giving the passing throng his usual 
dignified o. o. (Notice Jim was on the out- 
side this time.) He has been the subject 
of many good stories in his long career, 
and this one is worth repeating. One of 
those sight-seeing coaches, loaded down 
with out-of-towners was coming up Broad- 
way, and was just about to cross Forty- 
second Street when Thornton stalked ma- 
jestically through the crowded traffic, and 
standing directly in front of the "rubber- 
neck" bus, struck a dignified attitude, and 
said, "Welcome to our city." 



Rabid Rudolph ("Bugs" Baer) in the 
Evening World, says : After listening to 40.- 
000 Boston tenors sing "Tessie" for three 
hours we realize the Belgians haven't got 
that suffering stuff copyrighted. "Tessie" 
is a good song with good music, and after 
hearing a Bostonese sing it we wonder 
what it sounds like when it's sung. There 
are two ways of singing "Tessie." One is 
the Bostonesqnc way, and the other is the 
correct way. 



He leaned forward in the deep cushions 
of his limousine, and with an expression 
of extreme fright, and anxiety, saw his 
chauffeur just manage to atop the car in 
time to avoid striking a man crossing the 
street. Then his expression changed to 
one of deep disgust. He had recognized 
one of his piano players! 



Who is this "Moderato" used on music 
so much? What is the wheelbase of an 
automobile? Why is a viola? No mat- 
ter how badly lota of things sound, and 
are written, nearly all of them bear this 
mark at the end — Fine. 



Bartley Costello ia the co-author, with 
Fiske O'Hara, of a song entitled "How the 
Fairies Came to Ireland." Can this be the 
long looked for companion song to "To 
Arms! Whoops my dear. There's a ring 
around the moon?" 



James Kendis says every singer can't 
use the big publisher's songs, and that's 
where he comes in. The overflow that man- 
ages to get James* songs, has made big 
sellers for him, and even caused the land- 
lord to nod pleasantly to him. 



Popular Song Mechanics — Both feet on 
the pedals, and both heels beating time; 
both hands "tearing off" a rag; one cigar- 
ette between the lips. 



Drummers don't care what key they play 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




CRAIG TO GIVE 

STOCK AT 

GARR1CK 

PLANS TO PRODUCE NEW PLAYS 



Plana to give New York a stock com- 
pany are being formulated by John 
Craig, to follow the lines of. bis former 
Castle Squaw company in Boston. 

As was his custom there, he will pro- 
duce new plays to determine their com- 
mercial value. Mr. Craig gave an annual 
prize for the best play written by a 
student in the course on drama at Har- 
vard, and gave the .prize winning plays 
productions by his Castle Squaw com- 
pany. "Believe Me, Xantippe," and 
"Common Clay" were among these, which 
later bad successful New York runs. 

The theatre selected by Mr. Craig for 
the home of bis company is the recently 
overhauled and redecorated Garrick. It 
is probable he will not be able to take 
possession of the house until some time 
in December as the French operetta, "Le 
Poilu," is at present appearing there, and 
the Theatre Francais has contracted for 
an engagement at the Garrick later, until 
the completion of its playhouse on West 
Forty-fifth Street. 

Mr. Craig's company in Boston was 
a very popular organization, and, al- 
though it presented other plays besides 
new ones, budding playwrights were given 
a chance that they most likely would not 
otherwise be granted. 



EMILIE MELVILLE OUT WEST 

Los Angeles, Oct 14. — Emllie Melville 
is a recent addition to the cast of the Mo- 
rosco Stock Co. at the Morosco Theatre. 



MAUD LEONE IN SAN FRANCISCO 

San Francisco, Oct. 14. — Maud Leone 
has been engaged as a member of the Wig- 
wam Players at the Wigwam Theatre. 



JANET ALLYN IMPROVING 

Chicago, Oct 14. — Janet Allyn, the 
stosk actress who attempted to end her 
life with poison, is making daily improve- 
ment in a local hospital. 



SIOUX CITY CO. CLOSES 

Sioux CITY, la., Oct 14. — The stock 
company playing the Princess .Theatre, 
has terminated its engagement. 



BISHOP VISITS IN TERRE HAUTE 

Tehke Haute, Ind., Oct 14. — Chester 
Bishop, of the Bishop Stock Co., is visiting 
bis parents here. 



UCHTFOOT WITH JOHNSTONE CO. 

Rbnfrew, Ont Oct 14. — Andrew Light- 
foot is now appearing with the Florence 
Johnstone Stock Co., playing through Can- 
ada. 



EVELYN DUNCAN IN ALCAZAR CO. 

Saw Francisco, Oct 14. — Evelyn Dun- 
can has been engaged for ingenue roles 
with the Alcazar Stock Co. 



REEDS TO HEAD OWN CO. 

Cincinnati, Oct 16. — Joseph Reed, who 
recently closed as leading man with the 
Billle Plumlee Repertoire Company, is in 
town, organizing a stock company. 

The company will consist of eleven play- 
ers, headed by Mr. and Mrs. Reed, and 
will play through Ohio and Indiana. Oct 
15 is given as the opening date. 



HORN'S PLAYERS PRAISED 

The opening of Mr. Horn's Stock Com- 
pany at the Fifth Avenue Theatre in 
Brooklyn took place Monday night, Oct 
S, with "Under Cover" as the initial at- 
traction. 

The papers spoke highly of the players 
and of the excellent performance. 



BURROWES OPENS O. H. SEASON 

Losk, Wyo.. Oct. 10. — The Boyd Bur- 
rowes Co. has begun its house season for 
the winter. Burt Southern returned to 
the company yesterday as business man- 
ager and his wife, Dora, is playing lead- 
ing comedy and soubrette roles. Will H. 
Bruno has charge of the stage. Boyd 
Burrowes is at his home here for a few 
weeks looking after his crops. 



FLEMING STOCK CO. READY 

Portland, Ore., Oct 16. — Final arrange- 
ments have been completed for the open- 
ing of the Alice Fleming Stock Co., Oct. 
29. "Under Cover" will be the initial at- 
traction and Leah Winslow, if she can be 
secured, will play leads. Others in the 
company are Albert McGovern, Ruth Lech- 
ler, Charles Compron and William Evarts. 



HELEN KEYES PLAYING LEADS 

Helen Eeyes is playing leads for the 
Sherman Kelly Stock company this week 
at Waseca, Minn. 



NEW STOCK FOR BRIDGEPORT 

Brujcepobt, Conn., Oct. 16. — A new 
stock company is in the making for the 
Lyric Theatre, here. The opening date is 
set for Oct 28. 



FORMER STOCK ACTORS RETURN 

Los Angeles, Oct. 14. — Thomas Mac- 
Larnie and wife, Beatrice Nichols, former 
members of the Burbank Stock Co., have 
returned here from Australia. 



COMEDIAN RE-ENGAGED 

New Orleans, Oct 16. — Mickey Mark- 
wood baa again been engaged as comedian 
by the Lyric Theatre stock company. He 
was with that organization last season. 
He left New York last Saturday, accom- 
panied by his wife, Edith Ross, who will 
work in the chorus of the organization. 



RAE TO OPEN THEATRE SEASON 

Osborne, Kans., Oct 16. — John G. Rae 
will close his tent dramatic show here Oct 
21 and continue with the repertoire com- 
pany in theatres in Kansas until Christ- 
mas. Mr. Rae wil reopen his tent the- 
atre early in April. 



ANOTHER STOCK 

IN BROOKLYN 

PLANNED 

C. W. DANIELS BACK OF SCHEME 

Actuated by the letters which have 
been appearing in the papers by Brook- 
lynites pleading for a stock company, 
Charles W. Daniels, manager of the Grand 
Opera House, has offered to establish a 
new theatre in Brooklyn for stock. If 
his plans materialize this will make a 
second stock company in Brooklyn, as 
James Horn brought a company to the 
Fifth Avenue last week. 

Although he controls both the Crescent 
and Grand Opera houses, Daniels' plans 
include another house. 

It is his idea to let the public, by pop- 
ular vote, choose the Btars to head the 
company, and also select the plays to be 
presented. 

On the other hand, he wants the peo- 
ple interested to show their good faith 
by subscribing for stock certificates, each 
to carry coupons exchangeable for thea- 
tre tickets, or to be retained as an in- 
vestment, in which case be guarantees 
interest at 6 per cent. 

Mr. Daniels' proposition is really to ob- 
tain a guarantee from playgoers that 
they will support stock and make bis the- 
atre and company secure. 



JUNE KEITH TO STAR 

June Keith, who has won recognition as 
a stock nctress in Chicago, is to be starred 
in "The Right Little Girl," a play by Mrs. 
Charles A. Doremus and Leonidas Wester- 
velt, under the management of T. Daniel 
Frawley and W. H. Currie. The opening 
will be on November 6 at the Writing 
Opera House, Syracuse, N. Y. 

The company in support of Miss Keith 
will Include: Walter Howes, Walter 
Gibbs, George S. Natanson, John Wessell, 
Charles Cbappelle, P. O'Malley Jennings, 
Harry Scarborough, Carrington North, 
Josephine Bernard, Louise Farnum, Edna 
Dorman, May Montague, Madeline Mar- 
sl-all and Mary Seward. 



LORCH CO. ENDS SUDDENLY 

Tofeka, Kan., Oct. 16. — Saturday night 
the Tbeo. torch Co. closed as an organiza- 
tion caused by the sudden departure of 
Lorch, owner and manager, for parts on- 
known. 

"The Confesron" had been in prepara- 
tion for week of Oct 0, so hasty substi- 
tution was made in the cast and the pro- 
duction offered without difficulty to very 
fair business. Friends are searching for 
Lorch, bat up to the present no trace of 
him has been found. 



COMPTON-PLUMB TO OPEN XMAS 

Rock Island, 111., Oct 16. — The Comp- 
ton-Plumb Co. goes into stock at the Illi- 
nois Theatre here, about Christmas time. 



WILLIS WOOD CO. POPULAR 

Kansas City, Mo., Oct. l."i — The Willis 
Wood Stock Company, which has opened 
its permanent engngemeut nt the Willis 
Wood Theatre, Is presenting late releases 
and is meeting with succeit*. 

The roster of the compnny include* Aline 

McDermott, leading woman; Percy Win- 
ter, director; John T. Dwyer, Alfred 
Cross, Edward Haverly, Lillian Foster, 
Mary Hill, Florence Roberts, Walter 
Thomas and Jack Lewis. * 



BRAY OPENS COMPANY 

Portsmouth, O., Oct. 10.— T. F. Bray 
opened a stock company nt Portsmouth, 
Ohio, this week and was in Chicago last 
week engaging the people. Edwin to- 
rentz, Laura Chase, Lois Ulair, E. J. Ken- 
nedy and C. H. Becker are among the 
players selected. 



CARROLL JOINS HALLIDAY CO. 

Fargo, N. Dak., Oct 16.— Edwin Car- 
roll has joined the Ilnlllitny Stock Co., 
taking the plnce inado vacant by the sud- 
den death of Fred Von Itennsnlner. 



SHERMAN CO. CLOSES 

Dallas, Tex., Oct. 14. — The Sherman 
Stock Co. closed here last Sunday night 
and fares were paid to Oliicnco where the 
company arrived enrly this week. 



HELLEN COLLIER IN YONKERS CO. 

Helen Collier has been en-iugcd for lead- 
ing ingenue rolls with the Wnrbtirton 
Players in Yonkcrs, opening Oct. 10 in 
"Sinners." 



FOX COMPANY CHANGED 

Wra. B. Morse and wife, Marjorie 
Shrewsbury, have closed with the Moor 
Edding company after a pleasant sum- 
mer engagement, and opened with the Roy 
E. Fox Popular Players, Miss Shrewsbury 
replacing Hazel Fox (who is retiring) in 
the leads. 



JESSIE PRINGLE RETURNS 
Union Hill, N. J., Oct 10. — Jessie 
Pringle has closed with tlic Princess Play- 
ers, Sioux City, la., and rejoins the cast 
of Keith's Hudson Players tonight. Miss 
Pringle plays character roles. 



"DORA DEANE" ADAPTED 

The famous old novel, Dora Deane, by 
Mary J. Holmes, baa been written into a 
play by Marie Doran, assisted by her 
brother Frank. The manuscript, recently 
completed, will be placed in early re- 
hearsal for a stock showing. Miss Doran 
looks for Dora Deane to be equally as 
successful as Lena Rivera, also adapted 
from the book by the famous author. 

MOBILE STOCK DATE SET \ 

Mobile, Ala., Oct 16.— The date set for 
the opening of the stock company at the- 
Strand Theatre is Nov. C. Carpenters and 
painters are bard at work on the play- 
house getting everything in readiness for 
the opening. 



< 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 



CIRCUS 



CARNIVALS 



PARRS 



CARNIVAL SHOW 

WRECKED IN 

SOUTH 



FIVE PERFORMERS INJURED 



Special to The Clipper. 

9A.NDeu-svn.LK, Ga., Oct 14. — The inves- 
tigation into the cause of the wreck on the 
Augusta-Southern Railway near Gibson, in 
which five members of the Rutherford 
Greater Shows were injured, is being 
pressed by the railway officials, but np to 
the present time, the cause has not been 
determined. 

The Rutherford Greater Shows were 
traveling from Augusta to Sandersville, 

when the accident occurred and traffic was 
blocked for twelve hours. 

Two box cars of the train were over- 
turned and all the passengers were badly 
shaken up. 

Among those hurt was Hugo, the high 
diver, whose back is sprained and body 
bruised. A special train brought the in- 
jured to a hospital here and every atten- 
tion is being given them by the owners of 
the shows and hospital authorities. The 
train was being drawn by two locomotives, 
neither of which left the track. 



CAPTAIN HOOVER FLEES AT FAIR 

Samtiia, Kan., Oct. 14.— One of the big 

events la connection with the three-day 

fair here was Captain Hoover, of the Aero 
Club of America, who made two flights 
daily Oct. 12 and 13. dropping bombs, 
showing the terrible methods of destruction 
employed in the European war. 



GOOD BILL AT ALA. STATE FAIR 

Bibminuham, Ala., Oct. 14. — The Marco 
Twins played an engagement for the Ala- 
bama State Fair, held Oct. 5 It. together 
with the following acts: The Duttons, rid- 
ing act; Lottie Mayers, diving girls; The 
Roecoa, hand balancing: Alex Lowando, 
bounding rope act; Rlnglings, rings; Na- 

tiellos Band, and The Old Dominion 
Shews. 



LEAVENWORTH WANTS FREE FAIR 
liKAVENwoBTn, Kan., Oct. 14. — The 
Chamber of Commerce is enthusiastic over 
the plana formulated by M. B. Hamilton, 
former member of the State Fair Associa- 
tion, for a free fair next year. The plan 
suggested by Mr. Hamilton was to raise 
!8,M0 in the county and then take advan- 
tage of the appropriation offered by the 
State, 



ANNtSTON OPENS TO CARNIVAL 

AriNiHToif. Ala., Oct 14. — George W. 
We st e rina n. advance agent for the Greater 
Sbeesley Show, was responsible for the 
show's appearance here this week. An- 
ntaton had placed a ban on carnivals for 
twelve years. 



CHAS. BERNARD WITH WOODRUFF 

Charles Bernard recently joined the G. 
W. Woodruff Consolidated Fair Shows, 
■laying through Georgia with his Dixie 
JSe* as the feature attraction. 



AUSTRALIAN CIRCUS MAN HERE 

Saw Francisco, Oct 14.— Fidem Wirth, 
prominent Australian circus man, arrived 
here last week, and is now en route to the 
East He 1b here in search of novelty and 
freak turns for the Wirth Hippodrome and 
Circus. He expects to stay in this conn- 
try for four months, returning just in 
time for the season's opening in the An- 
tipodes. 



BRUNDAGE BUYS MILLER'S STOCK 

Mexico, Mo., Oct 14. — S. W. Brundage 
has purchased all of W. A. Miller's roll- 
ing stock, which was need by the Ed. Heinz 
Shows, and added the newly acquired equip- 
ment to the Brundage Shows here this 
week. 



BROOKLYN TO HAVE CARNIVAL 

The Wyckoff Knickerbocker Carnival As- 
sociation of Broo' lyn, held another meet- 
ing last week and made further arrange- 
ments for the coming carnival, which will 
be held Wednesday night, Nov. 8. 



SHOW SURVIVES A WRECK 

Hamlet, N. C-, Oct 16.— In spite of the 
railroad wreck which the Buffalo Bill Show 
experienced last week, that organization 
will appear here Wednesday. 



RUTH LAW MAKES FLIGHTS 
Wichita, Kan., Oct. 14.— The Wichita 
Fair and Exposition held last week had for 
one of its crowning features Ruth Law, 
who made flights in an aeroplane ablaze 
with brilliant fireworks. 



BENTON ANNUAL FAIR DATES 

Brntonvtjxe, irk., Oct 16. — The an- 
nual Benton County Fair will be held here 
Nov. 1 to 3. This is the only fair of it* 
kind held in Northwest Arkansas. 



MISSISSIPPI FAIR DATES 
Jackson, Miss., Oct 16. — The Missis- 
sippi State Fair wiU be held Oct. 23-28, 
and from present indications look forward 
to a big year. 



THOMAS HURD ILL 

Ft. Madison, la., Oct. 14. — Thomas J. 
Hard, of the Con T. Kennedy Shows, suf- 
fered a nervous breakdown recently and is 
seriously ill here. 



ROB1NSON-KEETCH ENDING TOUR 
A tour of thirty-six weeks will have been 
completed by the Robinson & Keetch Show, 
when that company closes Nov. 15 at Ar- 
lington, Ore. 



HAVERHILL TO HAVE FAIR 

HAVEitnn.r, Mass., Oct. 14. — Plans are 
nnder way for this city to have a fair of 
its own next year. The location has been 
selected. 



COLORED FAIR CHANGES DATES 

KrcKLAND, Ga„ Oct 16. — I. O. John- 
son, secretary, has announced the change 
of the Tri-County Colored Fair, from Oct 
17-21 to Oct 24-28. This change was made 
in order to contract with the Dreamland 
Exposition Shows for the midway attrac- 
tions. 



WINTER HOMES 

CLAIM MANY 

SHOWS 

SEASONS TO CLOPE DM SHORT TIME 



Circuses and carnivals are rounding up 
their seasons and the next few weeks will 
see the closing of many rhows. 

James T. Clyde - has already closed 
the tour of the World at Home Shows and 
has taken the outfit to its winter quar- 
ters at Streator, I1L The CoL Francis Fe-' 
ran United Shows and the People's Amuse- 
ment Co. closed their seasons Oct 14, the 
former going into its winter quarters at 
North Randall, O., while the latter will 
winter at St Lon's, Mo. 

The Walter Savidge Carnival terminates 
one of the biggest seasons in its history 
this week at Wayne, Neb., Mr. Savidge's 
home town, and the show will winter in 
Wayne until Spring. 

Many carnivals are booked for fair dates 
throughout the South and these will ex- 
Mbit probably until Cbr'stmas. 

Of the circuses, Pawnee Bill's Pio- 
neer Days, closed Sept 23 at Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich., Siniger Bros. & O'Wesney Oct 
16 at Boweratown, O., and as far as 
could be ascertained, other closings will 
take place early in November. The Ring- 
ling Bros. Circus ends its tour Saturday 
Nor. 4 at Clarksdale, Miss., and those 
closing the following Saturday, Include 
Barnum & Bailey at Memphis, Tenn., and 
Sells Floto at Waco, Tex. Robinson A 
Keetch will bring their season to an end 
Nov. 15 at Arlington, Ore. 



SET FAIR DATE 

Bubxinqton, Vt, Oct 16. — At the an- 
nual meeting of the stockholders and direc- 
tors of the Franklin County Fair Associa- 
tion held in Sheldon recently, 91,400 was 
appropriated for the 1917 races. S. B. 
Thomas of this town was re-elected presi- 
dent and the stockholders voted to recom- 
mend that the directors fix the date of 
next year's fair September 3 to 6, the first 
day to be a general preparatory day with 
no admission charge. 



LA MONT BROS.' CLOSING WEEK 

Ramset, HI., Oct 16.— The La Mont 
Bros.' Circus, which recently played Kin- 
caid, the first circus to exhibit there, closes 
here this week. The Hubert Family left 
the show recently and the Le Roy Family 
joined. The show's winter quarters are at 
Salem. 



F. E. LEWIS IN WASHINGTON 

Washington, D. C, Oct 14. — F. E. 
Lewis, manager of Baby Trixie, has ac- 
cepted a contract with a museum here for 
the winter, nnder Mr. Armstrong's man- 
agement 



GAUTHIER TO TAKE OUT SHOW 

Concordia, Kan., Oct 14. — The Ed. A. 
Evans Greater Shows are exhibiting here 
this week. A. Gauthier has announced his 
intention of taking out a small Winter 
show when the Evans Shows close. 



CARNIVAL ATTACHED 

Lynchbuko, Va., Oct 14. — Attachments 
amounting to $4,816.20 were brought 
against the Meyerhoff Carnival, which fur 
nished the attraction at the Interstate Fair 
here. 

Two of the claims for $137 and $39.20 
were filed by W. W. Lynn, proprietor of 
the Carroll Hotel. Another amounting to 
$3,040 was made through a local attorney 
for the Southern Iron and Equipment Co.. 
of Atlanta, Ga. The Interstate Fair As- 
sociation which advanced $1,600 to bring 
the midway attractions from Ironton, O., 
filed claim for that amount against Meyer- 
hoff, Inc. 



BRYANT PLAYERS RETURN 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Oct 14. — The Mar- 
guerite Bryant Players, who returned here 
recently, opening their Winter season at 
the Empire Theatre, are playing to large 
attendance at each performance. The com- 
pany is under the management of A. A. 
McTigh. Marguerite Bryant plays leads 
and Frank Mayo is her new leading man. 
The supporting company includes: Ella 
Kramer, Richard Foote, Mr. Johns, Charles 
Kramer, Mrs. McHugb, Katherine Mr- 
Hugh and Matt McHugh. 



DORMAN-KRAUSE PLAYING FAIRS 

Washington, N. C, Oct 16. — Dormao 
& Krauae Shows, now playing North and 
Sooth Carolina fairs, are here this week. 
Some of the attractions include Orvetta, 
Aerial McGinleya, Dare Devi] Jack 0*N«fl 
and his SUodrome, Five Musical Beers. 
Jim Hodges' Big Circus Sideshow and Mu- 
seum, Torelli's Dog, Pony and Monkey 
Circus, Up-High Billy Flein, high diver 
and Sturchio's Royal Italian Band. 



SOUTHERN AMUSE. CO. CHANGES 

Mobrili.ton, Ark., Oct 16. — The South- 
ern Amusement Co. is appearing here this 
week, the route of the company having 
been changed, because of the inability of 
the show to get railroad service over the 
Frisco Railway. 



SEEMAN JOINS BROWN St CRONIN 
Howard M. Seeman has joined the Brown 
& Cronin Shows, under the management 
of William T. Harrington, as general 
agent. 



WASHBURN SHOWS AT RALEIGH 

Raleigh, N. C, Oct 16. — Although there 
has been much opposition. General Agent 
W. J. "McDonougb, of the Leon Washburn 
Mighty Midway Shows, closed contracts 
with the secretary of the Raleigh Fair to 
have the Washburn Shows play the fair 
date here this week. This completes s 
solid chain of Southern fairs, covering a 

period of ten weeks. 



AMERICAN SHOWS AUGMENTED 

Washington, Ga., Oct 16.— The Great 
American Shows are exhibiting here this 
week. Kincaid's Photo Gallery and the 
Lockman-Deity combination were recent 
new arrivals on the shows. This makes 
forty concessions in all. An animal show 
and an illusion show were also added, 
which now makes eighteen paid attraction*. 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 



LONDON 



PARIS 




BERLIN 



SYDNEY 



LONDON AT A GLANCE 



London, Oct 12. 

It is a surprising fact that, in spite of 
the war, and the Zeppelin raids, and with 
5,000.000 soldiers, either actively engaged 
in battle or in training, the theatres 
throughout England and more particularly 
London, are doing good business. 

Upwards of forty theatres in the Eng- 
lish Metropolis are presenting attractions 
varying from melodrama to musical com- 
edy and nearly twice as many halls are 
giving vaudeville. The latter are drawing 
better than the average attendance in 
times of peace, while the only theatres in 
the dramatic class doing poorly are those 
unfortunate in' their selection of attrac- 
tions. Those which have good offerings 
are doing well while those with poor at- 
tractions axe not — just as in times when 
the war cloud isn't hanging over the na- 
tion's bead. 

While there are some plays of the 
heavier sort— chiefly melodrama — tor the 
most part the offerings are of the lightsr 
variety, which is the only indication of the 
feelings of the nation as regards the bear- 
ing of the war upon public amusement. 

Since the beginning of the war several 
plays have been produced bearing either 
directly or indirectly upon the conflict, but 
the only ones which reached even mediocre 
success were those used as a means to 
induce enlistment. 

No war play, be it ever so pro-Englisb, 
has found any degree of public fnvor in 
England since August, 1014, a sign that 
the English people, than whom none are 
more ready to appland their heroes, when 
mimicked on the stage, are so satiated 
with the horrors of conflict that they do 
not wish to be reminded of them in tbe 
theatre. Hence the trend of the public 
taste for the lighter shows is being catered 
to by the managers. 

Messrs. Grossmith ft Lnurillard are 
busy managers. When they are not pro- 
ducing they are securing plays for pro- 
duction. Besides the American play, "Un- 
der Cover," they now have on hand "Ruts," 
the play which won the £100 in their 
recent playwriting contest, and "Our 
Wedding," the latter of which is sched- 
uled to succeed "Mr. Manhattan," when a 
successor at the Prince of Wales' is 
needed. 



The Palace, London, which has been 
dark since the closing of "Bric-a-Brac," 
will be re-opened by Alfred Butt next week 
with "Vanity Fair," according to present 
plans. In the interim Mr. Butt has had 
the painters and decorators at work and 
a bright, clean, new-looking auditorium will 
welcome the patrons of the new show. 



The provincial tour of "Fads and Fan- 
cies" begins ' October 16 at the Hippo- 
drome, Margate. The company includes: 
Hayman and Franklin, Roy Jefferies, 
Doris Trevelyan, Muriel Collis and the 
Pour Dancing Tomboys. A. Alexander 
manages the cempany. 



At Wyndbam's Frank Curzon and Ger- 
ald du Maurier are giving evening perform- 
ances of "The Old Country" on Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday only of each week. 
Matinees are given every Monday, Tues- 
day, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday. 



Horace Sheldon succeeds James Sale 
as orchestra conductor at tbe Palladium 
and that gentleman goes to the St. Mar- 
tin's. Mr. Sheldon is well known in the 
States, having accompanied the Harry 
Lauder Company on an American tour. 



Sydney E. Brandon, the character actor, 
has been granted a further exemption from 
military service by the Manchester local 
tribunal. This extension of time expires 
November 8. 

It is not generally known that the 
widow of the late Hon. B. R. Wise, who 
died recently, was formerly known to the 
stage as Lillian Baird, a sister of Mrs. H. 
B. Irving. 

The Famous D'Voraks are pleasing this 
week's patrons of the Hippodrome, Nor- 
wich. Next week they play the Hippo- 
drome, Ipswich. 

Courtice Pounds, who was forced to 
temporarily retire from the "Chu Chin 
Chow" company at His Majesty's, is back 
in the cost. 

The Bates Duo close their month's stay 
at the Circus Varlete, Copenhagen, on Oct 
15. They send word of their pronounced 
success. 

La Razcka Duo, this week at the Hippo- 
drome, Hulme, Manchester, is next week 
at the Hippodrome, Queen's Park, Man- 
Chester. 

Tbe Four Nibs are playing the Town 
Hall, Sutton-in-Ashfield, this week. Next 
week they will be at the Palace, Braintree, 
Essex. 



Bob Neil is doing his quaint Scotch act 
for the patrons of Gnoll Hall, Neath, next 
week he is playing the Cinema, Coleford. 

The Two Florimonds and Little Stanley 
Russell are two acts that one would ex- 
pect to be snapped up by American agents. 

Kate Fry, of the Pry and Fry Trio, hav- 
ing recovered from a long illness, will re- 
turn to work with the trio next Monday. 

Ernest C. Rolls, who controls the revue, 
"Step This Way," secured the producing 
rights of the work from Charles J. Moore. 

Nellie Clarence, Renie Donglas and Kate 
Winstanley celebrated their birthday an- 
niversaries on the same date — Oct. 4. 



"The Pirates of Penzance" is the next 
offering scheduled for production by the 
South London Opera Company. 

Joseph Wbatley, for eight years with 
the Moss' Empires, has joined the A. S. O. 
Motor Transport. 

The Four Chandrons will present their 
novelty comedy act next week at the Em- 
pire, Chelmsford. 

The Juggling Jays are in their second 
week and last fortnight at the Olympia, 
Paris, France. 

Daisy James, who is recuperating at 
Brighton, expects to resume work in tbe 
halls shortly. 

Tbe Four Shades are the leading sing- 
ing act on this week's bill at the Hippo- 
drome, Wlgan. 

"Bric-a-Brac," which left the Palace, be- 
gan its provincial tour Oct. 9 at tbe King's, 
Glasgow. 

Harland and Rollison are doing their 
comedy musical act at the Hippodrome, 
Keighley. 

Bert Errol is in bis second week of a 
month's engsgement at the Oxford, Lon- 
don. 

Betancourt, this week at the Empire, 
York, is next week at the Tivoli, Aberdeen. 

E. D. Nlcholls ft Co., in "It's Up to 
Ton," are at the Palace, Hull, this week. 

The Record Quartette, in their novelty 
banjo act, are at Bedford this week. 



"THEODORE ft CO." A HIT 
London, Oct. 10.— Seats are booked for 
three months in advance for the new Gai- 
ety success "Theodore ft Co.," the new 
musical piece by H. M. Harwood, and 
George Grossmith with music by Jerome 
Kern and the young composer, Ivor No- 
vello. Just as Hayden Coffin made a comic 
opera with one song, so George Grossmith 
at the very beginning of the evening sealed 
the fate of Theodore ft Co. with his ren- 
dition of Novello's "Every tattle Girl Can 
Teach Me Something." 

The American musical rights to Mr. 
Novello's music have been secured by the 
New York publisher, Leo Feist 



The Violet Vaagban Trio are about to 
begin a long tour of the provinces. 

The Four Clovelly Girls are at tbe 
Tower, Blackpool, this week. 

The Sisters Sprightly are at the Hippo- 
drome, Colchester, this week. ' 

Alice Hayes is on the current bill at 
tbe Hippodrome, Lancaster. 

Adkin, the motoring ventriloquist is 
playing Aberdeen this week. 

George Graves is slated for the company 
at the new St Martin's. 

"Honor Bright" is to be done Oct 23 
at the Klngsway Theatre. 

The Atlas-Vulcana Tronpe is at Open- 
shaw this week. 

The Q's are next week at the Palace, 

Blackburn. 
Anita Correze plays Dublin next week. 



WHITMAN ON MOSS TOURS 

London, Oct 14. — Frank Whitman, the 
American dance-mad fiddler, has been 
signed by the Moss Empires for four suc- 
cessive tours. Whitman will soon be as 
well known over here as be is in America. 



"HOBSON'S CHOICE" FOR FAR EAST 

London, Oct. 13.— "Hobson's Choice" is 
to be given in the Far East This has 
been decided upon by those in direction 
of the forthcoming world tour of Ada 
Reeve. Miss Reeve will, of course, play 
the leading role. 



PROFESSORSHIP FOR ACTRESS 

London, Oct 13.— Kate Clinton, Mrs. 
Edmund Tearle. has been appointed pro- 
fessor of elocution and acting of Ernest 
d'Auban's School of Mnslc and Dramatic 
Art Her appointment is popular with 
both faculty and students. 



"THE FRAME UP" FOR AMERICA 

London, Oct 13.— Clarence Brune. who 
has been producing Byers* "Tbe Frame 
Up" in London tbe past six months has 
tbe rights to produce it In tbe United 
States and Canada, and will bring toe Eng- 
lish company for the American tonr. 



PLANS SHAKESPEARE REVIVALS 

London, Oct 14.— Lillian Baylls. man- 
ager of the Victoria Theatre, here, is pre- 
pari Ax to give sumptuous productions of 
"Henry Vm," "Richard III" and "The 
Two Gentlemen of Verona." 



LONDON TO SEE "UNDER COVER" 
London, Oct. 12. — Messrs. Grossmith ft 
Lnurilliird have arranged with Selwyn.A 
Co. for a London production of "Under 
Cover." 



CONNIE'S ENGAGEMENT EXTENDED 

Sydnet, Acs., Oct 12. — The engage- 
ment of Connie Edlss with J. C. William- 
son, Ltd., has been extended for six 
months. 



GRACE BROTHERS FOR AMERICA 

London, Oct 14. — The Famous Span- 
ish Grace Brothers contemplate a tonr of 
America beginning early in 1917. 



WILLIAMSON RETAINS SMITH 

Htdnet, Aus., Oct 11. — Phil Smith has 
just signed another two year contract wish 
J. C. Williamson. Ltd. 



It 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1910 



SCREEN CLUB MOVES INTO 

NEW W. 45TH S TREET HOME 

Old Metropolitan Club Remodeled, at $8,000 Cost, to House Man- 
agers, Performers and Manufacturers of Film World. 
Restaurant, Billiard and Reading Rooms 
Are Few of Attraction* 



Tbe Screen ' Club, the organization of 
screen performers, managers and manufac- 
turers is dow in its new home, a five-story 
brick building at 117 West Forty-fifth 
Street Formerly the old Metropolitan 
Turf Club, the bouse has been remodeled 
at a cost of $8,000, under the direction of 
James Maher, architect of the Friar's new 
building. 

The first floor is devoted to a restaurant 
and grill, finished in Old English fashion, 
with bar and kitchen in the rear, while 
above are luxurious lounging rooms. Pool 
and billiard tables occupy the third floor 
and a buffet bar has been especially con- 



structed for the convenience of the players. 
Tbe fourth story is given over to writing 
and reading rooms, together with a beauti- 
ful library and on the top floor are the 
quarters of the officers, Board of Governors* 
rooms and card rooms. 

Tbe new home is superior in every way 
to the one recently vacated in West Forty- 
seventh Street It is considerably larger 
and more handsomely appointed, while the 
addition of a restaurant and kitchen will 
find favor with the members. The boose has 
been leased for a term of five years, com- 
mencing Sept 1, at a rental of $5,000 per 



MARY THAYER PROLIFIC 

Mary K. P. Thayer continues busily in 
the work of supplying the profession with 
stage material, in which she began in 1900. 
Brown and Jackson, "Tbe Clubman and 
Tbe Suffragette" are meeting with success 
with her sketch on the Loew Circuit 
Vance and Langdon have just accepted her 
exclusive act for them, "A Dark Knight 
and Lady." 

She is now engaged on a comedy "Elk 
Talk," for A. L. Sullivan, in which he will 
introduce his driving team of young Elks, 
and she has recently rewritten a script for 
Arthur Bulley & Co., besides turning oat 
much other work. 



LLOYDS LOSE ON "AIDA" 

San Francisco, Oct la — The LJoyds 
Insurance Co. of London, who undertook 
the production of "Aida" for a benefit 
fund, failed to realize enough to cover ex- 
penses, and both the original management 
and insurance company are facing losses. 

Experts are now at work straightening 
out the accounts. 



PLAYERS CLUB OPENS 

San Francisco, Oct 16. — The new play- 
house of the Players Club opened tonight 
for a week's run of one-act plays. 

The works presented for the opening 
week include "The Sidhe of Ben Mor," by 
Buth Sawyer; "The Cradle Song," by 
Adrian Metzger ; "The Maker of Dreams," 
a fantasy by Olipbant Downs and "The 
Spoils of War," by Hilliard Booth. Beg- 
inald Travers is director. 



NEW PICTURE HOUSE DIFFERENT 

San Francisco, Oct 16. — The St Fran- 
cis Theatre, a motion picture house, which 
opened recently, is built on lines different 
from the ordinary theatre. The screen is 
placed against the wall of the entrance 
and the patrons emerge through curtains 
and find themselves at the front row and 
not the last row of seats. 



WOMAN AUTHOR ILL 

Anna Nichols, responsible for Fiske 
O'Hara's latest play, is recovering from 
an operation performed this week for ap- 
pendicitis. Meanwhile, the new play she 
lias been completing for August Pitou 
must await her recovery before it is fin- 
ished. 



KILPATRICK BUSY MAN 
Charley Kilpatrick, the former well 
known bicyclist, is busy writing travel in- 
surance. He informs us that he signed 
up over 800 polices with members of the 
Ringling Bros, and the Baxnum & Bailey 
shows alone. He makes his headquarters 
in Chicago from whence he makes fre- 
quent trips. This week he is visiting the 
State Fair at Dallas, Tex., writing up 
the acts, one hundred and twenty-five in 
number, with the Fred Barnes Show. 



NEW NAME FOR GIRL ACT 

Chicago, Oct 16.— "Little Miss Dp to 
Date," featuring Doc Baker and a bevy 
of girls, had its name changed this week 
hj Menlo Moore, Inc., sponsor for the turn. 
From now on the offering will be known 
as "The Magazine Girls." There is no 
change in the cast 



STAGEHAND DIES ON STAGE 

James Sullivan, a stage-hand employed 
at the Danse de Follies, above the New 
Amsterdam Theatre, died Oct 12 from 
heart disease while walking across the 
stage at a quarter to twelve, just before 
tbe curtain went np on the "Ziegfield Mid- 
night Frolic." 



HITCHCOCK WANTS INSURANCE 

Raymond Hitchcock has applied to tbe 
Uoyda for a policy insuring himself against 

the theft of the comedy lines and business 
which he originated and incorporated in 
his characterization of "Lord Darcy 
Playne" in the Dillingham production, 
"Betty." 



DEL MAR OPEN AIR STARTS 

San Diego, CaL. Oct 13. — The formal 
opening of the open air theatre at Del Mar 
took place Sept 30. "The Spirit of Love" 
was the pageant directed by Lillian Bork- 
hardt Goldsmith. Mme. Edna Darcb, 
Menoti Frasconi, Helene Thorner, and 
Margaret Loomis were in tbe cast, which 
comprised one hundred singers and dancers 
of southern California. The theatre was 
planned and tbe entertainment staged by 
Dolly Schindler, of San Diego, who has 
the Nature Theatre here. 



BAR NATIONAL ANTHEM 

Baltimore, Md., Oct 16. — The Aborn 
English Opera Co., which had planned to 
present "Madam Butterfly" at the Lyric 
last Saturday, were forced to give up the 
production, at least for the time being, 
because of a city ordinance, which reads as 
follows : 

"The Star Spangled Banner* shall not 
be played, sung or rendered in Baltimore 
in any public place or at any public en- 
tertainment, or in any theatre, except as 
an entire and separate composition or num- 
ber, without embellishments of national or 
other melodies." 



JACK LORD ON GREENWOOD TIME 

Atlanta, Ga., Oct 16. — The Lord and 
Vernon Musical Comedy Co. opens on the 
Greenwood time today and the show is 
routed up to the middle of next May. The 
chorus includes Grace and Gussie Vernon, 
Edith Goodman, Viola Welsh, and Geral- 
dine BeVan. The rest of the company are 
Billy Evans, comedy; Frank LaMonte, 
straights; Gladys Fern Willard, prima 
donna; Clara Evans, characters; and Jack 
Lord himself doing comedy. Jack Lord 
is manager and producer and he and Gus- 
sie Vernon are sole owners. 



M. P. THEATRE IN SHERIFF'S SALE 

Pmr.tnn.P HT>, Oct 16. — The moving 
picture theatre at the northeast corner of 
Sixth and Pike Streets, title to which was 
held by Adolph E. Bonnem was sold at 
sheriff's sole last week and bought by the 
Penrose Building and Loan Association 
for $12,150. There is a prior mortgage 
on the property, which occupies a lot 75 
by 103 feet 



NEW THEATRE FOR BRISTOL 

Lyschbcbg, Va., Oct 17. — Announce- 
ment baa been made by C. A. Goebel, man- 
ager of the Gayety Theatre here, of his 
purchase of property in Bristol, Va., for 
the purpose of opening another house which 
he will operate in addition to his house in 
this city. Goebel came to Lynchburg one 
year ago from Bristol and has made good 
with the Gayety. 



ROWLAND AND HOWARD BUSY 

The latest production of Ed W. Row- 
land and Lorin J. Howard is "The Smart 
Shop," which will open on the Pantages 
Circuit shortly. It is away from the 
revues and fashion shops usually seen in 

vaudeville, and has many qualities which 
are especially attractive. 



COCOANUT GROVE ATOP CENTURY 

"The Cocoanut Grove" has been decided 
upon as the name of the reconstructed roof 
of the Century Theatre, which the Dilling- 
ham-Ziegfeld management announces will 
be formally opened one week following the 
premiere performance of "The Century 
Girl" in the main auditorium of the big 
playhouse. 



MERCHANT DIES IN THEATRE 

George Barnes, a retired merchant of 
200 West Fourteenth Street died suddenly 
in a motion picture theatre at 115 Eighth 
Avenue. 



ACTRESS SUED FOR DIVORCE 

Dorothy Green, a motion picture actress, 
is being sued for absolute divorce by her 
husband, Samuel H. Pomerance, a Wall 
Street broker, in the Supreme Court 



VALLI VALLI SUES 

Valli Valli, the prima donna, has 
brought suit in the Supreme Court against 
the Bole Photo Plays Company, Inc^ for 
$2,600. She alleges that the Bolfe Com- 
pany contracted to star her in four photo- 
plays for which she was to receive grad- 
uated amounts of $2,400 for the first 
$3,000 each for the second and third plays 
and $3,200 for the fourth. 

After appearing in the first she alleges 
that the concern notified her no scenarios 
could be obtained. A compromise by 
which she was to receive $2,600 she 
alleges was made bnt nothing was ever 
paid her. 



ANNA HELD BUYS CHATEAU 

Louis Lafont, Anna Held's attorney in 
Paris, was among the arrivals on the 
French liner Etpagne from Bordeaux, last 
week. He brought papers which were 
signed by the French comedienne, con- 
summating the purchase by her of a beau- 
tiful chateau and spacious grounds in the 
picturesque Compiegne region. The deal 
involves $150,000 or 750,000 franca. 



YVETTE GU1LBERT IN CANADA 
Prior to the opening of her Autumn sea- 
son at Marine Elliott's Theatre on Nor. 
3, Mme. Yvette Guilbert will appear dur- 
ing the next two weeks in Toronto, Mon- 
treal, Quebec, Ottawa and some ether 
Canadian cities. 



WANT DOLLY KEMPNER 

It is possible that Dolly Kempnex, wife 
of William T. Keogh, manager of tie 
Bronx Theatre, will return to the stage. 
The managers of the International Circuit 
have a route ready for her and are trying 
to induce her to return. 



ELKS ORGANIZING BAND 

New York Lodge No. 1 of Elks is or- 
ganizing a brass band among its mem- 
bers, and all amateur musicians win be 
coached by a competent leader. The an- 
nual charity ball will be held Nov. S6. 



MRS. McMANUS ENTERS OPERA 

Florence McManus, wife of George Mc- 
Manus, the cartoonist, will make her de- 
but with the Aborn English Grand Opera 
Co. at the Brooklyn Academy of Music 
on Friday night, Oct 20, appearing in the 
role of Musetta in Puccini's "La Boheme." 



MINERS CELEBRATE WEDDING 

Marietta, O. — Mr. and Mrs. Miner cele- 
brated their nineteenth anniversary of their 
married life. Manager Hammond, at Cam- 
bridge, O., gave them a swell spread and 
Mrs. Miner received many presents. 



"LE POILir FOR LONDON 

An English version of the French pro- 
duction "Le Voiln," now appearing at the 
Garrick, is being prepared for presenta- 
tion in London in the Spring. 



ANITA PRINCETON RECOVERING 

Faix River, Mass., Oct. 16. — Anita V. 
Princeton is at Dr. TruesdaVa Private 
Hospital, where she is slowly recovering 
from a very serious operation. 



HATTON COMEDY FOR LONDON 

Oliver Morosco intends to produce the 
Hatton comedy, "Upstairs and Down," 
early in the coming new year in London. 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 



VIRGINIA QUARANTINE LAWS 

BAR ALL STA GE CHILDREN 

Prevalence of Infantile Paralysis Causes Health Authorities to 
Bar Young Folks From State. "Daddy Long Legs" 
Show Affected. Company Gives Perform- 
ance Without the Kiddies. 



BOSTON OPERA CO. OPENS 

Springfield. Mass., Oct. 12. — The Boa- 
ton National Opera Co. opened its season 
here tonight under the direction of Max 
Rabinoff. The company, with a roster num- 
bering two hunderd and seventy-two, ar- 
rived here in two special trains. 



Ltbchbubo, Va., Oct, 15. — On account 
of the quarantine laws against infantile 
paralysis, the children, connected with the 
"Daddy-Long Legs" Co. were prohibited 
from remaining with the show during the 
engagements in Virginia and ordered ont 
of the State by the Virginia health au- 
thorities this week. 

The little folk were sent to Greensboro, 
N. 0., and will rejoin the company when 
the show finishes its route with perform- 



ances in Richmond, Norfolk, Newport 
News and Lynchburg. 

The children escaped the medical exam- 
iners in another State and were held in 
Richmond by the health authorities upon 
advice of the circumstances surrounding 
their presence in Virginia. 

The company gave a performance in 
Lynchburg' on October 12 without the chil- 
dren and "got away with it" in good 
fashion. 



MISS DE FERRAS WELL AGAIN 

After an absence of several months from 
the stage owing to a nervous breakdown 
Rubia de Ferras, now fully recovered, is 
about to resume work. 



ANOTHER "HOBSON'S CHOICE" CO. 

A second company of "Hobaon's Choice" 
is being organized to present the comedy 
in the principal cities of the Middle West. 



SCHOLARSHIP FOR PLAYERS 

Mrs. Frank Vanderlip has endowed a 
scholarship in the Washington Square 
Players' School, recently opened in con- 
nection with the Comedy Theatre. 



GLADDIE O'HEARN NOW PATSIE 
Gladdie O'Hearn, who takes a leading 
part in "The Bull Ring," at Castles in the 
Air, atop the Forty-fourth Street Theatre, 
has had her name legally changed to Pat- 
sie O'Hearn in order that she may create, 
as she states, greater opportunities for 
herself as an Irish comedienne. 



ACTRESS LOSES BROTHER 

Iseth Munro, an English actress, re- 
ceived news of the death of her brother 
while fighting on the Somme battle front 
the past week. Munro, a lieutenant in 
the British army, had been decorated 
many times for bravery. Miss Munro has 
three other brothers fighting for the king, 
one of whom is now in the hospital. 



DEMOLISH OLD THEATRE 

Boston, Oct 12. — Carpenters, masons, 
plumbers, and every other sort of artisan 
are busy chopping up the old Columbia 
Theatre, which is to bo Loew's South End. 
$100,000 will do much, and Vic. Morris, of 
the Loew interests, says that the South 
End will equal, if not surpass, the beauty 
of the Orpheum. 



SEYMOUR JOINS HOPKINS' STAFF 

William Seymour has been added to 
the committee which will have charge of 
tile selection of plays to be produced by 
Arthur Hopkins later in the season in his 
revival of historic American plays as his 
contribution to the Drama League of 
America. 



NEIGHBORHOOD OPENS NOV. 11 

The Neighborhood Playhouse will begin 
its third season on Saturday evening, Not. 
11, presenting Gertrude Kingston in a bill 
of three short plays, including "Great 
Catherine,'' by Bernard Shaw; "The 
Queen's Enemies," a new unpublished play 
by Lord Dunsany, and "The Inca of Jeru- 
salem," by a Fellow of the Royal Society 
of Literature. 



• GR1SWOLD AS TOM SAWYER 

Nat Griswold, now with Leffler and 
Bratton's The Devil's Harvest," has been 
selected to create Tom Sawyer in the forth- 
coming production of that piece. 



FRANK COLLIER BETTER 
Chicago, Oct. 14. — Frank Collier of the 
Kelly & Brennan Shows, left a local hos- 
pital last week in a very good condition. 



PICTURE ACTOR DIVORCED 

Jack Larrabee, screen performer, was 
the loser in a suit for divorce brought by 
his wife, Mrs. Naomi Affel, in the Su- 
preme Court of Brooklyn, N. Y., before 
Justice Garretson. The defendant is now 

serving a term in the City Reformatory 
for the passing of worthless checks. 



JACK BOYLE SUFFERS STROKE 

Chicago, Oct. 14. — Jack Boyle, of How- 
ard and Boyle, is a patient at a local hos- 
pital. The team was ready to leave Chi- 
cago when Boyle suffered a stroke of 
apoplexy and was rushed to the hospital. 
He is improving. 




NEW PROFESSIONAL OFFICES OF M. WITMARK St SONS 



NEW THEATRE FOR YARMOUTH 

St. John, Can., Oct. 12. — Yarmouth, 
N. S., is to have a new theatre. Reman 
Kelty, formerly manager of the Academy 
of Music in Amherst, N. S., and the Opera 
House here, and who has for the past year 
been managing the Marine Hall in Yar- 
mouth, has interested capitalists and ar- 
rangements have been made to erect a new 
theatre in the center of the town. The 
site has been purchased, and the inten- 
tion is to have the building ready by 
Christmas. The house will seat 1,000, and 
will be used for both .pictures and traveling 
attractions. 



MISS UPPE PLANS CONCERTS 

Juliette Lippe, of the "Flora Bella" 
company, is to give a special series of con- 
cert matinees at Carnegie Hall during the 
Winter. 



PAVLOWA OUT S25.00O 

Anna Pavlowa in her answer to a suit 
filed against her for $5,000 says that her 
1915 season was a failure, the losses 
amounting to $25,000. 



MAGGIE TE Y TK ENGAGED 

Before spring comes, Maggie Teyte, the 
operatic soprano, will be a bride again, if 
reports are true, the lucky man being an 
officer in the British army. It is said he 
ia now in a French hospital recovering 
from wounds sustained in recent fighting. 
His name has not been learned. 



SOPHIA WILSON OPERATED UPON 

Chicago, Oct. 14. — Sophia Wilson, the 
wife of one of the Wilson Brothers, suf- 
fered an attack of appendicitis and was 
operated upon at a local hospital. 



DAWSON, GA., THEATRE OPENS 

Dawson, Ga., Oct. 14.— Ernest Whitch- 
ard has re-opened the Opera House here, 
which has been closed for two years. The 
house has been newly renovated and re- 
decorated. 



FILM STARS DISLIKE 

RAISING OF DUES 



Screaa Club Member*, Now Payiag 

$12 Annually, Object to $20 

Yearly Tax 

Immediately following the re-election of 
Billy Quirk as president of the Screen 
Club, it has been rumored that the annual 
dues of the organization, at present $12 
per year, will be raised to $20. The initi- 
tion fee now is $30. 

It is understood that the heavy financial 
obligations incurred by the moving picture 
club in taking larger quarters is one of 
the reasons advanced for the boosting of 
dues. Many pres nt members have had 
little hesitancy in expressing themselves 
as dissatisfied with the contemplated yearly 
tax, and it is said that an increase to $20 
will be the means of driving many mem- 
bers ont of the organisation. 

The Screen Club <a at present in a 
healthy condition financially, the member- 
ship is growing steadily and there is a wait- 
ing list of large proportions. 



MAUDE CHANGES PLAY 

Cyril Maude has changed his plana rek\- 
tive to the vehicle for his New York open- 
ing this season. "Jeff," the English 
artist's present play on tour, has proven 
itself not strong enough for the iauaor- 
talizer of "Grumpy." 

The date of Maude's metropolitan 
premiere at the Empire is unchanged, 
however. He will appear there on Oct. 
30 in "The Beakers," a play which U fa- 
vorably known in London. 



ACTOR LOSES SUIT 

Because he failed to appear In the Oity 
Court when his suit against the Interna- 
tional Mercantile Marine was called, Os- 
car Gauamit, a trainer of dogs and pigeons 
which be exhibits in vaudeville, will not 
recover the $2,000 he asked for the loss 
of one of bis performing doga from the 
steamship company. 

According to Gausmlt, when he came 
from Europe in 1914, be placed his dogs 
and pigeons in care of the botcher on the 
Philadelphia, bat the butcher left thesi In 
the passageway of the vessel. 



GARDEN SHOW DATE SET 

The Winter Garden's new fall produc- 
tion, "The Show of Wonders," book and 
lyrics by Harold Atteridge, music by 
Sigmund Romberg, Otto Motzan and Her- 
man Timberg, and staged by J. C. Huff- 
man, will open at the Winter Garden 
Monday night, Oct. 23. 



"COME AGAIN SMITH" PRODUCED 

Los Angeles, CaL. Oct 18.— John H. 
Blackwood has produced his maiden play, 
"Come Again Smith" at the Belasee The- 
atre here. Harrison Ford plays the title rote 
and Inez Plummer is the leading woman. 



FAMOUS ACROBAT BURIED 

George Dunbar, famous acrobat and 
vaudeville performer, was buried from the 
White Rats Auditorium at 227 West 
Forty-sixth Street, on Oct. 12. An im- 
posing ceremony was held over the re- 
mains, and Harry Mountford delivered the 
eulogy. Dunbar was seventy-two. His 
death follows that of bis wife by but a 
week. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 




NEW YORK MANAGERS FACE 
BIG NEW YE AR LOSSES 

Last of the Year Falling on Sunday Is Financial Blow to Local 
Amusement Purveyors. Many Schemes Suggested to Cir- 
cumvent the Sabbath Law. Midnight Shows May Be 
' Given. 



New Year's Eve, falling on Sunday this 
year, will rob theatre managers of the 
richest plum of the season. Visions of 
the usual increase of prices, of packed 
houses, and of overflowing coffers vanish 
into thin air, unless — and there's the rub 
— the city authorities can be cajoled into 
relaxing the severity with which they are 
wont to live up to the Sunday laws re- 
garding theatrical performances on that 
day. 

As a further proof that the managers 
are getting all the worst of the season's 

"breaks," they point to the fact that they 
are this year robbed of the opportunity 
to make up a little of the losses which 
almost invariably are theirs during pre- 
boliday time. They naturally think 
enough hardship has been their lot this 
season and they are trying to devise 
means whereby they may benefit by the 
crowds which habitually attend the thea- 
tre on that night of nights. 

Wm. A. Brady, who is recognized as 
one of our most aggressive and progres- 
sive of managers, has assumed the leader- 
ship and entered the fray with his usual 
''punch." As a starter he cornea forward 
with one of his characteristic and out-of- 
tbe-ordinary ideas which is nothing more 
than a plan to give night performances at 
the dramatic theatres in New York on 
Sunday, Dec. 31, 1916. 

To back up bis contention for New 
Year's Eve performances in dramatic, Mr. 
Brady argues that so-called Sunday con- 
certs are permitted a first-class house like 
the Winter Garden, there is no reason 
tor denying the same privilege to thea- 
tres where dramatic shows form the at- 
traction. He contends that the vaudeville 
given as the Sunday concert at the Win- 
ter Garden and other houses where Sun- 
day concerts prevail, is a subdivision of 
the dramatic end of the business and is 
just as much a form of amusement as the 
parent branch from which it sprang. 

Manager Brady has made a canvass of 
his colleagues, with the view to making 
a concerted movement in an appeal to the 
authorities for a special permit for the 
occasion, and upon his return from French 
Lick, whither he went Oct. 13, he will 
resume his activity in the matter. 

In the meantime bis fellow managers 
will not relax in their endeavors toward 
a common end. They realize that they 
will have to combat two antagonists — 
the Sunday Observance League and prece- 
dent. The former, of course, being the 
most formidable. 

The strength of this League is unques- 
tioned and its persistence is proverbial. 
Some time ago, when a number of pub- 
lic-spirited citizens of thia city promoted 



a benefit for the war sufferers in Belgium, 
the Sunday Observance League stepped in 
and prevented the performance which was 
to be given on a Sunday night at Wal- 
laces. 

In the present instance, if Mr. Brady 
and his fellow managers are successful in 
getting permission from the Mayor and 
the city fathers to give New Year's Eve 
performances, the League can, and proba- 
bly will, get an injunction from the city 
courts to prevent such performances. 

Precedent, probably the lesser of the 
two antagonists, is still a potent factor 
against the managers winning the cause 
they have espoused and doubtless will be 
the keynote of the argument the city 
authorities will use to show why they 
should not grant permission for Sunday 
night dramatic performances. They prob- 
ably will state that while, by not being 
permitted to give New Tear's Eve per- 
formances the managers will suffer great, 
monetary loss, that fact is not a sufficient 
reason to establish a precedent of allow- 
ing Sunday dramatic performances. 

However, whatever the City Fathers 

may decide in reganL.WtJhe plea of.Mr. 
Brady and those working with him, there 
are several of his fellow managers who 
have discovered a way in which they may 
give performances on the much desired 
date without breaking the Sunday stat- 
utes. 

The plan, which originated with J. J. 
Rosenthal, manager of the Bronx Opera 
House, is to begin the week's engagement 
of "Fair and Warmer," the booking for 
Jan. 1, exactly at 12.01 Monday . morning. 
By so doing there will be no violation of 
the Sunday law, and the New Year's Eve 
crowds which have been celebrating will 
be able to gratify their desire for enter- 
tainment, while the new way of begin- 
ning the new year will appeal to many 
because of its novelty — the order of things 
being reversed — supper preceding instead 
of following the performance. 

According to the idea of Mr. Rosenthal, 
the doors of the theatre will open at 11.30 
Sunday night, Dec. 31, 1916, and the per- 
formance will begin at one minute past 
twelve on Jan. 1, 1917. A number of 
Broadway managers look up to the Rosen- 
thal plan with favor, and if the Brady 
plan fails, it is likely that many of New 
York's leading theatres will give midnight 
performances to welcome in the new year. 



ANOTHER ONE BY MAX MARCIN 

"Are You My Wife," by the author of 
"The House of Glass" and other successes, 
will be placed in rehearsal the early part 
of this week. The production will be 
made under the direction of Edward Mac- 
Gregor, who returned from Syracuse Mon- 
day night to arrange for the opening per- 
formance of "Friend Martha," by Edward 
Peple. — 

"CAPITAL PUNISHMENT" TO TOUR 
Marion Russell's latest play, entitled, 
"Capital Punishment,'' is shortly to open 
on tour. Two companies are to present 
the Bbow in the larger and smaller cities. 



PATRONAGE OF 

N. Y. HOUSES 

IMPROVES 

BOX OFFICE RECEIPTS INCREASE 



TO STAGE NEW FRANKLIN PLAY . 

Ralph E. Cummings is to direct the new 
play for Irene Franklin, "The Melting of 
Molly," which goes into rehearsal this 
week at Bryant Hall. 



'TREASURE ISLAND" TO REOPEN 

When "Treasure Island" resumes on 
Oct. 21 its run at the Punch and Judy 
Theatre, Henry E. Dixey will be seen in 
the role of Long John Silver. Last year's 
policy of giving the matinees on Friday 
and Saturday will be continued. 



"FOLLOW ME" PREMIER DATE SET 
Rehearsals of "Follow Me," the musical 
play in which Anna Held will appear under 
the direction of the Messrs. Shubert, are 
progressing and the first performance of the 
work has been set for October 25 at Phila- 
delphia. ' . — —. 

NEW PRODUCING FIRM FORMED 

"A new producing firm consisting of 
Frank A. P. Gazzolo, George M Gatts 
and Edwin C. Clifford, all of Chicago, is 
being organized to take over the musical 
comedy rights to the "Katzenjammer 
Kids," recently acquired by Mr. Gazzolo. 
The firm will immediately organize sev- 
eral companies to present the piece. 



POST PLAY REHEARSALS BEGIN 

Richard Walton Tully will this week 
commence rehearsals of the modern Eng- 
lish drama by John Hunter Booth in 
which he is going to present Guy Bates 
Post, who starred for three seasons in 
Tully's "Omar, the Tent-maker." The 
supporting company will include Thais 
Lawton and Louis Calvert. 



"LETTY" IS CENSORED 

Boston, Oct 15.— "So Long Letty," by 
Earle Carroll, has given Boston something 
to talk about. The cultured Bostonese 
have taken offense at a bathing scene in 
the new musical comedy and the length of 
the stockings wom by the chorus. These 
things have been remedied to please the 
fastidious Hub taste. The lines stfll re- 
main the same. 



PITROT HAS "BLUE MONKEY" 
"The Blue Monkey" is the title of a 
new three-act operetta by the late Guatav 
Luder, which has been acquired by Rich- 
ard Pitrot. 



"PEG" TO BE REVIVED 

A revival of the Laurette Taylor suc- 
cess, "Peg of My Heart" is contemplated 
for the Lexington Opera House. Arrange- 
ments are being completed for an indefinite 
run of the Movosco play in New York 
again. 



Slowly but surely theatrical attendance 
is reaching normal conditions again. The 
street railway strike is a thing of the 
past and there are few of the companies 
which are not running their full comple- 
ment of cars. The infantile paralysis 
epidemic is on its very last legs and 
weather conditions are such that theatre- 
going is a pleasure. Thus the three thea- 
tre-attendance killers, with which the 
manager had to contend, have ceased to 
be potent factors. 

With the rapid decrease of infantile 
paralysis cases there comes that evidence 
of "show-hunger" that always follows the 
long-enforced absence from the show-shop, 
and with the gradual return of the nor- 
mal transportation facilities those suf- 
fering from this complaint are not re- 
strained from taking the remedy and 
thereby lies the reason for the growing 
managerial smile. 

During the past week the attendance 
at the local theatres has shown a slow 
but steady increase. Gradually the gal- 
lery and balcony patrons are returning, 
and it is this fact that convinces the man- 
ager that business has made its first step 
toward reaching its normal state. 

Of course all lines of business were 
more or less affected by the conditions 
above mentioned, bnt none suffered as much 
as the theatrical business. Few theatres 
in New York can show a balance on the 
right side of the ledger from the time of 
opening this season up to the present, 
and many a producing manager, who, in 
normal seasons, would have made good 
money on his offering, was forced to the 
alternative of putting it on the road or 
into the storage warehouse. 

More than one really good play has 
failed this season in New York from 
lack ' of patronage, while there are none 
that were forced on the road for this rea- 
son that did not receive the public re- 
sponse denied them in the Metropolis. 

As a proof that some of the plays that 
were driven from the New York theatres 
to "cold storage" were not considered fail- 
ures lies in the fact that the English 
rights have been secured by managers who 
desire to give them London productions, 
while others are booked for presentation 
when conditions are more favorable. 

It is no wonder, then, that the New 
York manager gratefully welcomes the 
crumbs of comfort handed to him last 
week in the shape of an increase in at- 
tendance. Of course he realizes that he 
is not yet out of the woods and that he 
has to go some to get back what the sea- 
son has cost him up to the present, but 
, the fact that the tide has begun to change 
is cause for the managerial smile, for its 
owner now has something to look forward 
to besides rows of empty seats. 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 




GBMZL 




SHUBERTS HAVE 

FORTY-FOUR 

SHOWS 

TWENTY-THREE OF THEM NEW 



The Messrs. Shubert, in accordance with 
their desire to make this season the most 
* ambitions in their career and to show 
that they have the courage of their con- 
victions that this will be a banner sea- 
son, announce that they have forty-four 
productions, dramatic and musical, ap- 
pearing or about to appear, under their 
direction. Twenty-three of this number 
are new, the others are successes of pre- 
vious seasons. 

Musical productions, as usual, are prom- 
inent among the offerings, and eleven of 

this class find place on this season's Shu- 
bert list. Among them are "The Beauti- 
ful Unknown," Oscar Strauss's new oper- 
etta, with book by Leopold Jaeobson and 
Leo Stein; "This, or None," by Edmund 
Eysler, with book by Willner a Bodan- 
aky; "The Star Gazer," by Franz Lehar; 
Tor the Love of Mike," by Thomas Syd- 
ney and Jerome Kern; "The Cave Lady," 
by Roland Oliver and Charles Dickson; 
"Follow Me," the new Anna Held show, 
and "The Show of Wonders," which will 
be the new show at the Winter Garden. 
These are the new ones to come, while 
"Her Soldier Boy," with Clifton Crawford 
as the star, is now on the road, and 'The 
Girl from Brazil," now playing at the 
Shubert Theatre, New York. 

Other musical shows are Lew Field's in 
"Step This Way," three companies of 
"The Blue Paradise"; three companies of 
"Alone at Last"; two companies of "The 
Girl from Brazil"; Al Jolson in "Robin- 
son Crusoe, Jr."; "A World of Pleasure," 
and "The Passing Show of 191C." 

The dramatic offerings contain a num- 
ber of new productions and include "The 
Fugitive," by John Galsworthy; "Gam- 
bler's All," by Mrs. May Martindale, pro- 
duced in association with Percy Burton; 
"The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come," 
a dramatization by Eugene Walter of 
John Fox's novel; "The Cry of a Child," 
by Wilson Mizner, from the German of 
Alexander Engel and Julius Horst, au- 
thors of "The Blue Mouse"; "Chi-Chi," by 
Axel Gerfalk; a new play by Owen Davis, 
entitled "The Key to Room 10"; "The 
Stampede," by Lincoln J. Carter; 'The 
Love Thief," a comedy which had a. long 
run in London last season, and a new 
play in which Louis Mann will be seen. 

Attractions which have already seen 
Broadway are: 

William Hodge in "Fixing Sister"; Tay- 
lor Holmes in "His Majesty, Bunker 
Bean" (presented in association with Jo- 
seph Brooks), and James T. Powers in 
"Somebody's Luggage." The touring 
dramatic productions include, in addition 
to "Somebody's Lnggage," E. H. Sotoern 
in "If I Were King," Marie Tempest in 
"A Lady's Name,* "A Pair of Silk Stoek- 
ina*** 



"NOTO" AUTHOR SUED 

George Blumenthal, who acted as man- 
ager and stage director for "Noto," a 
Japanese operetta, has brought suit in 
the Supreme Court against Mrs. Mary Lee 
Wertheimer, the author of the work. 

According to Blumenthal he entered into 
a contract with Mrs. Wertheimer to take 
entire charge of her works and produce 
them. His salary was to be $150 a week 
for thirty weeks. The necessary funds, 
Blumenthal says, were to be advanced by 
Mrs. Wertheimer. The first amount he 
asked was $10,000 to buy scenery and 
carry on rehearsals. Only a small part 
of this was paid, he says, and the de- 
ficiency, he claims, was made up out of 
his own pocket. Finally, he says, he was. 
compelled to abandon the production after 
one performance at Stamford, Conn., on 
Sept. 27. 



BRADY SUED FOR $10,000 

Lecbmere Worral and J. E. Harrold 
Terry, authors of "The Man Who Stayed 
Home," also known as "The White 
Feather," have brought suit in the Su- 
preme Court of New York against Wm. 
A. Brady for $10,000, which they claim as 
royalties due them, and which represents 
the $200,000 which they allege Manager 
Brady made out of the production of the 
play. 

In their bill of particulars they allege 
that Mr. Brady bought the American 
rights, agreeing to pay the co-authors 
five per cent of the gross up to $5,000; 
seven and a half per cent, of the gross 
weekly when it exceeded $3,000, and fifty 
per cent, of all receipts from stock pro- 
ductions. Despite this contract, Worral 
and Terry assert, nothing has been paid, 
although the play is still being presented 
and has netted Brady nearly a quarter of 
a million dollars. 



THIRD "KATINKA , • CO. 

A thorough believer in the axiom, 
"Make hay while the sun shines," Arthur 
Hammerstein has launched a third "Ka- 
tinka" company on the road, opening Oct. 
14 at Stamford, Conn. In the cast are: 
Peggy Bates, James, McDuff, Burton Len- 
ihan, John A. Crawford, Alice Ryan, May 
Wallace, Howard Langford, Clifford Nel- 
son, Harry C. Nelson, Alonzo Price, Dixie 
Blair, Vere Stanley, Thomas CHare and 
David Allen. 



CRITERION FOR JOHN DREW 

Contracts have been signed between John 
D. Williams, Klaw & Erlanger and George 
Tyler, whereby John Drew will come to 
the Criterion Theatre with "Major Pen- 
dennis" on Tuesday, October 24. George 
Arliss, who is appearing at that house in 
"Paganini," will resume his road tour. 



SATURDAY EVENING POST 

FATHER OF THREE PLAY HITS 

Popular Philadelphia Weekly a Veritable Compendium for the 

Dramatists — Magazines and Novels Other Prolific Sources. 

Six Book Plays Now at New York Theatres and More 

to Come. 



DOLLY SISTERS TO TOUR 

"His Bridal Night," with the Dolly Sis- 
ters, will finish its present engagement 
at the Republic this week. The erstwhile 
vaudeville entertainers will make a tour 
of the big cities at the head of the New 
York company. 



There are more "book plays" among 
the current offerings at the local theatres 
than have ever been seen at one time, and 
as a controversion of the fate formerly 
meted out to plays derived from popular 
stories, they are all accounted successes. 
This is only one of the curious features 
of a theatrical season marked by ab- 
normal conditions. 

Another curious feature lies in the fact 
that of these "book plays," and there are 
six of them, three are from stories which 
originally appeared in the Saturday Evening 
Post, a source to which the playwright has 
kept his eye upon ever since the Mon- 
tague Glass stories of "Potash and Perl- 
mutter" were turned Into plays for A. H. 
Woods. 

In his avidity to get plots for his plays 
the average playwright is kept reading 
the current literature as fast as the books 
are off of the press. To give an example 
of this, and to prove how quickly each 
issue of the Saturday Evening Pott is read 
by the play-maker, that edition of it 
which contained the first instalment of 
Maximilian Foster's story, "Rich Man, 
Poor Man," had not been on sale' twenty- 
four hours when the publishers received 
four offers, by wire, for the dramatic 
rights to it. George Broadhurst, with his 
offer, sent the money by which he ob- 
tained his object, and the play of the 
same name now running at the Forty- 
eighth Street Theatre is the result of his 
efforts. The play itself is a proof of the 
wisdom of the publisher of the Pott in 
awarding Mr. Broadhurst the prize. 

Lee Wilson Dodd fashioned "His 
Majesty Bunker Bean" from the stories of 
the same name by Harry Leon Wilson, 
which, after - appearing >n serial form In 
the Saturday Evening Pott, were published 
in book form. Mr. Dodd's play is proving 
a capital starring vehicle for Taylor 
Holmes. 

Another play from the Saturday Eve- 
ning Pott is "Undii Sentence," founded by 
Roi Cooper Megrue on the interesting 
stories by Irvin Cobb. In this play 
George Nash and Janet Beecher are do- 
ing excellent work at the Harris Theatre. 

Leaving the Playwrights' Compendium 
for the nonce, we come to "The Man 
Who Came Back," a play now running 
at the Playhouse and is a Wm. A. Brady 
production. This is the work of Jules 
Eckert Goodman and is founded by him 
on the story of the same name by John 
Fleming Wilson and which appeared in 
MeClure'i Magazine. 

"Nothing But the Truth," the play in 
which William Collier is being starred by 
H. H. Frazee and pleasing the Longacre 
patrons, is from the pen of James Mont- 



gomery, who took it from Frederick 
Isham's novel of the same name. 

"Pollyanna," an offering of Klaw & 
Erlanger and George Tyler, which is one 
of the most delightful entertainments of 
the season, is holding its own at the Hud- 
son. The play, which is by Catherine 
Chisholm Cushing, is founded on Eleanor 
H. Porter's novel of the same name. 

While the book play is cutting such 
a swath in New York, the out-of-tournera 

are enjoying at least one, and another 
will soon be added to the list. 

At Providence this week is a play child 
of Montague Glass. In dramatic form it 
is called "Object— Matrimony." As it 
appeared in the Saturday Evening Pott It 
was called "Slaking Over Milton." It is 
not really a dramatization, but is written 
around the character of Milton. 

This is another Brady production and 
will be brought by him to New York as 
soon as be can secure a suitable theatre 
for it. 

A book play which is about to be given 
out of town is "The Melting of Molly," 
from the book of the same name by Marie 
Thompson Daiviess. This is a Frederic 
McKay production. In looking around 
for a star for his work he hit upon Irene 
Franklin, who was induced by Mr. McKay 
to forsake her vaudeville bookings and make 
her debut as a dramatic star. 

In book form "The Melting of Molly" 
was one of the ten "best sellers" and 
its popularity as a book is sure to en- 
hance its value as a play. 

Of course-- the eight above mentioned 
are sure to be added to as the season 
advances, and if the tendency of the play- 
wright to depend upon the novelist for 
a plot for his play continues, an original 
play, not founded upon a novel or a story, 
may become the exception. But if this 
state of affairs docs come to pass — if the 
time comes when the playwright has no 
inventive or imaginative power of his 
own. and must depend upon the novelist 
for bis ideas for plays, the book-writer 
will be in the autocratic position of de- 
manding the creme of the royalties, and 
the playwright, whose work is admittedly 
the most difficult, will have to be satis- 
fied with what he can get. 



CHANGE "LETTY" DATE 

Oliver Morosco last week decided to 
change the opening date of "So Long, 
Letty," from Oct. 30 to Oct. 23. 



SELWYNS GET NEW PLAY 

"The Longest Way Round," from the 
pen of Edwin Mnton Boyle, has been se- 
cured by the Selwyna. 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 



PHILADELPHIA 



Mstkopoutam Opeka Hoosb — "Hip Hip 
Hooray," bp^an Oct. 14 a month's stay. 

Ltbic — Clirton Crawford In "Her Soldier 
Boy" Is In nls last week. 

Adblfhi — "Experience" began seventh 
week 18. ._ 

Fouiest — Sanderson, Briar and Cawthorn 
in "Bybll" continue. _ 

Qasbick — Jane Cowl In "Common Clay," 

ITiuun-^-Maria Tempest In "Her Lady's 
Name." nnal week. 

Walkct — "Bringing Up Father In Politics. 

KNicKzaBocKcs — Eugenie Blair In "The 
Eternal Magdalene." 

OKTBSCM — "For the Man She Loved." 
B. F. Keiths (H. T. Jordan, mgr.) — 
Belle Story Is the headllner week or IS in 
addition to Edwin Arden, Santley and Nor- 
ton, Cap Anson and daughters, Chas. Leon- 
ard Fletcher, Gerard and Clark, Parish and 
Fern, the Kramers, Camillas Bnda and mov- 
ing pictures. 

Grand (W. D. Megefaitb, mgr.)— Bill 16- 
21: "Town Hall Follies." Marlon Weeks, 
Freacott, Anthony and Mack, Flake and Fal- 
lon, Cabarets Dogs and moving pictures. 

Cboss-Kkys (James J. Springer, mgr.) — 
Pauline the hypnotist Is featured all week 
of 16. For 16-18: Rnasell Yokes, Rap and 
Hirst, Walters and Moore, three Angeles sis- 
ten, four Vauders. For 10-21 : "Tuto the 
Light," Sogers, Curxon and Rogers, B. K. 
Forrest, Sbeats and Eldred. and Archie 
Nicholson trio. _ . 

Globe (Sablosky and McGurk, nigra.) — Bill 
19-21 : "The Lawn Party," Dan Sherman and 
company. Nan Sullivan and company, Tl Ling 
Sing, Goldsmith and Plnard, Ward and Bay- 
mood. Johnny Reynolds. Harkins, McKee and 
Loftua, D. Almond and Fuller, and Richard 
Bros. . __ 

Wm. Penh (Wm. W. Miller, mgr.)— For 
16-1B: "The Globe Trotters," Big City Four, 
J. Edwin Lessl and company, and Jonea and 
Johnson, For 19-21 : "Mammy Jenny's Birth- 
day," Caaneld and Barnes, Brennan and 
Powell, and Thomas Trio. 

AXXSOHINT (Jaa. Harkins, mgr.) — For 16- 
18 : Wm. Nelson and company, Venetian trio, 
Kddle Dowllng, Mardo and Hunter. Herbert 
Germalne Trio. For 19-21 : Junior Review of 
1016, Claude Saner, Morris Beasley and Flor- 
ence Duo. 

Kbtbtonb (M. W. Taylor, mgr.) — Bill 19- 
21 : Svengall. Kennedy and Burt, "Dr. Joys 
Sanitarium," Billy Rogers, Martka and Car- 
men, Broslus and Brown and moving pictures. 

Domonts (Frank Dumont, mgr.) — -The bill 
last week had as Its feature a skit "Robtn- 
som Crusoe." 

Casino — The Sporting Widows, week of 16. 

Tbocadsso — The Pennant Winners, 16-21. 

Oatbty — Yoaka Hula Hlckey Dula Girls. 
16-51. 

Pbople's — Hello New York 16 and week. 

Stasliy (Plcturea) — "The Daughter of 
MacQrecor," 16-18. "The Kiss." 10-21. 

Abcadia— "The Old Folks at Home," 16-18. 
"The Return of Draw Egan," 10-21. 

VicroaiA — "Manhattan Madness." 16-21. 

RaGBicT. — "The Man Who Stood Still," IB- 
IS. "Ufes Shadows," 10-21. 

BOSTON 

OctPLarr (H. W. Pattee, mgr.) — Henry 
Jewett Players In "Importance of Being 
Earnest." week of Oct. 16. 

Shcbkbt (E. D. Smith mgr.) — Week of 
16, second and last week of "So Long Letty." 
"Her Soldier Boy" comes 23. 

T» Wilbl-h (E. D. Smith, mgr.) — Week 
of 16, "Very Good Eddie." Tenth week. 

Pltmocth (E. D. Stair, mgr.) — Week of 
10. -The Silent Witness," fourth week. Marie 
Tempest In "A Lady's Name" comes 30. 

Pabk So. (Fred E. Wright, mgr.) — Week 
of 16. "Good Gracious Annabelle," second 
weak. 

Colonial (Cbaa. Rich, mgr.) — Week of 10, 
fifth week of "Zlegfeld's Follies." 

Hollis (Chas. Rich, mgr.) — Week of 16. 
Sir Herbert Tree and his company, opening 
In "Henry VIII." 

Tbemont (John D, Schoetfel, mgr.) — Week 
of 16. "Potash and Perunutter In Society." 
second week. 

Majsrtic (E. D. Smith, mgr.) — Week of 
16, dark — Will re-open week of 30 with 
Anna Held. 

Castle So. (Phillip Lavlne. mgr.) — Week 
of 16. International Circuits "Rolling 
StCMf." 

CINCINNNATI 

High class bills were offered at the Lyric 
and Grand Opera House and box office re- 
ceipts are ahowlng a material Increase over 
last year. Burlesque houses and picture 
•bows report large attendances. 

Ltbic (C. Hubert Henck, mgr.) — "A Pair 
of Queens." week of Oct. 15. 

Oband Opera House (John. Havlln, mgr.) 
— Montgomery and Stone in "Chin Chin" 
week of 16. 

B. J*. Keiths (Ned Hastings, mgr.) — Elsa 
Ryan Is featured week of 15. Others: Tom 
Edwards, Minnie Alien, George Rollard and 
company. Winters lions and nymps. Kerr and 
Weaton. and Helton. Mareena and Deltoo. 

BKPBESS (George Flah, mgr.) — "Cheyenne 
Days" heals the bill week of IS which In- 
cludes : Nlrbol Sisters. Clifford and Wills. 
Marsh and DeAnno Due and Fitxsimmona and 
Groves. 

Poor-Lie's (Charles McDonald, mgr.) — The 
Casino Girls with Lew Golden and George 
Milton IS and week. 

Olympic (H. H. Hedges, mgr.) — Bon Ton 
Girls IS and week. 



TO PRODUCE 'TANGLED LIVES" 

Butter Davenport will produce "Tangled 
Lives" the latter part of tbis month at 
the BramhaU Playhouse. 



MILWAUKEE 

Davidson (Sherman Brown, mgr.) — Mltzl 
Hajoa In "Pom Fom," week of Oct. 15. 

Majestic (J. A. Higler, mgr.) — BUI week 
of 16: Boot, T. Haines and company. Belle 
Baker, Stern Stanley, Leah M. Hers, Claudia 
Albright and Maria Rodolfl, Billy Lloyd and 
Geo. F. Brltt Consul The Great and Sammy 
Weston and Sidney Clare. 

Shubebt (Carrigen, mgr.) — Shubert Stock 
company. 

Cbtstal (Wm. Gray, mgr.)-— Lillian Mor- 
timer in "Irish Molly 0." Headlines week 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Columbia — Second week of the spectacle 
Aim "Intolerance," began Oct, 16. 

Cost — Second week of "A World of Pleas- 
ure," began 15. 

alcasas — Weak of 10, "Widow By Proxy." 

Obpucuu — BUI 16-21 : Sam Chip and Mary 
Marble, Alexander Macfadyan, Nederveld's 
Baboons, Searl Allen and Ed. Howard. Sher- 
man and TJttry, Frederick Y. Bowers and 
company. Waiter Brower, Frank Ortb and 
William J. Dooley and Orpbenm Pictures. 

Eufbess — BUI 15-21 : Five Alarcons, 
White's Greater Circus, Alice Allison, Billy 
Broad, Ford and TJrlna, Beaux and Belles, 
Maude Kimball and company, and the fea- 
ture film "The Garden of Knowledge." 

PaNTAOBS— Bill 15-21 ; Junior FoUles, 
Browning and Dean, Will and Kemp, Ro- 
malne Fielding, Mike Bernard and Moving 
Pictures, 

BALTIMORE 

Fobt/s (Chas, E. Ford, mgr.) — "The House 
Of Glass," Oct, 16-21; "Potash and Perl- 
mutter In Society," 23-28. 

Academy (Harry Henkle, mgr.) — Chauncey 
Olcott In "Honest John O'Brien," 16-21. 
Rose Stahl "Our Mrs. McChesney." 23-28. 

Auditobicm (R. C. Benton, mgr.) — "The 
Girl Without a Chance," 16-21. "WhUe The 
City Sleeps," 23-28. 

Victoria (Harry Henkle, mgr.) — Bill 16- 
21 : Harry Glrard and company. The Cleve- 
land^, Tiny May's Circus, Four Palettes, Doro- 
thy Dasbells and company. 

Garden (Geo. Schneider, mgr.) — B1U 16- 
21 : Junior Mimic World, Lotus Kent and 
company, Andrews and Gardner, Arthur 
Wayne, and Siegle and Cooper. 

Falack (Wm. Ballauf, mgr.) — Sam Sldman 
Big Show, 16-21. Lew Kelly, 23-28. 

Gatety — Monte Criato Girls, 16-21. 
Broadway Belles. 23-28. 

Hippodboub (Harry Wood, mgr.) — Bill 16- 
21 : Australian Wood Choppers, Holden and 
Graham, Carry and Graham, Herbert and 
Dennis, Midgets, Vesale Farrell and com- 
pany and John O'Malley. 

INDIANAPOLIS 

Mi rat (Nelson G. Trowbridge, mgr.) — "a 
Pair of Silk Stockings," Oct. 20-21. "The 
Only Girl." 23-25. James T. Powers In 
"Somebody's Luggage," 26-28. 

English's (Ad F. Miller, mgr.) — "Twin 
Beds." 16-18." Cohan Revue 1016." week 
of 23. 

Keith's (C R. Eggleston, max.) — BUI week 
of 16 : Mercedes, Adams and Murray, Yates 
and Wheeler, Harry B. Lester, Edna Mun- 
sey. Eaden and Ramsden, Dunedln Duo and 
Billy Bouncer. 

Lyric (Barton & Olsen, mgra.) — BUI week 
of 16: Electrical Venus, Oneta, Howe and 
Howe, Jarrow, Five Martha Washington 
Girls and Brown-Fletcher Trio. 

Pabk (Shafer Ziegler, mgr.) — "The Woman 
He Married," week of 16. "Step lively," 
week of 23. 

Majestic (G. E. Black, mgr.)- 1 — The 
Charming Widows, week of 16. 



ALBANY HAS NEW THEATRE 

Albany, Oct 13. — The Regent, one of 
Albany's largest motion picture theatres, 
located on South Pearl Street, opened its 
doors to the public today. Samuel Suck- 
now is the proprietor of the Regent, which 
insures its patrons high class entertain- 
ment, and has a seating capacity of 1,000. 
The exhibiting machine is so arranged that 
it will project 170 feet from the screen. In 
arranging bis house, Mr. Sucknow has paid 
strict attention to light, ventilation and 
heat. The skylights are constructed so 
that they can be removed in the summer, 
thus converting the theatre into an open 
air resort. 



STRANDED SINGERS ARRIVE 

Three singers, the musical conductor 
and the manager of an Italian opera com- 
pany, arrived last week from Bogota, cap- 
ital of Colombia, where the company had 
been stranded. 

Tbe opera venture was a failure finan- 
cially, the manager said, and the five 
members who returned managed to pay 
their way by the sale of some musical 
instruments and part of their wardrobe. 



REGISTE R YO UR ACT 

PROTECT WHAT YOU ORIGINATE. 



THIS COUPON will be numbered and attached to your material, and a certificate will be 
returned to yon as an acknowledgment, and lor future reference. The contribution should be 
signed plainly by the person or firm lending the same, and should be endorsed by the stage 
manager of the show or of the house where the act is being used. Further acknowledgment 
will be made by the names and numbers being published. 

Address your contributions to 



The Registry Bureau, 



NEW YORK CUPPER. 1(M Broadway, New York 



Date 

NEW YORK CLIPPER REGISTRY BUREAU: 

Enclosed please find copy of my 

entitled 

for Registration. 

NAME 

Address • 



When you register a play or scenario that yon intend to submit for reading to any producer, 
we will furnish a label to be attached to the original, showing that the same hat been entered 
in Taa Cturxa Registry Bureau. Get the idea? 

New Certificates Issued 

922— Mrs. Marie Luebclce ...Song Poem 925— Rags Fuller Business 

923— Myrtle Morton Play 926— Swan B. MoUnder Photo Flay 

924— S. E. Cox....... Song Poem Hi|i 

The Clipper Registry Bureau 

This department, originated by Ths Nsw 
Tobk Clipper several years ago, has met 
with marked recognition by those who realize 
the importance of an indelible and undeni- 
able record of tbe time and place when their 
material, or invention, business, bit or plan 
was conceived or produced. 

The question of priority In producing has 
often given cause for long drawn arguments 
which could not. be satisfactorily settled by 
any Indisputable proofs. These arguments 
can be avoided, if all those who originate any- 
thing, or who produce original material ac- 
quired by purchase, would take advantage of 
the opportunity which tbla system presents. 

The originator simply sends a copy, plan or 
description of his material to this Registry 
Bureau, indicating when and where first con- 
ceived or produced. These facts are recorded 
and the material placed on file for future 
reference and a certificate is issued for the 
same. In the case of a copy turning up, the 
holder of the certificate sends It to Thx 
Clippke Registry Bureau and The Clipper 
will publish without charge any details re- 
quired to prove the holder's contention. 

The registering of the matter with The 
Clipper Bureau need not interfere with the 
securing of a copyright by the author. 

The copyright Is a useful possession, but If 
It becomes necessary for the holder to pro- 
test against Infringements through the theat- 
rical press It requires an outlay for advertis- 
ing space, but which is not made necessary 
when The Clipper Registry Bureau is called 



upon to publish facts relating to any «f its 
entries. 

The Clipper has on several occasions pub- 
lished such proofs, with the inevitable result 
that the Infringer had to acknowledge hia 
error and drop the copied act or material. 

Included In the material which has been 
registered by the Bureau are sketches, scena- 
rios, song lyrics, scene plots, mechanical in- 
ventions, gags, designs of costumes, amuse- 
ment devices, titles, models, musical composi- 
tions, etc., etc, and In a case where any of 
these matters would be produced or shown 
subsequently by anyone else the date of entry 
would prove beyond a doubt aa to who "had 
It first?' 

The label referred to above is a safeguard 
where material has to be submitted to a pro- 
ducing manager or bis agents. The l abel 
Indicates that there Is a positive proof in THX 
form of a duplicate In the hands of The 
Clipper, which would show without a doubt 
If any of the "rejected" material would find 
its way before tbe public. 

All those who write, who think, who Invent 
or originate are invited to register with The 
Clipper Registry Bureau, which Includes in 
Its entries the record, that the idea of The 
Clipper Registry Bureau Itself was originated 
by The New Tobk Clipper. 

The remark, "If Bill Jonea waa alive," wUI 
become obsolete, because you can prove it by 
The Clipper Registry Bureau, which wiU al- 
ways be alive and able to substantiate your 
claims at all times. 



5.000 9x12 Heralds. 4 pp., each pan 6x8 $10.00 

lO.Offi 9x12 Heralds, 4 pp., each pais 6x9.... 17.50 

5,000 10ttxl4 Herald.. 4 pp.. each pie TxlOU 11.50 
10,000 10UxI4 Heralds. 4 pp.. each pare TxlOH 18-50 

5.000 12x18 Heralds. 4 pp., each pate 9x12... 12.50 
10.000 1*118 pats* 4 pp., each pas* fxi2... 20.00 

5.000 14x31 Heralds. 4 to-, acta pats lOUxll 15.00 
10.000 14x21 Heralds. 4 pp.. each par- 10 141 14 25.00 

5.000 6x24 Benito, tan aides 11-50 

10.000 6x24 Herald!, tn skfcs 1J-50 

5.000 Tx21 Heralds, two fides 11.50 

10.000 7x21 Heralds, tan tMes 1S-50 

5,000 9x24 Heralds, two skies 12.50 

10,000 9x24 Herald*, two silks 20.00 

5.000 10V»x28 Bent*-, fro does 15.00 

10.000 10V»i2S Heralds, ten aides 25.00 

Printed to order from type sad ems, black ink en 
fasfssal poster paper. Ovine to market tsodlnoQS abort 
prices far t— — — fi acceptance, and taetfect to chance 
without note. Send for pries list Borne Beak, lOe. 
tUIETTE SHOW Fliariae CO., Hatta... 111.. U. S. A. 



BB&B Special 

Wardrobe Trunk 

S Ply Flbra Conrmd 
N. Y.: Cbaa. E. Mack, 1578 B'way (aVI AA 
ChicagoTManhaUField & Co. fW-W 

Send (or Catalogue 
B B A B TRUNK CO- Pitt sburg. Pa. 



m 



HH 




stats am 

,, . avast scastllil avaalcxlta 

Card for 50 rear, by ?ta» tf the Pfofraiioa Bai 
for free EX0BA taawles. OLAKU3 £=«£ 
(Fat- 1868] 1-* a* 1SU| "*■• ' Mm 



J 



I'll Show You £'?;*"* 

10 BKO.f « VAUOEVIUE PfRFflRHFR 

VsJsiWt isfsraauas SiaUed Free ' aJUWIUIILIl 

LONDON, 732 Cnlly BUf., O1KA60, ILIIN0I S 

W%£% VffalT 0011TOSE S0VO8 OB XBT- 

1JIJ I UU oakujujitaU. anreaoi it so, 

wm w** * *** **■ be sure to bare same arranged 
by an expert: an artistic arrangement may mean 
success. X have done hnndred s of big hits. Write 
or call afternoons. 3-5. ETJOEHX PT.aTraf AVW 
care Shapiro, Bernstein 6c Co., 224 West 47th 
Street, New York. 



HAWAIIAN SUNSHINE 



WARDROBE FOR SALE 

Evaxdag gswna and rep. wardrobe. Bp to date 
and good condition. Address Box sea, Cfcicaa-o. 

VAUDEVILLE 
INSURANCE POLICY 

Write Cbaa. O. Kflpatrick, 
Rookery Bldg.. Chicago, IU. 



$5.00 




^ - LET US PBOVB =»Z-^"^ IT 13 BEST. 
Send 10c for aaxnplsa. lit W. 4*th St.. ST. T. 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



CHOOSE PLAYS FOR 

NINE O'CLOCK HOUSE 



Opening BUI Includes "Chine**, Lily," 
"Maker of Drums" mud as Un- 
named Comedy. High Prices 
on Opening Night. 

The opening bill at Helen Freeman's 
Nine O'clock Theatre, which opens Oct. 19, 
will include "The Chinese Idly," by Paula 
Jacobi, which once was tried for vaudeville 
purposes in Tonkers; "The Maker of 
Dreams," by Oliphant Down, and a modern 
comedy, as yet unnamed. The soloist is 
Nina Varesi, wife of Henry Russell, of the 
Boston Opera Co. 

The little theatre, which is located at 
32 West Fifty-eighth street, has a seating 
capacity of only 299. At the opening per- 
formance the price of seats will be five dol- 
lars. The regular tariff later on will be 
two dollars and a half. In the way of com- 
pensation the management will serve Turk- 
ish cigarettes and coffee gratis. 

In Miss Freeman's company are Langdon 
Gillet, Gertrude Clemens, Mary Farren, 
Dorothy Cheston, Ross Macdongall and Er- 
nest Kowan. 



CELEBRATE ANNIVERSARY 

The twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
Brooklyn Lodge, Theatrical Mechanical 
Association was celebrated last week at 
the Imperial. The affair included a vau- 
deville performance, dancing and a ban- 
quet. 

The committee in charge comprised 
George H. Thomas, Leo Bums, Thomas 
Foley, A. Grundman, Louis Horn, Edward 
Thomas, Joseph Anton, Richard Leslie, 
John Fitzgerald, William Moreley, George 
Miller and David Schonberg. 



NEW MEMBERS FOR ORCHESTRA 

Several new members have been added to 
the Philharmonic Orchestra since last sea- 
son and they are all young men. The new 
violin players engaged are Marius Hanson, 
William Dorfman, Herbert Cordann, Rich- 
ard Baravalle, John Ingram and William 
Oscar. David Reggel has been procured -to 
play at the first desk with Josef J. Kovarik, 
the society's solo viola player, and Karl 
Kirksmith, well known in New York mu- 
sical circles, has become a member of the 
violoncello section. Richard Strauss's new 
symphony "Alpine" will be heard at the 
first concerts of the season, Oct 26 and 27. 




EVERYBODY'S FRIEND AND FTNNIGAN'S FRIEND 

Tom Gillen and Manager Hooley of the Sheridan Square, Pittsburg. Tom believes in 

"Safety First."— Adv 



"BACKFIRE" MOVING 

TO LYCEUM THEATRE 



Show Wul Leave Thirty-Ninth Street 

with Two Unexpired Weeks. New 

Contract Calls for Ten. 

Walter N. Lawrence, who brought 
"Backfire" to the Thirty-ninth Street The- 
atre Oct 2, has arranged to move that at- 
traction Oct. 30 into the Lyceum. 

The show has the substantial backing of 
the author, and although Mr. Lawrence 
contracted for its appearance at the Thirty- 
ninth Street Theatre for six weeks, regard- 
less of box-office reports, its moving will 
leave an unexpired term of two weeks at 
that house. 

The contract for the engagement at the 
Lycenm is said to be for ten weeks. 



KEITH'S, BOSTON, REDECORATED 

Boston, Oct. 14. — Keith's Theatre has 
been decorated after the style of the Palace, 
New York, with gray silk velour proscenium 
and panels. The panels are embossed in 
red and gold, as well as the arch itself, and 
with heavy gold-fringed draperies perfect 
this already beautiful playhouse. It is said 
the new equipment cost $10,000. 



BOXER TURNS ACTOR 
Philadelphia, Oct 12. — Philadelphia 
Jack O'Brien, the well-known boxer, win 
be seen in a new role on Oct 25, when be 
will appear as Charles, the Wrestler, in 
"As Yon Like It" at the Academy of Music 
The performance will be given by the Ter- 
centenary Society, a branch of the CathoUc 
Play Movement 



JULIE OPP'S MOTHER ILL 

Mrs. Mary Opp, mother of Julie Opp, 
last week underwent a successful opera- 
tion for appendicitis at the Post-Graduate 
Hospital, this city. 



KYLE IN "YELLOW JACKET' 

Howard Kyle wfll be seen in the role of 
the father of the hero in "The Yellow 
Jacket" during its matinee performances at 
the Cort 



77 



Positively, Absolutely, Emphatically. 
The Big Time Sensational Song. 

"DON'T 
FORGET ME 

By the Writers of "Baby Shoes," and "Down Among the Sheltering 

Palms." 

An Excellent Single, a Wonderful Double, and a 
Marvelous Trio or Quartet. 

A New Thought For An Irish Song 



u 



n 



L 



I M BUILDING 

A BRIDGE 
a IRELAND 



By the Author of "As Long As the Shamrock Grows Green." 

A Truly, Really, Remarkable, Irish Ballad. The 
Title Speaks for Itself. 



Published by the 

JAMES BROCKMAN MUSIC 
PUBLISHING COMPANY 

145 West 45th Street, New York City 



II 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 



DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 



Routes Moat Reach This Office Not 
Than Saturday 

luglln, Margaret (I'haj. Frohman. Inc., 

mgrs.) — Empire, New York, 16-21, 
Abarbanell, Una (Jobn Cort mgr.) — Casino, 

New York, Indef. 
ArllBn, Geo. (Klaw as Erlanger 4 Geo. C 

Tyler, nigra.) — Criterion; New York, 10-21. 
Adams, Maude (Chas. Frohman, Inc., nigra.) 

— Cbarlottesvllle, Va., 18 ; Lynchburg, 19 ; 

Danville, 20 ; Greensboro, N. C, 21. 
Allan, Maud — Forty-fourth Street, New York, 

10-20 (mats.) 
"Anns and the Girl" (Win. Harris. Jr.. mgr.) 

— Fulton, New York, IndeL 
-Alone at Last" (The Shuberts, nigra.) — 

Illinois, Chicago 15. Indef. 
Bernhardt, Sarah — Nixon, Pittsburgh, 16-21. 
"Big Show, The" (Cbas. B. DUUngbam, mgr.) 

— Hipp, New York, lndcf. 
"Back Yire" (Waiter N. Lawrence, mgr.) — 

Thirty-ninth Street, New York, indef. 
"Boomerang, The' - (David Belasco, mgr.) — 

Belasco, New York, 10-21 ; Belaaco, Wash- 
ington, 23-28. 
•Blue Paradise, The" (The Shuberts, mgrs.) 

— Chicago, indef. 
"Bine Paradise, The" — Hartford, Conn., 23- 

28. 

••Bird of Paradise"— Jackson, Mich., 27. 

"Bringing Up Father in Politics" (Griff Will- 
iams, mgr.) — Hanover, Va., 18; Martlns- 
burg, 10 ; Cumberland, Md.. 20 : Hsgers- 
town, 21 ; Winchester, Va., 23 ; Frederick, 
Md., 24 | Gettysburg, Pa., 25 : Waynesboro, 
26 : (" -lumbersburc. 27 ; Harrlsburg, 28. 

Collier, Wm. (II. It. Frazee, mgr.) — Long- 
acre', New York, Indef. 

Clifford, Billy "Single"— Anderson, S. C, 10; 
Piedmont, 20 : Greenville. 21 : Augusta, 
Ga.. 23: MUledgevllle, 24; Sandersvllle, 
25: Wrlghtsvllle. 26; Yldalla, 27; Dub- 
lin, 28. 

•Cheating Cheaters" (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — 
Eltlnge, New York, Indef. 

■Come Out of the Kitchen" (Slaw & Er- 
langer & Henry Miller, mgrs.) — Buffalo, 
N. Y., 16-21 : Cohan's, New York, 23 : indef. 

"Common Clay," with John Mason (A. H. 
Woods, mgr.) — Olympic Chicago, Indef. 

"Common Clay," with Jane Cowl (A. H. 
Woods, mgr.) — Garrlck, Phlla., 10- Nov. 4. 

"Common Clay" (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — Mon- 
treal, Can., 23-28. 
Cinderella Man. The" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) 
— Shubert, Bklyn. 16-21. 

Dltrlclisteln. Leo (Cohan & Harris, mgrs.) — 
Grand, Chicago, Indef. 

DlagbllerTs Ballet Uusac — Manhattan O. II., 
New York, 16, Indef. 

Drew, Jobn (John D, Williams, mgr.) — 
Hartford, Conn., 18-10. 

Kiting. ■. Julian (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — St. 
Louis. Mo., 15-21 ; Cincinnati, <>.. 23-23. 

"Every womun" (Henry \v. Savage, mgr. I — 
Hamilton. Can.. 18: Barrle, 10: North Bay, 
20: Sudbury, 21; Hancock, Mich., 23; 
Calumet. 24 ; Ashland, 2t» : Duluth. 20-28. 

"Experience" (Elliott. Comstock A Gest, 
mgrs.) — Adelphla, Phlla., Indef, 
Experience" (Elliott, Comstock ft Gest, 
mgrs. I— Grand Itaplds, Mich., 10-21. 

Klske. Mrs. (Corey ft niter, mgrs.) — Hart- 
ford, loan, 20-21. 

"Fair and Wnnuer" (Sclwyn ft Co.. mgrs.) — 
National. Washington. 10-21 ; Buffalo, N. Y„ 
23-28. 

"Fair and Warmer" (Sclwyn ft Co., mgrs.) — 
Cort, Chicago, Indef. 

Flame, The" (Richard Walton Tnlly. mgr.) 
— Forty-fourth Street, New York, lndcf. 

'Fear Market, The" — Majestic, Bklyn.. 16-21. 

'iruham. Oscar — Lometa, Tex.. 18 : Burnett, 
10 ; Marble Falls, 20 : Llano. 21 : George- 
town. 23 : Roundrock. 24 : Hutto, 25 ; 
Manor. 2(1; Gldillngs. 27: Bellvllle. .28. 

"•Girl From Brazil. The" (The Shuberts, 
mgrs.) — Shubert. New York, indef. 

"Good Gracious Annabelle" (Arthur Hopkins, 
mgr.) — Park So... Boston, lndcf. 

"Girl Without a Chance." Eastern Co. (Rob- 
ert Sherman, mgr.) — Sharon, O., 18; 
Greenville, 10; Mercer, 20: Beaver Falls, 
Pa., 21. 

•Girl without a Chance." Western Co. (Rob- 
ert Sherman, mgr.) — Lexington, Neb., 18; 
Casart. 10: McCook, 20: Norton, 21. 

Hodce. Wm. (The Shuberts, mgrs.) — Marine 
Elliott. New York, indef. 

Holmes. Tavlor — Astor. Now York, Indef. 

Hitchcock. Ravmond — Globe, New York. Indef. 

'His Bridal Night" (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — 
Republic, New York, 16-21. 

•Hush" tWInthrop Ames, mgr.) — Little, New 
York, Indef. 

"Hlt-thc-Trnll Holllday" (Cohan 4 Harris, 
mgrs.) — Hartford. Conn.. 20-28. 

"House of Glass" (Cohan ft Harris, mgrs.) — 
Ford's. Baltimore, 16-21. 

•Habson's Choice" — Rochester. N. Y„ 19-21. 

"Her Soldier Boy" (The Shuberts, mgrs.) — 
Buffalo. N. Y.. 16-21. 

••nip. Hip Hooray" — Metropolitan O. H., 
Thlla.. 21 -Nov. 11. 

-•Intruders. The" (Cohan 4 Ilnrrls. mgn.) — 
Cohan 4 Harris, New York, 16-21. 

"Ikey and Abey" (Geo. II. Huhh. mcr.) — 
Neccdah, Wis.. 18: Nelllsville. 10: White- 
ball. 20 : Fnlrrhlld. 21 : Baldwin, 23 : River 
Falls, 24: Ellsworth. 25: Menomonle. 20; 
Durant. 27 : Arcadia. 28. 

•Justice" (Corey 4 Rlter, fflgrs.) — Powers', 
Chicago. 16-Nov. 11. 

"Just a Woman" — Standard. New York. 16-21. 

"Kntlnka" (Arthur Hammerateln, mgr.) — 
Springfield. Mass., 20-21. 

"Le Pollu" — Garrlck, New York, tndef. 

Maude, Cyril — Montreal. Can.. 16-21. 

Mltsl (Henrr W. Savage, mgr.) — Milwaukee, 
wis- 15-21 : JanesTille. 23 : Davenport la., 
" i ; Cedar Rapids, 25 : Dea Moines. 26 ; 
Lincoln. Neb.. 27: St Joseph, Mo.. .28. 

Montgomery 4 Stone (Chas. DUUngbam, 
mgr.)— -Grand. Cincinnati. 16-21. 





"Man Who Came Back" (Wm. A. Brady, 
mgr.) — Playhouse, New York, indef. 

"Miss Springtime" (Klaw ft Erlanger, mgrs.) 
— New Amsterdam, New York, indef. 

"Merry Wives of Windsor" (Sylvlo Ileln, 
mgr.) — Hamilton, Kan., 16-18. 

"Mary Broome" — Little, Chicago, 17, Indef. 

"My Home Town Girl" — Auditorium, Chicago, 
indef. 

"Montana" (Bankston ft Morris, mgrs.) — 
Norton, Kan., 18 : Seldon, 19 ; Jennings, 
20 ; Kensington, 21 ; At hoi, 23 : Smith 
Center, 24 : Agra, 25 ; Webber, 26 ; Court- 
land, 27; Scandla. 28. 

"Minion Dollar Doll," Eastern Co. (Harvey 
D. Orr, mgr.) — Burlington, Vt, 18 : New- 
port, 19 ; Quebec, Can., 20-21 : Sherbrooke, 
23; Berlin, N. H., 24: Laconla. 28: Ro- 
chester, 26: Exeter, 27; Manchester, 28. 

"Natural Law, The,'' Western Co., United 
Prod. Co.'s (Merle H. Norton, gen. mgr.) — 
Cllntonvllle, Wis., 18 : Neenah, 10 ; Antlgo, 
20 : New London, 21 ; Fond du Lac, 22 ; 
Cambria. 23 ; Portage, 24 ; Baraboo, 25 ; 
Lodi, 20 ; Richland Center, 27 ; Evansvllle, 
28. 

Olcott Channcey, mgr. — Academy, Baltimore, 
16-21 ; Cohan ft Harris, New York, 23 
indef. 

"Other Man's Wife, The," Eastern, Lambert 
Prod. Co.'s (Lem Edwards, mgr.) — Mercer, 
Pa.. 18 : Oil City, 10 ; Salamanca. N. Y., 
20; Ashtabula, Ov, 21; Titusvllle. Pa., 23; 
Corry, 24 : Warren, 25.; Olean, N. Y., 26 ; 
Andover, 27 ; Emporium. Pa- 28. 

Patton, W. B. (Frank B. Smith, mgr.) — 
Webster City, la.. 18 ; Humboldt, 10 ; 
Eagle Grove, 20 ; Fonda, 21 ; Denlson, 23 ; 
Battle Creek. 24. 

"Passing Show of 1916" — Winter Gorden, 
New York, Indef. 

"Pierrot, the Prodigal" (Wlnthrop Amei and 
Walter Knight mgrs.) — Booth, New York, 
IndeL 

"Pollyanna" (Klaw ft Erlanger ft Geo. C. 
Tyler, mgrs.) — Hudson. New York, Indef. 

"Potaah ft Perlmutter In Society" (A. H. 
Woods, mgr.) — Tremont Boston, 10-21 ; 
Baltimore, Md.. 23-28. 

"Princess Pat The" — Garrlck, Chicago, Indef. 

"Pair of Silk Stockings" — Indianapolis. 16-18. 

"Pair of Queens" (H. H. Frazee, mgr.) — 
Lyric. Cincinnati, 15-21. 

"Pair of Queens" (H. H. Frazee, mgr.) — 
Ann Arbor, Mich., 20 ; Adrian, 21 ; Bat- 
tle Creek, 22 ; Kalamazoo. 23 : Michigan 
City, 24: Jollet 25: Ottawa, 26; Clinton, 
27: Iowa Cltv. 28. 

"Peck's Bad Boy" — Fennlmore, Wis., 18 i 
Prairie du Chlen. 19: Claremont, la., 20; 
McGregor. 21 : Giittenburg. 22 ; Elkader, 
23 : Strawberry Point. 24 : Osage, 26 ; 
Dodge Center, Minn., 27 ; Mankato, 28. 

Ross, Tims. W., 4 Mnclyn Arbnckle — Black- 
stone, Chicago, lndcf. 

Robson. May— Seneca Fnlls, N. Y., 18; Hor- 

. nell, 19 : Wcllsboro. 20 : Corning. 21 ; Ith- 
aca. 23: Bath. 24: Niagara Falls, 25; 
Perry, 20 : Wausuu, 27 : P.lnghamton. 28. 

Ring. Blanche — Rochester, N. Y., 16-18. 

"Rich Man. Poor Man" (George Broadhurst 
mgr.) — Forty-eighth Street Indef. 

"Rio Grande" (Chas. Frohman. Inc., mgrs.) — 
Montauk, Bklyn.. 16-21. 

"Robinson Crusoe Jr." — Alvln, Pittsburgh, 
16-21. 

Starr, Frances — Belasco, Washington, 16-21. 

Stalil. Rose — Allentown, Pa., 10 : Reading, 20 ; 

Easton, 21. 
. St Denis. Ruth — Terre Haute, Ind., 20. 

Sanderson-Brlnn-Cowthorn Co. (Cbas. Froh- 
man, Inc., mgrs.) — Forrest, Phlla., 16-21. 

Skinner. Otis (Chas. Frohman, Inc., mgrs.) — 
Lyceum. New York. 16-21. 

"Seven Chances" (David Belasco. mgr.) — 
Cohan's. New York, 16-21 : Belasco, New 
York. 23. Indef. 

"So Long Letty" (Oliver Morosco, rogr.)— 
Shubert. Boston, indef. 

"Show of Wonders. The" IThe Shuberts. 
mm.) — Buffalo. N. Y.. 23-28. 

"Silent Witness. The" (H. H. Frazee, mgr.) 
— Plymouth, Boston, 16-21. 

"Silas Green from New Orleans" (Prof. E. 
Williams, mgr.) — lndlanola. Miss., 18. 

"Snnnv Sonth" (J. C. Rockwell, mgrj — 
Shenandoah, Pa., 18 : Tower City. 10 : Tre- 
mont. 21 : Lebanon. 23 : Mechaulcsburg, 24 ; 
Lewiston, 25 : Hontzdale. 27 : Altoona, 28. 

"Serenade. The" (Walker 4 Stevens, mgrs.) 
— Raleigh. W. Va.. 18-10 : Goldsboro. N. C, 
20 : Durham. 21 : Winston-Salem. 23 : Flor- 
ence, 24: Fayetteville, 25; Colombia, 26- 
27 : Asheville. 28. 

"Step Lively"— Meadvllle.' Pa.. 18: Sharon, 
10 : Greenville. 20 ; Oil City. 21 : Sala- 
manca, N. Y„ 23. 

Tempest Maine — Broad. Phlla.. 16-21. 

"Turn to the Right" (Smith 4 Golden, mgrs.) 
— Gaiety. New York, indef. . 

"Treasure Island" (Chas. Hopkins, mgr.) — 
. Punch 4 Judy. 21. Indef. 

"Twin Reds" (A. S. 8tern 4 Co.. mgrs.) — 
Ft. William, Can.. 16-18; International 
Falls. Minn.. 19: Virginia, 20: Superior, 
Wis.. 21 : St Paul, Minn.. 22-25 ; Minne- 
apolis. 26-28. 

"Upstairs and Down" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) 
— Cort: New York, Indef. 

"Under Sentence" (Sclwyn 4 Co., mgrs.) — 
Harris. New York, indef. 

"TJnchastened Woman, The" (Oliver Morosco, 
mcr.) — Princess. Chicago, indef. 

"Unborn. The" — Terre Haute. Ind., 18-10, 

"Uncle Tom's Cabin," Kibble's — Terre Haute, 
Ind.. 18; Brazil. 19: Paris. 111.. 20: Mat- 
toon, 21 : Kankakee. 22 : Jollet 23 : Aurora. 
24: Elgin. 25: McCall, 26; Ottawa, 27; 
Streator. 28. 

"Very Good. Eddie" (Marbury. Comstock Co., 
mgrs.) — Wilbur. Boston. Indef. 

"Very Good. Eddie" (Marbury. Comstock Co.. 
mgrs.) 

Washington Sq. Players — Comedy, New York, 
tndef. 



Warfleld, David (David Belasco, mgr.) — 
Knickerbocker, New York, indef. 

Wilson. AI H. (Sidney H. Ellis, mgr.) — Ft 
Worth, Tex., 18 ; Dallas, 19-21. 

"Where the Rooster Crows" (Rush 4 An- 
drews, mgrs.)— Fine Arts, Chicago, Indef. 

"World of Pleasure" — San Francisco, 16-21. 

"When Dreams Come True" (Coutts ft Ten- 
nis, mgrs.) — Ottawa, Cart, 18; Pembroke, 
19 ; Renfrew, 20 ; Kingston, 21 ; Belleville, 
23 ; Trenton, 24 ; Peterboro, 25 : Lindsay. 
20; Midland, 27; Parry Sound, 28. 

"Zlegfeld's Follies" — Colonial. Boston, indef. 



INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT 

Blaney, Harry Clay — Lyric, Bridgeport, 

Conn., 16-21. 
Bover. Nancy (Will J. Donnelly, mgr.) 

Bijou, Richmond, Va., 16-21. 
"Bringing Dp Father in Politics" (Chas. H. 

Yale, mgr.) — Walnut Phlla., 16-21. 
"Broadway After Dark" (Halton Powell, 

mgr.) — Bijou, Birmingham, Ala., 16-21. 
"Daughter of Mother Macnree" — Bronx. New 

York, 16-21. 
Ellnorc. Kate (Williams ft Hill, mgrs.) 

American, St Louis, 16-21. 
Emmett. Grade — Majestic Jersey City, N. J, 

16-21. 
"Eternal Magdalene, The" (Lee Harrison. 

mgr.) — Knickerbocker, Phlla., 16-21. 
Fox ft Stewart (J. Goldenberg, mgr.) — G'. O. 

Atlanta, Ga.. 16-21. 
"For the Man She Loved" (Wm. Woods, mgr.) 

— Broadway, Camden, N. J., 9-14 ; Or- 

pheom, Phlla., 16-21. 
"Girl Without a Chance, The" (Robt Sher- 
man, mgr.) — Auditorium, Baltimore, 10-21. 
"Girl He Couldn't Buy, The" (Arthur C. 

Alston, mgr.) — Orpheom, Newark, 16-21. 
"ncart of Dixie" (Robert Campbell, mgr.) 

Lyceum, Pittsburgh, 16-21. 
"How Heart and Homes Are Broken" — Wilt- 
ing, O. H., Syracuse, N. Y., 16-18 ; Colonial, 

UHca, 19-21. 
"His Other Wife" (Vaugban Glaser, mgr.) — 

Imperial, Chicago, 16-21. 
"Hour of Temptation" (Schiller 4 Wels, 

mgrs.) — Grand, Worcester, 16-21. 
"Little Girl In a Big City" (Arthur Alston, 

mgr.) — National, Chicago, 16-21. 
"Little Lost Sister"— Bijou, Nashville, Tenn., 

"Llttfe ' Peggy O'Moore" (Halton Powell, 

mgr.) — Broadway, Camden, 16-21. 
''Little Girl God Forgot The" (J. Bernero, 

mgr.) — Lyric, Memphis, Tenn., 16-21. 
"My Mother's Rosnrv" (Ed. Rowland, mgr.) 

— Crescent. New Orleans, La.. 16-21. 
"Mutt and Jeff's Wedding" (Joe Pettcnglll, 

mgr.) — G. O. H., Toungstown, 16-21. 
"Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl, The" — 

Gaiety. Louisville, 16-21. 
"Major Peg" — Palace, Toledo, 10-21. 
"Natural Law, The" (Geo. Goett, mgr.) — 

Nixon. Atlantic City, N. J., 16-18; Trent 

Trenton, 10-21. 
"Old Homestead. The" (8. Z. Poll, mgr.) — 

Boyd's O. II.. Omaha, 10-21. 
"Other Woman, The" — G. O. H., Bklyn., 10- 

21. 
"Peg o' My Heart" — Lyceum, Paterson, 10-21. 
"Penalty of Sin" — Prospect. Cleveland, 10-21. 
"Rolling Stones" (Clark Ross, mgr.) — Castle 

So., Boston, 16-21. 
Thurston, Howard (Geo. H. NIcolat, mgr.) — 

Lyceum, Detroit, 16-21 ; National, Chicago, 

22-28. . 

"Texas" (Jake Llebennnn, mgr.) — Modern, 
• Providence. 16-21. 
Joe Welch (M. Jacobs, mgr.) — Majestic, Buf- 
falo. 16-21. 
"While the City Sleeps" (Edwin Clifford. 

mgr.) — Poll's, Washington, 16-21. 
"Woman He Married, The" (Max Spiegel, 

mgr.) — Park. Indianapolis. 16-21. 
"Which One Shall I Marry?" (J. J. Howard, 

mgr.) — Garden. Kansas City, 16-21 ; 

Boyd's. Omaha, Neb., 22-25; Webster, la., 

26 ; Iowa Falls. 27 : Waterloo, 28. 



STOCK AND REPERTOIRE ROUTES. 

Permanent and Traveling. 

Academy Players — Haverhill, Mass., indef. 
Alcazar Playera — San Francisco, Indef. 
Alclne Players — Wichita, Kan., indef. 
American Players — Spokane. Wash., Indef. 
Academv Players — Halifax, N, S., Can., Indef. 
Angell Stock (Joe Angcil, mgr.) — Park, Pitts- 
burgh, indef. 
Allen. BlUy, M. C. Co.— Plattsburg, N. Y„ 

10-21. 
Balnbridgc Plnyers — Minneapolis. Indet 
Burbank Players — Los Angeles, indef. 
Brownie Blye Rep. Co. — Johnstown, O., 15-21. 
Coburn-Pearson Plnyers — St Cloud, Minn., 

Indef. 
Chicago Stock (C. H. Rosskam, mgr.) — 

Franklin, Pa., 16-21 ; Yoongstown, O., 23- 

28. 
Denhnm Stock — Denver, Indef. 
Dublnsky Stock (Ed. Dnhlnsky, mgr.) — St 

Joseph,. Mo.. Indef, 
Dougherty, Jim, Stock — Eau Claire, Wis., 

indef. " *, 

Davis. Walter, Stock (Adam W. Friend, mgr.) 

— Newark, N. Y„ 16-21; Seneca Falls, 

23-28. 
Desmond, Ethel. M. C. Co. — Lafayette, La., 

15-21 : Rayne, 22-28. . 

Elsmere Stock — Elamore, Bronx, indef. 
Eekhardt Oliver, Players — Begins, Sasfc, 

Can., indef, 
Emerson Players — Lowell, Mass., IndeL 
Empire Plavers — Salem, Mass., indef. .. 
Edwards, Mae. Players — Wahpeton, N. Daku, 

16-21 : Fergus Falls, 23-28. 
Hyperion Playera — New Haven, Conn., indef. 
Hlmmeleln Associate Players — EvansvUle, 

Ind-, Indef. 



Hlllman Ideal Stock, No. 1 (Harry Sohns, 

mgr.) — WilsonvUle, Neb., 16-18; Orleans. 

10-21. 
Hlllman Ideal Stock (F. P. HlUman, mgr.)— 

Cencralia, Kan., 16-18 : Jamestown, 19-21. 
Imperial Stock — Imperial, St Louis, indef. 
Jewett Henry, players — Copley, Boston, 

ludef. 
Keiths Hudson Theatre Stock — Union Hill, 

N. J., indeL 
Lawrence, Del., Stock — Wigwam, San Fran- 
cisco, indef. 
Lorcb, Theo., Stock — Topeka, Kan,, indef. 
Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, indef. 
Mozart Pluyers (Jay Packard, mgr.) — Elmlra. 

N. Y.. indef. 
New Yorker Musical Stock — Illon, N. Y.. 

10-21 ; Oswego, 23-25 ; Herkimer, 26-28. 
National Stock (F. It Cole, mgr.) — Minne- 
apolis, indef. 
Nestell Players — Freeport 111., Indef. 
Orpbeum Players Stock (Ed. Williams, mgr.) 

— Omaha. Neb., indef. 
Orpheom Players — Reading, Pa., indef. 
Oliver, Otis. Players (Harry J. Wallace, 

mgr.) — Oak Park, III., indef, 
Payton. Corse, Stock— Spooner, Bronx, N. Y„ 

indef. 
Park Opera Co. — Park, St Louis, tndef. 
Players Stock — Players, So. St. Louis. indeL 
Plckert Stock— Batavla, N. Y., 16-21. 
Rae, John G., Co. — Osborne, Kan., 16-21. 
Sherman Stock (Robert- Sherman, mgr.) — 

Dallas, Tex., indef. 
Spooner, Cecil, Stock — Lawrence, Mass., 

indef. 
Shubert Stock — Milwaukee. IndeL 
Shubert Stock— St. Paul, Indet _ _. 

SoinervUle Theatre Players — Somervllle. 

Mass., indef. 
Selby Mus. Stock (Art L. Selby, mgr.) — 

Torre Haute, Ind., Indef. 

Sherman Kelly Stock — Waseca, Minn., 16-21. 
Turner-Hammond Players (Jim Hammond. 

mgr.) — New London, Conn., 18, indef. 
Van Dyke 4 Eaton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.)— 

Tulsa, Okla., indef. 
Wilkes Players— Seattle, Wash., Indef. 
Wilkes Players— Salt Lake City, U., Indet 
Wallace, Chester, Players — Sharon, Pa,, 

Indef. 
Wallace, Morgan, Players— Sioux City, la., 

Indef. 



BURLESQUE 

Columbia Wheel 

Al. Reeves' Big Beauty Show — Gaiety, Waah- 

lngton, 16-21; Gaiety, Pittsburgh, 23-28. 
Bebman Show — Cohen's, Newburgb, N. Y„ 

16-18 ; Cohen's, Pougbkecpsle, 19-21 ; 

Bronx, New York, 28-28. 
Ben Welch's — Lyric, Dayton, O., 16-21 : 

Olympic, Cincinnati, 23-28. 
Bon Tons — Olympic, Cincinnati, 16-21 ; Chi- 
cago, 111. 
llusliininiis — Gaiety, Kansas City, Mo., 16-21 ; 

Gaiety, St Louis. 23-28. 
Bowery Burlcsqucrs — Hurtle 4 Seaman, New 

York. 18-21 : Empire, Brooklyn, 23-28. 
Burlesque Review — Empire, Brooklyn, 18-21 : 

Park, Bridgeport 20-28. 
Follies of the Day — Gaiety, Montreal, Can., 

. 1621 ; Empire, Albany, N. V . 23-28. 
Globe Trotters — Bronx, New York, 16-21 ; 

Orplieuiu, Paterson, 23-28. 
Golden Crooks — Bercbcl, Des Moines, Is., 15- 

18; Gaiety, Omaha, Neb., 23-28. 
Hastings' Show — Boston, 16-21 ; Colombia, 

New York, 23-28. 
Hello, Now York — Peoples, Philadelphia, 16- 

21 ; Palace, Baltimore, 23-28. 
nip nip Hooray Girls— Gaiety. St. Louis, 16- 

21 : Chicago, 23-28. 
Howe's Kissing Girls — Corinthian, Rochester. 

N. V., 16-21 ; Bastnble, Syracuse, N. Y.. 

23-25; Lumberg, Utlca, N. Y., 26-28. 
Irwin's Big Show — Empire, Newark, N. J., 

10-21; Casino. Philadelphia, 23-28. 
Liberty Girls — Gaiety, Omaha, Neb., 16-21 ; 

open 23-28; Gaiety, Kansaa City, Oct 30- 

Nov. 5. 
Maids of America — Boston, 16-21 ; Grand, 
- Hartford, Conn., 23-28. 
Majesties — Casino, Brooklyn, 16-21 ; Empire. 

Newark. N. J., 23-28. 
Marion's Big Show — Gaiety. Toronto, 16-21 : 

Gaiety, Buffalo. N. Y., 28-28. 
Merry Rounders — Jacques, Waterbury. Conn., 

16-21 : Cohen's, Newbnrgb, 23-25 : Cohen's. 

Poughkeepsle. 20-28. 
Midnight Maidens — Gaiety. Pittsburgh, 16- 

21 : Star, Cleveland, 23-28. 
Minion Dollar Dolls— Orpheum, Paterson, 

10-21 : Empire, Hoboken, N. J., 23-28. 
Molllc Williams' Show, Columbia, N. Y., 16 

21 : Casino. Brooklyn, 23-28. 
New York Girls— Chicago, 16-21 ; Gaiety, De- 

trolt 23-28. 

BUILD DP YOUR ACT 

And Double Your Income 

WITH 

DEAGAN 

Aluminum Chimes 
Pizzicato Nabimbas 
Marimb&phones 
Electric Una-Fons 

AND OTHER MUSICAL 
NOVELTIES *"*"■ 

Write for. List of Show- Room Bargains. 

J. C DEAGAN 

CAG*lSiNO , S"* W " 0dA,r * 




October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



Fnss Pass — Empire, Toledo, O,, 16-21 ; Lyric, 

Dayton. 0., 28-28. 
Rag Dol) In Ra gland — Grand, Hartford, 

Conn., .16-21 ; Jacques, Waterbury, Conn., 

23-28. 
Roseland Girls — Empire, Albany, N. I., 16- 

21 ; Boston, 23-28. 
Rose Sydell London Belles — Chicago, 16-21 ; 

Bercbel, Dea Moines, 22-26. 
Sldman's Show — Palace. Baltimore, 16-21 ; 

Gaiety, Washington, D. C, 23-28. 
Sightseers — Star. Cleveland. O., 16-21 : Em- 
pire, Toledo, O., 23-28. 
8ome Show— Gaiety, Buffalo. N. Y., 16-21; 

Corinthian, Rochester, N. v., 23-28. 
Spiegel's Revue — Colonial, Providence, R. I., 

16-21; Boston, 23-28. 
Sporting Widows — Casino, Philadelphia, 16- 

21 ; Hnrtlg ft Seamons, New York, 23-28. 
Star and Garter — Bastable. Syracuse. N. Y., 

16-18: Lumbers. Utica, 19-21; Gaiety, 

Montreal, Can., 23-28. 
8tep Lively Girls — Gaiety, Detroit, Mich., 

16-21 ; Gaiety, Toronto, Ont., 23-28. 
Twentieth Century maids — Empire, Hobokeu, 

N. J., 16-21; Peoples, Philadelphia, 23-28. 
Watson's Beef Trust — open, 16-21 : Gaiety, 

Kansas City, 23-28. 
Watson te Wrotae — Park, Bridgeport. Conn., 

19-21; Colonial, Providence, R. I., 23-28. 

American Circuit 

Americans — Camden, N. J., 16-18 : Trenton, 
N. J.. 19-21 ; South Bethlehem, 23 ; Easton, 
24; Wllkesbarre. 25-28. 

Anto GlrlB — Terre Haute, Ind., 16-18; Laf- 
ayette, 19 ; South Bend, 20 ; Gary, 21 : 
Gaiety, Chicago, 23-28. 

Beauty, Youtb and Folly — Lyceum, Colum- 
bus. O., 16-21 : Zanesvllle, O., 24 ; Canton, 
25; Akron, 26-28. 

BIe Review of 1917 — Standard. St. Louis, 
16-21 ; Terre Haute. Ind.. 23-25 : Lafay- 
ette. 26 ; South Bend, 27; Gary, 28. 

Broadway Belles — Penn Circuit, 16-21 ; 
Gaiety, Baltimore, 23-28. 

Cabaret Girls— Empire, Cleveland, O., 16-21; 
Brie, Pa., 23-24 ; Ashtabula, O., 25 ; Park, 
Youngstown, O., 26-28. 

Charming Widows — Majestic, InillunnjioIlK, 
16-21; Buckingham, Louisville, Ky., 23-^8. 

Cherry Blossoms — Waterloo, la., 18 ; Mar- 
shalltown. 19 ; Cedar Rapids, 20 ; Ottum- 
wa, 21 ; Century, Kansas City, 23-28. 

Darlings of Paris — New Bedford, Mass., 16- 
18 ; Worcester, 19-21 : Gardner. Mass., 28 ; 
Greenfield. 24 ; Amsterdam, N. Y„ 25 ; 
Hudson., Schenectady. N. Y„ 26-28. 

Follies of Pleasure — Akron, 0- 19-21 ; Em- 
pire, Cleveland, 23-28. 

French Frolics — Ashtabula, O., 18; Park, 

Youngstown, 19-21 ; Penn Circuit, 23-28. 
Frolics of 1916 — Amsterdam. N. Y.. 18; 
Hudson, Schenectady, 19-21 ; Blnghamton, 
N. Y.. 28-24 ; Norwich, 25 ; Oneida, 26 ; 
Inter-National, Niagara Falls, N. Y., 26-28. 

fJInjter Girls — Gaiety, Milwaukee, 16-21 ; 
Galctv, Minneapolis, 23-28. 

Girls from Joyland — Gaiety. Philadelphia, 
16-21; Camden, N. J.. 23-25; Trenton, 
26-28. 



High 



Girls from the Follies — Star, Brooklyn, 16- 

21; Holyoke, Mass., 23-25; Springfield, 

26-28. 
Grown Dp Babies — Star, Toronto, Ont.. 10- 

21 ; Savoy, Hamilton, Ont- 23-28. 
Hello Girls — Buckingham. Louisville. Ky., 

16-21 : Lyceum, Columbus, O., 23-28. 
Hello, Paris — open, 16-21 ; Englewood, Chi- 
cago, 23-28. 

'sh Life Girls— Century, Kansas City, 16- 

h ; Standard, St. Louis, Mo., 23-28. 
Lady Buccaneers — Englewood, Chicago, 16- 

21 ; Gaiety, Milwaukee. 23-28. 
Lid Lifters — Oneida. 19 ; International, 

Niagara Falls, 20-21 ; Star, Toronto. Ont, 

23-28. 
Military Maids— Cadillac, Detroit, 16-21 ; 

open, 23-28 ; Englewood, Chicago, 30- 

Nov. 5. 
Mischief Makers — Trocadero, Philadelphia, 

16-21 ; Olympic, New York, 23-28. 
Monte Carlo Girls — Gaiety. Baltimore, 

16-21 : Trocadero, Philadelphia. 23-28. 
Pace Makers — Gaiety, Cblcago, 16-21 ; Majes- 
tic, Indianapolis, 23-28. 
raiislan Flirts — Gaiety, St Paul, Minn., 16- 

21 ; Dolutb, Minn, 22 : St. Cloud, 23 ; 

Monkato. 24 : Waterloo, la.. 25. 
Pat White Sbow — Savoy, Hamilton, Can., 

16-21; Cadillac, Detroit, 23-28: Marshall- 
town, 26 : Cedar Rapids, 27 ; Ottumwa. 28. 
Record Breakers — Gaiety, Brooklyn, 16-21 ; 

Academy of Music, Jersey City, N. J., 

23-28. 
September Morning Glories — Wllkes-Barre, 

18-21 : Star, Brooklyn, 23-28. 
Social Follies — Majestic, Scranton, Pa., 16- 

21 : Gaiety, Brooklyn, 23-28. 
Tango Queens — Academy, Jersey City, N. J., 

16-21 ; Gaiety, Philadelphia, 23-28. 
Tempters — Howard. Boston, 16-21 : New 

Bedford, 23-23 : Worcester, Mass.. 26-28. 
Thorouchbrcds — Olympic, New York, 26-21 ; 

Majestic. Scranton. Pa., 23-28. 
Tourist* — Gaiety, Minneapolis. Minn., 16-21 ; 

Star. St. Paul. Minn.. 23-28. 
U. 8. Beauties— Holyoke and Springfield. 16- 

21 : Howard. Boston. Mass., 23-28. 

Pann Circuit 

Opera House, Newcastle, Pa., Monday. 
Cambria, Johnstown. Tuesdoy. 
Mishler, Altoona, Wednesday. 
Orphcum, Harrlsburg, Thursday. 
Orpbeum, York. Friday. 
Academy, Reading, Saturday. 



MINSTRELS 



Big City Minstrels — BIngbamton, N. Y., 18; 
Port Jervls, 19; Mlddletown, 29; New- 
burg, 21. 

Fields, Al. O. — Montgomery, Ala., 18 ; Colum- 
bus, Ga., 19 ; Macon, 20 ; Savannah, 21 ; 
Jacksonville, Fla., 23-24: Tallahassee, 25; 
Pensacola, 26 : Mobile, All,, 27-28. 

O'Brien's — Galesburg, III., 18; Davenport, 
la.. 19; Marshalltown, 20; Omaha, 
Neb.. 21. 



BANDS AND ORCHESTRAS 

Kyrl'a Bohemian Orchestra (H. J. Leake, 
mgr.) — Hastings, Minn., IS; Hutchinson, 

19 ; Sny lord, SO ; Springfield, 21 ; 

Canny, 23. 

COMPANIES IN TABLOID PLAYS 

American Girl, Zarrow's — Klnston, N. C, 16- 

21; Victoria, 23-28. 
Bernard's, Al * Gertrude, Girls and Boya 

from Dixie (Al. Bernard, mgr.) — Birming- 
ham, Ala., lndef. 
Broadway Girls M. C. Co. (Hal. Wat tiers, 

mgr.) — Drumwrlght Okla., 15-21. 
Enterprise Stock (Norman Hilyard, mgr.) — 

Chicago, lndef. 
Enterprise Stock, No. 2 Co. (Norman Hil- 
yard, mgr.) — Chicago, lndef. 
Hoyt's Musical Revue (M. J. Meancy, mgr.) 

—Portland, Me.. 16-21. 
Hutchinson, Jack, M. C. Co. — Homestead, Pa., 

16-21. 
Kult Komedy Kiddles — Grafton, W. Ya., 

16-21. 
Kllgare's Comedians — Cincinnati. O.. lndef. 
Little Bluebird, Zarrow's — Winston-Salem, 

N. C, 16-21. 
Lee. James P., M. C. Co. — E. Liverpool, O., 

lndef. 
McAullffe, Jere, Revue (Fred Bowman, mgr.) 

— Gloversvllle. N. Y.. 16-21. 
"Oh You Daddy" (Fox Rellly, mgr.) — Rocky 

Mount. N. C. 15-21 ; Durbam. 22-28. 
Sub-Marine Girls (Mersereau Bros., mgr.) — 

Shamrock, Okla., 15-21 1 Ada, 22-28. 
Stewart. Walter J.. Stock (Stewart A Good- 
win, men.) — Cnicago, lndef. 
Thomas M. C. Co. — Bowdotn So... Boston, 

16-21. 
Variety Review, Zarrow's (D. J. Lynch, mgr.) 

—Wilmington, N. C, 16-21 ; Rocky Mount, 

23-28. 

CARNIVALS 

Campbell. W. H.. United' Shows — Little Rock, 

Ark., 16-20; Hope, 23-28. 
Dorman A Kraus Shows — Washington, N. C, 

16-21. 
Frisco Expo. Shows (Chas. Martin, mgr.) — 

Shiner. Tex.. 16-21: Halletsvllle, 23-28. 
Great American Shows (J. F. Murphy, mgr.) 
— Washington, Ga., 16-21. 

Gray, Roy, Amuse. Co. — Fayette. Ala., 16-21. 
Veal's Famous Shows — Ft. Raven, Ga.. 16-21. 
Washburn Mighty Midway Snows — Raleigh, 

N. C, 16-21. 

CIRCUSES. 
Barnes, Al. G. — Bay City, Tex., 18; Vic- 
toria, 19 ; Beevllle, 20 ; Cuero, 21 ; San 

Antonio, 28-24: Uvalde. 25; Eagle Pass. 

26: Del Rto, 27; Alpine, 28. 
Buffalo Bill & 101 Ranch— Hamlet. N. C, 

18: Darlington, 8. C, 10; Camden, 20; 

Sumter, 21. 
Harnum ft Bailey — Beaumont, Tex., 18 : Lake 

Charles, La., 10 ; Alexandria, 20 ; Shrcve- 

port. 21. 
Carlisle's Frontier Wild West Show — Lewls- 

burg, Pa., 16-21. 
Hagenbeck- Wallace — Jackson, Tenn., 18 ; 



Corinth. Miss.. 10: Trenton, Tenn., 20; 
Union City. 21. 
Robinson, Yankee, Wild Animal Sbow (Fred 
Buchanan, mgr.) — Columbus. Tex., 18 : 
Rosenberg, 10: Caldwell, SO; Oroesbeck. 
21, Teague, 23; Hubbard, 24. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Bragg ft Bragg Show (Geo. M. Bragg, mgr. i 

— Toronto, Can., lndef. 
Frimlnl (Harry J. Freeman, mgr.) — Atlanta. 

Ga.. 16-21. 
Lucey, Tbos. Elmore — Mott N. Dak., 18: 

Carson. 19 : Flasher. 20 : Elgin, 23 : Stan 

ton, 24 : Zap. 25 ; Halllday. 26. Werner. 

27 : Dunn Center, 28. 
Smith, MjBtertoua — IirldKcport. Neb., 18-19". 

Harrison. 20-21 : Cbadron, 23-24 : Gordon. 

25; Valentine, 28. 

JACOB MEYERS RECOVERS 

Jacob Meyers, advertising manager fot 
Klnw & Erlangcr, was awarded $18,000 
damages from the Brooklyn Rapid Transit 
Co. before Justice Blackman and a jury in 
the Supreme Court in Brooklyn for injuries 
sustained by his ten-year-old son on the eve 
ning of March 10, 1015. 

Mr. Meyers was given $8,000 in a suit 
he had brought in his own behalf and $10,- 
000 in favor of the child. According to the 
testimony, the Meyers boy was crossing the 
Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co.'a trolley track* 
at Eighty-fourth street and Thirteenth ave- 
nue on the night In question when, in avoid- 
ing a cor going in one direction, he was 
struck by a car going the opposite way and 
dragged sixty feet. 



ACTORS TO CONVENE AGAIN 

The members of the Actors' Equity Asso 
ciation hare decided to bold another meet- 
ing at the Hotel Astor, the date of which 
will be Not. 3. At that time the committee 
on plans for obtaining legislation that will 
permit actors to vote while on the road will 
make its report and there will be speeches 
aDd everything. The committee comprises 
John Cope, Charles Stevenson. Harry Har 
wood, George Christie. 



FIVE WONDERFUL BALLAD HITS 



c c 



RYLAND" 



Childhood song which is different, Can be sung by old or young.. Will, positively be a terrific hit. 



THERE'S A BURMAH GIRL A-CALLING 



[IN BURMAH BY THE SEA) 



A New Hnwaiian Song with a Haunting Mr tody 



AUF WIEDERSEHN BUT NOT GOOD-BYE" 

Semi-high <~lass number. A wonderful, effective solo i with a climax,; that ■ will insure innumerable encores. A great sung to show .off the' voice. ..*-. 



"I FOUND YOU AMONG THE ROSES" 



A charming heart ballad suitable for any! style act 



OVER A HALF MILLION, CGPIES SOLD** 



WE'RE IN LOVE WITH THE SAME SWEET GIRL" 

. A n « style "Mother" Song. A' decided Novelty. Just the number to brighten your *cl; .', ■■-!• ~ , ■ 



recognized artiste Send a; rece;nt programme. Regular copies 



rs on sale al all 5 and 10c. stores and 



Philadelphia Office 



EARL BURTNETT, Mgr 



>%k/*Stia&ttjrJifm&ic 



56 W. 45th St. 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 



NAZIMOVA TO 

PRODUCE 

PLAYS 

STARTS WITH NEW YORK SEASON 



Mme. Alia Nazimova, not satisfied with 
the honors she baa won as an actress, has 
determined to seek the lanrels of manager 
as well. Actor-managers are quite numer- 
ous in this country, but there have been 
few actress-managers who have reached 
much prominence. The entrance of this 
great actress into the field is therefore of 
more than passing interest. As a starter 
she has completed arrangements for a New 
York season. 

The engagement in New York, which 
will be preceded by a preliminary tour, 
will be called the Nazimova season, and is 
to be international in scope. Nazimova has 
in preparation by a company of players 
already rehearsing under her direction, a 
number of plays of origin distinctively 
unique. She announces that her season 
will include three, and probably four, 
works never before presented in New York, 
and the revival of as many others selected 
from among her most notable successes. 

The Nazimova season will open with the 
premiere of " 'Ception Shoals," by Austin 
Adams, a young American dramatist who 
wrote "God & Company," which was suc- 
cessfully presented last season for two per- 
formances, under the auspices of the Stage 
Society of New York. 

The other new plays are "The Price of 
Life," a drama which is now in its nine- 
teenth year of popularity in Russia, and 
"The Fairy Tale," by Dr. Arthur Schnite- 
ler. 

"The Price of Life," by Wladimir Dan- 
chenko, for many years a predominant fig- 
ure in the Russian theatre, and an asso- 
ciate of Stanfislawslti, having founded with 
him the Artistic Theatre of Moscow, is 
particularly interesting, owing to the fact 
that Nazimova, before coining to this coun- 
try, frequently appeared in it. The author 
also was Nazimova's dramatic tutor. 

"The Fairy Tale," by Dr. Arthur 
Schnitzler, author of "The Affairs of Ana- 
t'ol" and many other plays, has been per- 
formed successfully on tour by Nazimova, 
but never has been seen in' New York. 

In addition to these new pieces, the' ac- 
tress announces revivals of her biggest Ib- 
sen successes. - 



DINGWALL LOSES MOTHER 

The friends of A. W. Dingwall learned 
last week that his mother, who was nearly 
eighty years of age, died Oct. 13, in Mil- 
waukee, from a complication of diseases 
combined with old age. 



SPECIAL SHOWING OF "PIERROT" 

Winthrop Ames has been besieged with 
so many letters from actors requesting that 
he give a special performance of "Pierrot 
the Prodigal" that one will probably be an- 
nounced in the near future. 



SHERIFF AL. SMITH 

AIDS FRITZI SCHEFF 



Rescues Vaudeville Star's Costumes at 

Eleventh Hour, Enabling Her to 

Open at the Palace. 

Thanks to Sheriff AL Smith, Fritzi 
Scheff, the prima donna, made her vaude- 
ville reappearance at the Palace on Mon- 
day afternoon. One of the features of her 
act is the beautiful and striking costumes 
which Miss Scheff displays to such great 
advantage, but had it not been for the 
prompt assistance of the sheriff Miss 
Scheff would have been obliged to go on 
in street attire or cancel the week. 

Fritzi and her husband, George Ander- 
son, lived in a West Eighty-fifth apart- 
ment house, under the management of 
Herbert S. Harde. Deciding to move into 
other quarters for the winter, they made 
preparations and notified the manager. 
He informed them that they would not be 
allowed to remove their effects until cer- 
tain alleged damages to an Oriental rug 
belonging to the landlord were settled. 
The pleas of the prima donna that she 
be allowed to remove her stage costumes 
were unheeded by the manager, and they 
promptly sought the aid of Nathan 
Bnrkan, their attorney, who sued out a 
writ of replevin. This was placed in the 
hands of iwo deputies, who, upon arriv- 
ing at the apartment house, were refused 
admittance, and Sheriff Smith, was ap- 
pealed to. 

Sheriff Smith took the matter in hand, 
and secured the Scheff effects, which he 
now has in his custody, but allowed Mr. 
Anderson to select the necessary wardrobe 
for his wife's requirements during the 
Palace engagement. 



GEORGE McFADDEN DISAPPEARS 

After searching for her husband for over 
a week Mrs. George McFadden, wife of the 

monologist, has made known that be has 
done the vanishing act. 



FOXANDBRENON 

CASES IN THE 

COURTS 



JUSTICE PENDLETON HEARS SUITS 



The Herbert Brenon Film Corporation's 
motion for a temporary injunction restrain- 
ing Fox Film Corporation and William 
Fox, its president, from using the name 
"The War Bride's Secret" as an alleged in- 
fringement of the Brenon picture "War 
Brides," was denied upon the defendants 
entering into a stipulation for a trial be- 
fore a referee on two days' notice. 

The Brenon Corporation may take the 
case to the courts, in which event it is 
likely Marion Craig Wentworth, author of 
the Brenon play, "War Brides," would aid 
in the prosecution of the suit In the event 
the Brenon Corporation decides not to 
press the suit, Mrs. Wentworth has an- 
nounced her intention of starting suit her- 
self, as author. 

On top of the decision in the above mo- 
tion, the Fox Corporation was in turn 
granted an injunction last week in its 
"$100,000 damages" suit against The Her- 
bert Brenon Corporation, Herbert Brenon 
and Lewis J. Selznick, prohibiting Mr. 
Brenon and Mr. Selznick from using on 
letterheads or advertisements the names of 
certain Fox stars and motion pictures. 
The suit was brought by William Fox in 
connection with "A Daughter of the Gods," 
the Annette Kellermann feature motion pic- 
ture, which was shown this week at the 
Lyric Theatre. The Fox Company objected 
to the advertisements of Mr. Brenon in 
which were used the names of Annette Kel- 
lerman and Theda Bara, as well as others. 
Justice Pendleton's decision prevents the 
use of the names of any Fox stars or mo- 
tion pictures, in any way. 

It is likely the whole matter wilil be 
threshed out in the courts, and the trial 
should be extremely interesting, dealing as 
it would with the right of a producing di- 
rector employed by a corporation to after- 
wards, having left that employ, advertise 
himself as producer and director of pic- 
tures made for the employing corporation. 



RECEPTION FOR O'BRIEN 

Tebbe Haute, Ind., Oct, 14. — Neil 
O'Brien was tendered a reception by the 
Knights of Columbus at the close of 
evening performance Oct. 6. 



OPERA PROGRAM READY 

The repertoire for the week's engage- 
ment of the Boston-National Grand Opera 
Company, which begins on Monday eve- 
ning, Nov, 6, at Oscar Hammerstein's 
Lexington Theatre, Fifty-first Street and 
Lexington Avenue, has been announced as 
follows: 

Monday evening, Giordano's "Andrea 
Chenier," with Luisa Villani and Messrs- 
Giovanni Zenatello and Thomas Chalmers, 
followed by the Polovtsian da n c es from 
"Prince Igor"; Tuesday evening, Mas- 
cagni's "Iris," with Tamald Miura and 
Toria Kittay, followed by an Oriental 
ballet; Wednesday matinee, Puccini's "La 
Bohcme," with Maggie Teyte and Messrs. 
Riccardo Martin and Auguste Bouilliez, 
followed by Rubinstein's "Bal Masque" 
Wednesday evening, Montemezzi's 
"L'Amore dei Tre Re," with Luisa Villani 
and Messrs. Zenatello, George Baklanoff 
and Jos€ Mardones, followed by the Po- 
lovtsian dances from "Prince Igor"; Thurs- 
day evening, Verdi's "Rigoletto," with Na- 
dina Lcgat and Messrs. Enrico Arensen 
and Baklanoff, followed by ballet diver- 
tissements; Friday evening, Offenbach's 
"Tales of Hoffman," with Maggie Teyte 
and Mabel Riegelmann, and Messrs. Aren- 
sen and Baklanoff, with an interpolated 
ballet by Offenbach; Saturday matinee, 
Puccini's "Madama Butterfly," with Ta- 
maki Miura and Messrs. Riccnrdo Martin 
and Thomas Chalmers, followed by an 
Oriental ballet; Saturday evening, repeti- 
tion of "Andrea Chenier" with the same 
cast. 



PRINCETON CHOOSES PLAY 

Prihcetoh, N. J, Oct, 16.— "Safety 
First" is the title of the musical comedy 
production which the Triangle Club of 
Princton University is to give this winter. 
The show will be presented in New York 
during the Christmas season. 

From all accounts the students will put 
out one of the most original comedies that 
has been produced since the club was 
founded back in the nineties by Booth 
Tarkington. John Frederick Bohmfalk, of 
New York, and John Biggs, of Wilming- 
ton, wrote the book, and F. Warburton 
Guilbert, of New York, who wrote most of 
the music for last season's show, will again 
be the chief contributor to the score. Scott 
Fitzgerald, of St. Paul, Minn., is compos- 
ing the lyrics. 



HARRY LA TOY PROGRESSING 

Chicago, Oct. 16. — Harry La toy is able 

to get around again. 



HE GAVE YOU "I DIDN'T RAISE MY BOY TO BE A SOLDIER," "PEG O* MY HEART," "MANDALAY," ETC 

Alfred Bryan's Greatest Success Is 
AIVD I BROKE lVTV MOTHER'S 



"ALL OVER YOU 



99 



READ THIS MASTERPIECE 



, , 1st Vers* 

And so rou'rt coins to laava me. another"* won your heart. 
You tali me with a amile, dear, that you and I must part; 
Hare yon »o soon forgotten, all I gava up far you? 
They told dm rd rtrrat it, and now I know if s true. 



Cborui 
All over you. I left my home, dear; 
All over you. I went away. 
All over yon, and yon alone, dear. ' 
My poor heart aches, both night and day. 



ALSO MAKES WONDERFUL DOUBLE NUMBER 



All over yon my friends have left ■ 
You took away the eunaMne too: 
I went home with shattered pride, 
AU alone knelt down and cried. 
And I broke my mother's heart all 



over you. 



66 



99 THE NOVELTY 

COMEDY SEIMSATIOIM 



"KE1VDIS," 14S W. 45t*i {Street, IV. Y. 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



& 



WARFIELD'S REVIVAL 
OF "MUSIC MASTER" 
CAPTURES NEW YORK 



■THD MUSIC MASTER" — Charlee 
Klein's three-act comedy drama re- 
Tired Tuesday, October 10, at the 
Knickerbocker Theatre. 

CAST. 

Herr Von Barwlg Dana Wsrfleld 

Sl*-nor Taglteflco Augnste Aramlnl 

Moos. Loata Plnac Francis Gaillard 

Herr August Poooa Edward Moller 

Henry A. Stanton Charles Abbott 

Andrew Crnger William Boas 

Beverly Croger Grifflth Losk 

Mr. Schwara William H. Barwald 

air. Ryan Too? BeTmn 

Al. Gostello Loula Bendrlcka 

Jolee. Pickering Brown 

Dltson H. 0. Carlton 

A Collector Thomas Gilbert 

Mrs. Andrew Cruger Elesoor Barry 

Helen Stanton Jane Cooper 

MLsa Honeton. Marie Bates 

Jenny Helen Weer 

Charlotte Gertrude Valentine 

Oetarie Rose Saltonatall 



GERMANS IN TOLSTOY PLAY 

The first performance in America of a 
drama by Leo Tolstoy entitled "Der Le- 
bende Leichman" ("The Living Corpse"), 
will be given Oct. 18 at the Irving Place 
Theatre, on which date "Wie Einst im 
Mai," now appearing there, will be trans- 
ferred to the Bandbox. 

The manuscript of the Tolstoy play 
was found among the Russian author's ef- 
fects after bis death. He left a request 
that the play should not be printed or 
performed until after the death of sev- 
eral well known Russians who had fur- 
nished him with the idea of the play, 
and had unconsciously sat aa models for 
the chief characters. Rudolf Christiana, 
Grete Meyer and Heinrich Marlow will 
play the principal roles. 



When David Belasco announced that he 
would present David Warfidd in a revival 
of The Music Hatter there were many who 
were inclined to scoff at the idea, but those 
of the scoffers who were present on the 
opening night underwent a very quick 
change of heart From the appearance of 
the audience one might have supposed it 
was a regular first night opening. All 
first-nighters were there and the reception 
given the star on his first entrance must 
have warmed the cockles of his heart and 
made him feel that New Yorkers were his 
steadfast friends and admirers. 

Tie performance of Herr Von Barwig, 
the old music master, was just as delight- 
ful, just as appealing as it was when we 
had our first view of it twelve years ago. 
Perhaps the art of the actor has mellowed 
with the years, but this has only tended 
to make Von Barwig more lovable, more 
human. 

In his scenes with three musical friends. 
Miss Houston and Jenny, he was just as 
tender, and in his meeting with Henry 
Stanton he was forceful in giving way to 
his anger, pent-up for sixteen years. 

He made you laugh with him or cry 
with him just as readily as in years agone. 
But it did not seem as though we were go- 
ing back twelve yeara to revive old mem- 
ories, but rather it was as thongh Herr 
Von Barwig had kept pace with the times. 

For the play itself, there is nothing 
bnt commendation. It has stood the test 
of time so well that it bears no mark of 
the passing years. It is just aa new as 
it was years ago. It is just as interesting 
and just as up-to-date. It is in fact one 
of the very few plays that will bear a 
revival 

A revival, as a rule, lays bare the de- 
fects which escaped onr observation when 
- the play was new. It shows how out-of- 
date and old fashioned we were. Bnt 
"The Music Master" js the exception to the 
rule. • 

Of those in the original cast, aside from 
Mr. Warfield, Marie Bates is prominent 
in the revival. She, too, seemed sweeter 
and more tender and on her first entrance 
received an ovation. ■ ■ 

William Boa?, as Mr. Cruger, and H. G. 
Carlton, as Ditson, were the others of the 
original cast 

Augnate Aramini, Francis Gaillard and 
Edward Moller, as Earwig's three friends, 
were all excellent In fact the same may 
be said of all the members of the cast 

The engagement is for eight weeks. 



REPUBLIC DARK FOR A WEEK 

The Dolly Sisters in "His Bridal Night" 
close Oct. 21 at the Republic and will then 
go on tour. This theatre after being dark 
for a week will reopen Monday, Oct. 30, 
with Arthur Hopkins' production of "Good 
Gracious Annabelle," now playing in Bos- 
ton. 



TO REVIVE "LITTLE CAFE" 

"The Little Cafe," one of the successes of 
the local stage several years ago, ia to be 
revived. Bert Leigh and Hazel Burgess 
will have the leading roles and a competent 
supporting company has been secured. Re- 
hearsals are now under way and the show 
will open in two weeks and then work its 
way South. 



CAST OF "TANGLED LIVES" 

The cast that will appear in "''Tangled 
Lives" at the Bramhall Playhouse late 
this month will include Margaret Camp- 
bell, Ethel Haller, Mabel Reed, Marie 
Baird, Kitty Marion, Natalie Blakeley, 
Kenneth MacDougall, William Sherwood, 
John Fernlock, Butler Davenport, Hooper 
Trask and Denah Benrimo. 



SWAN RE- WRITING KLINE PLAY 

Mark Swan is re-writing "Yankee Doodle 
Dick," Virginia Kline's play, which was 
recently tried ont on the road, under the 
direction of the Tennant Producing Co. Re- 
hearsals will start in two weeks and the 
production, under the same management, 
is expected on Broadway some time this 
season. 



T1LLSON MANAGING THEATRE 

Tebke Haute, Ind., Oct. 14. — Roy Till- 
son, who has had charge of Buckeye Park 
daring the Summer season, has accepted 
the management of an Ashtabula theatre. 



OPERA SINGER MARRIES 

SuEBOTOAW, Wis., Oct 16. — Vanda Niel- 
son, grand opera and concert singer, was 
married to an orchestra conductor, Vin- 
cenzo Lacapria, whom she met when study- 
ing in Italy. 

The wedding was quiet She had sum- 
mered at her mother's country place at 
Cedar Lake and a week ago came into the 
county seat and procured a marriage li- 
cense. After five days she was married. 
Not until three days later, when the com- 
missioner returned the license, did the pub- 
lic become aware of the marriage. 



ELGIN SEES "NATURAL LAW" 

ELGIN, III., Oct. 12. — The United Pro- 
ducing Co., presented "The Natural Law," 
by Charles Sumner, at the Grand, last 
night, being the first dramatic attraction 
offered by Manager Newman this season. 
Edna Marshall was leading woman, play- 
ing the part of Ruth Stanley. Others in 
the company were George Dill, Lawrence 
Williams, Will H. Strauss, Foster G. 
Manley, Bessie Mae, and Mrs. Clarence 
Bennett. Wm. T. Hobbins ia company 
manager. Almost capacity prevailed. The 
company played at the Fox Theatre, Au- 
rora, HI., the previous night 



ARTHUR EVANS FUND INCREASED 

Many contributions have been received 
by Sam H. Harrison, custodian of the fund 
being raised for the blind mother of the 
late Arthur Evans. "The Blue Paradise' - 
company sent in $91.50 ; Edgar Smith, $15 ; 
Felix Meyer, $10, and a second "Blue Par- 
adise" company, $86.50. George MacFar- 
land and John E. Hazzard also contributed. 



OPERATE ON CRITIC 

Provtdence, E. I., Oct. 16. — James C. 
Garrison, dramatic critic on the Provldenee 
Journal, has been stricken with appendi- 
citis, and an operation was performed on 
him last week bo successfully that he ex- 
pects to be back at his desk within a fort- 
night Garrison only recently returned 
from Holland, where he was engaged in 
war relief work. 



"POM-POM" TO PLAY ROCKFORD 

ROCKFORO, HL, Oct. 12. — W. H. Wright, 
representing Henry W. Savage, manager 
of Mitzi Hajos in "Pom-Pom," was here 
this week arranging for the appearance of 
this attraction at the Grand. Oct 24. 



KYLE FOR "YELLOW JACKET" 

Howard Kyle has been specially en- 
gaged for the forthcoming matinees of "The 
Yellow Jacket" at the Cort Theatre, com- 
mencing November 9. He will play two 
roles, the father of the hero and the 
Confucian-like philosopher who helps his 
young manhood to regain bis birthright 



■ RAY COX has had her London engage- 
ment extended indefinitely. 



NEW PLAY FOR MISS WELLMAN 

Emily Ann Wellman has been engaged 
for the principal lead in Willard Mack's 
new play, "Her Market Value." The piece 
will go on tour before coming to New 
York for a run. Miss Wellman recently 
scored a personal hit in "The Guilty Man" 
during the short run of that play at the 
Astor Theatre. 



BOSTON MANAGERS CHANGE 

Boston, Oct 14. — John E. Comerford 
has left Gordon's Olympia and is succeeded 
as manager by Frank Hookailo, former 
financial manager. Mr. Hookailo has been 
connected with the Gordon interests for 
some years. > 

ACTRESS CHRISTENS VIADUCT 
CrNCtrTKATl, Oct. 14. — Alice Raymond, 
playing at the Empress this week and who 
formerly lived in this city, christened the 
Hopple street viaduct with a bottle of cham- 
pagne. A vaudeville program was given and 
other members of the Empress bill took 
part 

RI A I TA B'WAY * 42d STREET 
A r\ Li Ja V» Continuous from noon daily 
- THE EXPEBTZsTCE Or 

DONALD C. THOMPSON ON 
EUROPEAN BATTLEFIELDS 

* stom a TAJ-MADGE H '•rrFTT.rUTT," 
EXYbTOBE COMEDY ABD raCOMFASABLE *I- 
ALTO 0B.CH. 



COLUMBIA THEATRE 

BWAY, «7 th STREET. N. V. 

MOHJE WILLIAMS SHOW 



HIPPODROME 

MANAOEMKNT CHARLES nitJ.tNC.II All 
NIshta at 8.13: Mat. ererr .1st. 2.15. 

"THE BIG SHOW" 

STAOED BY R. H. BUKNSIPB 

with the, Incomparable PAVLOWA 

NEW ICB | MAMMOTH I 100 NOVBL/TUM 

BALLET I MINSTRELS I 1000 PEOPLE 

World's blunt enow at lowest prices. 



1st TV AMS1 fcKUAM Bres. at S.15. Mats. 3.13 
KLAW * ERLANOER'S New Musical Conjedy 

MISS SPRINGTIME 

By EMMERICH KAtMA.N, Composer ot "SARI." 



OWTnCsTarU THEATRE, West 44th St. 
tllJllaUIM Rres. S.20. Mat.. W«t A Sal 

"Tha> OUddaat Play la 111 li. Ola* 

World." — Tslsaram. 

POLLYANNA 

FT" I TI TaOIVI W. sSthSt Era. at8.lv 
WTXXIAX HArlRIB JB. presents 

"ARMS AND THE GIRL" 

K> Hjf piDP B'WAY A 40th ST. Era. 8.13 
aCt 1U rlHEi Mate. Wed. & Sat. at 2.15 

CUAS. FIIOIIMAN CO Masac*' 

CHARLES FROHMAN CO. Presents 

MARGARET ANGLIN 

to the New PaDlal INF By Wm. Somerset 

Comedy lisEMeMsaWB Manxham 

Hon. Oct. SO— Cyril Maude In "The Banker" 

W A/sTTI Tra* J5<h "t * B'way. Era. 8. IS 
I_i X LIiIIHI Mate. Than. A Bat. 2.1s 

LAST TWO RBD 
CHAHPBOHMANCO QJ|g SKINNER 

IN TUB AMERICAN COMEDY 

MISTER ANTONIO 



By 

BOOTH TAHKINGTO.V 



■a iiiee aiaaiaiaaa aa ■■ aweaaea Theatre. B'way At 3gtb 

KNICKERBOCKER »«•• etc. at o 

Klaw * Erlacg-T Leasees *, Uanapera 

DAVH) BELASCO preeeata 

DAVID WARFIELD in 

THE MUSIC MASTER 



ELTINGE TnEATnB v w - ■*- 



Wed. sad Bat. at 2.30 



A. H. WOODS presents 



CHEATING CHEATERS 



By MAX UAHC1N. 



GEO. rVf. 



THEATRE, B'WAY A 43d 



COHAN'S St "M. - "* ™- * 

KLAW A EBLANQEB Managers 

~ T s«J5S 4,co SEVEN CHANCES 

MOV. OCT. «*— HXaTBY HUXZat presents 

RUTHCHATTERTON x e ^£ w 

COME OUT OF THE KITCHEN 



BBOADWAY * «0th ST. 
Era. at 8.U. Mat*. 

Wed. * Sat. Bt 2.15 



GAIETY 

TURN TO THE RIGHT 

By WINCHBXX. SMITH and JOHN E. HAZZABD 

CORT 

UPSTAIRS 8 DOWN 

tl FralatU t Fiaile Hlttss. arisen e« '"Tan el 
Oiaortiea" sal et-sstaan sf "lee Great lerer " 



Weft 48th Bt. FDooe arrant «6. 

tra. at 8 :o. Hala. Wed. A Bat. 5.20. 

(Hirer Monaco's pot Iambus i 



B. T. KEITH'S 

PALACE 

Broadway * 47ta St. 

Mat. Dally at 2 P. M. 

23. 00 and 73c. 

Itiii Mia-att 

25-50-75-11*1.50 



laatteB 
SOCK ft T11IOII 
WRITS, Daisy Jean. 
"CUC" Bale, Claude Dlll- 
la(water. Greater Morwam 

Dio«ra. Haydn A Bayda. 

MoscoDl Bros., Crjrrtttt 
News PictorUL 



BELASCO 



West «4tb St. Em. s SO 
Mats. Thors. A Set. at 2JB 



2d YRAB 



DAVID BELASCO 



TOE BOOMERANG 

OCT. 23— SEVEN CHANCES 

Morea from tap Csba'a to tils 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 




BY DR. M AX THOR EK, Chicago 

Surgeon -in- Chief American Hospital; Consulting Surgeon Cook 
County Hospital; Consulting Surgeon Sheridan Park Hospital, 
Chicago; Surgeon White Rats and Actors Fund, etc, etc 

These articles are written exclu**rerjr far the NEW YORK OLIPPER- 
Queationa pertainlne to health, disease, hygiene. 



▼ ention ef diseases and mattsrs of general interest to health 
answered in ihl. column. ADDRESS ALL INQUIRIES TO DR. MAX 
THOREK. AMERICAN HOSPITAL, CHICAGO, ILLS. Wher. .pace will 
sot permit or the subject Is not suitable for an open answer, letters 
will be sent to the applicant personally. Dr. Thorek should not ha ex- 
pected te diagnose or prescribe la these enlumns for iadiviaaul His—tea. 

ALCOHOL IN "SOFT' DRINKS 



There is a general belief current that the 
.to-called "soft" drinks are free from alco- 
holic contents. In other words, if yon 
drink root beer or similar beverage, yon 
are sure, as a rule, that alcohol is not 
contained in the potion. Yet, on close in- 
vestigation, a different story is revealed by 
Charles H. Wall, a Philadelphia chemist. 
He sums up his investigations in the Amer- 
ican Journal of Pharmacy, and among 
other things speaks thusly : 

It is a fact well known to chemists and 
biologists, as well as many others, who, by 
experience and training, have been brought 
into contact with certain industries or bave 
studied the subject theoretically, that when 
yeast is added to any sugar-containing ma- 
terial end subjected to favorable condi- 
tions of temperature and moisture, it im- 
mediately begins to grow and develop car- 
bon dioxide and alcohol. 

Even in bread-making, where yeast is 
used, alcohol is present to an appreciable 
extent in the earlier stages of manufacture, 
and from 0.2 to 0.4 per cent has been de- 
tected in a freshly baked loaf of bread, al- 
though alcohol begins to escape as soon as 
the loaf is cut, and it is doubtful whether 
even the moat minnte traces could be de- 
tected in the ordinary bread of commerce. 
The unfermented grape-juice of the market 
always contains small amounts of alcohol, 
ranging from 0.05 per cent np to 0.5 per 
cent, the higher amount being found in the 
carelessly prepared article. 

It la very difficult. Indeed, to get away 
from alcohol entirely. A rotting apple or 
other juicy fruit is likely to contain minute 
amounts ; vinegar sometimes contains sev- 
eral per cent: preserves or canned fruits, 
which have started to "work" and have 
been resterilized, contain it, and there are 
numerous other products which unavoid- 
ably and necessarily contain it. 

In making some brewed root-beer re- 
cently I suspected, from the physiological 
effect upon a person who drank a glass of 
it and who is very susceptible to alcohol, 
that more alcohol waa present than is 
commonly supposed. The conditions under 
which the beverage is made are very favor- 
able for the development of appreciable 
amounts of alcohol. Yeast, sugar, water 
and a Savoring which usually contains 
some inorganic salts for the stimulation 
and nutrition of the yeast, are combined 
nnder conditions favorable to the rapid 
growth of the yeast, and the mixture is 
then bottled, and the bottles are directed 
to be tightly closed. 

When the pressure of carbon dioxide, 
evolved by the fermenting mixture, reaches 
a certain point, the fermentation automat- 
ically ceases. It may easily be seen that 
If the mixture is allowed to stand for a 
short time before bottling, or if the bottles 
are not entirely filled, so that a compara- 
tively large air space remains, fermentation 
may proceed for some time, and the alcohol 
contents is accordingly varied or increased. 



I accordingly made some experiments to 
ascertain just how high the alcohol would 
go under the most favorable conditions, and 
also to see what the average alcoholic con- 
tents of a product made strictly according 
to directions would be. The following re- 
sults were obtained : 

After standing 2 days. .0.25 per cent alcohol. 
8 " ..0.32 " " " 
" " 4 " ..0.35 " " ' " 

" " 5 " -.0.53 " " " 

" " 6 " ..0.64 " " 

" " 7 " ..0.81 " " " 

" " 9 " 1 20 " "' " 

" io " '..use " " 

- 11 " . .1.52 " " , - 

No higher alcohol content was observed 
in this series, even after standing for ten 
days longer. 

Later some additional experiments were 
made, allowing the fermenting liquid to 
stand for three hours before bottling, and 
only partially filling the bottles, and while, 
of course, the alcohol content rose more 
rapidly in each case, the highest amount 
noted under the most favorable conditions 
was 1.77 per cent. 

Concluding bis article, Mr. Wall com- 
ments : 

No ruling, so far as I can find, has ever 
been made with reference to root-beer, nor 
can I find any literature on its alcohol con- 
tent when made as above described. The 
soda-fountain root-beer, of course, is made 
by diluting a flavored syrup with car- 
bonated water, and therefore contains no 
more alcohol than the minute amount con- 
tributed by the extract used to flavor the 
syrup, which would not exceed 0.005 per 
cent, and is not to be confused with the 
home-brewed or fermented product which 
is the subject of this article. 

It is recorded in literature that Kumiss, 
which is made from milk fermented under 
somewhat similar conditions, sometimes 
contains over 2 per cent of alcohol.. 

The foregoing may come as a surprise to 
many who have looked upon home-brewed 
root-beer as a strictly temperance drink. 
With beer averaging 4 per cent alcohol, the 
mathematical ratio becomes apparent that 
three bottles of home-brewed root-beer 
which have been allowed to stand for ten 
days, or over, are equivalent to one bottle 
of ordinary beer. 

This contribution clearly shows the alco- 
hol contents of certain beverages classified 
as "soft drinks" in the ordinary sense of 
the term. 

It is interesting to note that. such is not 
the case, strictly speaking. 

In my opinion, no harm is done from the 
alcohol contents dispensed in the so-called 
"soft drinks" under ordinary circumstances. 
While it is true that home-made root-beer 
contains, as seen from the above, the great- 
est percentage of alcohol, it should be 
classed as an alcoholic beverage and its 
alcohol contents made known to the un- 
suspecting. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 



CATARRH IN THE HEAD. 
Mrs. T. A. M., Philadelphia, Pa., writes : 
Dear Doctor: I am a constant reader of 
The New York Cupper, and would like 
to get some advice. I am afflicted with 
catarrh of the head from which I suffer 
intensely. I am taking a patent medicine 



now that I saw advertised in the papers. 
The label on the bottle . states that it con- 
tains eight minims of chloroform to the 
ounce. I would like to know if that would 
injure me. Is there anything yon would 
kindly suggest for the catarrh? An early 
reply will be appreciated. . 



REPLY. 
You need not worry abont the chloroform 
contents of the medicine yon are taking. 
That in itself will not barm you. How- 
ever, it is bad practice to take patent med- 
icines. Most of them are fakes. Catarrh 
of the head is a delicate proposition and 
may be caused by a great variety of con- 
ditions. You must first ascertain what 
causes it and eliminate the cause as thor- 
oughly as yon can. You cannot possibly 
expect results from preparations which have 
no scientific basis and are simply sold to 
anyone who wishes to pay for them. 



SHOULD SEE A SURGEON. 

Ifrc. P. C. D., Mobile, Ala., writes: 
Dear Dr. Thorek: My husband and I do 
an acrobatic act. About seven months ago 
I injured the nipple of my left breast dur- 
ing the act I paid little attention. It bled 
a little and then healed np. Since that 
time I discovered a lump in the breast, 
which was first small and is now about the 
size of a small egg. I have not seen a 
doctor as, yet, but bave been using home 
remedies. I have no pain. Will you please 
advise me through the Health Department 
of The CuprEB what you would suggest 
that I do? Thanks. 

REPLY. 
Ton should see a first-class surgeon at 
your earliest possible opportunity. You 
must not neglect lumps in the breast. In 
the beginning they are a comparatively easy 
proposition to handle. If neglected, they 
may prove troublesome and even serious. 
The absence of pain does not indicate any- 
thing. Do not procrastinate. 



BRUTE OR INSANE? 

Broken Spirited, Phiatdelphia, writes: 
Dear Dr. Thorek : If you will answer me 
in The Cupper on the following subject, 
I shall appreciate it I am unfortunate 
enough to be married to a man who beats 
me. He has a special inclination to hit me 
over the head. The jars from the repeated 
hitting have made me a nervous wreck. I 
know you will say : "Why live with him?" 
but he is so repentant after the deed that 
I am dazed in arriving at a solution of the 
problem. It may be fear of disgrace that 
causes me to often forgive him. A few 
words in The Clipper on the subject will 
be appreciated by me. A special article on 
the subject of "Wifebeaters" would, I think, 
be !>n excellent topic for discussion. I am 
unfortunate and appeal to you for advice. 

REPLY. 
Your husband is either a brute or crazy. 
If he is the former he should be treated 
like a brute — with severity and drasticity. 
If he is insane, as I am inclined to believe 
him to be, I should advise you to sen'd him 
to a sanitarium for the treatment of the 
mentally unbalanced. If yon believe him to 
be sane and are willing to stand for bis 
brutality, the trouble rests with yon. There 
is only one possible mitigating circum- 
stance in such cases, and that is when a 
man is carried away with himself in the 
frenzied state of miud in a fit of jealousy. 
This constitutes a form of temporary in- 
sanity, during which the individual becomes 
irresponsible and should be treated with 
consideration. If you don't provoke such 
states of mind, then yon ore simply the 
victim of a brute who should be shunned. 

CLEFT PALATE AND HARELIP. 

Mr. and Mrs. 8. Q. V., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

write: ■ "... • " • ■ 

': My dear Ooetor : Our girl is forir yean 
of age. . We are artists. The baby was born 
with a /cleft palate and harelip, and the 
physicians advised, at time of birth, against 
operation, and since the defect is very 
noticeable and her speech affected, I would 
kindly ask yon to advise me through The 
New York Cupper whether ths condition 
is curable or not. Many thanks, etc 

. REPLY. 
With proper care the condition is curable. 
Of course this greatly depends upon the de- 
gree of the deformity, the condition of the 
tissues and other factors. But, as a gen- 
eral proposition, it may be stated that with 
persistent effort and in skilled hands the 
results are often brilliant. 



PHENACETIN EFFECTS. 

Aire. F. Z., St. LouU, Afo., writes: 
Dear Dr. Thorek: I have been using 
phenacetin for some time post for the re- 
lief of recurrent headaches. Of late I de- 
veloped certain symptoms about the heart 
which a physician said were due to my 
using the phenacetin. Please advise me 
through The Cuppeb whether that is so. 

REPLY. 

Phenacetin is certainly a heart-depres- 
sant of first rank. The physician has told 
you the truth. There is nothing that will 
disorganize heart functions as much as the 
coal-tar products to which family phenacetin 
belongs. Leave it alone. Try to ascertain 
what causes your headache and remove the 
cause, if at all possible. 



PROLAPSE OF UTERUS. 

Mr*. F. S. A., Cleveland, Ohio, writes: 
Dear Doctor: I am the mother of four 
children who are all on the stage. I am a 
constant reader of The New York Cupper, 
and wish you would kindly advise me on 
the following: I suffer from prolapse very 
markedly, and wish to know if the condi- 
tion can be cured without an operation. 
Eagerly lookiug for an early reply, I re- 
main, with thanks, etc. 

REPLY. 
The degree of the prolapse is the deciding 
factor. If it is only slight, you need not 
undergo an operation. Other measures wiD 
suffice. On the other hand, if the prolapse 
is marked, then some form of operation to 
bring the fallen organ into its normal posi- 
tion will have to be resorted to, in order 
to get permanent relief. 



HERNIA AFTER OPERATION. 

Ifrs. P. Van C, Buffalo, W. Y., writes: 
Dear Doctor: Six years ago I had to 
undergo an operation (abdominal). I am 
cured as far as the condition for which I 
was operated on is concerned, bnt subse- 
quently I developed a hernia that is get- 
ting larger right along and which is caus- 
ing me a great deal of inconvenience. Please 
tell me in The Mew York Cupper what 
causes these ruptures and what is to be 
done for them to correct them permanently. 
I am 29 years of age and have worn a belt 
since the operation. 

REPLY. 
Ruptures following operations are caused 
by the following factors: Too large in- 
cisions; suppurations (pus formations) in 
the wound ; a natural weakness of the ah. 
nominal wall : improper closure; prolonged 
use of drainage : too rapid absorption of the 
suture material, etc. Since yon have worn 
an abdominal binder without success. I 
would suggest a thorough operation for the 
relief of the hernia. If properly performed 
the results are often brilliant. . , Yon will be 
laid np, of course, for a number of weeks, 
bat, taking everything into consideration, 
it will be to your advantage, generally, to 
be absolutely cured. 



NINE-F0URTEEN. 

R. R. A., Neio Orleam, La., writes : 
Dear Dr. Thobek: Where can. one ob- 
tain 914? Is it expensive? A reply in 
The Cuppeb will be appreciated. 

-f. REPLY. i.-—.;.'. 

There are some physicians and phar- 
macists who have some 914" left:: before the 
supply was completely exhausted It in very 
expensive ..right now, for -the" people who 
have some of this valuable chemical left 
hold on to it and do not en re to part with 
it, unless their compensation is proportion- 
ate to the rarity of the product. 

P. Ij. P. — You can see me in New York 
(Hotel Knickerbock r) about October 23 
and 22, and in Philadelphia (Hotel Belle- 
vue-Stratford) after that date for abont 
a week. D. S. A.. Brooklyn, N. Y. — Yon 
are doing right- Persist and the result will 
be excellent. There is no use in being mild 
A malignant disease requires heroic treat- 
ment. B. A., New York. — Yon may get a 
copy containing my article on the subject in 
The New York Cupper office, 1604 Broad- 
way, New York City. 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



U. B. O. CIRCUIT 

New York City. 

PALACE— Eddie Foy and 7 Fojs — Morton and 
Moore— Arthur Deagon— Dainty Marie. (Five to 
flii.i 

COLONIAL— Page, Hack ft Mack— Toote Peka * 
Co. — Phlne A Plx— Frank Le Dent — Lovenberg 
Slaters — Nan Hnlperin- Dngan A Raymond — Will 
Morrlaaey. 

ROYAL — Mack A Oakey — Better Broa.— Edw. 
Murray— Julie Ring ft Co.— Hooper ft Rlcardo— 
Harry Gerard A Co. — Wm. Slato — Maria Lo. 

ALHAMBBA —Nellie V. Nichols— Joe Cook— 
Chan. L. Fletcher — Cycling Brnnettea — Brlerre A 
King— Wlllard Simma ft Co. 

Brooklyn. 

BU8KWICK— Bae B. Bill— "Five of Globe"— 
"Four Husbands" — Tempest & Sonshlne — Milt Col- 
lins— HaUlgan ft Sykea— Meredltb ft Snooxcr. 

OH.FKEUM -Young A Brown. Eva Taylor A Co. 
— Leach-Wallcn Trio — Three Lelghtona — Camllla'a 
Birds— Chick Bale — White A Cnvanaugh— Dorothy 
Jardon — "Boyi of 1918." 

Atlanta. 
FORSYTH— Jones A Sylvester— Lorraine A Cam- 
eron— Vlollnaky — Stone A Hayes — Tuscano Broa, — 
Violet McMillan— Imperial Troupe. 

Boston. 

KEITH'S— La Argentina — Bochex'a Monks — 
Cecil Cunningham — Begal A Bender — Santley A 
Norton. 

Birmingham. 
LYRIC (First Half)— Mnslcal Johnstons— Dainty 
Marie. (Last Half) — Barabon A Crohn— Three 
F.scnrdoe. 

Buffalo. 

BHEA'8— J. C. Nugent A Co.— Marlon Weeks— 
Palfrey, Hall A Brown — Smith A Austin — Kane 
Broa. 

Baltimore. 

MARYLAND Geo. Kelly A Co Jack NorWOrtb 

— Capt. Anson ft Daughter— Clara Howard— The 
Levolos. 

Cleveland. 
KEITH'S— Mildred Macomber A Co. — Daren- 
port ft Battery — HuSord ft Chain— Keene ft Morti- 
mer — Roy A Arthnr — Mercedes. 

Chattanooga. 

KEITH'S (Flrat Half)— The Norvelles— Cbss. 
Msck A Co. (Last Halt)— Laurie A Bronson— 
Elsie Williams A Co. — Geo. N. Rosener. 

Cincinnati. 
BBSS'! — narry Gllfoll — The Demacoa — Bea- 
trice Morrell Sextette— Phyllis Nellson-Terry— 
Warren A Conley — Ben Deeley A Co. — Billy 

Bouncer & Co. 

Columbus. 

KEITH'S — Howard's Animals — John A Winnie 
HennluKa— Harry Fern A Co.— Baker A Janla — 
DeWltt Young ft Bister— Tom Edwards ft Co. — 
Hull A Durkln — Howard A Clark. 

Dayton. 

KEITH'S— Herbert's Doga — "Forty Wlnki" — 
II alien A Fuller — Del ton, Mareena A Del ton — 
Blossom Seelcy ft Co. 

Detroit 

TEMPLE — Hans Hanke— Hunting ft Francis— 
Peggy Breuen A Co. — Houdlnl — Weber A DIebl — 
Gerard ft Clark— A. Sullivan ft Co.— Those Fire 
Girls. 

Erie. 

COLONIAL — Fashion Show — Kullerra Bro*.— 
Crelgbton, Belmont A Crelghton — Akl Troupe. 

Grand Rapids. 

EXPRESS — Mrs. Thoe. Whlffen — Bert Hanlon — 
Jasper— Dooley ft Bugel— Jordan Trio — Clark ft 
VerdL 

Hamilton. 

TFJCFLS — Frank Crumlt — Connolly ft Webb — 
Booth ft Leander— Qulgley ft Fltagereld — Great 
Johnston — Brown's Minstrels. 

Indianapolis. 

GRAND — Minnie Allan— Kerr A Weston — Man 
Bros.— The Ushers — Witt ft Winter— American 
Comedy Four. 

Jacksonville. 

KEITH'S (First Half) — Sampson ft Douglas— 
Five Sweethearts. (Last Half)— Apdale'e Ani- 
mals—Walters ft Walter*— Walts Dream. 

Knoxville. 

BIJOU (First Half)— Laurie ft Branson — mat* 
William. A Co. — Geo. N. Beeenex. (Last Half) — 
The Norrelles — Cbas. Mack ft Co. 

Louisville. 

KEITH'S— Harry B. Lester— Adam* ft Hurray- 
Harry rereeford ft Co. — Danedln Duo T ate* ft 
Wheeler— Comfort ft King — Winston's Seal* — Bona 
Mtmsey. 

Montreal. 
ORPHEUM — Fern ft Davis — Mlrano Bros. — Sea- 
tary ft Price — Jean Adair ft Co. 

Norfolk. 

COLONIAL (Flrat Half)— 1 
Jerome A Carson. 



vau&Mwi. 




W®i? Mmsstt W&bBs. 



Providence. 

-"Prosperity" — Bur ley A Barley — 
Kerr ft Berko— Guamanl Trio — Jos. M. Norcrosa ft 
Co. — Daisy Jean — Ponsello Slaters. 

Pittsburgh. 

DAVIS— Valmont ft Beynan — Avellng ft Lloyd- 
World Dancers — Joe Fanton A Co. — Geo. Demerol 
A Co. 

Philadelphia. 

KEITH'S — Kitamura Japs — Cbas. Kellogg — Wm. 
A Margaret Cutty — "Age of Season" — Samaroff A 
SonU — Wlnsor McKay — Weston A Clarke— Nau- 
daln ft Fried! and — Jack WUson Trio. 

Richmond. 

COLONIAL (First Half)— Paul Levan A Dobbe. 
(Last Half) — Marie Stoddard — Jerome A Carson. 

BOANOKE (Last Half)— Sboen A Mayne— Hal- 
lea ft Hunter. 

Rochester. 

TEMPLE— Harris ft Manlon— Nat C. Goodwin— 
Isabelle D'Armond A Co. — Hopkins Axtell — Three 
Bob* — Albert Donnelly — Mrs. Gene Hugbe* ft Co. 

Savannah. 

SAVANNAH (First Half)— Apdale's Animals- 
Walter ft Walters— Waltz Dream. (Last Half) — 
Sampson ft Douglas— Fire Sweethearts. 

Toledo. 

KEITH'B — Eadle A Ramsden — Yvette — Dna 
Clayton A Co. — Jaa. Carson A Co. — Clifford Wal- 
ker— Van Bergen & Gosler — Three Rosalie*. 

Toronto. 

SHEA'S — Goelet, Harrla A Moray — Elinor* & 
Carlton — Keno, Keya & Melrose — Qucenlr Dunedln 
•—Hugh Herbert ft Co. — "At the Party" — Harry 
Ellis. 

Washington. 

XETTH'S — Muriel Window— Clccolinl — Saxo Sex- 
tett*— Loula Hardt — Morton ft Moore — Leigh ft 
Jones — Harry Green ft Co,— Frank ft Toby— Mor- 
gan Dancers. 

Wilmington. 

OABBICK — Hippodrome Four — Alexander Broa. 
—Adelaide Boothby. 

Youngstown. 

KEITH'S — Bob Albright— Tennessee Ten— Parish 
ft Peru— Tower A Darrell— Stuart Barnea— "What 
Happened to Ruth" — Hager A Goodwin — Adelaide 
A Hughes. 



Marl* Stoddard— 



Nashville. 

PRINCESS (First Half) — Bars bon ft 
Three Kseardo*. (Last Half)— Monde*! Johnston* 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

Chicago. 

MAJESTIC — Fay Templetoo — Geo. HoweU ft Co. 
— Mr. A Mrs. J. Barry— Myrl A Delmar — Albright 
ft Bodolfl — Al Shayne— "Girl In the Moon" — 
"Vacuum Cleanera" — Weaton ft Claire. 

PALACE -Stella Mayhew A Co.— Leah Hera ft 
Co. — Stanley Trio — BoekweU ft Wood — Imperial 
Chinese Trio — Brent Hayea — Bobble Gordone. 

Calgary. 

ORPHEUM— Sarah Padden ft Co. — Raymond ft 
Caverly — Four Reading*— Craig Campbell — John 
Geiger — The Brighton*— "Dancing Girl of Delhi." 

Denver. 

ORPHEUM— Alan Brooks ft Co.— Old Time 
Darkle*— Al ft Fannie Steadman — Hans Linne's 
Dancers — Lateen ft Cross — Gordon ft Hies. 

Des Koines. 

ORPHEUM — Vera Sablnna ft Co. — Mary Mel- 
ville— Fire Belgian Girls— Ray Samuels — Mason ft 
Heeler— The Volunteer*— Area Bro*. 

Duluth. 

ORPHEUM— Clown Seal— Jim ft Betty Morgan 
— Wilfred Clarke ft Co.— Marie Fltaglbbon— Mary- 
land Singers — Gomes Trio. 

Kansas City. 

ORPHEUM— Bnth St, Denis— Oliver ft Olp— Lew 
Madden ft Co, — Betty Bond — Cooper ft Smith — 
Dulxnr Boys — Lao ZarraU Trio. 

Los Angeles. 

ORPHEUM — Bran-Borrowe* Fontaine— Demarest 
A CoUette — Helen* Davie— Jacques Plate! — Webb 
ft Burns— Allan Dinrhart ft Co. 

Lincoln. 

OKPHEUM— Mr*. Lengtry— Lydell ft Higgle*— 
— The Sharrocks— Dancing Kennedy*— Parke* ft 
Conway— Joe. Newman. 

Minneapolis. 

ORPHEUM— Mmr. Sumlko— Bert Levy Moon ft 
Morri*— "Petticoat*"— CanroU A Wheaton — Six 
Water Tfllna Kenny * HoUia. 

Memphis, 
Prodnear" — Homer Miles ft 
Day*— Trovato— Mary Gray— Bart 
Betty Wheelar— McLallao ft Carton. 

Milwaukee. 

ORPHEUM — EIll* ft Bordonl — Creasy ft Days* 
—Fay; Two Coleys ft Fay — May* ft Tally— La! p- 
alg— Lohae ft SterUng— Howard, Klbel ft 
— Max ine Bro*. ft Bobby. 



New Orleans. 

ORPHEUM — Louise Dresser — Lew Docketader — 
The White iluasars— "Lore In the Suburbs" — The 
Meyakoa — Primrose Four — Love ft Wilbur. 

Portland. 

ORPHEUM — "The Bride Shop" — De Witt, Burn* 
A Torrance — Mand Lambert — Rmeat Ball — Ray- 
mond Bond ft Co. — Bernard ft Scarta — Mnslcal 
Geralds. 

Oakland. 

OKPHEUM— "Honor Thy Children"— Fred V. 
Bowers A Co. — Laura Nelson Hall A Co. — Sher- 
man A Uttry — Nederveld'a Baboons — Alexander 
Macl'aydcn — Francis ft Kennedy, 

Omaha. 

ORPHEUM — Brlce A King — Harry Holman A 
Co. — Duffy A Lorensc— Svlvla Loyal ft Co. — l'rln- 
eeaa Kalsms Duo— Lou Holt* — Booney ft Bent. 

Stockton, Fresno and Bakerafield. 

ORPHEUM— Kajl jam a— Lunette Sisters— Walter 
Brower — Claire Vincent ft Co. — Murln Slaters — 
Plelert A Scbofleld. 

Salt Lake City. 

ORPHEUM — Kalmar A Brown — Wlllard — Delro 
— Dore A Halperln — J. C. Lewis A Co. — Balxer 
Sisters. 

Seattle. 

ORPHEUM — "Forest Fire" — Ward Broa.— Mc- 
Devltt, Kelly ft Lucy— Miller ft Vincent— Friscoe 
— Kltaro Broa. — Joale Heather A Co. 

St. Louis. 

COLUMBIA— Bessie Clayton A Co. — Odlva— 
Franklyn Ardell & Co. — Leo Been — Moore. Gard- 
ner & Rose — Reoa Parker — Consul tbe Greet. 

San Francisco. 

ORPHEUM— Morton A Glass— Brltt Wood — Wil- 
liams A Wolfua — Scotch Lads A Lassies— Chip A 
Msrble — Marshall Montgomery— Allen A Howard — 
Orth ft Dooley. 

St. Paul. 

ORPHEUM— Bankoff A GlrUe Ballet— Misses 
Llgbtner ft Alexander— Spencer ft Williams — Q. 
Aldo Bandegger — Martinet!! A Sylvester — Anna 
Chandler— "The Might Have Been*." 

Vancouver. 

ORPHEUM — Sophie Tucker A Co. — "Cranber- 
ries" — Beeman A Anderson — Cantwetl A Walker — 
Both Budd— Bert Fltaglbbon— Blche ft Burt 

Winnipeg. 

ORPHEUM— Stone A Kails*— McKay A Ardln* 
— Gautler's Tor Shop — Mullen A Coogan — Mr. ft 
Mra. Gordon Wilde — McConnell A Simpson — Illgga 
A Ryan. 



LOEW CIRCUIT 

New York City. 

AMERICAN (First Half)— Chadwlck A Taylor— 
Hanlon A Hanlon — Tracer A McBrlde — Nora AUen 
— Sully Family — Murray Bennett— Arthur DeVoy ft 
Co. (Last Hair) — O'Nell A Sax ton — Australian 
Woodchoppers— FrtDkle Kelcey— Sully Family— 
Froslnl — E. B. CUre A Co. — Stella Berlin. 

BOULEVARD (Flrat Half)— Johnson A Wells- 
Herbert A Dennis — Morattl Opera Co. — Brown * 
Jackson — Froslnl. (Last Hslf) — Osrdner's Maniacs 
—Lillian Watson— Burke ft Harris— Mercedes 
Clark A Co. — Three Lyres. 

GREELEY SQUARE (Flrat Half)— Harry ft 
AuguaU Tnrpln — LUIIan Watson— "Boys ft Olrls" 
— Adam* A Gun! — Kelso Bra*. (Last Half)— 
Marie Fentoo — Brown A Jackson — "Into the 
Light" — Empire Comedy Four. 

DELANCEY STREET (First Half)— Gray A 
Klunker— Borke ft Harri*— Bernard ft Meyers— 

Mercedes Clark A Co. — law Wells — June Dixon's 

Model*. (Last Half )— Musical Hunters— Hanlon 
A Hanlon — Nor* ADrn — Jones ft Johnson— "Boys 

A Girls." 

IXNOOLH SQUARE (First Hslf)— Gaston 
Palmer— Scanlon ft Press— Frankle Kelcay— B. E. 
CUve ft Co. — Empire Comedy Four — Phillip! roar. 
(Last Half)— Johnson ft Wells— Elisabeth Catty- 
Curry A Graham — "Fireside Reverie" — The*. Pot- 
ter Dunne — Bell Thaser Broa 

NATIONAL (First Half)— The Halkings— Curry 
A 'Graham — Hawthorn* A Lester — Frank Gaby A 
Co. — Marl* Fenton — Capt. Soreho. (Last Half) — 
Harry ft Augusta Tuxpln — Edah Deldridge Trio — 
Ca pt. Soreho. 

ORPHEUM (first Half) — Holden A Graham — 
O'Nell ft Sexton— FarreU ft FarreU— Six Stylish 
Stepper*— Billy McDermott— Mr. ft Mr*. Norman 
Phillips— Al Woblman ft Co. (Last Half)— Kelso 
Broa. — Cbsdwlck ft Taylor — Dan!*]* ft Walter* — 
"Her Honor, the Mayor" — Wilson Broa,— Morattl 
Op era Co. — F ra nk!* Fay — Jan* Dlxon'a Models. 

SEVENTH AVENUE (First Half) — Gardner's 
IsaBxassl — Stella Berlin— Archer ft Bslf ord — 
Francis Renault — Burns ft Klsaen. (Last Half) — 
The Hatting*— Herbert ft Dennis— Foteotn ft 
Brown — Bryan Lee A Co. — Murray Bennett — Six 
Bty Uab Ste pper*. 

AVENUE jj (tint Hslf) — Chisholm A Brs sn 
Harry Breen — Nine Craxy Kid*. (Last Half)— 
FarreU ft FarreU— Dave Thursby — "MO* a 
Minute.". 

Brooklyn. 

BUOB (First Half— Norton ft Noble— Watte* 

ft Delberg— Bryan Le* ft Co.— Maud Tiffany — 
Australian Wsodchopper*. (Last Half) — Laura ft 
Billy Dreher — Evans Smith A Dunn* — Bernard ft 
Meyers — Owen McOlfney— Tracey A McBrlde— 
HaU's Mnslcal Minstrel*. 



SS KALB (First Half)— Clark A Lewi*— John 
O'Malley — "Her Boo or. the Mayor" — Wilson 
Bro*.— Stelner Trio. (Last Half)— Areber A Bel- 
ford — Hawthorne A Lester— "School Days"— A! 
Woblman ft Co.— "Gray ft Old Rose." 

FULTON (Flrat Half)— Math Bro*. ft Girlie— 
"Fireside Reverie" — The*. Potter Donne — Sicilian 
Serenader*. (Last Half) — Martys A Florence- 
Norton A Noble — Lew Wells— .Mr. A Mr*. Norman 
Phillips— Burns ft Klssen— PhlUlpl Four, 

PALACE (Flrat Bain — Gordon A Marx — "Mil* 
a Minute-' — Dave Thursby — Dotty A Delay. (Last 
Half) — Chisholm A Breen — Nine Kraay Kid* — 
Harry Breen. 

Baltimore. 

HIPPODROME — Johnson A Crane— Jack Barnett 
—Chinese .Musical Entertainers — Junes ft Rente 
Thornton — Marie BusseU — Etta Lavrlle. 

Boston. 

ORPHEUM (Flrat Half)— Mr. A Mra. Caplan— 
Barry Sydell— "Bachelor ft Sweetheart*"— Barns* 
A Robinson — Dunbar, Banvanl A Dunbar. (Last 
naif)— Forrester ft Lloyd— "Memories"— El Clave 
— Wllmer Walters A l'u.— PeVlnv A Williams— 
Ford A Lrslls. 

ST. JAMES (.First Half)— Mahal McKlnley— 
Hall's Muilral Minstrels. (Last Half)— Harry 
SydeU— "Once Girls" — Barnea A Robinson— Tore* 
Kundles. 

Fall River. 

BIJOU (First Halt)— Wllmer Walter* A Co.— 
Tom Maboney— Ford ft Leslie. (Laat naif)— 
Mabel McKlnley— Dunbar, Banvard ft Dunbar. 

Hoboken. 

LYRIC (First Half)— Three Del.uies— Everett 
Bennett — Evans A Wilson— Three Lyre*. (Last 
Half)— Holden A Graham— BlekaeU A Glbney— 
Tabor A Green. 

Newark. 

MAJESTIC (First Half)— Martyn A Florence — 
Daniels A Wallers — Folsom A Brown — Lew Welch 
ft Co. — Jones ft Johnson— "Oray A Old Rose." 
(Last Half) — Oaston Palmer — Walton A Delbert— 
Francis Renault — Arthur DeVoy ft Co.— Adams ft 
Guhl — Sicilian Serenader*. 

New Rochelle. 

LOEW'S (First Half)— Laura A Billy Dreher— 
Frankle Fs.v — "Old Soldier Fiddlers." (laat 

Hslf) — Rogers A Wood — Broughton ft Turnsr — 
Frank Gaby A Co. 

Providence. 



(First Half)— Three Kundles— El Clove 
— "Offlce Girls"— DeVlne A Williams— "Mem- 
ories." (Last Half) — Tom Maboney — "Bsrhelor 
ft Sweethearts." 

Springfield. 

PLAZA (First Half)— Wilbur A Sweatman— 
Forrester A Lloyd— Edsh Deldridge ft Co.— Patsy 
Doyle — ailmore A Romanoff. (Last Hslf) — Lyrlca 
—sir. ft Mra. Caplan — Stone ft Clear. 

Toronto, Can. 

YONOE STREET— Tbe Lowvys— Luellle'a Cocka- 
toos — Alt. Grant — Robt. O'Connor ft Co. — Bearploff 
—"College Girls' Frolic." S 

POLJ CIRCUIT 

Bridgeport. 

FOXX'8 (First Half) — Flying Henrys — Oorgette 
A Capitols— "The Scoop"— Ward A Van Girls — 
Pinkie. (Laat Half)— Black A McCone — 01«a ft 
Alado Paradofakl— Clem. Beran ft Co. — R. O. 
Faulkner — Conroy's Models. 

PLAZA (First Half)— The Yoonges— Toujee Sis- 
ters— Hlalto Four — Msrcelte. (Last Half)— The 
Frlctschea— Lewis A Fclber— "Surprise Party." 
(To OIL) 

Hartford. 

PALACE (Flrat Half)— The Schmettens— Win- 
cheater ft Claire — "Klddy'a Burglar*' — Moore. 
O'Brien ft Cormlck— Osllager ft Lewis. (Laat 
naif) — Ponalno A Contlnl— Kltner, Taylor ft Mc- 
Kay— "Breath of Old Virginia"— Boh Tosco. 

POLI'B (First Hslfl— The Frletsches— Alvln A 
Williams — Harry Mason ft Co. — Three Kaloe— Tan 
Empire Olrla. (Laat Half) — Alvln Bros. — Ton}** 
Slater* — "Vic* Vena"— Holden ft Harroo— Mar 
cell*. 

New Haven. 

POLI'S (First H*lt>— Block ft McCone— Shorty 
Hewitt— Harry ft Er* Puck — Conroy's Model*. 
(Two to an.) (last Half)— Tbe Scbmetteos— 
(iorvette A Capltola — "Tbe Scoop" — Ward A Van 
Olrla. 

BIJOU (First Half)— La Dore-Lewii ft Fairer 
■Breath of Old Virginia." (Last Half)— The 
Younger*— Wm. Hal* * Bros.— Blalto Four— 0*1- 
lager ft Lewis. (To an.) 

Springfield. 

PALACE (First Half)— Frank Hartley— Olga ft 
Olada Paradotsk! — Brown A McCormlck — Sam Lie- 
bert Co. — Ray A Gordon Dooley — Da Koch Tronpe. 
(Laat Half)— The Yalta*— Bernard ft Bennett— 
Harry ft Bra Puck — Arthnr Llpaon — "Dreams of 
the Orient" 

Scranton. 

POLI'B (Flrat Half)— Rose A Dell— "Finders. 
Keeper*"— Irving ft Ward— W1U Oakland ft Co. 
(To tUL) (Last Half)— Vivian ft Arsanrlaa— 

Clob Trio— Julia Ring ft Cot— Lander Bros.— 
"Whirl of Song and Dance." 

Waterbtiry. 

POLI (Flrat Half)— Seabory ft Shaw— Holden A 
Harroo— Leonard ft Wlllard— Arthnr Upson — 
"Dream* of the Orient." (Last Half) — Frank 
Hartley — Wm. stba — Pinkie — Moore. O'Brien A 
Cormlek — De Koch Troup*. (To fill.) 
Wilkes Barre. 

POLI (Flrat Half) — Vivian A Arsenlan— Clob 
Trio — JnU* Ring A Co. — Lander Broa. — "Whirl of 
Senc ft Dew*." (Laat Half)— Beat ft Ds**— 
"Finder*. Keeper*"— Irs-lnc A Ward — WW Oak- 
land ft Co. (To mi.) 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 



Worcester. 

POLI (First Eilfi-wiu Hals * Bros.— Kltner. 
Taylor ft McKay— Clem Bra ft Co.— Bob Yosco 
— Cbas. Abeam Troop*. (Lest Half) — Seabury 
Sbaw — aitis * Tnnnim mm iisfu a Co. — 

Bay A Oordoo Dooley — "Ten staplre Girls." 

PLAZA (First Half)— Ponsiao * Cootlnl— Wm. 
tte-Btnud * Bennett— "Surprise Party." (To 
0JL) (Lest Belt)— La Dora— Leonard * wmard 
— CsL Jack Geor g e Three Kelos— Sage Liabtat * 

W. V. M. A. 

Alton. 

■MMB (first Half)— Lav n mMnw 

Rlsrrrr * (km. (Lest Half) — Mack * Velmar. 

Brandon. 

BB1VS0S (Oct. 27-28)— Great Weetta— Chase 
At La Tour — "Darn. Good * Funny" — Roberts, 
Stuart at Boberts. 

Champaign. 

OKTHZnt (First Half)— "The Iraabmaa"— 
Cook a Botuert— Geo. Fisher at Co. — Pstrleola at 
■trass)— CarUta * Bnhod. (Last Hall)— La 
Tor's Models— idler a ArLlne— Moxleal Ma. floss 
Fiber at Waters— stasia Kiss * Co. 

Camp Hughes. 

CAXF HTJGHES— TreEsfleld Blstere — Spies el ft 
Dunn — Axtior Angst at Co. — Three Melrln Brae. 

Chicago. 

sTTHiTw (First Half)— DeReno ft Floree— Bay 
Snow — Emily Darren ft Co. — Goldlng * Keating. 
(Last Half)— Oramls Duo — Gorman Bros. — Ada 
Latham ft Co. — Vlerian'e Docs. 

LacOLS (First Halt)— Warren ft Dietrich— 
"H!a Dinner Party"— Boae ft Flak. (Two to on.) 
(Last Half)— Musical Olils— Bert Howard. (Three 
to nil.) 

iwnnu (First Half) — Polsin Bros.— Balph 
Connors Bastes ft Hayes— Carl Helt.cn Berne — 
Sol ft Leall* Bens. (Lest Halt)— Green ft Pegu 
— Dunbar's Salon Singers— Pirrirola & Myers— 
BreotU ft UlDcntlaca. (One to OIL) 

WTJTDSOK (First Half) — Oranda Doo — Green ft 
Pos.lt — John B. Gordon ft Co.— Ernie ft Bmle — 
Carl Boaalnl ft Co. (Last Halt) — Bay Snow — 
"T he Fnnny Sheet." 

ft ViB UK (First Half) — "Fraternity Boys and 
Girls." (last Half)— sssssstasf * Borers— Ward 
ft Cmrran— Goldlng ft Keatisc — Carl BsesssS ft Co. 

WXtaOsT (First Half)— Jeear Laster— Ven ft 
Carrie Aeery — Ada Latham ft Co. — Gorman Bros. 
(Last Half) — Zmle ft Ernie — Marmeln Sisters— 
Friend ft Downing — Geo. Lorett ft Co. 

Cedar Rapids. 

MAJESTIC (First Half) — Two Tom Bora— Argo 
ft Virginia — Plssno ft Bingham — Four SUcaers— 
O-Netl ft Qallasber— Mertan's Swiss Canines. (Last 
Beit) — Gordon Delmar ft Prager — Ralph Connors 
— Sol ft Leslie Ban — Ameta. 

- Deeatnr. 

EXPRESS (First Halt)— Enunetts* Canines — 
Benny ft Woods — "On the Teranda" — Pnol Baw- 
ens TTsnlrm ft Clifton. (Last Half) — "Tne Van- 
ity Fete." 

Davenport. 

OorcstBIA (First Half)— Bala Tins et si ua i 
Brady ft Mabouey — MUe. Lnxsne ft Dancers — 
NeTlns ft E i w uud — "Funny Sbeat." (Lsat Half) — 
PoUtB Bros, — Sllrer ft DnrsB— Chaa. Howard ft 
Co. — Joe. Browning — "Lamont'a Western Day." 

DtOnth. 
(Ftest Half)— Frank Palmer— Nelson Sisters— La 
Verns ft Demur— Larry ReOly ft Co. (Last Half) 
— Kremka Bros. — Johnny Email ft Small Slaters — 
Clark ft MeCnllougb— Boss Bros. 



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Dubuque. 

MAJESTIC (First Half)— "The Blow Oat.'' 
(Lest Half)— Jack tarter — Wilton Sisters— Foot 
Slickers— O'NaJl ft Gallagher— Norton ft Karie. 

East St. Louis. 

ERBER'B (First Half)— Shirley Sisters)— Kane 
ft Herman — Wartenburg Bros. (Last Half) — RIs- 
ner ft Gores — Grant Gardner— "What Happened to 
Both." 

Evansville. 

SJC.W OSiSD (Last Half) — MaeBaa ft Clegg— 
Morlarty Sisters— "Bight Man"— Bison City Four 
—"The Femail darks." 

Ft. Dodge. 

OTJrOXSS (First Halt) — Adele Jason— Billy 

'•Swede" Hall — Bowman Bros Dawn Jane. (Lest 

Half) — Stanley and La Brack — The Lelands — 
Charles Wilson — Six Crinoline Girls. 

Ft William. 

(Lest Half)— Deris ft Kitty— Tyler ft Crollus— 
Oordoo Highlanders. (To 811.) 

Green Bay. 

ORPHZUaf (Lest Half) — Wmiaon ft Sherwood — 
Lew ft Motile Hunting — Metropolitan Dancers. 

Hammond. 

asaasasasssass (Last Half )— Richard Welly ft Co. 
—Eight Black Dots— Paul Pedxlnl ft Monks. (Two 
to an.) 

Ironwood. 

TEMPLE— Great Mars— Mick ft Dean — Cortoae 
Trio. 

Janeavflle. 

BR METERS (Last Half) — Onetta — Anderson 
and Golnes. (Three to SB.) 

Kenosha. 

VTB.GX2TXA— Weak and Manning — Zeltler and 
Zeltler. (Three to nil.) 

LYRIC (first Half)— Darling Saxaphone Four — 
Three Peroness. (Lest Helf)— Adele Jssoo — "The 
Fashion Shop." 

Lincoln. 

OKPBEUX— Lee Seniors — Beyle end Fetsay — 
Davett and DoraTJ — La France and Kennedy — 
Fonr Nelson Comlqoes. 

Madison. 

ORPHEUM (First Half) — Mystic Hsnsoo ft Co. 

— Skipper. Kennedy ft Eeeres — Werner Amorce 
Troupe — Foster. Hall ft Co. (One to an.) (Last 
Half)— •■fraternity Boys and Obis." 

Milwaukee. 

PALACE (First Half) — Angelo Armento Tronpe 
— Bosh ft Shapiro— A Musical Matinee — wniy Zim- 
merman— Bert Howard — Richard Wally ft Co. 
(Lest Half) — Cook ft Bothert— "Carl Belsen Re- 
™" — Jarrow — Plssno ft Bingham — Earl ft Ed- 
wards— "Marble Gems." 

Moose Jaw. 

Great Westto — Chase ft La Tour — "Dam, Good 
ft Funny" — Boberts, Stuart ft Boberts. 

Minneapolis. 

eRAsTD— Sprague ft McN te cs May ft Klldcff— 
Lonos HiTtnict. 

PALACE— Martini 4 MaiimlUlan— Weston ft 
Young — BerniTld Bros, — Blta Gould — Kerrille 
family. 

Omaha. 



(First Half) — Stanley ft La Brack — 
Bawson ft Claire — Fiddler and Sbelton — Ameta. 
(Last Half)— Bayle and Patsay— Darling Saxa- 
phone Fonr— La France and Kennedy — "The Edge 
of the World." 

Port Arthur. 

(First Half)— Dm-rts ft Kitty— Tyler ft Crollus— 
Gordon Highlanders. (To OIL) 

assesses.** 

Chei. Ledeter— Otto Reenter ft Co.— Hows ft 
Bowe. (To *JL) 

Begins. 

(Last Half)— La Visa— Fields, Keene ft Walsh— 
McGee ft Kerry— Frank Stafford ft Co. 

Bockford. 

JEW fat.ace (First Half)— FoaT Eoeet— Er- 
gottl ft LUUcntlans— "Lemont't Western Days"— 
Lew ft MoUie Bunting — Jos. Browning. (Last 
Half)— WUI Morris— Skipper, Kennedy ft BeeTee— 
John B. Gordon ft Co.— Frank Bush— Electrical 
Venus. 

Rochester, Minn. 

XETBOPOLITAjr (Last Balf)«-Greet Mars- 
Four Boses— Treat's Seals. (Two to nil.) 

Sioux City. 

OBPBXTTM— Geo. ft Lily Garden— Bobt. Henry 
Hodge ft Co. — Hope Vernon — "Fashion Sbop." 
(One to OIL) (Last Half"! — Nora ft Sidney Kel- 
logg— Fiddler ft Sbelton— Leroy ft Harrey — Pat 
Barrett— Flak's Comedy Circus. 

Sioux Falls. 

OBPHETJV (Last Half)— Gladys. Vance— Bmy 
"Swede" Ban — Bowman Bros. — Sterling Rosa Trio. 

Saskatoon. 

(First Ham— La Vrre— Fields. Keene ft Walsh 
— McGee ft Kerry— Prank Stafford ft Co. 

St, Panl. 

(First Half) — K re mi a Bros. — Jofinny SmtU ft 
Small Sisters — Clark ft McCnUoogb— Boas Bros. 
(Last Half)— Dare Wellington— Cross ft. Doris- 
Sextette De Luxe. 

: St Louis. 

GBABD (First Half)— Millie OUre— Delmar ft 
Kllgaxd— Howard Sisters— Adroit Bros. — "Six 
little Wire*." ..:•• 



EXPRESS (First Half) — Swiss Song Birds- 
Brady ft Ms honey — Madam Marlon — Grant Gard- 
ner— Malale Kins. (Last Half)— Shirley Sisters- 
Bell ft Fredo— lmhof. Conn ft Corene — Kane ft 
Herman — "On tba Veranda." 

South Bend. 

OBPHETTX (First Half)— Lasine ft Inman — 
Barry Girls — Caesar Rlvoll — Friend ft Downing— 
Gen Plssno ft Co. (Last Half) — Two Tomboys — 
MUe. Loaane ft Dancers — Morris Golden — Grew. 
Paites ft Co. (One to OIL) 

Springfield. 

MATESTIO (First Half)— "All Girl Berne"— 
Kate Watson. (Last Half) — "The Freshman" — 
Benny ft Woods — Geo. Flatter ft Co. — Carllta ft 
Howland — Santas ft Hayes— Paul Bawens. 

Terre Haute. — Splits with Evansville. 

BKW HXPPOSBOMZ (First Half) — Rambler 
Slaters ft Plnard— Knapp ft Cornelia — Grapewln ft 
Chance — Kaufman Bros. — "International Girl." 

Virginia. 

ROYAL (Lest Half )— Frank Palmer— Nelson Sis- 
mar — La Verne ft Dagmar— Larry Bellly ft Co. 

Waterloo. 

MAJESTIC (First Half) — Nora ft Sidney Kellogg 
—Gordon. Delmar ft Prager — "The Family" — Pat 
Barrett— Fink's Circus. (Last Half) — "The Blow 
Out." 

BUTTERFIELD TIME . 

Ann Arbor. " 

MAJESTIC (First Half) — Marie Genaro— Mason 
ft Murray — "Fun on a Farm" — Baby Helen — Mrs. 
Bra Fsy. (Last Half) — "Around the Town." 

Battle Creek. 

BOOT; (First Half)— Lawrence ft Hurl Falls— 
Weir. Temple ft Daeey — "A Case for Sherlock"— 
Jarrow — Weber ft Wilson Berne. (Last Half) — 
"The Fonr Husbands." 

Bay City. 

BUOTJ (First Half)— Lea and Ansleka— Lane ft 
Harper — "The Cop" — Clayton ft Lennle— The So- 
ciety Circus. (Last Half)— Alfred FarreD— For, 
and Ingraham— "All Wrong" — Ton Hampton ft 
Bhrlner— "Lack of a Totem." 

Flint. 

MAJESTIC (First Half)— Henry and Adelaide— 
Murphy, Howard and Budolpb — Bruce, Duffett ft 
Co. — Birshel Hesdler — Amarus Sisters. (Last 
Half) — Frawley ft West— Carl and La Claire — Mor- 
gan & Gray— MedUn, Watts ft Townes— Carmen's 
Minstrels. 

Jackson. 

ORPHET/X (First Half) — "Around the Town." 
(Last Half) — Marie Genaro— Mason ft Murray — 
"Fun on a Farm" — Mrs. Sea Fay. 

Kalarnasoo. 

MAJESTIC (Ftest Half (—"The Four Husbands." 
(Last Bait) — Lawrence ft Hurl Fans — Weir, Tem- 
ple ft Daeey — 'A Case for Sherlock" — Jarrow— 
Weber ft Wilson Berne. 

Lansing. 

BIJOU (First Half)— Frawley ft West— Carl ft 
Le Claire — Morses A Gray — MedHo. Watts ft 

Towne« — Carmen',' Minstrels. (Lest Half) — Henry 
ft Adelaide— Murphy, Howard ft Rudolph — Bruce, 
Duffett ft Co. — Hlrehel Bendler — Amoros Sisters. 

Saginaw. 

FKA5KLTW (First Half)— Alfred Farrell— Fox 
ft Ingraham — "ATI Wrong"— Von Hampton ft 
Shrlner — "Lock of a Totem." (Last Half) — Lea 
ft Analeka — Lane ft Harper — "The Cop" — Clayton 
ft Lennle — The Society Circus. 

PANT AGES CIRCUIT - .-/ 

Calgary. 

PAMTAGEB — London Bellrlngers — "Bettlns 
Bettys" — OllTe Briscoe — Smith ft Kaufman— Big- 
bee's Dogs- 
Denver. 

PAHTAGES— Six Klrksmlth Sisters— Brooks ft 
Bowen — "Divorce Question" — Freeman A Dunham 
— Black ft White — Psrls Green. 

Edmonton. 

PAHTAGES — Nordeen — John T. Doyle ft Co. — 
Joe Whitehead — Osakl Japs— Wood, MelrUIe ft 

Phillips— Howard ft Bote. 

Great Falls. 

PASTAGES — Three Keatona — Backer ft Winifred 
—"Mr. Inanialttre"— Burke ft Broderlck— Isetts. 

Kansas City. 

EXPRESS— "Midnight Follies"— Four Haley 
Sisters — Geo. K. Brown ft Co. — Sober ft North — 
Win. De Hollla. 

..-•.-.j ; Los Angeles. - 

PAHTAGES— "Society Buds"— Creole Bagtime 
Band — Claudia Coleman — Kartell! — Welch, Nealey 
ft Montrose. 

Ogden. 

PAHTAGES— "My Horse" — Leonard Anderson 
Players— Von Cello— Maley ft Woods— Norton ft 
Earl — George Morton. 

. . Oakland. ...... - 

' PAHTAOES— "Junior Follies"— "The Heart of a 
Msn" — Bernard ft Trscey — Wm A Kenrp— Brown- 
ing ft Dean. 



San Diego. 

PAHTAOZS— PirUnnoff Rose Ballet— Clark's 
Hawalians — OereJnetti Bros.— Holmes ft Wells — 
Beaumonte ft Arnold) — Luclsr Trio. 

Salt Lake City. 

PAHTAGES— "A Night In the Park"— Melody 

Six — Stanley ft Farrell — Emmy's T*sts Sinn Ij 

ft Arnold — Harry Coleman. 

Seattle. 

PAHTAGES— HorDck Danc er s H oward ft Fields 
— Freer, Raggett ft Freer — Elols White — Barry ft 

Wolford— Sehopp'a Circus— San tucd. 

Spokane. 

PAHTAGES— O'Neal ft Waoxonley Girls— Adonis 

ft Dog— Yelarie Sisters. 

San Francisco. 

PAHTAGES — Henrietta De Sortis ft Co.— Slat- 
ko*s BoUlckers — Edna Aug — Tom Kelly— Latosks 

— Benny ft Basel Mann. 

Tacoma. 

PAHTAGES— Fonr Ha moss TJerturt Lloyd ft Co. 
— Minnie Kaufman — Ward ft Fay e— Chlnko— 
Bogannl ft Vtolettt. 

Vancouver. 

PAHTAGES — "Oh, the Women" — James Grady 
ft Co.— Neal Abel— OUIe ft Johnnie Vsnls— Joe 
Quon Taj — Warren ft Templeton. 

Victoria, 

PASTAeEB— "Not Sundae"— Valentine Vox- 
Sherman, Van ft Hymen — Three Moris — Clifford ft 
Mack. 

Winnipeg. 

PAHTAGES — Olympla Derail ft Co.— "An 
Aboard"— Nancy Fate— Nerel Bros.— Moss ft Fray. 

WESTERN U. B. O. 

Danville. . 

PALACE (First Half)— La Toy's Models— Albert 
ft Irrlng — Grew, Pelts ft Co. — Royal Gascolgnes. 
(One to nil.) (Last Half) — Hsnlon ft T'"rTH — 
BosttJno A 8helly— BaM) Fletcher Trio— Imperial 
Troupe. (One to filL) 

Elkhart. 
OBPHXSic (First Half)— Three Dixie Girls— 
The Dohertys— Morris Golden — Imperial Xrsase. 
(Last Half)— Billy A Ada White— lewis Belmont 
ft Lewis— Miner, Beld ft Co.— Martha Wsahinejtoo 
Girls. 

Ft, Wayne. 

PALACE (First Half)— Note's Dogs— Earl ft 
Edwards — Saabs and Alton — 8chwarts Bros. Co.— 
Adler ft Arlesn — Berr Jensen ft Co. (Last Half) 
— Wsrtenberg Bros.— Harry Gilbert— Albert ft Ir- 
rlng— Wm. O'CIstee ft Girls— Bmlly Darren ft Co. 
—"The Dog Watch." 

Kankakee. 

GAIETY (first Half )— Wilson ft Wilson— Boat- 
ttno ft Shelly — Brown Fletcher Trio. - (Two to 
fln.) (Last Half)— Harold Tates— Msbsl ft Le 
Boy Havt— PIplfax ft Panto. (Two to an.) 

Kokomo. 

SITE (First Half)— Larry Crane ft Co.— Mabel 
A Le Roy Hart — Otto Koerneg ft Co.— Four BoUs 
— Copeland ft Peyton's GIrla. (Last Half)— Mc- 
Hyar ft Hamilton— Norwood ft Ball— Three Dixie 
Girls— Foster, Ball ft Co. — Mm. Marion. 

La Fayette. 

TAMTLT (First Half)— "The Neoghty Prin- 
ces*." (Lest Half )— Freroli, Green, McHenry ft 
Dean — Caesar RItoII — Bmbe and Alton — Royal Gas- 
colgnes. 

PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liberty St, T A. M. to 1» P. ML 

and at Midnight with Slasjisss 

It MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. ZSd St, 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E. P. Agent 
. Mel BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



A sortiirsAvir 

JllCO/KCRn/MS 
«* WHILE 
MUCINS 




THIS WEEK 



Portland. 



KEITH'S Philadelphia 



NEXT WEEK 



PAHTAGES — Rlgoletto Bros.— Three Bartos — 
Crawford, ft Brodersrk^«reat Lester— Nestor ft 
Sweethearts — James Gordon.. 



KFITH'S hipi>ODR( ' m e 



Youngslown, O. 



October 18, 1916 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



ELECTION RETURNS AT KEITH'S 

There trill be two complete erecting per- 
formances at all the Keith vaudeville the- 
atres in Greater New York on election night 
and special wires will apprise those in at- 
tendance of the ballot retains between the 
acts. The second show at the Palace will 
start at 11 :30, while those at the Colonial, 
Alhambra, Royal, Orphenm, Boshwick and 
Prospect win begin one hour earlier. 



ALICE DE GARMO 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



■or used BY 

EVERY TOM, DICKand HARRY 

It Casts 11.50— TasTs Way 
Enrx ttsM. ■isllsssi. hiWr. Slss-Walt lit 

CIS, Elt.. (asblss. Is 

LONDON'S 

VAUDEVILLE BUDGET 

IS SUBE HIE STUFF 
LSSOSS'S VAUDEVILLE BUDGET Fit 
Sanaa 1316- 17 totalis 
6 SKETCHES Fit 2 MALES. litis. Ostth. slat*. 
jot, Eeststrtt, Silly KM sal am*, a acsil- 
IsCSES. sis thud. Datsk. Trsas. Jr., Mats ssd 
Esssstne. 7 SKETCHES FOB KALE AND FE- 
MALE, Dltts. Melstraaatli. Bill lagsmaattaa. 
■talk, Httrtw. Irltk. Ettsatrk. TA8LSID. CASS. 
SITS. 12 MMrM PAMDIES. PRICE SI, SO. 

sal aaat« tail if sot uuurt. THE BEST Iudg- 

ET II SNOW BOSIIESS. OIDEI MICK. 

LflMlY VAUDEVILLE IUDCET. 
CHILLY IL06.. CHICA60 



W. S. CLEVELAND 

WANTS THE BEST IN VAUDEVILLE 

2M, Ordway Bide, 2*7 Market St, NEWARK. NEW JERSEY. PHONE tS MARKET 



B.F. Keith's Circuit of Theatres 

A. PAUL KEITH, PrwldWit. E. F. ALBEE, Vlce-Pne. A Can. Mar. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Booking Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 



DOLLY CONNOLLY 



HAWAIIAN SUNSHINE 



-JOHN C. .PEEBLES Presents 



WILLIAM 



SISTO 



(THE ITALIAN STATE SM AIM) 

LAUGHING SENSATION AT PROCTOR'S FIFTH AVENUE LAST WEEK. 
ROYAL, OCT. 23. ALHAMBRA, OCT. 30. 



w wan i n 

Juvenile Leading Man For Week 
Stand. Repertoire. 

Must be young, and not over five feet ten. 
State all first letter with photo. BANCE 4 
NEWTON CO., this week Seville, Ohio; next 
week. West Salem, Ohio. 

Wanted for Kibble & Martin s 

UNCLE TOM'S CABIN COMPANY. Woman for 

. Ophelia, with child for Eva. Wire answer. 

Paris, Oct. 20; Mattoon, 21; Kankakee, 22; 

Joliet, 23; Aurora, 24; Elgin, 25. All in Illinois. 

WM. KIBBLE. 

At 
Liberty — 

Juveniles, heavies and sen. boa., height 5:10, 
weight ISO. sge 28. Hazel L. Hall— Juveniles and 
Ingenues, height 0:2, weight 139, age 23. Prefer 
one night stand. Sellable manager, only. Address 
WILL J. HALL, Beulah. Kleh.. e/e V. W. Ely. 



WILL J. HALL 



HAWAIIAN SUNSHINE 



ACTS 



PLAYS, SKETCHES, WRITTEN. 

SCENARIOS and MSS. REWRIT- 
TEN. 
E. L. GAMBLE, Playwright, 
East Liverpool, Ohio. 



WIGS, TOUPEES, GREASE, 
PAINT, ETC. 

Send for Price List 
G. SHLNDHELM, 1» West Uth St., N. Y. 



CAN ALWAYS USE 

good-looking girls, with cultivated voices, 
for Vaudeville. Also LnatrumentsJists. 

SAM DU VRIES 

35 So. Dearborn St. Chicago 



WANTED FOR 

MARSHALL'S PLAYERS 

Dramatic people In an lines. State It von do spe- 
cialties, lowest salary, pay own. Rehearsal Nov. 
1st. Show opens Nov. 9th. Address H. B. HAX- 

BHAIX. Babuls. Iowa. 



-iuus "1TJ GET RICH." its tne ru..- 
, NIEST SKETCH in Vaudeville. 
McNALLVS MERRY MINSTRELS. Con- 
sisting of six corking FIRST PARTS, 
ending* with a screaming Finale. "NOT 
. GUILTY." 
A TABLOID COMEDY AND BURLESQUE 
entitled. "ITS YOUR WIFE"; also hun- 
dreds of Cross- Fire Gags and Joke* and 
additional Comedy Surprises. Remem- 
ber the price ol McNALLY'S BULLE- 
TIN No. 2 U only ONE DOLLAR per 
copy, with money-back guarantee. 

WM. McNALLY. 

sl E. LZSth St., New York 



CROSS & BANTA 

Show 
-Printing 

AT RIGHT PRICE 
501 S. Dearborn CHICAGO 

IH Theatrical Lawyer 

EDWARD J. ADER 

10 So. La Salle St. Chicago 

Practice in Slate and U. S. Courts 



vvauieu — LL/vuirNiij man 

AND PEOPLE IN ALL LINES 



Band, actors and musicians; specialty people. Repertoire; salary; •«»»•■ work to ""K^ 
people. Photos returned. Russel Test, Sheridan Davidson. Clyde Holmes write. UUKLU 
NEV1SON PLAYERS. Portland, Indiana; nut week, Be) [on tains, Ohio. 



HIP HIP HOORAY 

Why worry over laughs when you'll find them 
by the bushel In 

Madison's Budget No. 16. 

PRICE ONE DOLLAR 

Contents Include 12 original monologues, 8 
great acta for 2 males sod T for male and 
female; a bright Irlsb comedy, 16 wnnderfal 
parodies, 4 erackerjack minstrel first-parts, 
a screaming tabloid comedy, besides hundreds 
of new gags, sidewalk bits and osefnl flll-ln 
Jokes. Pries 11. Back Usees all gone ex- 
cept No. 13. Combination price or No. IS 
and No. 18 la tl.!I0. JAKES aCADISOS, 
US* THTBJ) atehtte. 1TEW took. 



Wanted— GOOD LOOKING CHORUS GIRLS 

that can sing and dance. Stats age, height, weight; long ""on. Tav *^"J- „ „ 
ALLEN RICHARDS MUSI CAL CO.. Washington, Pa.. Week Oct. 16. Fairmont, W. Vs., »■ 

WANTED— AN IMMEDIATE ENGAGEMENT 

A superior leading woman and . comedian with specialties .invite offer! Both young, clever 
and capable. The best of wardrobe. Reliable managers desiring vcrsatde people communicate 
with H. A. LESTER, Li ma, Ohio. ■ 

WANTED MANAGER ^^^^^^tttSS^XlSm 

soney-getters. S' 
THE SEQUEL.' 



sure winners for lease. 
"DIVORCE QUESTION, 

KANKAKEE? ILL. 



It draws them in. Address LOCK BOX 212, 



ONE NIGHT ATTRACTIONS 



For ThankigTvinR. Xmaa, and New Year's Day, at Springfield, 
60.000: Marion. Ohio, population 25.000. also havo otner open tune fo 
attractions. Address GUS SUN, Springfield, O. __ 



Ohio, population 
r first-class 



AX LIBERTY 



I- 



PLAYS. SKETCHES. 
SCENARIOS and 1188. REWRITTEN. 
E. L. OAJEBLE, Playwright, 

r.rt Ilv.moJ OM». 

MUSIC COMPOSED AND ARRANGED 
Chas. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati, O. 



ACTS 



i CHARLES CUBiNE FLORENCE WOODWARD 

COMEDY AND CHARACTERS CHARACTERS AND COMEDY 

Season 1914-15 Colonial Theatre. Sioux City, Iowa; season 1»"-M Garden Theatre, Kansas Oty. 

MoTVersstae stock people. Every essential. Address Jit Eaat Eighth Street, Cotlsyvule, Kan. 

VOUR FLAG" 

- - ("FREEDOM, HOME AND UBERTV*) 

America's latest and greatest Patriotic March song. Regu- 
lar copiea free to recognized singers. Send postage. 
CHAS. W. CORDREY Hnmmmd, Ind. 



FRANCES AGNEW 

INGENUE 

Address T» MANHATTAN AVE, NEW YORK 



AX L. IB ERT V 

For rep. S night or week stand. W. Leroy. Juvs- 
nues: gen. bus., doable trap drams, bars complete 
outfit. Ags M, bt, 5 ft. 8, wt- ISO. ItaM LsrjT' 
Juveniles; lngenoes; slaslng specU ltjea._ AgaSL 
bt, 5 ft. 2. wt, 120. Address W. LZBOY. •Uses 
hurst, m. 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



October 18, 1916 



Worcester. 

FOXJ (tint Balfl— Wm Bala at Bros,— Kltner. 
Taylor A McKay — Clrm Beran * Co. — Bob Toaeo 
— Ohm Iteun Troupe. (Last Half)— Seabory 
Shaw— Alrln * Williams— Harry Moran * Co. — 
Bay £ Gordon Doolay — "Tka Empire Olrls." 

PLAZA (lint Half)— Foaatao A ConMni— Wm. 

Eb*— Bernard A Bennett — •■Surprise Party." (To 

(UL) (Laat BalD— La Dora— Leonard A Wlllard 
— CoL Jack George— Three Kales Ham Llabert A 
Co. 



W. V. M. A. 



Alton. 

HTPPODBOME (Pint H. If)— Lew Fltsrfboons— 
Burner A Gores. (Leat Half)— alack A Yslmar. 

Brandon. 
BBAJTOOH (Oct. 27-28)— Gnat Westtn— Chase 
A La Toor— "Dam, Good A a-oany" — Robert., 
Btoart A Roberta 

Champaign. 

OITBZUK dint Half)— "The Freshman"— 
Cook A Botbart— Geo. riabcr A Co. — p.trfcola A 
Myers— Carllta A Howland. (Laat Half) — La 
Toy'a Modela — Adler A Arilae — Hoaleal Matinee — 
Faber A Water*— Mamie Kin* A Co. 

Camp Hughes. 

CAMP HUGHES— Transneld Slstera— Spiegel A 

DOBS — Arthur Ansel A Co. — Three Melrin Bros. 

Chicago. 

—PJ (tint Half )— DeBeoo A Floree— Bay 
Snow— Emily Damn A Co. — Goldins A Keating. 
(Laat Half) — Oraoda Dno— Gorman Bros — Ada 
Lathim A Co.— Mertan'a Dog*. 

T.Twrrnr.w (Pint Half) — Warrea A Dietrich. — 
"Hie Dinner Party"— Boae A Fink. (Two to an.) 
(Laat Half) — Mmdesl Olrla— Bart Howard. (Three 
to Oil.) 

AJCEBICAJT (Ptrat Hair) — Pondn Bros. — Ralph 
Connor*— Santo. A Hayes— Carl Helaen Berne — 
Sol A Lealle Berni. (Laat Half)— Green A Pogh 
— Dunbar'. Salon Singer* — Fatrlcola A Myera— 
■ rgotti A Lilliputian.. (One to flU.) 

wnrDSOR (Pint Half) — Oranila Dno — Green A 
Push— John B. Gordon A Co. — Ernie A Ernie— 
Carl Boaainl A Co. (Laat Half) — Bay Snow — 
"The Funny Sheet." 

1 VUIU1 (rint Half)— "Fraternity Boys and 
Olrla." (last Half)— Maboney A Borer*— Ward 
A Carran — Goldlng A Keating — Carl Hoaalni A Co. 

WILMS (lint Half)— lack Larler— Van A 
Carrie Aiery — Ada Latham A Co. — Gorman Broa. 
(Leat Half) — Ernie A Ernie— Manneln Sisters- 
Friend A Downing — Geo. Losett A Co. 

Cedar Rapids. 

XAJXSTXO (First Half) — Two Tom Boya — Argo 
A Vlrglnl. — Pli.no A Bingham — Four Slicker*— 
O-Nell A Gallacber— Mertan'a Swlaa Canines. (Leat 
Half) — Gordon Delmar A Preger— Balph Cannon 
— Sal A Lealle Bern. — Ameta. 

■ Decatur. 

ZKFBBaa (First Half) — Emmatta' Canines- 
Beany A Woods— "On the Veranda"— Paul B*w- 
ens— Banlon A Clifton. (Laat Half) — "The Van- 
ity Pair." 

Dave&T«irt. 

OOLtTMSIA (First Half)— Balancing Stereos— 
Brady A Maboney— Mile. Lnzsna A Dancer*— 
Ne*1na A ErwooO — "Funny Sheet." (Laat Half)— 
Pobnn Bros. — Bllrer A Dnrall — Cnaa. Howard A 
Co. — Jos. Browning — "Lemont'a Western Day." 

Dnluth. 

(Flnt Half) — Prank Palmer— Nelson Sisters— La 
Verne A Dssmar— Larry Beilly A Co. (Last Half) 
— Kremk* Broa. — Johnny Small A Small Sisters — 
Clark A McCnlloof h— Boss Bros. 



HAWAIIAN SUNSHINE 



Bal's Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 

Jt Inch. IBM » Inch 

S inch. ises sa Inch. 

M bach. 1AM ** inch. ZLM 

42 Inch S2L5» 

WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 

145 W. 45th St, N. T. 4 W. 22d St, N. Y. 
NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

Mafl Order* Filled Sun* Dew Received 

tS Deposit Required 



Dubuque. 

MAJESTIC (Pint Half)— "The Blow Oat." 
(Lest Half)— Jack Larler— Wilton Bisters— Tour 
Slicker*— O'Neil A Gallagher— Norton A Karle. 

East St. Louis. 
ESSEX'S (Flnt Half)— Shirley Slstera)— Kan* 
A Herman— Wartenborg Bros. (Lest Half)— Eis- 
ner A G ore. Grant Gardner — "What Happened to 
Both." 

EvansvOIe. 

■■■ G